Communication Studies (COMS)

Courses

COMS 120   Interpersonal Communication (3 Hours)

This course focuses on the principles of effective speech communication in small group and one-to-one relationships. Theory and practice of interpersonal communication are studied and applied to a variety of life situations. The course focuses on perception, self-concept, listening, conflict, language, nonverbal communication and culture as they relate to interpersonal relationships.

COMS 121   Public Speaking (3 Hours)

This course is designed to meet the needs of people who wish to improve their ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations before an audience. This fundamental speech course emphasizes creation of ideas, research techniques, outlining, organization, audience analysis, listening skills, and delivery techniques. Students will deliver a variety of speech types including informative and persuasive.

COMS 125   Personal Communication (3 Hours)

This course examines the theory and concepts of the most frequently used human communication skills, interpersonal communication and public speaking, in a variety of contexts. The course demonstrates the natural relationships between communicating one-to-one and in public, showing that skills in one can be employed in the other, and also provides practice and development of skills in both areas.

COMS 130   Elementary Debate (3 Hours)

This course is designed for those students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to participate in debate rounds in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation.

COMS 132   Intermediate Debate I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : COMS 130.

This course is designed for those students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

COMS 155   Workplace Skills (1-2 Hour)

This course focuses on communication concepts and skills utilized in the workplace. The course demonstrates the relationships between listening; oral communication; human relations skills; problem-solving and teamwork dynamics; time and resource management; and work ethics and job interviewing; with success in a student’s desired field.

COMS 180   Intercultural Communication (3 Hours)

The Intercultural Communication course is concerned with communication theory as it relates to cross-cultural interactions. This course utilizes concepts drawn from sociology, psychology, anthropology and communication. Focus is on identifying the cultural bases of beliefs, attitudes, values and behaviors. Objectives include recognizing commonalities across cultures, tolerating ambiguity in a variety of situations, developing a more global multicultural perspective, identifying and appreciating other cultural orientations, and recognizing and assigning cultural explanations to specific behaviors.

COMS 230   Intermediate Debate II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : COMS 132

This course is designed for students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

COMS 235   Advanced Debate* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : COMS 230.

This course is designed for students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation will be developed. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

COMS 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites : 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

COMS 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of communication not usually taught in the curriculum. This course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that span across existing courses, or explore a topic not currently addressed in the Communication Studies curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Communication Studies for credit, but only on different topics.

COMS 120

  • Title: Interpersonal Communication
  • Number: COMS 120
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course focuses on the principles of effective speech communication in small group and one-to-one relationships. Theory and practice of interpersonal communication are studied and applied to a variety of life situations. The course focuses on perception, self-concept, listening, conflict, language, nonverbal communication and culture as they relate to interpersonal relationships.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the fundamental elements of the communication process.
  2. Demonstrate how a healthy self-concept improves communication.
  3. Explain how perception affects communication.
  4. Demonstrate effective listening habits and skills.
  5. Use the English language effectively to reflect the intended message.
  6. Interpret and employ nonverbal cues to optimize communication.
  7. Identify and apply strategies to assure the maximum health of interpersonal relationships.
  8. Manage relational conflict.
  9. Demonstrate the effect of culture on interpersonal communication.
  10. Apply effective communication skills in a variety of contexts. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamental Elements of the Communication Process

