Environmental Science (EVRN)

Courses

EVRN 115   Natural History of Kansas (3 Hours)

Natural History of Kansas describes physical and biological processes that have led to the present Kansas landscape. Physical science topics include geology, climate patterns and soil formation. Biological science topics include ecology and a survey of the plants and animals of Kansas. The course will consider how the physical and biological environment relates to past and present human resource uses.

EVRN 124   Oceanus: Essentials of Oceanography (3 Hours)

This course for beginning students focuses on the marine environment as a unique feature of the planet Earth and investigates areas of intense scientific and public concern: the pervasiveness of the ocean and its effect on the earth's weather, its stunning physical size and diversity of contained life forms, its contributions to the physical and historical development of man, its impact on geopolitical and economic matters, and the impact of oceanic pollutants and the potential exploitation of marine resources.

EVRN 130   Environmental Science (3 Hours)

Environmental Science seeks to describe problems and solutions associated with human use of natural resources. Students will study the major physical and biological processes that govern the complex interactions in natural ecosystems. Major course topics include human population growth, resource use and pollution. Practical solutions aimed at sustainability will be identified and examined. This is an introductory, nonscience-major survey course.

EVRN 131   Environmental Science Lab* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 130 or EVRN 130.

In this lab, students will learn ecological principles that are necessary for understanding and solving environmental problems. Students will sample the local environment for various types of environmental pollution, conduct lab projects and computer simulations, and attend field trips. Field trips may include a visit to a local wastewater treatment plant, a stream ecosystem and a prairie ecosystem. 2 hrs. lab/wk. plus up to three field trips. EVRN 131 students must be currently enrolled in EVRN 130 or have successfully completed BIOL/EVRN 130 within the last three years.

EVRN 134   Principles of Sustainability (3 Hours)

Principles of Sustainability introduces students to the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability and sustainable development. The course will critically examine the use of sustainable principles to guide decision making and problem solving in personal, campus, community and global contexts. Students will engage in a variety of individual, group, campus and community activities and collaborate with campus and community offices and agencies in order to identify, assess and address local sustainability needs. Students will be required to present their projects at a public sustainability forum.

EVRN 155   Bioethics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : BIOL 121 or Department approval.

This course introduces students to the scientific, ethical and legal issues relevant to the discipline of biology and those raised by the rapid development of new biological technologies. Students will examine the major theories of ethics, including deontology, utilitarianism, and select others. Topics include: beginning of life issues such as contraception, abortion, and nontraditional methods of human reproduction; end of life issues such as advance healthcare directives and physician-assisted suicide; and other issues such as experimentation on human and animal subjects and human environmental impacts. EVRN 155 and PHIL 155 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

EVRN 255   Freshwater Ecology (4 Hours)

Freshwater Ecology describes the interaction between freshwater organisms and their environment. Structure and function of streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwater systems will be explored. Students will learn life histories and identification skills for aquatic organisms including plankton, fish, mollusks, insects and plants. The influence of abiotic factors such as temperature, oxygen, and nutrients will be examined. Field and classroom experiments will be used to apply concepts learned. Students will study local water quality issues and aquatic management strategies to improve ecosystem health.

EVRN 115

  • Title: Natural History of Kansas
  • Number: EVRN 115
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Natural History of Kansas describes physical and biological processes that have led to the present Kansas landscape. Physical science topics include geology, climate patterns and soil formation. Biological science topics include ecology and a survey of the plants and animals of Kansas. The course will consider how the physical and biological environment relates to past and present human resource uses.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the geological processes during the geological eras and periods which formed today's Kansas physiography.
  2. Locate and describe the 11 physiographic areas in Kansas.
  3. List the rock types and fossils found in Kansas.
  4. Relate climate patterns to typical weather conditions in Kansas.
  5. Compare water resources in eastern and western Kansas.
  6. Describe soil formation unique to Kansas soils.
  7. List the major biomes of Kansas and the important plants found in each.
  8. Describe the grassland and deciduous forest biomes in ecological terms.
  9. List major animal groups, major characteristics used in classification, general habits and adaptations.
  10. Relate natural resources in Kansas to past and present human use. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Science Topics

A. Geology

1. Describe the geological time line as it relates to Kansas physiography.

2. List the destructive/constructive geological processes active in Kansas.

3. List and locate the 11 physiographic areas of Kansas.

4. Describe major fossil groups and where they are found in the state.

B. Climate patterns

1. Describe the general climate type and determining factors for the state.

2. Contrast northwest and southeast Kansas with respect to 10 weather factors.

3. Give temperature and rainfall data, draw a climatogarph.

C. Soils

1. List major Kansas soils.

2. Describe formation factors, soil structure and uses of Kansas soils.

D. Water resources

1. Describe the formation and location of major surface water resources.

2. Describe the formation and location of major groundwater resources.

3. Contrast water problems in western vs. eastern Kansas.

II. Biological Topics

A. Plants - Biomes

1. Locate and describe the three major components of the temperate deciduous forest biome.

a. Oak-hickory forest

b. Cross timbers

c. Flood plain forest

2. Locate and describe the three major components of the temperate grassland biome.

a. Tall grass prairie

b. Mixed grass prairie

c. Short grass prairie

3. Contract the limiting factors between the deciduous forest and grassland.

B. Animals

1.  Describe the use of stream invertebrates to determine water quality and species diversity.

2. For the vertebrate groups, i.e., fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals

a. List the characteristics of the group

b. Describe the abundance in Kansas

c. List the major characteristics used in classification

d. Describe adaptations to conditions in the state

III. Human Impact on the Natural Environment

A. Describe the major events in the human history of the state affecting its environment and resources.

B. List current land uses in the state.

C. Describe the major industries in the state.

D. Describe the major environmental concerns of the state.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20%    Class participation, homework assignments, field trip reports
20%    Oral (5-10 minutes)/written report (3 pages) on topic of choice from the course outline
60%    Tests containing both objective and short answer questions

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Off-campus field trips may be required. Students will provide their own transportation. 
  2. Computer Literacy Expectations:Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EVRN 124

