Railroad Electronics (RREL)

Courses

RREL 110   Introduction to Railroad Signal Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the first of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe basic company organization, operating and safety rules pertaining to signalmen, basic principles of electricity and measurement as well as protective devices. Also he or she should have a basic understanding of signal systems, track circuits, and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) rules. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab/total.

RREL 112   Track Circuits and Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RREL 110 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the second of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and explain the operation of various track circuits, relay and control circuits, traffic control systems, locks, and applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

RREL 114   Traffic Control, Switch Machines & Locks* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 112 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the third of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to describe and maintain automatic block signaling systems, centralized traffic systems, power switches and locks. He should also be familiar with ground testing and isolation, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

RREL 116   Interlocking, Classification, Crossings & Gates* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 114 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the last of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform interlocking plant and route plant analysis, explain classification yards, grade crossing warning systems, gates, and other devices, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs instructional lab/total.

RREL 180   Introduction to Railroad Electronics* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to state basic safety procedures in electronics, explain basic principles of electronics, perform basic electronic calculations and use basic electronic tools. 2.5 hrs. lecture, 2.5 hrs. lab/wk.

RREL 181   Circuit Analysis DC/AC* (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 180 and the approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of the railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and use fundamental DC circuit concepts such as Kirchhoff's laws, power and energy formulas, Ohm's Law, Thevenin's Theorem and Norton's Theorem as they apply to resistive circuits. Also upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze circuits involving resistors, capacitors and inductors driven by time-variant sources. This analysis will involve both time and frequency responses. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. alternate deliver/wk.

RREL 182   Semiconductor Devices and Circuits* (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 181 and the approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the characteristics of basic semiconductor devices, explain practical circuits using semiconductor devices and analyze these circuits for DC and AC quantities. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab., 3 hrs. alternate delivery/wk.

RREL 183   Digital Techniques* (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 182 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze basic digital circuitry consisting of arrangements of gates and flip-flops using TTL and CMOS integrated circuits, as well as relay logic. This analysis will include the application of elementary Boolean algebra, truth tables and timing diagrams. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab., 3 hrs. alternate delivery/wk.

RREL 284   Electronic Communications* (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 183 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to state the principles of amplitude, frequency, phase and pulse modulation and describe the technologies of transmitters, receivers, antennas, local area networks, wide-area networks and telephone systems. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. activity/wk.

RREL 285   Microprocessor Techniques* (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 183 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and troubleshoot 6800 family microprocessor circuitry as well as microprocessor interface circuitry. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. activity/wk.

RREL 286   Applied Microprocessors* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 285 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to advanced microcomputer concepts and applications. This course is a continuation of topics introduced in the microprocessor course, with specific applications in general-purpose microcomputers (PCs) and dedicated microprocessor-based control systems. Included are hardware and software training in operating systems, peripherals, monitors, processors, storage media, maintenance, diagnostics and troubleshooting. Analog and digital data acquisition and processing, as well as voice digitization and playback, will be demonstrated. Presentations and labs will include incorporation of these functions into a PC, Harmon HLC and the Servo 9000 hot box detector. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

RREL 110

  • Title: Introduction to Railroad Signal Systems*
  • Number: RREL 110
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the first of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe basic company organization, operating and safety rules pertaining to signalmen, basic principles of electricity and measurement as well as protective devices. Also he or she should have a basic understanding of signal systems, track circuits, and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) rules. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the basic functions of BNSF, the geographic areas it serves, its corporate organization, its signal section organization, and how one will fit into the BNSF organization.
  2. List, explain and apply BNSF's personal safety requirements for employees and the public while on the job.
  3. Describe the past, present, and future implications of railroad signaling and how it relates to safe and efficient train operations.
  4. Identify the function, purpose, and safety precautions required to operate all laboratory equipment and systems, safely operate the equipment, and identify BNSF and American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association (AREMA) nomenclature and circuit plan symbols.
  5. Identify and describe the equipment, systems, and technologies that a signalman is required to install, maintain, and repair.
  6. Describe and apply basic electrical laws and terms, including Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Law, calculate circuit parameters, interpret resistor color code, and convert numbers back and forth into scientific notation.
  7. Describe how high voltage alternating current is transmitted, reduced to lower voltages, and rectified to a direct current at a usable value for signal applications. Also, demonstrate understanding of the operation of protective devices for lightning and other voltage transients.
  8. Identify signal battery types, styles, composition, voltages, and charging, maintenance, and disposal requirements.
  9. Describe the design, construction, and operation of a direct current neutral relay.
  10. Construct, adjust, and troubleshoot a conventional direct current track circuit.
  11. List and explain the construction and maintenance rules, standards, inspections, and tests that are required for track circuit systems; explain how these requirements must be met and maintained; and, recognize that permission must be received from Signal Engineering to deviate from these requirements.
  12. Identify that all American railroad signal systems must conform to minimum safety and operating standards as required by the FRA; that these minimum standards are enforced by a system of periodic inspections and tests; and, that BNSF often requires more stringent inspections and tests than does the FRA.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen's Agreement with BNSF regarding
Apprentice and Student Training.        
   A. State individual performance and attendance requirements.
   B. Identify home-study requirements.
   C. State conduct requirements while attending training sessions.
                