A. Identify the elements of the communication process.

B. Explain the relevance of communication competence in everyday life.

II. Self-Concept in Communication

A. Define the concepts of self-concept and self esteem.

B. Describe the meaning of self-fulfilling prophecy.

C. Evaluate students' self-concepts and how self-concept has influenced their communication.

D. Identify ways an individual can improve his/her self-concept.

III. Perception in Communication

A. Identify the steps in the perceptual process.

B. Explain what influences perception.

C. Identify methods to enhance one’s ability to perceive.

IV. Listening Habits and Skills

A. Explain the types of listening.

B. Describe the process of listening.

C. Identify the importance of listening.

D. Describe the barriers to effective listening.

E. Demonstrate methods to improve listening skills.

V. Effective Use of the English Language for Communication

A. Explain the difference between words and meaning.

B. Describe the connection between language and culture.

C. Identify language barriers.

D. Demonstrate methods to improve language skills.

VI. Nonverbal Cues

A. Identify the types of nonverbal communication.

B. Explain research findings for interpreting nonverbal communication.

C. Describe ways to improve interpreting nonverbal communication.

VII. Interpersonal Relationships

A. Explain the stages of relational development.

B. Explain why relationships are formed.

C. Describe the difference in relational and content messages.

D. Explain the need for self-disclosure in relationships.

E. List guidelines for effective self-disclosure.

F. Identify significant relationship theories.

G. Identify effective ways in which to improve interpersonal relationships.

VIII. Relational Conflict

A. Explain areas for creating positive communication climates.

B. Identify areas of defensive and supportive communication.

C. Define interpersonal conflict.

D. Explain conflict resolution styles.

E. Identify strategies to improve conflict resolution skills.

IX. Culture and Communication

A. Define the characteristics of communication culture.

B. Identify cultural barriers to communication.

C. Explain cultural values and norms.

D. Describe ways to improve intercultural competence.

X. Effective Communication Skills in a Variety of Contexts

A. Explain the functions of communication in family, friend, small group, and work environments.

B. Identify ways to improve communication competence in family, friend, small group, and work environments.

C. Explain the importance of mediated communication.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-35%    Tests. Testing may include quizzes, chapter tests, mid-term and final examinations.
15-25%    Major Project.The project may be a single large project or a series of smaller works. The project must be in written form and may be presented orally.
15-30%    Written Work. Written work may include (but is not limited to) worksheets, daily exercises, reaction papers, and journals.
15-35%    Participation/Discussion*

*Participation/Discussion may include worksheets or daily exercises done in dyads, triads, small groups or individually. It can also include class discussion and/or oral presentations. These activities may be evaluated through peer evaluation, self-evaluation and instructor evaluation.

Note: an online addendum follows for faculty teaching online Interpersonal Communication.

Addendum for Online Interpersonal Communication Instruction

The previous evaluation guidelines are required for teaching Interpersonal Communication online with the exception of the following:

  • A requirement of the online course is that students engage in multiple face-to-face communication assignments. Some suggestions include: a personal interview in a paper or participation assignment, a conflict analysis paper which requires that the student discuss the conflict with the person involved, or an analysis paper on self-concept in which the students talk to people about how they are perceived.
  • Participation/Discussion category: (15-35%) Online discussion is required for this course. A discussion board is required and a chat room is recommended in order to get the students actively engaged in the course. Discussions need to take place consistently throughout the semester. A minimum of 6 discussion topics is required and grading should be based on the number and the quality of posts.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 121

  • Title: Public Speaking
  • Number: COMS 121
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of people who wish to improve their ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations before an audience. This fundamental speech course emphasizes creation of ideas, research techniques, outlining, organization, audience analysis, listening skills, and delivery techniques. Students will deliver a variety of speech types including informative and persuasive.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the fundamental elements of the communication process.
  2. Complete a minimum of four speeches each requiring a written assignment, peer review, increasingly rigorous research, and delivery in front of a live synchronous audience. 
  3. Compose a message and provide ideas and information suitable to the topic, purpose, and audience.
  4. Compose convincing arguments through reason, personal credibility and emotion suitable to the topic, purpose and audience.
  5. Demonstrate the use of audio-visual resources suitable to the topic, purpose and audience.
  6. Transmit the message by using delivery skills suitable to the topic, purpose and audience.
  7. Demonstrate listening literal comprehension.
  8. Demonstrate listening critical comprehension.
     

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Communication Process

A. Identify the elements of the communication process.

B. Identify and utilize apprehension reducing techniques.

C. Identify and utilize ethical codes of conduct for both speakers and listeners.

D. Explain the differences between written and oral communication styles.

II. Speech Requirements

A. Complete a minimum of four speeches each requiring a written assignment, peer review, increasingly rigorous research, and delivery in front of a live synchronous audience.

B. Create and present at least one informative message to a target audience.

C. Create and present at least two persuasive messages to a target audience.

D. Demonstrate research skills necessary to the public speaking process.

1. Identify and utilize various types of support materials.

2. Identify and utilize strategies for accessing quality and strength of sources.

3. Incorporating sources into speech outlines.

4. Orally incorporating sources into speeches.

5. Create a works cited page using a standard citation style.

E. Deliver each speech to a live audience of a least six appropriate persons.

III. Speech Development

A. Describe and utilize topic generation techniques.

B. Identify and compose a general purpose, specific purpose and central idea/thesis statement for each required speech.

C. Identify, create and utilize an audience analysis process.

D. Explain types of organizing patterns for speeches.

E. Identify and demonstrate the necessary elements of a speech including introductions, main points, connectives and conclusions.