  • Title: Oceanus: Essentials of Oceanography
  • Number: EVRN 124
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course for beginning students focuses on the marine environment as a unique feature of the planet Earth and investigates areas of intense scientific and public concern: the pervasiveness of the ocean and its effect on the earth's weather, its stunning physical size and diversity of contained life forms, its contributions to the physical and historical development of man, its impact on geopolitical and economic matters, and the impact of oceanic pollutants and the potential exploitation of marine resources.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the special nature of the Earth as a "water planet" and recognize its place in the universe.
  2. Compare some of the current theories concerning the origin of the planet and the waters that cover its surface.
  3. Identify the features of the oceans' basins and relate the structures observed to theories of origin.
  4. Discuss the co-evolution of the Earth and its resident biology.
  5. Discuss basic chemical oceanography in terms of the special properties of water and dissolved salts and dissolved gases.
  6. Describe the motions of the seas – as currents, waves and tides – in terms of causes and their influences and effects upon the land.
  7. Recognize the adaptations of marine organisms to special properties of the ocean such as light and sound.
  8. Identify the features of special animal groups such as sharks, protozoa and marine mammals.
  9. Realistically assess the resources of the sea in terms of minerals, energy and food.
  10. Discuss the reasons for and the means by which humankind uses and misuses marine resources.
  11. Appraise the nature and power of man's growing interferences with the often subtle interrelationships of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth.
  12. Describe areas of intense scientific interest and public concern such as plate tectonics and earthquake predictions, the impact of ocean pollutants, climate fluctuations, cetacean intelligence, and ocean technology.
  13. Identify the causes of marine pollution and understand the problems of containment and alleviation.
  14. Recognize that all parts of the world are interconnected by the sea and that this planet's last frontier needs help in its preservation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Water Planet

A. Define oceanography and list and briefly describe at least five branches of this science.

B. Discuss science as a way of understanding the universe and accumulating knowledge.

C. List the steps in the scientific method and compare and contrast the terms, hypothesis, theory and law as they are used in science.

D. Discuss the big bang theory of the origin of the universe including at least two types of evidence that support this theory.

E. Explain how and when the sun, solar system, Earth and oceans formed.

F. Discuss three current ideas on how life arose and list the contributions of Bada, Haldane, Miller and Wächtenhäuser to these ideas.

II. First Steps

A. Compare and contrast the early voyages of the Polynesians, Vikings, Greeks and Chinese, especially their motivations, vessels and seafaring skills.

B. Recognize the importance of record-keeping and catography to voyaging, and the historical role of the Library of Alexandria.

C. List some of the major contributions to early voyaging of Prince Henry, Magellan and Columbus.

D. Recognize the role of Captain James Cook in the history of marine science, and be aware of his three major voyages.

E. Describe the United States Exploring Expedition, its objectives and accomplishments, and its importance in bringing in the United States into the field of oceanography.

F. Describe the Challenger Expedition and its major contributions in marine science.

G. Chronicle the rise of land-based oceanographic institutions, from the early beginnings in Naples ad Monaco to the major facilities now operating in the United States.

H. List the disciplines in which marine research is being done today, as it relates to recent advances in data gathering and technology.

III. Making the Pieces Fit

A. Compare and contrast the classification of Earth’s layers based on chemical composition versus their classification based on physical properties.

B. Describe the layered structure of Earth and understand how the structure was determined through the study of seismic waves.

C. Understand Wegener’s evidence for the theory of continental drift and how this theory was received.

D. Explain the concepts of buoyancy and isostatic equilibrium and their relationship to continental drift.

E. Understand the source of convection and the role it plays in plate tectonics.

F. Describe the roles of Benioff and Wadati, Hess and Dietz, Wilson and the R/V Glomar Challenger in formulating the paradigm of plate tectonics.

G. Compare and contrast the terms continental drift, seafloor spreading and plate tectonics.

H. Explain the evidence, both direct and indirect, for plate tectonic theory.

IV. The World in Motion

A. Describe the three major types of plate boundaries and discuss specific examples of each.

B. Describe the formation, movement and fate of the Hawaiian Ridge and Emperor Seamounts and explain how these features support the theory of plate tectonics.

C. Discuss the formation of guyots and terranes and how each is related to tectonic movements.

D. Compare and contrast deep and shallow earthquakes and describe the Wadati-Benioff Zone.

E. Explain how the patterns of paleomagnetism, seafloor age and sediment thickness contribute to an understanding of tectonic theory.

F. Summarize the major types of evidence that support the theory of plate tectonics and list at least five significant unanswered questions about this process.

V. Over the Edge

A. Discuss the history of bathymetry from the early voyagers to the scientists of today.

B. Understand the modern techniques and technologies (both shipboard and satellite) used to describe and study the ocean floor and the variety of specially designed and instrumented vessels.

C. Describe the features and boundaries characterizing the continental shelf, shelf break, slope and rise.

D. List the various types of continental margins and their relationships to the plate margins.

E. Compare and contrast manned and unmanned undersea research vessels regarding their basic construction, operation and capabilities.

F. Explain Earth’s oceanic ridge system and how it relates to the lithospheric plates.

G. Discuss the hydrothermal vent phenomenon – how it works, its biological and physical aspects, and its potential for research and exploitation.

H. Describe the abyssal plain – its extent and boundaries, relief features and sources of sediment.

VI. The Ocean’s Memory

A. Characterize the distribution of the major seafloor sediment types, and how they can be associated with the more sediment-free relief features.

B. Discuss the role of sediments in constructing a history of recent seafloor formation.

C. List and describe the major criteria used to classify marine sediments.

D. Compare and contrast the sediments of the continental margins and those of the deep-sea floor.

E. Describe the biological and chemical diversity of the biogenous sediments.

F. Discuss the growing commercial interest in marine sediments, including their potential as a resource and recovery methods.

G. Characterize the technologies involved in seafloor sediment study: locating, profiling, recovering and laboratory analysis.

H. Explain the basic processes involved in the formation of oil and gas in marine sediments.

I. Explain how knowledge of marine sediments can aid in describing Earth’s historical climatic changes and magnetic field orientation.

VII. It’s in the Water

A. Describe the structure and characteristics of water molecules and explain how these contribute to the global thermostatic effects of water on Earth’s climate.

