Energy Perform & Resource Mgmt (EPRM)

Courses

EPRM 120   Introduction to Residential Energy (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate energy usage of the past and the future, describe the energy picture of today's world, identify the priorities for energy efficiency, and describe the purpose of a residential energy audit. Competencies will include knowing energy and the laws of thermodynamics; heat transfer through building envelope; sources of internal heat gain and heat loss calculations; energy transformation and heat flow; efficiency of HVAC systems, water heating systems, and appliances; and basic electrical wiring, lighting, and components of a residence. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EPRM 123   Active & Passive Residential Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: EPRM 120 or deparment approval.

This is a course to explain how active and passive systems work together in a residence, and to discuss the energy efficiency of each system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the components of the building shell and their relationship to air-conditioning systems, heating systems, hot water heating, lighting, appliances, occupants, and the electrical or gas systems that supply energy. Topics will include heat laws, refrigeration cycle, electrical theory, various types of furnaces, air conditioners, hot water heaters, lighting, windows and doors, and various types of controls. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

EPRM 127   Residential Energy Data Collection and Input* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EPRM 123.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures used in the residential construction industry to determine the construction details of the residence, the size and type of HVAC equipment, and other appliances as it relates to a residential energy audit. The student will be required to complete field data collection forms and record detailed information of the components of a residence. This data will be entered into various computer modeling programs. The output from the software will help determine what recommendations should be made to the homeowner to improve the energy efficiency of their residence. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs instructional lab.

EPRM 142   Solar Thermal Systems (3 Hours)

Solar Thermal Systems presents the key components of thermal conversion systems to absorb and use heat from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, energy management, and economics for a variety of solar thermal system applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of solar thermal systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level Solar Thermal exam. 4 hours of integrated lecture lab/wk.

EPRM 120

  • Title: Introduction to Residential Energy
  • Number: EPRM 120
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate energy usage of the past and the future, describe the energy picture of today's world, identify the priorities for energy efficiency, and describe the purpose of a residential energy audit. Competencies will include knowing energy and the laws of thermodynamics; heat transfer through building envelope; sources of internal heat gain and heat loss calculations; energy transformation and heat flow; efficiency of HVAC systems, water heating systems, and appliances; and basic electrical wiring, lighting, and components of a residence. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the purpose of an energy audit.
  2. State the principles of energy and assess energy usage.
  3. Compare building construction and the building shell.
  4. Describe air leakage and the purpose of insulation.
  5. Explain basic heating and cooling principles.
  6. Identify the construction methods of windows and doors.
  7. List energy efficient types of lighting and appliances.
  8. Compare the various types of water heating systems.
  9. State health and safety issues as related to residential homes. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles of Energy Use as Applied to the Consumer
   A. Define the purpose of an energy audit.
   B. Apply appropriate terminology to describe energy-efficiency homes.
II. Energy and Its Related Laws and Principles
   A. State the laws of thermodynamics.
   B. Explain energy transformation.
   C. Distinguish between climate and comfort.
   D. List types of energy for home use.
   E. Identify electrical wiring, circuits, and controls.
III. Types of Building Construction
   A. Discuss building-shell and flow of heat.
   B. Describe building inspection and diagnosis.
IV. Air Leakage and Insulation Characteristics
   A. List air sealing principles.
   B. Describe blower-door testing and air duct leakage testing.
   C. Identify air sealing methods and materials.
V. Heating and Cooling Principles
   A. State basic heating and cooling principles.
   B. Describe combustion efficiency and safety.
   C. Identify various heating and cooling systems.
   D. Define air movement in a residence.
   E. Identify various controls for heating and cooling units.
VI. Windows and Doors
   A. Evaluate the construction and characteristics of various types of
doors.
   B. Assess the construction and characteristics of various types of
windows.
   C. State the selection process for replacement windows.
VII. Energy Efficient Lighting and Residential Appliances
   A. Define lighting principles.
   B. State the purposes of illumination.
   C. Evaluate various types of lighting for energy efficiency. 
   D. Identify various energy efficient household appliances.
VIII. Energy Usage as Applied to Water Heating
   A. Evaluate types of storage water heaters.
   B. Identify alternatives to storage water heaters.
   C. Describe techniques for improving efficiency of water heating.
   D. Explain techniques for maintenance and operation of water heaters.
IX. Residential Health Problems and Safety Precautions
   A. Identify indoor pollutants.
   B. Describe moisture management techniques.
   C. State the purposes of mechanical ventilation.
   D. List the purposes for dehumidifiers.
   E. Identify pollutant control strategies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter and/or unit tests   20%-30% of grade
Quizzes                     20%-30% of grade
Final written exam          20%-30% of grade
Participation               10%-20% of grade
Total                       100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%  