F. Compose a message utilizing language suitable to topic, purpose and audience.

G. Explain and demonstrate standard outlining format.

H. Explain the difference between a preparation and delivery outline.

I. Develop full-sentence preparation outlines for at least two speeches.

IV. Persuasion

A. Explain and differentiate between Aristotle's methods of persuasion: ethos, pathos and logos.

B. Develop methods for increasing personal credibility in association with the chosen topic.

C. Develop methods of persuasion using emotional appeals appropriate to the topic.

D. Identify types of reasoning patterns and develop argumentation that avoids using logical fallacies.

V. Audiovisual Resources

A. Identify various types of audiovisual aids and how they are best used in speeches.

B. Demonstrate the use of effective audiovisual aids in speeches that are suitable to the topic, purpose and audience.

VI. Delivery

A. Define the four types of delivery styles—impromptu, manuscript, memorization, and extemporaneous.

B. Identify and demonstrate how nonverbal behaviors can support or hinder the message in speeches.

C. Identify and demonstrate vocal variety in rate, pitch, and intensity.

D. Identify and demonstrate appropriate pronunciation and articulation.

VII. Listening Literal Comprehension

A. Determine the goals and methods for listening.

B. Identify main ideas and supporting details of discourse.

C. Identify transitional, organizational and nonverbal cues that direct the listener to the main ideas.

D. Determine whether supporting details adequately support main ideas.

VIII. Listening Critical Comprehension

A. Identify the arguments and their implications used to justify the speaker’s position.

B. Evaluate the quality and strength of evidence.

C. Demonstrate an understanding that arguments have both an emotional and logical dimension.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60% Major Speeches

A minimum of four major speeches will be given during the semester.

Requirements for these four major speeches include:

  • Length: All four will be at least 4 minutes long.
  • Type:
        --At least two will be persuasive
        --At least one will be informative
        --The remaining one is flexible as long as it meets the requirements of a major speech. This could be a special occasion speech (eulogy, introduction, tribute, after-dinner, etc) or another informative or persuasive speech.
  • Delivery:

       --At least three will use extemporaneous delivery.
       --Not more than one may use manuscript delivery.

  • Written Work:

        --Of the required three extemporaneous speeches, at least two will be accompanied by a full-sentence preparation outline.
        --If one speech assignment requires manuscript delivery, then it will be accompanied by a copy of the manuscript used.

  • Source Citations: At least three will include oral citations and written works cited pages.
  • Visual Aids: At least two will require the use of visual aid(s).
  • Video-Recording: At least one will be video-recorded.
  • Audience: All four, including make-ups, require an audience of at least six people.

10-25% Outlines
An outline or a manuscript (one speech maximum) will accompany all major speeches; in effect, demonstrating competency of speech organization and design.

10-25% Tests
Written testing will be given to determine theoretical understanding of speech organization and development. Testing may include quizzes, chapter tests, midterm and final exam.

5-20% Individual Assignments and Class Participation
Individual assignments may include but are not limited to student evaluations, critiquing, impromptu speeches, and text exercises.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 125

  • Title: Personal Communication
  • Number: COMS 125
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines the theory and concepts of the most frequently used human communication skills, interpersonal communication and public speaking, in a variety of contexts. The course demonstrates the natural relationships between communicating one-to-one and in public, showing that skills in one can be employed in the other, and also provides practice and development of skills in both areas.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and apply the fundamental elements of the communication process.
  2. Demonstrate how self-concept and perception affect communication.
  3. Demonstrate effective listening habits and skills.
  4. Apply the concepts of verbal and nonverbal to appropriate communication contexts.
  5. Identify and apply effective communication skills in a variety of contexts.
  6. Describe the effect of culture on the communication process.
  7. Develop goals, gather research, and organize information suitable to the topic, purpose, and audience.
  8. Identify and utilize delivery skills and audiovisual resources suitable to the topic, purpose, and audience.
  9. Create and present two speeches, one informative and one persuasive, to a live synchronous target audience.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamental Elements of the Communication Process

A. Identify the elements of the communication process.

B. Explain the relevance of communication competence in everyday life.

C. Identify and utilize apprehension-reducing techniques.

D. Identify and utilize ethical codes of conduct.

II. Self-concept and Perception in Communication

A. Evaluate how self-concept and self-esteem influence communication.

B. Identify ways an individual can improve his or her self-concept.

C. Explain what influences perception.

D. Identify methods to enhance one’s ability to perceive.

III. Listening Habits and Skills

A. Explain empathic, critical, and informational listening.

B. Describe the process of listening.

C. Describe the barriers to effective listening.

D. Identify and evaluate the main points and supporting material used in an informative message.

E. Identify and evaluate the arguments and evidence used in a persuasive message.

IV. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication

A. Explain how verbal and nonverbal communication can be misunderstood in the communication process.

B. Identify the channels of nonverbal communication.

C. Demonstrate methods to improve verbal and nonverbal communication skills.

V. Effective Communication Skills in a Variety of Contexts

A. Explain the stages of relational development.

B. Identify significant relationship theories.

C. Explain the functions of and identify ways to improve social, intimate, and professional relationships.

VI. Culture and Communication

A. Describe how culture affects communication.

B. Describe ways to improve intercultural competence.

VII. Speech Preparation

A. Describe and utilize topic-generating techniques.

B. Identify and compose purpose statements.

C. Utilize an audience analysis process.

D. Demonstrate the ability to research a topic and incorporate the information into a speech with appropriate source citations.