B. Describe the factors that regulate the density of seawater and explain the nature and importance of the thermohaline circulation.

C. Describe the sources, composition and measurement of the ocean’s salinity and outline the colligative properties of water.

D. Discuss the principle of constant proportions and compare, contrast and give examples of conservative and non-conservative constituents of seawater.

E. Compare and contrast the general distribution, concentration and roles of dissolved carbon dioxide and dissolved oxygen in the ocean.

F. Explain the relationship between carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect and the interplay of oceanic and atmospheric carbon dioxide in global warming.

G. Explain why some scientists believe that adding iron to the oceans could affect atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming.

VIII. Beneath the Surface

A. Describe the general density stratification of the oceans and explain why it exists and how it differs in tropical, temperate and polar oceans.

B. Compare and contrast the euphotic, disphotic, and aphotic zones of the ocean.

C. Compare and contrast the following ocean zones: epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic, abyssopelagic, and hadopelagic.

D. Discuss how the quantity and wavelength of light changes as it passes through seawater and list some ways this affects marine life.

E. Draw a profile illustrating how the speed of sound changes with depth in the ocean.

F. Explain how these changes create the sofar layer and the shadow zone.

G. Explain how and why sound is used to study global ocean temperatures.

H. Explain what sonar is and describe how humans use it.

IX. Going to Extremes

A. Define primary production and compare and explain the patterns of production in polar and tropical oceans.

B. Explain the structure of coral animals and coral reefs and explain why coral reefs are much more common on the western sides of oceans than on the eastern sides.

C. Define biodiversity; compare and contrast biodiversity in polar oceans and on coral reefs.

D. Compare and contracts the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions; compare and contrast western tropical oceans and eastern tropical oceans.

E. Explain the symbiotic relationship between zooxanthellae and the coral polyps they inhabit.

F. List and give examples of several ways of organisms cope with the long dark session of polar oceans.

G. Discuss several uses, abuses and problems specific to coral refs and to polar ecosystems.

X. Something in the Air

A. Discuss the molecular composition of Earth’s lower atmosphere, the fluctuating role of water vapor, and how all of this influences air’s density.

B. Describe the phenomenon of convection and how it affects the movement of air over Earth’s surface.

C. Explain the concept of Earth’s “climate system” as it relates to the whole Earth system – ocean, atmosphere and land.

D. Explain the basic sequence of events involved in Hurricane Mitch, and why it is used as an example of how the power of Earth’s climate system affects the human population.

E. Explain the role of the sun’s energy in atmosphere circulation, including the absorption/radiation/re-radiation concept and the varying amounts of Earth’s heat budget involved.

F. List and characterize the four major types of atmospheric convection cells – Hadley, Ferrel, Polar and Walker.

G. Explain the Coriolis affect and how it influences atmospheric conditions.

H. Describe the various common global wind and storm patterns – where they form, their basic characteristics and how they are names.

I. Define the concept of an air mass, how different air masses move and behave, and how they interact at boundaries and fronts.

XI. Going with the Flow

A. List and briefly discuss the physical factors that cause surface currents.

B. Describe the characteristics and dynamics of the geostrophic gyre, including the effects of wind, gravity and the ocean basin boundary.

C. List and be able to locate on a map the six great currents of the world oceans.

D. Compare and contrast the characteristics of the eastern and western boundary currents.

E. Explain the mechanisms involved in the poleward transfer of water and heat by surface currents.

F. List and describe, briefly and in order, the events leading to an ENSO event.

G. Describe the La Niña phenomenon.

H. Describe the Ekman transport mechanism.

I. Discuss the Gulf Stream and the research done there.

J. Discuss the difficulties involved in studying surface currents and the technology now being used to overcome them.

XII. Deep Connections

A. Identify and characterize the basic (“named”) oceanic water masses – three for the world ocean and additional two in temperate and topical latitudes.

B. Explain where, and under what conditions, the ocean’s water masses are formed, how they retain a history of that information over time, and how they eventually lose it.

C. Describe the T-S (temperature/salinity) curve and how it is used to explain the layering of oceanic waters.

D. Discuss the Antarctic Bottom Water – its formation, characteristics, migration and mixing patterns.

E. Explain the basic thermohaline circulation patterns and mechanisms, including what happens when different water masses encounter each other.

F. Compare the slow-moving currents with faster-moving contour currents, and tell how we know of the existence of the contour currents.

G. Explain the roles played by both thermohaline flow and surface flow in the global heat budget.

H. Compare the two basic methods for studying ocean currents – flow and float – and the types of devices used in each.

I. List and briefly discuss chemical tracers as they are used in studying currents.

J. List and describe some of the satellite-involved technology used for ocean curret studies.

XIII. Surf’s Up

A. Describe the formation and propagation of wind waves.

B. Explain how waves are classified and named, based on the strength and character of the forces that affect them.

C. Describe the relationship between wave length and wave speed.

D. Discuss the terminology used in describing wind waves and their effects – size and shape, crest-and-trough, rogue waves, surf, sea and period.

E. List the chronological sequence of events that occur from the time a deep-water wave begins to approach a shore until it breaks as surf.

F. Identify some of the more notable historical events resulting from the impacts of storm surge, secihes and tsunami, particularly the locations, damage done and lives lost.

G. Identify the various educational and warning programs now in place to address tsunami and other large-wave threats.

XIV. Look Out Below

A. Describe the three types of immense waves – storm surge, seiche and tsunami – and the disturbing forces that cause them.

B. Explain the sequence of events that can cause storm surge to form from a hurricane or frontal storm, and the type of impact storm surge can have as it comes ashore.

C. Describe the transition of a shoreward-bound progressive wave in a seiche, and its potential effect on the shores of enclosed or semi-enclosed bodies of water.

D. Discuss the uniqueness of the progressive wave called tsunami and the types of distributing forces that can cause them.

E. Compare the seismic sea wave – its formation, behavior and impact on a shoreline.

F. Compare the characteristics and behavior of tsunami generated by volcanic activity, landslides and calving glaciers to seismic sea waves.