II. Company Organization of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Company.
   A. State geographic areas served by BNSF and major commodities
transported.
   B. Describe titles and functions of senior officers.
   C. Describe the organization of the Signal Section at system and
division levels.
   D. Identify the place of one’s immediate supervisor in the BNSF
organization.
   E. List the basic responsibilities of one’s immediate supervisor.
   F. Describe one’s own responsibilities to the organization.
        
III. Operating and Safety Rules
   A. Identify and correctly interpret the specific rules from
“Maintenance of Way Operating Rules” that apply to the Signal
Section.
   B. Identify and correctly interpret the specific rules from
“Maintenance of Way Safety Rules” that apply to the Signal Section.
   C. Locate and correctly interpret general information found in Division
Timetables.
   D. Express the most important rules that are related to the Technical
Training Center.
        
IV. Overview of Train Operation and Signaling
   A. Define the term “train”.
   B. Describe the evolution of and reason for signaling.
   C. Identify the effect signaling has on railroad safety, operational
efficiency, and productivity.
   D. Identify the economic justifications for single vs. double main
lines, multiple tracks, yards, and branch lines.
   E. Identify the significant technological breakthroughs in signal
systems development.
   F. Identify the future directions and requirements of signal and train
control systems.
        
V. Signal Lab Equipment and Circuit Plan Symbols
   A. Identify and safely operate the automatic block signal simulator.
   B. Identify and safely operate the automatic interlocking plant
simulator.
   C. Identify and safely operate the traffic control simulator.
   D. Identify and safely operate both power operated switch machines.
   E. Identify and safely operate the electric switch lock.
   F. Identify and safely operate conventional and electronic track
circuit simulators.
   G. Identify and safely operate the highway crossing warning simulator.
   H. Identify electric train simulators.
   I. Identify the solar array.
   J. Interpret circuit plans, profiles, and detail sheets.
   K. Interpret BNSF and AREMA symbols and nomenclature used to describe
apparatus and functions.
        
VI. Overview of Signal Systems and Equipment
   A. Identify the types, functions, operating locations, nomenclature,
and associated hardware for:
      1. Interlockings.
      2. Manual Block Systems.
      3. Automatic Block Systems.
      4. Traffic Control Systems.
   B. Describe and explain:
      1. Classification Yard Systems.
      2. Highway Crossing Warning Systems.
      3. Detection equipment and adjuncts.
        
VII. Basic Electrical Laws and Terms
   A. Describe the structure of matter.
   B. Compare Electron Theory to Conventional Theory.
   C. Define “voltage”, “current”, and “resistance”.
   D. Identify common electrical symbols.
   E. Apply Ohm’s Law to calculate voltage, current, and resistance.
   F. Restate electrical measurements in different units.
   G. Describe a basic circuit.
   H. Describe a series circuit.
   I. Describe a parallel circuit.
   J. Describe a combination circuit.
   K. Apply Kirchoff’s Law to a series circuit.
   L. Apply Kirchoff’s Law to a parallel circuit.
   M. Calculate circuit parameters.
   N. Calculate power in series and parallel circuits.
   0. Interpret resistor color codes.
   P. Apply scientific notation.
   Q. Explain simple circuit analysis.
   R. Explain DC track circuit analysis.
        
VIII. Energy Distribution
   A. Describe how commercial AC and DC power is generated and
transmitted.
   B. Describe how transformers work.
   C. Describe turns ratio for step-up and step-down transformers.
   D. Describe power transfer within a transformer.
   E. Describe transformer internal losses.
   F. Identify and describe the functions of half-wave, full-wave, and
bridge rectifiers.
   G. Identify and describe the functions of fuses, cutouts, lightning
arresters, and surge suppressors.
   H. Describe how lightning works, grounding techniques to minimize
damage from lightning strikes, and how the grounding of equipment is
applied to signal cases and instrument houses.
        
IX. Batteries and Battery Charging Circuits
   A. Describe battery symbols and nomenclature used in signaling.
   B. Describe the difference between primary and secondary batteries.
   C. Describe the difference between lead acid and nickel cadmium
batteries.
   D. Describe the difference between vented and non-vented batteries.
   E. Interpret voltage readings, charging current, and discharging
current.
   F. Describe temperature compensation and effects.
   G.Describe proper precautions when handling or transporting.
   H. Explain maintenance requirements.
   I. Describe how to connect cells in series, parallel, series-parallel,
and split configurations.
   J. State proper procedures for load testing of secondary batteries.
   K. Define proper record keeping.
   L. Describe types of battery charging systems.
   M. Explain proper testing of battery charging circuits.
        
X. Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter (VOM) Use and Care
   A. Demonstrate the proper handling, precautions and care of a VOM.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the function and proper positioning of all
knobs on the meter.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the function of the needle-stop on the
VOM.
   D. Draw and explain a basic internal circuit for the voltage, current,
and resistance scales.
   E. Describe the function and replacement of the internal batteries and
fuse.
   F. Describe the function of the overload protection device.
   G. Demonstrate selecting the correct meter with the appropriate
sensitivity for specific tasks.
   H. Describe how to properly connect the VOM to measure resistance,
voltage, and current.
   I. Employ the VOM to measure values of resistance, voltage, and
current.
   J. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedures for transporting a
VOM.
   K. Select the appropriate meter for the appropriate task.
        
XI. Direct Current Neutral Relays
   A. Describe the design of a relay.
   B. Identify and explain the function of all parts and components of a
relay.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the electrical operation of a relay.
   D. Describe the electromagnetic operation of a relay.
   E. Interpret the information on the name plate of a relay.
   F. Test the operating characteristics of a relay and interpret pickup,
holding, and drop_away current values.
   G. Demonstrate the operation of a direct and indirect repeater
circuit.
        
XII. Conventional Direct Current Track Circuit
   A. Identify and describe the function of all components in a track
circuit.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a track
circuit.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of a track circuit during normal,
dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the fail-safe principle of a track circuit
during normal conditions, shunts, and opens.
   E. Describe and demonstrate the normal maintenance and test procedures
for a track circuit.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure;
use this procedure to find and repair an open and shunted track circuit.
   G. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a series foul
track circuit.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the operation, inspection, troubleshooting,
and testing of a series foul track circuit.
   I. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a parallel foul
track circuit.
   J. Describe and demonstrate the operation, inspection, troubleshooting,
and testing of a centerfeed track circuit.
   K. Describe the basic advantages and disadvantages of coded track
circuits.
        
XIII. BNSF Rules, Standards, Inspections, and Tests for DC Track Circuits
   A. Describe and explain the construction and maintenance practices
for:
      1. Rail, frog, and fouling bonding.
      2. Insulated joint placement and maintenance.
      3. Insulated joint inspection and testing.
      4. Dead section requirements.
   B. Describe and perform hands on exercises involving:
      1. Track circuit wire installation and ringing.
      2. Track circuit wire connections.
      3. Establishing track circuit shunting sensitivity.
      4. Track circuit inspections and tests.
        
XIV. Federal Railroad Administration Rules, Standards, and Instructions
   A. Identify the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 233.
   B. Identify the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 235.
   C. Discuss the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 236.0
through 236.26.
   D. Describe and demonstrate in detail the requirements contained in R,
S & I Part 236.51 through 236.76.
   E. Describe and identify the defects contained in Classification of
Defect Codes, R, S & I Part 236.51 through 236.76.
   F. Discuss the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 236.101
through 236.110.
   G. Discuss the differences between violations and willful violations.
   H. Identify and describe actions that would be considered for Civil and
Criminal Penalties.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 112

  • Title: Track Circuits and Systems*
  • Number: RREL 112
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RREL 110 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the second of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and explain the operation of various track circuits, relay and control circuits, traffic control systems, locks, and applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Set up, adjust, and troubleshoot one battery -two relay, two battery - two relay, and AC/DC type OS track circuits.
  2. Set up, adjust, and troubleshoot a variety of Audio Frequency Overlay (AFO) type track circuits.
  3. Describe the function and operation of electronic coded track circuits.
  4. Explain the historical development and principles on which modern railroad signal systems are designed
  5. Explain the general principles and design requirements of single direction, current of traffic, ABS signal systems.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of an Overlap type signal system and compare design requirements with other automatic block signal systems.
  7. Determine safe train spacing and detecting based on ABS, A-PB signal system design requirements.
  8. Describe Traffic Direction (TD) type A-PB signal system and compare design requirements with other automatic block signal systems.
  9. Describe the importance, function, and application of vital DC relays.
  10. Describe the basic function and operation of colorlight type wayside signals and the normal maintenance, inspections, and tests required for this type of signal.
  11. Discuss the basic function and operation of searchlight type wayside signals, and the normal maintenance, inspections and tests required for this type of signal.
  12. Describe the basic function and operation of standard line and local relay logic circuits.
  13. Discuss the function and operation of a switch circuit controller, and perform all inspections and tests required for this device and for all circuits controlled through this device.
  14. Demonstrate familiarity with the FRA’s requirements for Automatic Block Signal Systems.
  15. Demonstrate understanding of the principles of design and equipment required of a modern Traffic Control System.
  16. Demonstrate and apply the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure (UTP) for track, local and line circuits troubleshooting.
  17. Describe the functions, types, components and operation of the GRS 5A through 5H power operated switch machines.
  18. Describe the functions, types, components and operation of US&S power operated switch machines.
  19. Describe the functions, types, components and perform the operating requirements of electric switch locks
  20. Describe the function, operation and safety requirements of a Spring Switch Mechanism (SSM), and perform the maintenance, inspections and tests required for this device.
  21. Describe the basic requirements and demonstrate the fundamental operation of Traffic Control Systems controlled, intermediate and distant signals.
  22. Describe and apply the Federal Railroad Administration’s requirements to typical Traffic Control System equipment.
  23. Identify, describe and perform BNSF’s requirements for each standard Inspection and Test Procedure pertaining to Traffic Control System equipment.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. OS Track Circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components in typical OS track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of typical OS
track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical OS track circuits
during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical OS track circuits.
   E. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for a one battery - two relay
OS track circuit.
   F. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for a two battery - two relay
OS track circuit.
   G. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for an AC/DC type OS track
circuit.
        