E. Create main points and determine speech organizational patterns.

F. Create and demonstrate the necessary elements of a speech including introduction, body, connectives, and conclusion.

G. Explain and demonstrate standard outlining format.

H. Develop a full-sentence and delivery outline for at least two speeches.

I. Describe the difference between informative and persuasive speaking.

J. Explain the difference between ethos, pathos, and logos.

K. Explain types of reasoning and logical fallacies.

VIII. Speech Presentation Skills

A. Define the four types of delivery styles.

B. Identify and demonstrate how nonverbal behaviors can impact the message in speeches.

C. Identify and demonstrate the types of audiovisual aids and effectively utilize them in a speech presentation.

IX. Speech Presentation Requirements

A. Create and present one researched informative speech to a live synchronous target audience.

B. Create and present one researched persuasive speech to a live synchronous target audience.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Tests

  • Testing may include quizzes, chapter tests, mid-term, and final examination.

20-30%    Speeches

  • A minimum of two major speeches will be given during the semester.

Requirements for these two major speeches:

Length:  Both will be at least 4 minutes long.
Type:  One will be informative and one will be persuasive.
Delivery:  Both will use extemporaneous delivery.
Written Work:  Both will be accompanied by a full-sentence preparation outline.
Source Citations:  Both will include oral citations and written works cited pages.
Visual Aids:  At least one will require the use of a visual aid(s).
Video-Recording:  At least one will be video-recorded.
Audience:  Both, including make-ups, require an audience of at least six people.

5-10%    Speech Outlines

  • A full-sentence preparation outline will accompany both required major speeches.

20-30%   Written Assignments:

  • Written assignments may include reaction papers, worksheets, research assignments, critiques or daily exercises.

20-30%    Participation/Discussion:

  • Participation/Discussion may include worksheets or daily exercises/activities done in dyads, triads, and small groups; class discussion; oral presentations or impromptu speeches (other than major speeches); and speech critiques.  These activities may be evaluated through peer evaluation, self-evaluation and instructor evaluation.

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 130

  • Title: Elementary Debate
  • Number: COMS 130
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed for those students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to participate in debate rounds in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of debate in our society, in particular at the college level.
  2. Develop stronger verbal skills and the ability to think quickly on one's feet.
  3. Develop the means by which to structure an argument, find proof for the argument, and answer attacks through refutation.
  4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic area debated for the current intercollegiate debate season.
  5. Develop and apply critical thinking methods in debate rounds.
  6. Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches effectively.
  7. Demonstrate argument understanding through cross-examination skills.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Academic Policy Debate

A. Define collegiate policy debate.

B. Explain the benefits of academic policy debate.

C. Define the structure of a policy debate round including speaker order and time limits.

II. Critical Thinking

A. Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches.

B. Deliver speeches rebutting another students argument.

C. Participate in cross-examination with other debaters.

D. Identify and explain flaws in argument structure.

E. Research and develop arguments related to the debate topic.

F. Demonstrate the ability to flow during rounds.

III. Research

A. Research the specific debate resolution.

B. Defend and support different types of evidence.

C. Demonstrate proper source citations for evidence production.

D. Demonstrate on-line research capabilities and electronic evidence production.

E. Demonstrate argument production through matrix and document mapping.

IV. Argument Structure

A. Define a particular problem area, research that area, and write a first affirmative constructive speech.

B. Explain the stock issues in context of a debate round: significance, harms, inherency.

C. Explain the core negative arguments: topicality, disadvantages, counterplans, kritiks, and case arguments.

D. Construct shells and extensions for negative arguments.

E. Explain and define the Toulmin model of argument.

V. Topic Area

A. Expand knowledge base in the topic area by continued research and argument development.

B. Demonstrate knowledge of topic through in-class debate rounds and tournament debate rounds.

C. Organize and prioritize arguments on both sides of the resolution.

VI. Constructive and Rebuttal Speeches

A. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative constructive speeches.

B. Demonstrate ability to respond to specific arguments in speeches.

C. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative rebuttal speeches.

D. Deliver rebuttal speeches that demonstrate selection of the strongest arguments.

VII. Cross-Examination Skills

A. Develop questions regarding the arguments advanced by the opposition.

B. Respond to cross-examination questions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Theoretical: (25-40% of grade) Constructing affirmative and negative arguments, and tests/quizzes over theory material.

Research: (25-40% of grade ) Minimum research assignments will be given on a weekly basis.

Practices: (25-40% of grade) Regular practice rounds will be scheduled and critiqued throughout the semester.