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EPRM 123

  • Title: Active & Passive Residential Systems*
  • Number: EPRM 123
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4.5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EPRM 120 or deparment approval.

Description:

This is a course to explain how active and passive systems work together in a residence, and to discuss the energy efficiency of each system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the components of the building shell and their relationship to air-conditioning systems, heating systems, hot water heating, lighting, appliances, occupants, and the electrical or gas systems that supply energy. Topics will include heat laws, refrigeration cycle, electrical theory, various types of furnaces, air conditioners, hot water heaters, lighting, windows and doors, and various types of controls. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the implications of climate on energy use in buildings.
  2. Distinguish between various energy sources and end uses.
  3. Identify major components of a building envelope and their relation to heat transfer.
  4. Apply basic electrical theory and identify types of residential electrical circuits.
  5. Apply basic combustion theory and identify types of residential combustion systems.
  6. Identify residential HVAC control and electrical monitoring technology.
  7. Describe the fundamentals of air and water heating and the related components.
  8. Describe the fundamentals of refrigeration and the related components.
  9. Explain the implications of an energy-efficient residence on indoor environmental quality.
  10. Identify residential diagnostic tools and their function.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Implications of Climate on Energy Use in Buildings
   A. Define temperature and molecular motion.
   B. Make conversions between Fahrenheit and Celsius scales.
   C. Define British Thermal Unit.
   D. Distinguish differences between sensible heat, latent heat, and
specific heat.
   E. Define density.
   F. Characterize a climate zone by design elements (solar exposure,
temperature, humidity).
   G. Describe heat, air, and moisture flow through various substances.
   H. Explain the transfer of heat by conduction, convection, and
radiation.
II. Various Energy Sources and End Users
   A. State two forms of energy important to air conditioning (heating and
cooling).
   B. Describe work and state the formula used to determine the amount in
a given task.
   C. Convert units of energy.
   D. Identify modes of electrical power generation and discuss their
differences.
   E. Distinguish differences of various combustion fuels and discuss
their differences.
   F. Identify common residential appliances and discuss their power
consumption.
   G. Complete a residential analysis of baseload energy use and seasonal
energy use.
III. Major Components of a Building Envelope and Relation to Heat
Transfer
   A. Discuss R-Value and U-Factor.
   B. Discuss windows and doors and their resistance to heat transfer.
   C. Define various types insulation and describe characteristics of
common insulation materials.
   D. Describe methods for quantifying insulation values.
   E. Explain effective R-Value based on the quality of an installed
product.
   F. Calculate the R-Value of a wall of various insulation types.
   G. Calculate the R-Value of a parallel path for heat through a wall and
convert to the U-Factor for the wall.
   H. Calculate the U-Factor of a wall with various envelope components
(windows, wood, insulation).
   I. Explain and calculate the relationship between U-Factor and the
BTU/hour load.
IV. Basic Electrical Theory and Types of Residential Electrical Circuits
   A. Explain the atomic theory and its relationship to physical objects
and electron flow.
   B. Describe electrical potential, current flow, and resistance.
   C. Define electrical power.
   D. Explain Ohm's law.
   E. Calculate the potential, current, and resistance of an electrical
circuit using Ohm's law.
   F. Calculate the electrical power of a circuit and the BTU/hour rating
of an electrical resistance heater.
   G. Describe the concepts of a basic electric circuit.
   H. Explain a series circuit and a parallel circuit.
   I. Describe the basic difference between direct and alternating
currents.
   J. Explain the function of a transformer in a circuit.
   K. Describe the power distribution system.
   L. Define the smart power distribution system or smart grid. 
V. Basic Combustion Theory and Types of Residential Combustion Systems
   A. Explain combustion and the fire-triangle.
   B. Discuss the products of combustion and their affect on humans and
structures.
   C. Describe spillage and identify potential causes.
   D. Distinguish between drafting and backdrafting and identify potential