II. Audio Frequency Overlay Track Circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components in typical AFO track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of typical AFO
track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical AFO track circuits
during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical AFO track circuits.
   E. Describe the normal inspection and maintenance procedures for AFO
track circuits.
   F. Describe and demonstrate BNSF/Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)
requirements for shunting AFO track circuits.
        
III. Electronic coded track circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components of electronic coded track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of electronic
coded track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical electronic coded track
circuits during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical electronic coded track
circuits.
   E. Describe the normal inspection and maintenance procedures for
electronic coded track circuits.
   F. Describe and demonstrate BNSF/FRA requirements for shunting
electronic coded track circuits.
        
IV. Automatic Block Signal Systems (ABS)
   A. State the history of train operations.
   B. Discuss the evolution of manual block signaling.
   C. Describe train operation through the issuing of train orders.
   D. Describe train operation through the issuing of track warrants.
   E. Discuss the evolution and developmental concepts of ABS systems.
        
V. ABS Signal Systems
   A. Define “station”, “block”, and “automatic”.
   B. Interpret single direction signal location requirements.
   C. Sketch basic track and line circuits required for ABS operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the directional circuitry involved for
following movements.
   E. Describe and demonstrate braking distances for following movements.
   F. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   G. Describe train operation “against the current of traffic”.
   H. Describe the action to be taken for fundamental signal rules,
aspects, names, and indications.
   I. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for ABS.
        
VI. Overlap Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define the term “overlap” as used in Overlap signal systems.
   B. Determine signal location requirements with regard to staggered and
paralleled (flat pair) signals.
   C. Draw basic track and line circuits required for Overlap operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the directional circuitry involved for
following movements.
   E. Describe and demonstrate braking distances for following movements.
   F. Describe the overlap requirements for opposing movements.
   G. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   H. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for signal number plates for Overlap
signal systems
   I. Explain three applications for braking distance requirements as
stated in FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to Overlap signal systems.
        
VII. Absolute-Permissive Block (A-PB) Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define “absolute” and “block” as it refers to A-PB.
   B. Define “permissive” and “block” as it refers to A-PB.
   C. Determine signal location requirements.
   D. Sketch basic track and line circuits required for A-PB operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   E. Describe and demonstrate normal train operation with opposing and
following movements.
   F. Explain and demonstrate the directional and overlap circuitry
involved for following movements.
   G. Describe braking distances involved for following movements.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the overlap circuitry involved for opposing
movements.
   I. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   J. Demonstrate the one requirement of FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to
A-PB signal systems.
   K. Describe the fundamental differences between Overlap and A-PB signal
systems.
        
VIII. Traffic Direction Block Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define “absolute” and “block” as it refers to TD.
   B. Define “permissive” and “block” as it refers to TD.
   C. Determine signal location requirements.
   D. Draw basic track and line circuits required for TD operation,
determine battery and relay placement and determine necessary line
breaks.
   E. Describe and demonstrate normal train operation with opposing and
following movements.
   F. Explain and demonstrate the directional and overlap circuitry
involved for following movements.
   G. Describe braking distances involved for following movements.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the overlap circuitry involved for opposing
movements.
   I. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   J. Demonstrate the one requirement of FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to
Traffic Direction A-PB signal systems.
   K. Describe the fundamental differences between Overlap and Traffic
Direction signal systems.
        
IX. Nomenclature, Function, and Application of Relays
   A. Describe the basic parts of a DC neutral relay and their functions.
   B. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay.
   C. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as a direct repeater.
   D. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as an indirect
repeater.
   E. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as a sensing device.
   F. Describe the application of a DC neutral relay as a low voltage
device controlling one or more high voltage devices.
   G. Describe applications of DC neutral relays used in local circuits.
   H. Describe applications of DC neutral relays used in line circuits.
   I. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of
biased relays.
   J. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of
polar relays.
   K. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of slow
release relays.
        