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 132

  • Title: Intermediate Debate I*
  • Number: COMS 132
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: COMS 130.

Description:

This course is designed for those students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of debate in our society, in particular at the college level.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and use of research in both the library and online methods.
  3. Develop the means by which to structure an argument, find proof for the argument, and answer attacks through refutation.
  4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic area debated for the current intercollegiate debate season.
  5. Develop and apply critical thinking methods in debate rounds.
  6. Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches effectively.
  7. Explore current theoretical issues in debate.
  8. Refine argumentation skills through tournament competition. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Academic Policy Debate

A. Define collegiate policy debate.

B. Explain the benefits of academic policy debate.

II. Research

A. Research the specific debate resolution.

B. Defend and support different types of evidence.

C. Demonstrate proper source citations for evidence production.

D. Demonstrate on-line research capabilities and electronic evidence production.

E. Demonstrate argument production through matrix and document mapping.

III. Argument Structure

A. Define a particular problem area, research that area, and write a first affirmative.

B. Explain the stock issues in context of a debate round: significance, harms, inherency, topicality and solvency.

C. Explain the core negative arguments: topicality, disadvantages, counterplans, kritiks and case arguments.

D. Construct shells and extensions for negative arguments.

E. Explain the Toulmin model of argument.

IV. Topic Area

A. Expand knowledge base in the topic area by continued research and argument.

B. Demonstrate knowledge of the topic through in-class debate rounds and tournament debate rounds.

C. Organize and prioritize arguments on both sides of the resolution.

V. Constructive & Rebuttal Speeches

A. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative constructive speeches.

B. Demonstrate the ability to respond to specific arguments in speeches.

C. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative rebuttal speeches.

D. Deliver rebuttal speeches that demonstrate selection of the strongest arguments.

VI. Current Theoretical Issues

A. Explain and apply topicality arguments to the current topic.

B. Explain and apply counterplan theory.

C. Explain and apply kritik theory.

D. Explain and apply framework arguments and theory.

VII. Cross Examination Skills

A. Develop questions regarding the arguments advanced by the opposition.

B. Respond to cross-examination questions.

VIII. Tournament Competition

A. Participate in a minimum of four intercollegiate debate tournaments.

B. Evaluate tournament performance by critiquing specific rounds of debate.

C. Judge practice debates and/or high school debates and write explanations of decision making criteria.

D. Listen and record judge decisions after rounds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Theoretical: (25% of grade) Constructing affirmative & negative arguments; and tests/quizzes over theory material.

Research: (25% of grade) Research assignments will be given on a weekly basis.

Tournaments: (25% of grade) Students will be evaluated on participating in scheduled tournaments.

Practices: (25% of grade) Regular practice rounds will be scheduled and critiqued throughout the semester.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 155

  • Title: Workplace Skills
  • Number: COMS 155
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 2
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 2
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 2

Description:

This course focuses on communication concepts and skills utilized in the workplace. The course demonstrates the relationships between listening; oral communication; human relations skills; problem-solving and teamwork dynamics; time and resource management; and work ethics and job interviewing; with success in a student’s desired field.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Proficiently use listening skills to interpret, analyze and follow through on instructions.
  2. Demonstrate oral communication through presentations, speeches, interviews and group interactions.
  3. Display the necessary human relation skills to be a valued employee.
  4. Utilize problem-solving/decision-making in a work environment.
  5. Participate in team tasks in building group consensus.
  6. Identify and explain resource management.
  7. Develop time management strategies for scheduling, meeting deadlines and prioritizing tasks.
  8. Interpret work ethics for responsibility, behavior, workplace rules that lead to job satisfaction.
  9. List the job interview skills necessary in a career decision-making process.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Listening Habits and Skills

A. Identify the types and process of listening.

B. Describe the barriers to effective listening.

C. Identify methods to improve listening skills in the workplace.

D. Demonstrate critical-thinking methods of synthesizing, prioritizing, and reproducing messages to an audience.

II. Oral Communication Skills

A. Compose and deliver a presentation on a career-oriented topic that is suitable to the topic, purpose, and audience.

B. Identify and demonstrate the elements of a speech presentation including introductions, main points, connectives, and conclusions.

C. Demonstrate the use of visual aids, including basic technology and terminology, used during an oral presentation.

D. Identify how nonverbal behaviors can support or hinder a message in oral presentations, speeches and group interactions.