causes for both.
   E. Describe industry standards and tests for worst case
depressurization.
   F. Describe industry standards tests for spillage.
   G. Interpret industry standards and tests for draft.
   H. Describe industry standards and tests for products of combustion,
such as carbon monoxide.
   I. Compare combustion fuels and list their potential energy in BTUs by
quantity.
   J. Describe the atmospherically drafted furnace or water heater and its
components.
   K. Identify the mechanically assisted furance or water heater and its
components.
   L. Describe the condensing furnace or water heater and its components.
   M. Define unvented and direct vented combustion appliances.
VI. Residential HVAC Controls and Electrical Monitoring Technology
   A. Define bimetal.
   B. Make general comparisons between different control applications
(bimetal, rod and tube, fluid-filled, partial liquid, partial
vapor-filled, bellows, diaphragm, mercury control bulb, and Bourdon tube.
   C. Identify the termocouple.
   D. Discuss the thermistor.
   E. Describe the pilot safety controls and methods of ignition of
burners in a combustion system.
   F. Describe the difference between low-high and high voltage controls.
   G. Name components of low- and high-voltage controls.
   H. Name two ways motors are protected from high temperature.
   I. Describe the function of mechanical and electromechanical controls.
   J. Explain the basic function of a line and low-voltage thermostat in a
control system.
   K. Explain the basic function of a programmable thermostat.
   L. Identify the common types of thermostats used in the industry.
   M. Discuss control technology for a smart home.
   N. Discuss monitoring and feedback technology for a smart home.
VII. Fundamentals of Air and Water Heating and Related Components
   A. Discuss measures of efficiency.
   B. Describe electric systems for air and water heating.
   C. Identify combustion systems for air and water heating.
   D. Explain stack, wind, and chimney effect.
   E. Define air infiltration and exfiltration.
VIII. Fundamentals of Refrigeration and Related Components
   A. Describe the basic refrigeration cycle.
   B. Explain the relationship between pressure and the boiling point of
water or other liquids.
   C. Describe the function of the evaporator or cooling coil.
   D. Explain the purpose of the compressor.
   E. Describe the function of the condensing coil.
   F. State the purpose of the metering device.
   G. List refrigerants commonly used in residential and air conditioning
systems.
IX. Implications of an Energy-Efficient Residence on Indoor Environmental
Quality
   A. Discuss air flow and industry standards associated with fresh air
exchange.
   B. Calculate the minimum ventilation requirements for a building.
   C. Identify moisture, mold, and options for prevention and
remediation.
   D. Discuss radon and options for prevention and remediation.
   E. Discuss lead, lead-based products, and options for prevention and
remediation.
   F. Identify volatile organic compounds and list products that
incorporate VOCs.
   G. Define integrated pest management.
   H. Discuss combustion and combustion by products, and their effect on
humans.
   I. Locate industry standards or resources that cross reference energy
and air quality.
X. Residential Diagnostic Tools and Functions
   A. Explain how electrical potential, current flow, and resistance are
measured.
   B. Demonstrate the use of volt meter, an ammeter, and an ohmmeter.
   C. Explain how electrical power is measured.
   D. Describe basic hand tools and their function.
   E. Distinguish between the analog meter and digital meter and explain
their differences.
   F. Describe a manometer and its function, and demonstrate the use.
   G. Distinguish between a blower door and a duct blaster and explain
their function.
   H. Acquire a blower door and duct blaster, and demonstrate the use of
each.
   I. Describe a thermometer and its function, and demonstrate the use.
   J. Define a combustion analyzer and its function, and demonstrate the
use for detecting quantities of gases.
   K. Describe a combustible gas detector and its function, and
demonstrate the use for detecting the presence of a combustible gas.
   L. Identify a sling-psychrometer and a humidistat and their function,
and demonstrate the use.
   M. Describe an anemometer and belometer, among other inline airflow
measuring devices and their function, and demonstrate the use.
   N. Define a thermal imaging camera and its function, and demonstrate
the use.
   O. Describe a boroscope and its function, and demonstrate the use.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter and/or unit tests: 20% - 30% of grade
Quizzes: 20% - 30% of grade
Final written exam: 20% - 30% of grade
Participation: 10% - 20% of grade       
TOTAL   100% Grade Criteria:

  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EPRM 127

  • Title: Residential Energy Data Collection and Input*
  • Number: EPRM 127
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EPRM 123.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures used in the residential construction industry to determine the construction details of the residence, the size and type of HVAC equipment, and other appliances as it relates to a residential energy audit. The student will be required to complete field data collection forms and record detailed information of the components of a residence. This data will be entered into various computer modeling programs. The output from the software will help determine what recommendations should be made to the homeowner to improve the energy efficiency of their residence. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs instructional lab.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare load calculation methods and programs.

  2. Perform data collection using standardized forms.

  3. Sketch various views of a residence showing size and construction details.

  4. Evaluate building materials and their relationship to heat transfer.

  5. Examine the windows and doors for energy efficiency.

  6. Evaluate mechanical equipment used for heating and cooling.

  7. Document type of lighting and appliances.

  8. Measure and calculate the volume of a residence.

  9. Input data into various computer software programs. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Load Calculation Methods
   A. Discuss/compare various methods and programs for determining the
cooling load for a residence.
   B. Discuss/compare various methods and programs for determining the
heating load for a residence.

II. Data Collection
   A. Complete a field data collection form(s) for construction details of
a residence.
   B. Compile information for the type of HVAC, lights and appliances in
the home.

III. Residence and Construction Details
   A. Measure and sketch a plan (top) view of a residence to scale.
   B. Draw/sketch four elevation views showing each side of the home.

IV. Building Materials and Their Relationship to Heat Transfer
   A. Gather information on the type of foundation walls.
   B. Describe the type of slab floor.
   C. Document the type of frame floor(s).
   D. Record the type of rim and band joists and amount of insulation
present.
   E. Evaluate the construction type of above grade walls.
   F. Record type of ceiling and amount of attic insulation.

V. Windows and Doors Evaluations
   A. Evaluate the type of windows and sliding glass doors.
   B. Assess the type and construction of entry/exit doors.
   C. Measure and record the type of skylights, if present.

VI. Mechanical equipment for Heating and Cooling
   A. Document the type and size of AC unit.
   B. Record type and size of heating unit.

VII. Lighting and Appliances
   A. Evaluate the types of lighting used in the residence.
   B. Document the system used for heating water in the residence.
   C. Record other appliances that are presently used in the home.

VIII. Volume and Type of Space Within a Residence
   A. Evaluate the residence for area that are conditioned and
unconditioned space.
   B. Measure and record the overall size of the residence.
   C. Identify the height of ceilings in the structure.
   D. Calculate the volume of vaulted ceilings and skylights, if present.