X. Colorlight Type Signals
   A. Describe and demonstrate the:
      1. Function and application of signal.
      2. Placement of lenses.
      3. Operation of the control circuit.
      4. Reduction of phantom aspects.
      5. Proper signal alignment principles.
   B. Describe and explain
      1. Proper operation of the lighting and light-out circuits.
      2. Appropriate colorchecks.
      3. Appropriate inspections and maintenance requirements.
      4. Proper method for disabling the signal.
      5. Signal adjuncts such as plates, indicators, stub posts, lights
and markers.
        
XI. Searchlight Type Signals
   A. Describe and demonstrate the:
      1. Function and application of signal.
      2. Function and placement of lenses.
      3. Function and placement of roundels.
   B. Describe the operation of:        
      1. The control circuit.
      2. The signal mechanism.
      3. Repeater circuits.
      4. Lighting and light-out circuits.
   C. Outline:
      1. Appropriate maintenance requirements.
      2. Appropriate inspection and tests required.
      3. Proper method for disabling the signal.
        
XII. Line and Local Control Circuits
   A. Construct and explain the operation of a two wire line control
circuit.
   B. Construct and explain the operation of a three wire line control
circuit.
   C. Construct  and explain the operation of a four wire line control
circuit.
   D. Describe the function and FRA rule related to each line break in a
two, three and four wire line control circuit.
   E. Construct and explain the function and operation of a signal
location battery distribution network.
   F. Construct and demonstrate the operation of approach lighting.
   G. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a light out circuit.
   H. Construct and demonstrate the operation of directional stick,
traffic stick and polechanger circuit logic.
   I. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a three aspect lighting
circuit.
   J. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a four aspect lighting
circuit.
        
XIII. Universal Troubleshooting Procedure
   A. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing track circuit troubles.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing local circuit problems.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing line circuit problems.
        
XIV. Switch Circuit Controller (SWCC)
   A. Describe the function of a SWCC.
   B. Identify SWCC components and demonstrate the operation.
   C. Identify all SWCC nomenclature and symbols.
   D. Describe the installation requirements of a SWCC.
   E. Wire and demonstrate the proper operation of all circuits controlled
by a SWCC and demonstrate the appropriate adjustment procedure for each
circuit.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the proper operation of the centering
device on a SWCC.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the maintenance requirements for a SWCC.
   H. Describe and perform the inspections and tests for a SWCC.
   I. Describe and perform the inspections and tests for a shunt foul
circuit controlled by a SWCC.
        
XV. FRA Rules, Standards and Instructions For Automatic Block Signal
Systems
   A. Describe FRA Standards 236.201 through 236.207 and apply these
standards directly to BNSFs A-PB system to ensure that it
conforms.
   B. Describe the FRA Classification of Defects for 236.201 through
236.207 and apply these defect codes to the appropriate area of
BNSFs A-PB system.
   C. Identify which FRA requirements (236.0 through 236.110) apply to
BNSF’s A-PB system.
        
XVI. Introduction To Traffic Control Systems (Centralized Traffic Control,
CTC)
   A. Describe the principles of Traffic Control Systems (TCS) and the
advantages over ABS.
   B. Identify and operate the equipment required for an operational TCS.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the function of ABS intermediate signals.
   D. Describe the functions and state the reasons for installing electric
switch locks.
   E. Demonstrate the basic operation of a control point including its
controlled signals and power operated switch machines.
   F. Identify the basic equipment required at a centralized
dispatcher’s office required to communicate with field operable units.
   G. Describe the basic communications medium between dispatcher’s
office and field locations.
   H. Identify the equipment required at a field location necessary to
complete the communications network.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the safety and integrity features of a TCS
including office requests, field interlocking and fail-safe requirements.
                                                
XVII. General Railway Signal (GRS) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify the three functions of any main line power operated switch
machine (POSM).
   B. Identify the four types of single control POSM’s.
   C. Identify the four types of dual control POSM’s.
   D. Identify the primary components of a POSM layout.
   E. Demonstrate and explain the hand operation of a POSM.
   F. Demonstrate and explain the power operation of a POSM.
   G. Identify and demonstrate the mechanical locking requirements of a
POSM.
   H. Demonstrate the general operation of the switch circuit controller
including the motor, braking, overload and indication circuits.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the special features of a POSM.
   J. Perform the POSM adjustment procedures.
   K. Discuss the lubrication and maintenance requirements of a POSM.
   L. Describe and demonstrate the periodic inspections and tests required
of a POSM.
        