E. Demonstrate positive verbal and nonverbal behaviors crucial toward workplace presentation success.

III. Elements of Workplace Communication

A. Define the communication process as it relates to an organization.

B. Evaluate the personal self-concept and how it influences communication within the workplace.

C. Identify the steps of the perception process.

D. List methods to enhance one’s ability to perceive in the workplace.

E. Identify methods to manage one’s self-identity and strengthen credibility in the workplace.

F. Demonstrate skills for communicating with a culturally diverse population.

IV. Conflict Management and Decision-Making

A. Define interpersonal conflict.

B. Explain conflict resolution styles.

C. Identify strategies to improve conflict resolution skills in the workplace.

D. Explain variables for sound decision-making in a workplace.

V. Group and Team Communication

A. Define group membership roles and leadership styles.

B. Demonstrate strategies for navigating group dynamics.

C. List limitations and strengths of group dynamics in relation to implicit and explicit communication power.

D. Demonstrate skills of positive team membership and consensus building.

VI. Resource Management

A. Define resource management.

B. Explain the similarities and differences between physical and human resources.

C. Determine informative and persuasive communication techniques needed to successfully complete a task within an occupation.

VII. Time Management

A. Identify the difference between social and workplace relationships.

B. Explain methods for setting and meeting deadlines as well as communicating deadlines to others.

C. Identify time management strategies to provide balance between work, family, civic, social, and other responsibilities.

VIII. Organizational Behavior and Communication

A. Define organizational workplace cultures.

B. Determine ethics in coordination with workplace implicit and explicit rules.

C. Explain the reasoning for ethical standards including legal, reputation-related, general industry standards, and individual business preferences.

D. Identify workplace ethical standards regarding safety, substance abuse, honesty, sexual harassment, social media, technology use, horseplay, and general behavior.

E. Explain consequences for workplace ethical or cultural violations.

IX. Career Development Communication

A. Develop short, medium, and long-term career goals.

B. Prepare for a job interview.

C. Identify and critique high and low-quality examples of resumes, cover letters, and other career-seeking communication tools.

D. Describe communication activities which can enhance one’s ability to earn a job and advance within a profession.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Tests
Testing may include quizzes, chapter tests, mid-term and final examination.

20-30%    Oral Presentations
A minimum of two (2) brief oral presentations will be given during the semester.

  • One presentation must be performed relating to an aspect of the student’s desired profession. This presentation can be informative or persuasive. Appropriate presentation genres include (but are not limited to) product or procedure talks; how to use and care for a specific tool; leading a business, production, or shift meeting; leading a safety briefing or discussing workplace expectations meeting; and generalized training. A visual aid is required for this oral presentation.
  • For a second presentation, students must prepare and present a brief sales pitch; deliver an appropriate thank you, apology, or explanation to a stakeholder; or handle a potentially difficult conflict with a supervisor or employee.

20-30%    Written Assignments
These can include reaction papers, worksheets, research assignments, resume drafts, critiques, or daily exercises.

20-30%    Participation   
Participation/Discussion may include worksheets or daily exercises/activities done in dyads, triads, and small groups; class discussion; oral presentations or impromptu speeches; and speech critiques.  These activities may be evaluated through peer evaluation, self-evaluation, and instructor evaluation.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 180

  • Title: Intercultural Communication
  • Number: COMS 180
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The Intercultural Communication course is concerned with communication theory as it relates to cross-cultural interactions. This course utilizes concepts drawn from sociology, psychology, anthropology and communication. Focus is on identifying the cultural bases of beliefs, attitudes, values and behaviors. Objectives include recognizing commonalities across cultures, tolerating ambiguity in a variety of situations, developing a more global multicultural perspective, identifying and appreciating other cultural orientations, and recognizing and assigning cultural explanations to specific behaviors.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the fundamental elements of the communication process.
  2. Identify the fundamental elements of culture including recognizing the difference between idiosyncratic and culturally based behaviors
  3. Describe the role of perception in the intercultural communication process.
  4. Identify and describe various cultural contrasts.
  5. Recognize and describe how worldview affects intercultural interactions.
  6. Demonstrate the effect of language on intercultural communication.
  7. Identify the various forms of nonverbal communication and explain their impact on intercultural interactions.
  8. Develop and apply intercultural communication competence and a more global multicultural perspective by effectively using intercultural skills in a variety of contexts. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamental Elements of the Communication Process