G. Identify some of the more notable historical events resulting from the impacts of storm surge, seiches and tsunami, particularly the locations, damage done and lives lost.

H. Identify the various educational and warning programs now in place to address tsunami and other large-wave threats.

I. Describe present concerns about rising sea levels and their association with global warming, the disciplines in which research is being done, and the technologies being used.

XV. Ebb and Flow

A. Recognize that the periodic rise and fall of sea-level, called tides, has been recorded and studied since the early explorers and coast-dwellers, particularly in the Middle East.

B. Understand the characteristics of the true tidal wave and related tidal phenomena, as compared to distributing force waves.

C. Understand the contributions of Newton and Laplace in describing and explaining the tidal phenomenon.

D. Explain the roles of gravity and inertia as they affect the dynamics of the sun/moon/Earth system.

E. Explain the role of the gravitational attraction between two bodies in the mechanics of the tide generating process.

F. Compare and contrast Newton’s equilibrium model of the tidal phenomenon with Laplace’s dynamic theory.

G. Discuss the formation of the crest/trough configuration of the tidal “wave”, the concept of tidal bulges, and how this explains the daily high-tide/low-tide.

H. Define the terms: low tide and high tide, neap tide and spring tide, tidal datum and tidal range.

I. Explain the interest in accurate tidal prediction and the methods used to accomplish it.

J. List the pros and cons of using the tides as a source of power.

K. Characterize the basic intertidal zone that is inhabited by marine organisms.

XVI. On the Coast

A. Explain the basic concepts of the coast and coastline, as well as the existing variety of descriptive subcategories under that general terminology.

B. Identify the various schemes and systems used for classifying coasts, and the concepts upon which they are based.

C. Discuss the terrestrial and marine processes that affect coasts, and how and where they interact.

D. Characterize the basic differences in appearance, structure and dynamics between the three main U.S. coasts – Pacific, Atlantic, Gulf.

E. Discuss the general concept of a beach (as opposed to other shoreline structures), and understand the terminology used to describe the various beach shapes, slopes, features and material compositions.

F. Explain the formation of barrier spits, barrier islands, sea islands, bay mouth bars and lagoons.

G. Describe the unique physical features of estuaries, lagoons and wetlands, and then compare and contrast their ecological significance.

H. Describe the major points of controversy and discussion relating to human interaction with natural coastlines, and some of the possible management solutions and strategies.

XVII. Due West

A. Characterize each of the four southern California study sites, in terms of location, general physiography and geology.

B. Describe and explain, for each case site, the human factors and their potential impacts and effects, including urbanization, contamination runoff and road-building.

C. Discuss the plans of processes being used or considered to mitigate the negative effects of human intervention for each case study.

D. Understand the issues surrounding the concept of endangered species at Point Mugu, and how this concern is being addressed.

E. Explain the various natural factors involved in the landslides and shoreline erosion activities in Malibu, including sea level changes, heavy rains and mountain building.

F. Describe the various levels of involvement of area residents, regulatory agencies, politicians and scientists, in addressing the problems and concerns of each location studied.

XVIII. Building Blocks

A. Discuss the behavioral and natural systems of classification of ocean life.

B. Compare the six kingdoms of life.

C. Discuss the physical limiting factors – light, temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients and gases, pH and hydrostatic pressure – as they relate to marine life.

D. Define osmosis and discuss its importance to life in the sea.

E. Discuss the relationships between surface area and volume, gravity and buoyancy, and viscosityand movement.

F. Explain the importance of each to marinen life.

G. Describe how the marine environment is classified on the basis of light penetration and on the basis of location.

XIX. Water World

A. Define life and discuss scientific hypotheses about how it might have begun.

B. Explain the relationships among matter, energy and life, and explain how the second law of thermodynamics and entropy relate to life.

C. Outline the biogeochemical cycles for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and iron, and compare and contrast these cycles.

D. Outline the theory of evolution by natural selection and discuss its importance in biology in general and biological oceanography in particular.

XX. Food for Thought

A. Define the term ‘primary production’, explain how it is measured and describe its importance.

B. Compare and contrast diatoms and dinoflagellates and discuss the role of dinoflagellates in harmful algal blooms.

C. Discuss the importance of the picoplankton.

D. Discuss how light and nutrients interact to produce the general seasonal patterns of primary production in tropical, temperate and polar oceans and notable exceptions to theses patterns.

E. Outline the major groups of macroalgae and angiosperms and discuss their roles in marine primary production.

XXI. Survivors

A. Describe Earth’s earliest life forms and how they got their energy.

B. Describe the evolution of photosynthesis and how it led to the oxygen revolution and the subsequent proliferation of animal forms of life.

C. Define the terms autotroph and heterotroph as they relate to the oxygen revolution and the evolution of early animals.

D. Define the term phylum as it is used to classify animals.

E. Explain why the Burgess Shale is an important location for discovering the evolutionary history of animals by studying their fossils.

F. Define the term invertebrate as it is used to describe groups of aimals, both living and fossil.

G. Discuss the eight invertebrate phyla presented, noting their basic taxonomy, ecology and unique structural characteristics.

H. Describe the two invertebrate chordate groups, their characteristics and how they seem to make the transition between the true invertebrates and the true vertebrates.

I. Discuss the concept of the backbone and how it may be used erroneously to separate more advanced from less advanced invertebrate animals.

J. Describe the intertidal zone of the marine environment, including both rocky and sandy/muddy shores – what physical conditions prevail there, and how the organisms that live there survive.

XXII. Life Goes On

A. Describe the three features of the chordate body plan and contrast the two groups of invertebrate chordates.

B. List the animals in this lesson in order according to their classification and understand both their common and scientific names.

C. Describe the three classes of fishes.

D. Describe the three major groups of marine reptiles.

E. Outline the general characteristics of the class Aves and compare the tubenose, gull, pelican and penguin groups.

F. Discuss the general characteristics of the class Mammalia and discuss four features shared by marine mammals.

G. Describe the three orders of marine mammals and discuss the major groups within each order.

XXIII. Living Together

A. Define ecology and ecological community and relate the terms, niche, habitat and biodiversity to the study of communities.