XVIII. Union Switch and Signal (US&S) Power Operated Switch Machines
(POSM)
   A. Identify the three functions of any main line power operated switch
machine (POSM).
   B. Identify the single control POSM’s.
   C. Identify the dual control POSM’s.
   D. Identify the primary components of a POSM layout.
   E. Demonstrate and explain the hand operation of a POSM.
   F. Demonstrate and explain the power operation of a POSM.
   G. Identify and demonstrate the mechanical locking requirements of a
POSM.
   H. Demonstrate the general operation of the switch circuit controller
including the motor, overload and indication circuits.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the special features of a POSM.
   J. Perform the POSM adjustment procedures.
   K. Discuss the lubrication and maintenance requirements of a POSM.
   L. Describe and demonstrate the periodic inspections and tests required
of a POSM.
        
XIX. Electric Switch Lock (EWL)
   A. Describe the basic functions of an EWL.
   B. Demonstrate the types of EWL’s and describe their uses.
   C. Identify the components of an EWL.
   D. Demonstrate the working requirements of an EWL.
   E. Define and demonstrate the force-down feature of an EWL.
   F. Define and demonstrate the emergency release of an EWL.
   G. Define and demonstrate the door switch of an EWL.
   H. Wire and demonstrate the unlock circuits of an EWL.
   I. Demonstrate the maintenance requirements of an EWL.
   J. Perform the inspections and tests required of an EWL.
        
XX. Spring Switch Mechanism
   A. State the definition of a SSM.
   B. Identify the symbol and nomenclature associated with a SSM.
   C. Describe the basic function of a SSM.
   D. Identify the components and state the basic operation of a SSM.
   E. State the safety considerations associated with a SSM.
   F. Wire and troubleshoot a SSM switch point indicator circuit.
   G. Trace and explain SSM signal control circuits.
   H. Describe the installation and maintenance requirements for a SSM.
   I. Describe the required inspections and tests for a SSM.
        
XXI. Traffic Control Systems Signal Operation
   A. Describe and demonstrate the basic operation of controlled and
intermediate signals.
   B. Describe the basic requirements of a distant signals.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the operation of directional stick circuits
and follow-up train movements.
        
XXII. FRA Rules, Standards And Instructions For Equipment In Traffic
Control Systems
   A. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to power operated switch machines.
   B. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to electric switch locks.
   C. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to spring switches.
   D. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to searchlight signals.
   E. Discuss and apply FRA defect codes for electric switch locks, power
operated switch machines, spring switches and searchlight signals.
        
XXIII. BNSF Inspection and Test Procedures
   A. Use BNSF’s standard Test Procedure to perform the following
inspections and tests:
      1. Electric switch lock inspection.
      2. Power operated switch machine obstruction test.
      3. Power operated switch machine point detector integrity test.
   B. Perform the following inspections and tests per BNSF’s standard
Test Procedure:
      1. Searchlight signal inspection.
      2. Searchlight signal operating test.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
        Total                  100%

Grade Criteria:           A = 90 – 100%        
                          B = 80 –  89%               
                          C = 70 –  79%               
                          D = 60 -  69%         
                          F =  0 –  59%      

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 114

  • Title: Traffic Control, Switch Machines & Locks*
  • Number: RREL 114
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 112 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the third of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to describe and maintain automatic block signaling systems, centralized traffic systems, power switches and locks. He should also be familiar with ground testing and isolation, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and demonstrate the principles of Automatic Block Signaling (ABS) design and operation.
  2. Describe the principles of Centralized Traffic Control (CTC) design and operation.
  3. Describe the correct placement, individual requirements and specific uses of all wayside signals currently in operation in CTC territory.
  4. Describe all aspects of General Railway Signal (GRS) power operated switch machines, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  5. Describe all aspects of Union Switch and Signal (US&S) power operated switch machines, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  6. Describe all aspects of electric switch locks, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  7. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the organization and operation of CTC system circuits
  8. Describe the function and importance of maintaining signal circuits ground free and perform BNSF/FRA ground tests to isolate and clear both positive and negative grounds.
  9. Describe and perform CTC inspections and tests as required by BNSF Railways and the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).
  10. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the requirements for a signal colorcheck and cutover. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Track Circuits and Automatic Block Signaling (ABS)
   A. Discuss and demonstrate the basic differences between single
direction ABS, Overlap, A-PB and Traffic Direction systems.
   B. Identify basic track and line circuits required for ABS operation,
determine battery and relay placement and determine necessary line
breaks.
   C. Interpret basic local lighting, directional and traffic stick
circuits required for ABS operation.    
   D. Wire and adjust switch circuit controllers for typical circuits used
in ABS systems
   E. Discuss the requirements for spring switches.
   F. Demonstrate an application of each BNSF / FRA Rule, Standard and
Instruction pertaining to ABS.
   G. Perform all required BNSF/FRA Inspection and Test procedures
pertaining to ABS.