A. Identify the elements of the communication process.

B. Explain the relevance of the intercultural communication competence in everyday life.

II. Fundamental Elements of Culture

A. Define culture.

B. Describe the fundamental characteristics of culture.

C. Identify and explain the difference between idiosyncratic and culturally based behaviors.

D. Identify and explain those things in culture that influence thought and behavior.

E. Describe the deep structures of culture.

1. Family

2. State

3. Religion

III. Perception

A. Describe the role that stereotyping plays in intercultural interactions.

B. Describe the nature of prejudice and how it affects intercultural interactions.

C. Describe the difference between in-groups and out-groups and how ethnocentrism affects intercultural interactions.

IV. Cultural Contrasts

A. Describe the difference between individualistic and collectivistic cultures.

B. Describe the difference between high-power distance and low-power distance cultures.

C. Describe the difference between high-context and low-context cultures.

D. Describe the difference between assertive and responsive cultures.

E. Describe the difference between weak uncertainty avoidance and strong uncertainty avoidance cultures.

V. Worldview

A. Define beliefs and describe their nature.

B. Define worldview.

C. Describe the elements of worldview.

D. Describe the difference between an Eastern worldview and a Western worldview.

VI. Language

A. Explain the nature of language.

B. Describe the connection between culture and language.

C. Demonstrate methods to improve language skills.

VII. Nonverbal Communication

A. Identify the types of nonverbal communication.

B. Explain the cultural basis for interpreting nonverbal communication.

VIII. Competence and Multicultural Perspective

A. Define and demonstrate intercultural communication competence.

B. Describe the aspects needed to become a more competent intercultural communicator.

C. Describe the connection between intercultural communication and ethics.

D. Define culture shock.

E. Describe the stages of culture shock.

F. Describe the strategies for managing culture shock.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-35%    Tests; may include quizzes, chapter tests, mid-term, and final examinations.
15-30%    Written work; may include (but is not limited to) worksheets, daily exercises, papers, and journals.
15-35%    Major project, which will either take the form of a single large project or a series of small works.
15-35%    Participation/Discussion; may include worksheets or daily exercises/activities done in dyads, triads, small groups and class discussion, or oral presentations. These activities may be evaluated through peer evaluation, self-evaluation and instructor evaluation.

Note: An online addendum follows for faculty teaching online Intercultural Communication.

Addendum for Online Intercultural Communication Instruction:
Online discussion is required for online classes. A discussion board is required and a chat room is recommended in order to get the students actively engaged in the course.  Discussions need to take place consistently throughout the semester. A minimum of 6 discussion topics are required and grading should be based on the number of posts and the quality of posts.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 230

  • Title: Intermediate Debate II*
  • Number: COMS 230
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: COMS 132

Description:

This course is designed for students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of debate in our society, in particular at the college level.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and use of research in both the library and online methods.
  3. Develop the means by which to structure an argument, find proof for the argument, and answer attacks through refutation.
  4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic area debated for the current intercollegiate debate season.
  5. Develop and apply critical thinking methods in debate rounds.
  6. Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches effectively.
  7. Explore current theoretical issues in debate.
  8. Refine argumentation skills through tournament competition. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Academic Policy Debate

A. Define collegiate policy debate.

B. Explain the benefits of academic policy debate.

C. Define the structure of a policy debate round including speaker order and time limits.

II. Research

A. Research the specific debate resolution.

B. Defend and support different types of evidence.

C. Demonstrate proper source citations for evidence production.

D. Demonstrate on-line research capabilities and electronic evidence production.

E. Demonstrate argument production through matrix and document mapping.

III. Argument Structure

A. Define a particular problem area, research that area, and write a first affirmative constructive speech.

B. Explain the stock issues in context of a debate round: significance, harms, inherency, topicality, and solvency.

C. Explain the core negative arguments: topicality, disadvantages, counterplans, kritiks, and case arguments.

D. Construct shells and extensions for negative arguments.

E. Explain the Toulmin model of argument.

IV. Topic Area

A. Expand knowledge base in the topic area by continued research and argument development.

B. Demonstrate knowledge of the topic through in-class debate rounds and tournament debate rounds.

C. Organize and prioritize arguments for and against the topic.

V. Constructive & Rebuttal Speeches

A. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative constructive speeches.

B. Demonstrate the ability to respond to specific arguments in a speech.

C. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative rebuttal speeches.

D. Deliver rebuttal speeches that demonstrate selection of the strongest arguments.

VI. Current Theoretical Issues

A. Explain and apply topicality arguments to the current topic.

B. Explain and apply counterplan theory.

C. Explain and apply kritik theory.

D. Explain and apply framework arguments and theory.

VII. Cross-Examination Skills

A. Develop questions regarding the arguments advanced by the opposition.

B. Respond to cross-examination questions.

VIII. Tournament Competition

A. Participate in a minimum of four intercollegiate debate tournaments.

B. Evaluate tournament performance by critiquing specific rounds of debate.

C. Judge debates and write explanations of his/her decision making criteria.

D. Judge practice debates and/or high school debates and write explanations of decision making criteria.

E. Listen and record judge decisions after rounds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Theoretical: (25% of grade) Constructing affirmative & negative arguments; and tests/quizzes over theory material. Further assignments may include reviewing theoretical articles and providing written critiques of debate rounds.

Research: (25% of grade) Research assignments will be given on a weekly basis.