B. Discuss the environmental tolerence curve concept and the relationship between different curves to the abundance and distribution of organisms in a community.

C. Compare intraspecific and interspecific competition and illustrate how these regulate the distribution of Chthamalus and Balanus barncles in the rocky intertidal community.

D. Discuss J-shaped and S-shaped population growth curves including how environmental resistance converts J-growth into S-growth and establishes a carrying capacity.

E. Distinguish between exploitative and interference competition and give examples.

F. Discuss symbiosis by comparing mutualism, commensalisms and parasitism.

G. Compare the characteristics of any of the following communities with any of the others:

1. Rocky intertidal

2. Sandy intertidal

3. Salt marsh/estuary

4. Coral reef

5. Pelagic photic zone

6. Deep scattering layer (DSL)

7. Bathpelagic zone

8. Abyssal plains

9. Hydrothermal vent/cold seep

10. Whale fall

XXIV. Treasure Trove

A. Distinguish among marine physical, biological, energy and nonextractive resources and give several examples of each.

B. Describe the characteristics and extent of utilization of each resource.

C. Discuss fisheries and their management including the concepts of common property, maximum sustainable yield, overfishing, the relationship between effort and yield.

D. Briefly discuss the history, regulation and future prospects of the whaling industry.

E. Outline and discuss the history and current status of the United Nations International Law of the Sea Convention.

XXV. Dirty Water

A. Explain the terminology used to define and discuss the human activities that impact natural processes and ecosystems.

B. Compare natural pollutants to human-generated pollutants.

C. Discuss oil pollution – types of polluting agents, their sources, and the habitats and organisms affected.

D. Explain eutrophication, including the substances involved, their sources, and how organisms and habitats are affected.

E. Discuss pollution by heavy metals – types of metals involved and their sources, organisms and habitats effected, short- and long-term residual effects.

F. Discuss the various types of synthetic products that can pose environmental threats, particularly the organic chemicals and plastics; their short- and long-term effects on ecosystems; and the concept of biological amplification.

G. Explain the potential environmental impact of sediments, from both natural and human-related sources.

H. Discuss sewage pollution – types, sources, potentially harmful components, effects on organisms and ecosystems.

I. Describe the environmental threats posed to marine ecosystems by waste heat energy and by introduced species.

J. Explain the concepts of environmental alteration at the global level, especially ozone layer depletion, global warming/greenhouse effect, nuclear energy/ionizing radiation, sea level rise.

XXVI. Hands On

A. Explain the general process of science in oceanography using at least three examples from the course.

B. Discuss the motivations, personal characteristics and training needed to pursue a career in oceanography.

C. Describe the purpose of major global oceanographic initiatives and understand the importance of each to oceanography.

D. Describe at least four areas of ongoing oceanic research and understand their importance.

E. Describe at least four scientific discoveries and describe why they are important.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

0-25%      Instructor discretion – includes not only written assignment of a research paper but also a collection of news articles from current print media with accompanying written assessment of the articles.

​75-100%  Completion of examinations containing both objective and short answer questions that will be selected from material presented in the textbook and the telecourse lessons.

Evaluation Criteria for Writing: Complete, concrete, correct and clear writing is a major goal of the writing assigned. Use required documentation styles.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EVRN 130

  • Title: Environmental Science
  • Number: EVRN 130
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Environmental Science seeks to describe problems and solutions associated with human use of natural resources. Students will study the major physical and biological processes that govern the complex interactions in natural ecosystems. Major course topics include human population growth, resource use and pollution. Practical solutions aimed at sustainability will be identified and examined. This is an introductory, nonscience-major survey course.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the major environmental problems.
  2. Explain basic science principles which relate to environmental problem-solving.
  3. Describe past and present human population growth in terms of growth curves and demography.
  4. Identify factors which influence population growth.
  5. Describe the resources available on the surface of the earth and the alternative ways of using them.
  6. Describe the types and causes of pollution.
  7. List the components of a sustainable future.
  8. List solutions to pollution problems under the headings of legal, technological and individual behavioral changes.
  9. Describe the impacts of differing ethical economic and political viewpoints on environmental problem-solving. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction and Historical Concerns

A. Define environmental science.

B. Trace the development of attitudes toward natural resources in the United States.

C. Describe conflicting world views.

D. Describe the interactions among human population growth, resource use and pollution.

II. Principles of Science

A. List the ecological levels of the hierarchy of matter.

B. List and describe the five physical characteristics of the biosphere which allow life to exist on Earth.

C. Describe the biomes east and west of Kansas City with respect to limiting factors and vegetation.

D. List the biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem.

E. Compare and contrast photosynthesis and cell respiration.

F. State the Principle of Competitive Exclusion and the Law of Tolerances.

G. State the Law of Conservation of Matter and the two Laws of Thermodynamics.

H. Describe the application of the Law of Conservation of Matter and the two Laws of Thermodynamics to ecosystems.

I. Describe factors which lead to ecosystem stability.

J. Describe nutrient cycling and the specific of two cycles.

III. Human Population

A. Define demography and demographic factors including crude birth rate, crude death rate, doubling time, natural rate of increase/decrease, total fertility rate, replacement fertility rate, population profiles, marriage age, infant mortality rate, literacy, population density and GNP/capita.

B. Given the crude birth and death rates of a country, calculate the natural rate of increase/decrease as a percent and the doubling time in years.

C. List demographic factors which are used to judge quality of life in different countries.

D. Describe what the different demographic factors tell about a population.

E. Compare and contrast demographic factors between less developed countries and more developed countries.

F. Describe the historical growth of the world’s human population.

G. Contrast historical and future human population growth between more developed countries and less developed countries.

H. List arguments in favor of and against controlling human population growth.

I. Describe the four stages of a demographic transition.

J. Describe the influence of the availability of family planning on human population growth.

K. Describe factors which are effective in reducing fertility.

IV. Resources

A. Water Resources

1. Describe the hydrologic or water cycle.

2. Describe the local water cycle in Johnson County, Kansas.

3. Describe the general drinking water treatment process including coagulation and sedimentation, filtration and disinfection.