II. Review of Centralized Traffic Control (CTC) Principles
   A. Describe the underlying concept of CTC.
   B. State the advantages of CTC over ABS.
   C. Describe the fail-safe requirements of CTC.
   D. Describe all major components within a CTC System and determine
whether or not each is required to be fail-safe.
        
III. Centralized Traffic Control Analysis-Signals
   A. Determine the necessity, correct placement and braking distance
requirements for intermediate, holding, controlled and distant signals.
   B. Discuss the utilization of bridge, dwarf and back-to-back signals.
   C. Determine the correct placement of insulated joints with regard to
signals.
   D. Describe the use and requirements of holding signals.
   E. Identify and describe all combinations of signal rules, aspects,
names and indications.
   F. Identify and describe all signal attachments such as number plates,
letter plates, marker plates and marker lights.
   G. Interpret circuitry for intermediate, holding and controlled
signals.
   H. Discuss the appropriate Maintenance of Way Operating Rules that
pertain to CTC operation.
        
IV. General Railway Signal (GRS) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify and explain the operating characteristics of GRS 5A through
5H power operated switch machines (POSM).
   B. Identify and explain the function of all components in the motor,
gear and electrical compartments.
   C. Explain and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   D. Explain and demonstrate proper power operation.
   E. Describe the mechanical locking requirements of the throw rod, throw
bar, locking bar dog and lock rods.
   F. Explain and demonstrate a thorough and complete mechanical
inspection including the “Screwdriver Test”.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the POSM “Obstruction Test”.
   H. Describe the theory of operation, voltage and current requirements,
and electrical circuit of the motor while in the power mode.
   I. Describe the theory of operation, components, and electrical circuit
of the motor while in the generator (dynamic braking mode).
   J. Describe and demonstrate the entire operation of the circuit
controller.
   K. Describe and demonstrate the proper motor and shunt contact
adjustment procedure.
   L. Describe, demonstrate and adjust the overload circuit.
   M. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the point detector rods,
clips and rocker assembly.
   N. Describe and demonstrate the proper point detector contacts
adjustment.
   0. Describe and demonstrate a thorough electrical inspection.
   P. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Point Detector Integrity Test
(TP-103).
   Q. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedure for disabling the POSM
including disabling the appropriate signal control circuits and providing
proper notification.
   R. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Power Operated Switch Indication
Locking Test (TP-380).
        
V. Union Switch and Signal (US&S) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify and explain the operating characteristics of US&S M23-A and
M23-B power operated switch machines (POSM).
   B. Identify and explain the function of all components in the motor,
gear and electrical compartments.
   C. Explain and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   D. Explain and demonstrate proper power operation.
   E. Describe the mechanical locking requirements of the throw rod, slide
bar, rack, dogs and lock rods.
   F. Explain and demonstrate a thorough and complete mechanical
inspection.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the POSM “Obstruction Test”.
   H. Describe the theory of operation, voltage and current requirements,
and electrical circuit of the motor while in the power mode.
   I. Describe the theory of operation, components and electrical circuit
of the motor while in the generator (dynamic braking mode).
   J. Describe and demonstrate the entire operation of the circuit
controller.
   K. Describe and demonstrate the proper motor and shunt contact
adjustment procedure.
   L. Describe, demonstrate and adjust the overload circuit.
   M. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the point detector rods.
   N. Describe and demonstrate the proper point detector contacts
adjustment.
   0. Describe and demonstrate a thorough electrical inspection.
   P. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s “Point Detector Integrity
Test”.
   Q. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedure for disabling the POSM
including disabling the appropriate signal control circuits and providing
proper notification.
   R. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Power Operated Switch Indication
Locking Test (TP-380).
        
VI. Electric Switch Lock (EWL)
   A. Describe the function, styles and uses of various EWL’s.
   B. Describe and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   C. Identify and describe the mechanical locking components and
requirements.
   D. Describe and demonstrate operation of the emergency release.
   E. Describe and demonstrate the electrical locking components,
requirements and operation.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the release track.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the force down feature.
   H. Describe the maintenance and inspection requirements for an EWL
location.
   I. Discuss the requirements of BNSF/FRA Electric Lock Test Procedure
(TP-105).
   J. Identify and discuss the FRA Requirements and test procedures of a
Release Section (TP-16).
        
VII. CTC Circuit Analysis
   A. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to clear
controlled, intermediate and distant signals.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to make power
operated switch machines operate and indicate normal and reverse.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to operate electric
switch locks.
   D. Troubleshoot typical CTC circuitry and clear faults in signal and
switch control, lighting and locking circuits.
        
VIII. Signal Circuit Ground Testing and Isolation (TP-107)
   A. Describe and demonstrate the requirements for proper battery
maintenance.
   B. Inject and explain the consequence of a ground on signal line
circuits.
   C. Inject and explain the consequence of a ground on a local signal
circuits.
   D. Perform the standard ground test, “snap” test and auxiliary
battery test (TP-107).
   E. Isolate and clear a positive ground on a line and local circuit.
   F. Isolate and clear a negative ground on a line and local circuit.
   G. Isolate and clear a combination positive and negative ground.
   H. Properly complete appropriate paperwork.
                