Tournaments: (25% of grade) Students will be evaluated on participating in scheduled tournaments.

Practices: (25% of grade) Regular practice rounds will be scheduled and critiqued throughout the semester.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 235

  • Title: Advanced Debate*
  • Number: COMS 235
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: COMS 230.

Description:

This course is designed for students interested in participating in competitive intercollegiate debate. Through the course, students will learn debate theory, debate skills and techniques, and methods of becoming successful intercollegiate competitors. Students are expected to travel to tournaments in order to develop skills in research, argument construction, debate format, intercollegiate debate speaking style and refutation will be developed. Students enrolling in this course will be required to participate as members of the intercollegiate debate team and will attend an appropriate number of weekend intercollegiate debate tournaments a semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of debate in our society, in particular at the college level.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and use of research in both the library and online methods.
  3. Develop the means by which to structure an argument, find proof for the argument, and answer attacks through refutation.
  4. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the topic area debated for the current intercollegiate debate season.
  5. Develop and apply critical thinking methods in debate rounds.
  6. Deliver constructive and rebuttal speeches effectively.
  7. Explore current theoretical issues in debate.
  8. Refine argumentation skills through tournament competition. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Academic Policy Debate

A. Define collegiate policy debate.

B. Explain the benefits of academic policy debate.

C. Define the structure of a policy debate round including speaker order and time limits.

II. Research

A. Research the specific debate resolution.

B. Defend and support different types of evidence.

C. Demonstrate proper source citations for evidence production.

D. Demonstrate on-line research capabilities and electronic evidence production.

E. Demonstrate argument production through matrix and document mapping.

III. Argument Structure

A. Define a particular problem area, research that area, and write a first affirmative constructive speech.

B. Explain the stock issues in context of a debate round: significance, harms, inherency, topicality, and solvency.

C. Explain the core negative arguments: topicality, disadvantages, kritiks, and case arguments.

D. Construct shells and extensions for negative arguments.

E. Explain the Toulmin model of argument.

IV. Topic Area

A. Expand his/her knowledge base in the topic area by continued research and argument.

B. Demonstrate knowledge of the topic through in-class debate rounds and tournament debate rounds.

C. Organize and prioritize arguments for and against the topic.

V. Constructive & Rebuttal Speeches

A. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative constructive speeches.

B. Demonstrate the ability to respond to specific arguments in a speech.

C. Construct and deliver affirmative and negative rebuttal speeches.

D. Deliver rebuttal speeches that demonstrate selection of the strongest arguments.

VI. Current Theoretical Issues

A. Explain and apply topicality to the current topic.

B. Explain and apply counterplan theory.

C. Explain and apply kritik theory.

D. Explain and apply framework arguments and theory.

VII. Tournament Competition

A. Participate in a minimum of six intercollegiate debate tournaments.

B. Evaluate tournament performance by critiquing specific rounds of debate.

C. Judge debates and write explanations of his/her decision making criteria.

D. Assess the impact of specific judge paradigms on his/her argument selection.

E. Listen and record judge decisions after rounds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Theoretical: (25%) Constructing affirmative & negative arguments; and tests/quizzes over theory material. Further assignments may include reviewing theoretical articles and providing written critiques of debate rounds.

Research: (25%) Research assignments will be given on a weekly basis.

Tournaments: (25%) Students will be evaluated on participating in scheduled tournaments.

Practices: (25%) Regular practice rounds will be scheduled and critiqued throughout the semester.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

COMS 291

No information found.

COMS 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: COMS 292
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of communication not usually taught in the curriculum. This course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that span across existing courses, or explore a topic not currently addressed in the Communication Studies curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Communication Studies for credit, but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate comprehension of relevant readings of selected topic.
  2. Define and explain key terms and concepts within the selected topic.
  3. Employ research and analytical skills relevant to the area and issues of study.
  4. Relate the special topic to essential issues and themes in communication.
  5. Articulate a critically informed perspective on the selected topic, drawn from qualitative and/or quantitative and/or rhetorical evidence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Content Outline and Competencies will vary because they are dependent on the special topic being offered. The outline and competencies will follow the standard format for JCCC courses and will be written in outcomes-based language. The Special Topics course proposal will first be reviewed and approved by the Communication Studies Department. The Communications Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review and approve each Special Topics course proposal.  Scheduling of Special Topics courses will be the responsibility of the Department Chair.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of evaluation will vary depending on the special topic being offered. Standard methods of evaluation may be employed, such as: readings, discussions, written assignments (short response through research papers), library or web-based research, individual or group projects, formal and informal presentations, and service learning. Other methods may be utilized to assess student mastery of competencies based upon the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

A specific topic may not be taught more than once within a two-year sequence in the Special Topics course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).