4. List 5-10 ways to personally use less water.

5. Describe concerns about the overuse of ground water and surface water.

B. Soil, Agriculture and Pesticides

1. Briefly trace the development of agriculture.

2. Compare and contrast agribusiness, subsistence farming and sustainable agriculture.

3. Describe the concerns of animal farming.

4. List methods to increase food production.

5. List and describe five physical characteristics of soil.

6. Describe methods of controlling soil erosion.

7. Describe federal policies aimed at managing United States agriculture.

C. Energy

1. Trace the history of energy use in the United States.

2. List five sources used in the United Stated and give the percent of the current energy.

3. Connect sources of energy in the United States to end uses.

4. List and describe possible energy futures for the United States including fossil fuels, conservation, nuclear and nonrenewables.

D. Biological Diversity

1. List the benefits of species diversity.

2. List factors causing species decline.

3. Describe methods to protect and conserve species.

E. Minerals

1. Describe the environmental impact of mining and processing minerals.

2. Draw a depletion curve for a non-renewable resource and describe how to extend the curve.

3. Describe the United States’ situation with respect to mineral supply.

4. List minerals found in Kansas.

F. Public Lands

1. State the amount and location of public lands in the United States.

2. Describe current management philosophies and practices with respect to public lands.

3. Describe ecosystems as natural resources and as natural capital.

4. Describe areas of concern in the national parks, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, national forests and Bureau of Land Management areas.

5. Describe land use planning and relate it to local cities.

6. Describe the cycle of decay in a city.

7. List characteristics of a sustainable city.

V. Pollution

A. Describe attitudes toward pollution in the United States.

B. Contrast pollution control with pollution prevention.

1. Water

a. Describe the process of eutrophication.

b. List long-term strategies to combat eutrophication.

c. Describe the wastewater treatment process, specifically which processes remove which pollutants.

d. List major federal laws related to water pollution.

2. Air

a. List and give the sources of primary and secondary air pollutants.

b. List the general impacts of air pollution.

c. Describe the major components and impact of the Clear Air Act of 1970 and Amendments of 1977 an 1990.

d. Give examples of control strategies to reduce air pollution.

e. Describe the problem, cause, impact and possible solutions for acid deposition, global climate change or ozone depletion.

3. Hazardous Chemicals

a. Define and give examples of hazardous materials.

b. List the major sources of hazardous materials.

c. List the results of mismanagement of hazardous materials.

d. State the major goal with respect to hazardous chemicals of the following federal laws:    

1. Superfund - 1980    

2. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act - 1976    

3. Underground Storage Tank    

4. DOT Regulations    

5. “Right-To-Know”    

6. Toxic Substances Control Act

4. Municipal Solid Waste

a. List and describe methods of disposal used in the United States.

b. List the components of Municipal Solid Waste.

VI. Society

A. Describe the public policy life cycle using an environmental example.

B. Contrast pollution control using a market vs. a regulatory approach.

C. Briefly describe cost-benefit analysis.

D. List the four steps in risk analysis.

E. Describe components of an environmental ethic.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

70-90%    Tests over lecture, reading material, films, discussions, etc. 
10-30%    Discussions, assignments, quizzes, and in-class projects

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EVRN 131

  • Title: Environmental Science Lab*
  • Number: EVRN 131
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOL 130 or EVRN 130.

Description:

In this lab, students will learn ecological principles that are necessary for understanding and solving environmental problems. Students will sample the local environment for various types of environmental pollution, conduct lab projects and computer simulations, and attend field trips. Field trips may include a visit to a local wastewater treatment plant, a stream ecosystem and a prairie ecosystem. 2 hrs. lab/wk. plus up to three field trips. EVRN 131 students must be currently enrolled in EVRN 130 or have successfully completed BIOL/EVRN 130 within the last three years.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scientific method and be able to write a paper in scientific format.
  2. Collect, analyze and interpret data.
  3. Follow standard lab safety practices.
  4. Correctly follow procedures to operate equipment used in laboratory experiments.
  5. Analyze resources such as soil and water to determine their quality.
  6. Describe the operation of a water treatment and/or wastewater treatment plant.
  7. List and describe the ecosystems in the local area.
  8. Conduct laboratory activities which illustrate specific ecological principles.
  9. Describe the impact of human consumer decisions and human population growth on the environment.
  10. Use the computer to run environmental simulations, graph data and conduct an Internet search. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Resources

A. Soil

1. Describe a soil sample with respect to color, texture, structure, depth and permeability.

2. Relate soil characteristics to specific land uses.

B. Water

1. Sample an aquatic environment with respect to specific characteristics and determine water quality.

2. Compare two or more aquatic environments.

C. Energy

1. Describe home energy conservation practices.

2. Use a computer simulation to evaluate energy use in a home.

II. Water Pollution

A. Describe the processes in a water treatment plant and/or a wastewater treatment plant.

B. Sample ambient air for specific pollutants.

C. Construct a miniature sanitary landfill and analyze decomposition.

III. Scientific Principles

A. Write a report in scientific format.

B. Ecology

1. Describe a local ecosystem with respect to major life forms and physical characteristics.

2. Construct and use a dichotomous key.

3. Relate the information obtained from a tree core to the actual environment of the tree.

4. Conduct a vegetational analysis in a local forest to determine density and dominance.

5. Analyze a microcosm with respect to physical and biological changes.

6. Conduct an experiment to determine abiotic/biotic influences on an organism.

7. Gather data and graph a species area curve for a local environment.

8. Describe procedures to estimate populations.

IV. Human Ecology

A. List examples of consumer decisions and describe their impact on the environment.

B. Compare and contrast human demographics for different world regions.

V. Computer Activities

A. Run a computer simulation.

B. Construct a line graph using computer software.

C. Conduct an Internet search.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-40%    Lab reports, papers, homework, quizzes, participation
60-85%    Exams

Total = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students will need transportation to field trip sites.
  2. Any student dropping BIOL 130 (Environmental Science Lecture) will also be dropped from BIOL 131 (Environmental Science Laboratory)
  3. Safety Statement: Students enrolling in a laboratory course should be aware that they will be working with a variety of chemicals and scientific materials. Individuals are expected to practice safe techniques with all equipment and materials used in the laboratory. Students are responsible for their own health and safety. 
  4. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EVRN 134