IX. Data Input Into Computer Software Programs
   A. Enter residential data into Manual J spreadsheet.
   B. Input residential data using various industry standardized
software.
   C. Generate reports using various industry standardized software.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Periodic quizzes and/or chapter tests   20% to 30%
Mid Term Test                           20% to 30%
Final Test                              20% to 30%
Participation                           10% to 20%
Total                                   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EPRM 142

  • Title: Solar Thermal Systems
  • Number: EPRM 142
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Description:

Solar Thermal Systems presents the key components of thermal conversion systems to absorb and use heat from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, energy management, and economics for a variety of solar thermal system applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of solar thermal systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level Solar Thermal exam. 4 hours of integrated lecture lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain solar phenomena as it applies to energy collection.
  2. Demonstrate safety practices with solar thermal systems.
  3. Identify system types and their components.
  4. Adapt a system to a specific design.
  5. Conduct a site assessment.
  6. Install a solar thermal collector.
  7. Install a storage tank.
  8. Install piping, pipe insulation and connecting system piping.
  9. Install mechanical/plumbing equipment and related components.
  10. Install electrical control systems.
  11. Perform a system checkout.
  12. Demonstrate appropriate maintenance and troubleshooting protocols for a solar thermal system. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Solar Phenomena and Energy Collection
   A. Explain sun-earth geometric relationships with regards to annual and
diurnal cycles.
   B. Calculate the difference between solar time and standard time at a
given longitude and time zone.
   C. Differentiate between solar radiation and irradiance.
   D. Diagram appropriate solar array orientation for a given latitude.
   E. Interpret solar radiation data sets.
   F. Demonstrate how radiation data is used in sizing of thermal
systems.
   G. Discuss current issues in solar energy.

II. Solar Water Heating Systems Safety
   A. Demonstrate knowledge of OSHA Regulations.
   B. List safety hazards on the job.
      1. Roof
      2. Attics
      3. Confined spaces

III. Systems Components and Control Systems
   A. Describe freeze protection protocols.
   B. Define indirect systems.
   C. Define direct systems.
   D. Differentiate between types of valves and their uses.
   E. Define types and functions of thermostats.
   F. Define types and functions of thermal sensors and control boxes.

IV. System Design Adaptation
   A. List steps and pitfalls in getting permits.
   B. Demonstrate ability to estimate costs.
   C. List installation sequence.
   D. List steps in the inspection of a system.
   E. List components specific to solar pool heating.

V. Site Assessment
   A. Demonstrate use of site analysis hardware and software.
   B. Describe procedures to perform a rough site analysis.

VI. Solar Collectors
   A. List characteristics of an evacuated tube collector.
   B. List characteristics of a flat plate collector.
   C. List characteristics of an fin and tube collector.

VII. Storage Tanks and Water Heaters
   A. Describe the interface with existing or new water heaters and hot
water systems.
   B. Describe use of On-Demand heaters as backup.
   C. Demonstrate installation of storage tanks specific to solar hot
water system.
   D. Demonstrate installation of heat exchanger, and direct use types of
systems.

VIII. Solar System Piping and Pipe Insulation
   A. Install solar system pipe.
      1. Copper
      2. CPVC and PVC
      3. PexTM tubing
   B. Install pipe insulation.
   C. Connect solar system to existing system piping.

IX. Mechanical/Plumbing Equipment and Other Components
   A. Locate position for and install plumbing valves.
   B. Install monitoring components.
   C. Install indirect system heat exchanger.
   D. Install pumps.
   E. Pressure relief valves.
   F. Install check valves.

X. Electrical Control System
   A. Interpret wiring diagrams.
   B. Install sensors and evaluate their function.
   C. Install pump controls.
   D. Install thermostatic controls.

XI. Performing a System Checkout
   A. Install operation and identification tags and labels.
   B. Conduct pressure testing of system.
   C. Conduct leak testing of system.
   D. Conduct control set point testing.

XII. Maintaining and Troubleshooting A Solar Thermal System
   A. Demonstrate appropriate maintenance protocols for a solar thermal
system.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate troubleshooting protocols for a solar
thermal system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Assignments -  20% - 30% of grade
Lab Participation -  10% - 20% of grade
Lab Tests -          30% - 40% of grade
Final Written Exam - 20% - 30% of grade

Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F = 0% - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).