  • Title: Principles of Sustainability
  • Number: EVRN 134
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Principles of Sustainability introduces students to the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability and sustainable development. The course will critically examine the use of sustainable principles to guide decision making and problem solving in personal, campus, community and global contexts. Students will engage in a variety of individual, group, campus and community activities and collaborate with campus and community offices and agencies in order to identify, assess and address local sustainability needs. Students will be required to present their projects at a public sustainability forum.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Examine sustainability from a multidisciplinary perspective and the vocabulary associated with informed discussions of sustainability issues and solutions.
  2. Define systems thinking and apply that approach to issues in sustainability.
  3. Identify, diagram and describe systems in terms of their ecological, social and economic dimensions.
  4. Discuss key figures, tests, events and laws associated with the environmental movement at the local, state, national and international levels.
  5. Identify a local sustainability issue and research and assess the problem, including its inherent political, economic, ecological and social components.
  6. Participate in a local ongoing sustainability initiative or develop new initiatives.
  7. Collaborate with other students and members of the community in order to propose solutions for a more sustainable world. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Definitions and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Sustainability

A. Review definitions of sustainability from multiple disciplines.

B. Examine definitions to find common themes and relevant distinctions.

C. Define social, ecological, and economic systems, and provide examples of each.

D. Define "systems thinking" and use models of simple systems to understand the complexities and requirements necessary for sustainable problem-solving.

II. Sustainability and Environment

A. Define ecological footprint.

B. Describe economic, social and ecological health.

C. Review research methods for assessing the impact of human activity on the environment.

D. Identify and discuss key sustainability issues associated with environmental health, transportation, energy production, food production and distribution, architecture, resource management, recreation, and consumer choices.

E. Describe scenarios in which human activity depletes the ability of a system to remain sustainable.

F. Define Biomimicry and describe scenarios in which biological systems may be used to model sustainable practice.

III. Sustainability and the Economy

A. Examine lifestyles and discuss the ecological, economic and social requirements necessary to support the lifestyles considered.

B. Identify the natural resource requirements needed to maintain a local for-profit business or company.

C. Assess the environmental, economic and social costs associated with the acquisition and use of those resources.

D. Explore methods for incentivizing and reducing the environmental impact of a company while enabling the company to remain viable.

E. Define the "greening" of a company and "green-washing" and the economic impacts of both.

F. Identify a local business which has considerably reduced its eco-footprint.

G. Discuss the environmental ethics issue involved in various consumer behaviors.

IV. Sustainability and Society

A. Identify key people, policies, laws and perspectives relevant to the environmental movement.

B. Discuss the history of Earth Day.

C. Explain the Environmental Protection Agency, its mission and responsibilities.

D. Identify and characterize social classes in the United States.

E. Describe the income distribution in the United States and another culture.

F. List major ethnic groups in the United States.

G. Research and map the geographical distribution of various social classes, economic and ethnic groups in a definite area of the United States, such as a city or county, and compare to another culture.

H. Identify biohazards, landfills, major industries, agricultural enterprises, highways, railroad installations, mining and other activities which involve intense acquisition and use of natural resources within a particular U.S. geographical boundary.

I. Discuss and/or investigate the possible health impacts that resource use has on a specific social, ethnic or economic class.

J. Define environmental justice.

K. Identify and discuss policies and laws that seek to ameliorate environmental injustice.

L. Define food security and food sovereignty in terms of the poorest of U.S. citizens.

M. Identify and describe Native American or sustainable practices used by other indigenous groups that promote and maintain a sustainable environment.

N. Define Biopiracy and the relevant legal and ethical concerns.

O. Distinguish among environmental science, environmental activism and environmental extremism.

V. Sustainability and the Planet

A. Discuss global environmental issues such as climate change, resource scarcity, pollution and biodiversity preservation.

B. Identify competing views associated with the issue of climate change and other global issues.

C. Discuss the United Nations and international efforts to help sustain human populations while protecting environmental systems.

D. Identify and discuss international treaties associated with the protection of the environment.

E. Discuss and locate particularly challenging environmental issues that have a global economic impact.

VI. Sustainability and Problem-Solving

A. Identify an ongoing, nonprofit local effort to increase sustainability, a local or campus-related environmental/sustainability issue that needs assistance or remediation, a business that is implementing sustainability practices, or a current legislative or political campaign that involves sustainability.

B. Identify a specific, focused problem relevant to sustainability within this local effort, issue, company or campaign.

C. Assess the identified problem using research methods.

D. Design a solution to the problem, accounting for the economic, social and environmental impacts involved, after consulting with all interested stakeholders.

E. Collaborate with other students and members of the community to implement sustainable solutions.

F. Present the sustainability project to the class and in a public sustainability forum.

VII. Research and Writing on Sustainability

A. Develop a bibliography of articles and books relevant to the topic of sustainability.

B. Maintain a personal reading and activity journal.

C. Create a portfolio of projects and presentations on various issues related to sustainability.

D. Compose a personal definition of sustainability and list of personal sustainability objectives.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40%    Exams
10-20%    Personal Reflective Journal and Writing Assignments
20-30%    Research Project and Presentation
10-30%    Research Paper or Community Service Project

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to off campus sites. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EVRN 155

No information found.

EVRN 255

  • Title: Freshwater Ecology
  • Number: EVRN 255
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

Freshwater Ecology describes the interaction between freshwater organisms and their environment. Structure and function of streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwater systems will be explored. Students will learn life histories and identification skills for aquatic organisms including plankton, fish, mollusks, insects and plants. The influence of abiotic factors such as temperature, oxygen, and nutrients will be examined. Field and classroom experiments will be used to apply concepts learned. Students will study local water quality issues and aquatic management strategies to improve ecosystem health.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the economic and cultural impacts of freshwater ecosystems on humans.
  2. Compare structural characteristics of streams, lakes, wetlands and groundwater.
  3. Identify aquatic organisms and describe their role within the aquatic community.
  4. Analyze the effects of variation in water chemistry on aquatic habitats.
  5. Measure freshwater ecosystem health through bio-assessment and chemical characteristics of water.
  6. Determine solutions to local water quality problems using sustainable management strategies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Economic and Cultural Impacts of Freshwater

A. Explain primary human uses of water.

1. Explain industrial and agricultural water demand.

2. Define water withdrawal and water consumption.

B. Evaluate differences in water use between developed and developing nations.

1. Compare physical and economic water scarcity geographically.

2. Compare per capita water consumption in developed vs. developing nations.

C. Explain the economic value of biotic and abiotic resources in water.

1. Explain organism harvest for economic gain.

2. Summarize historical views regarding mineral resources and waste disposal in aquatic environments.

D. Describe the use of the aquatic environment for recreation and ecotourism.

1. Give examples of community action that lead to increased ecotourism.

2. Identify challenges for ecotourism in Kansas.

II. Structural Characteristics of Aquatic Systems

A. Model and describe the hydrologic cycle.

1. List the components and processes of the hydrologic cycle.

2. Interpret influences of climate change on the hydrologic cycle.

B. Compare the physical characteristics and hydrology in various aquatic habitats.

1. Rivers and Streams

a. Model watersheds, discharge, thalweg, point bar, riffles and pools.

b. Categorize streams using the Strahler classification system of stream order.

c. Interpret a hydrograph as it relates to periods of wet and dry weather influencing stream discharge.

d. Diagram zones of erosion and deposition in meandering streams.

2. Lakes and Reservoirs

a. Define lake, lentic, fetch, Langmuir circulation cells, and seiche.

b. Diagram the pelagic, profundal, and littoral zones in lakes.

c. List common formation processes for lakes.

d. Determine retention time in a lake using volume and rate of flow in or out.

e. Describe temperature stratification in lakes throughout the course of a year for monomictic, dimictic, and polymictic lakes.

f. Discriminate between layers of stratification including epilimnion, metalimnion (thermocline), and hypolimnion.

3. Wetlands

a. Define wetland, hydrophytes, and riparian.

b. List some major world wetland types and their typical distribution and vegetation.

c. Explain the predator permanence gradient in wetlands.

d. Explain the importance of transpiration to wetland hydrology.

4. Groundwater

a. Define aquifer, water table, permeability and fossil water.

b. Describe how materials are exchanged through the hyporheic zone.

III. Life in Freshwater

A. Assemble a local inventory of the types of aquatic organisms and their adaptations.

1. Phytoplankton and zooplankton

a. Sketch observations of aquatic organisms using basic microscopy techniques.

b. Identify common algae phyla.

c. Describe the effect of algal blooms.

d. Identify zooplankton to taxonomic phylum using a key.

2. Plants

a. Name common growth habits of aquatic plants.

b. Compare habitat needs of nonvascular and vascular aquatic plants.

3. Aquatic insects and mollusks

a. Identify aquatic macroinvertebrates to taxonomic family using a key.

b. Prepare a collection of local aquatic macroinvertebrates.

c. Explain the role of filter feeding mollusks in reducing suspended sediments and pollutants.

4. Fish and other vertebrates

a. Identify common local fish species.

b. Analyze various fish form and color adaptations.

c. Identify examples of sensory adaptations of fish.

d. List vertebrates that inhabit freshwater systems.

e. Explain the importance of amphibians as indicator species.

B. Describe interactions between freshwater organisms.

1. Food webs

a. Describe the role of macrophytes and phytoplankton in nutrient supply to the food chain.

b. Dissect feeding structures in aquatic insects and/or mollusks.

c. Model aquatic food chains using herbivory, detritivory, omnivory, and predation examples.

2. Competition and mutualism

a. Identify the difference between scramble competition and contest competition.

b. Give examples of mutualism-related adaptations in aquatic systems.

IV. Water Chemistry

A. Explain the importance of the interaction between light and water.

1. Connect light penetration to photosynthesis rates.

2. Describe the use of light as a sensory cue.

3. Identify causes of changes in light availability.

B. Describe effects of changing oxygen levels.

1. Define oxic, anoxic, aerobic, and anaerobic.

2. Name factors that influence dissolved oxygen levels.

3. Explain changes in distribution and activity of organisms in anoxic zones.

C. Explain the influence of temperature on water chemistry and aquatic organisms.

1. Relate temperature of water and solubility of gases.

2. Describe changes in respiration and photosynthesis as a result of temperature.

D. Determine the causes and effects of changing nutrient levels.

1. Relate pH and forms of carbon.

2. Relate nitrogen and phosphorus to ecosystem productivity.

3. Assess sources of excess nitrogen and phosphorus.

V. Measuring Ecosystem Health

A. Estimate fish diversity and abundance in a local aquatic habitat.

B. Estimate the population size of an aquatic species using mark-recapture methods.

1. Contrast population estimation techniques between open and closed populations.

2. Calculate population size using a Lincoln-Peterson estimation.

3. Name the assumptions of Lincoln-Peterson estimation.

C. Assess the health of a stream ecosystem using biotic and abiotic indicators.

1. Sample macroinvertebrates using proper techniques.

2. Measure chemical characteristics such as dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrates, phosphates, and turbidity in a local stream.

3. Compare measured characteristics of a local stream to those of known stream ecosystems.

VI. Applied Aquatic Management

A. Explain local water conservation issues.

1. List common point and nonpoint source water pollutants in Kansas.

2. Identify the importance of the Ogallala Aquifer to the irrigation water supply.

3. Compare withdrawal to recharge rates in the Ogallala Aquifer.

4. Summarize impacts of local invasive species.

B. Evaluate techniques to manage threatened and endangered freshwater species.

1. State the purpose of the Endangered Species Act.

2. Relate endangered species listing criteria to specific freshwater species.

3. Summarize methods for captive growth of endangered freshwater organisms.

C. Relate habitat restoration methods to local water concerns.

1. Evaluate methods for managing eutrophication in streams, rivers, and lakes.

2. Describe techniques to control effects of invasive species.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-70%    Exams (minimum of 2)
10-30%    Project (Aquatic Invertebrate Collection)
10-30%    Active Learning Exercises (Participation and Worksheets)

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Off-campus field trips may be required. Students must provide their own transportation.
  2. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises, and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).