IX. BNSF and FRA Inspections, Tests and Forms
   A. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
switch circuit controller inspection and test (TP-103).
   B. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
shunt fouling circuit test (TP-104).
   C. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
power operated switch obstruction test (TP-382).
   D. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for power
operated switch point detector integrity test (TP-103).
   E. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
searchlight signal rollover inspection (TP-102).
   F. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
searchlight signal operating characteristics test (TP-102).
   G. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
ground test (TP-107).
   H. Describe the route locking test for section, route and sectional
release (TP-379).
   I. Describe the time locking test for control point and electric switch
lock (TP-378).
   J. Describe the approach locking test for control point and electric
switch lock (TP-377).
   K. Describe the indication locking test for switches and signals
(TP-380).
   L. Describe the BNSF traffic locking test (TP-381).
        
X. Colorcheck and Cutover
   A. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck after construction or after the disarranging of vital circuits
or components.
   B. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck for adjacent control points at the ends of a passing siding.
   C. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck for adjacent control points between passing sidings.
   D. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of an electric switch lock with approach locking.
   E. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of adjacent control points at ends of a passing siding.
   F. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of adjacent control points between passing sidings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet for a minimum of 7 ½ , eight hour days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 116

  • Title: Interlocking, Classification, Crossings & Gates*
  • Number: RREL 116
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 114 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the last of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform interlocking plant and route plant analysis, explain classification yards, grade crossing warning systems, gates, and other devices, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs instructional lab/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the function, need, use, basic equipment required and rules in effect at a manual interlocking plant.
  2. Describe the manual interlocking process.
  3. Outline the principles of route signaling systems.
  4. Describe the Automatic Interlocking Plant process.
  5. Describe the function and requirements of vital automatic interlocking plant circuits.
  6. Describe and perform all BNSF Railways (BNSF) and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) required Inspections and Tests pertaining to interlockings, and correctly complete all required paperwork.
  7. Demonstrate a general understanding of the location, function, equipment and operation of Classification Yards.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of the general terms, nomenclature, function, operating and safety requirements associated with Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems (HRGCWS).
  9. Explain the basic design, safety and operating requirements of conventional track circuited, directional HRGCWS.
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for standard HRGCWS lighting circuits and for lamp, reflector, and lens placement and alignment.
  11. Explain the requirements for HRGCWS gate control, operation, and maintenance.
  12. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory, operation, and maintenance of motion reactive equipment.
  13. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory, operation and maintenance of constant warning time devices.
  14. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory and operation of HRGCWS adjuncts.
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of the appropriate installation, inspection and test requirements.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.Manual Interlocking Plant Function (MIP)
   A. State the definition of a manual interlocking plant (MIP) and
compare it to a Centralized Traffic Control System.
   B. Explain the function of and need for MIP’s.
   C. State the locations where MIP’s are installed and discuss the
operating and safety benefits derived.
   D. State the basic equipment required at a MIP and describe how each
contributes to the operation of the plant.
   E. Draw a railway/railway MIP and describe its layout and normal
operation.
   F. State the relevant operating rules for a railway/railway MIP.
   G. Describe FRA Standards 236.301 through 236.3 14 and apply these
standards to a railway/railway MIP.
   H. Describe FRA Rules and Instructions 236.326 through 236.342 and
apply these rules and instructions to a railway/railway MIP.
   I. Describe FRA Inspections and Tests 236.3 76 through 23 6.386 and
apply these inspections and tests to a railway/railway MIP.

II. Manual Interlocking Process
   A. Explain the operational priority of trains that is considered when
designing a MIP.
   B. Describe the requirements of the “Request” portion of the
interlocking process.
   C. Describe the requirements of the “Establish” portion of the
interlocking process.
   D. Describe the requirements of the “Lock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   E. Describe the requirements of the “Clear signal” portion of the
interlocking process.
   F. Describe the requirements of the “Train movement and recording”
portion of the interlocking process.
   G. Describe the requirements of the “Unlock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   H. Analyze the possibility of a failure within each section of the
interlocking process and determine the consequences.

III. Entrance/Exit (NX or Route) Plants
   A. Describe the basic operation of a route plant.
   B. Describe the general routing scheme of a route plant.
   C. Discuss the general inspection and test requirements.

IV. Automatic Interlocking Plant Process (AlP)
   A. Explain the operational priority of trains that is considered when
designing an AlP
   B. Describe the requirements of the “Request” portion of the
interlocking process.
   C. Describe the requirements of the “Establish” portion of the
interlocking process.
   D. Describe the requirements of the “Lock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   E. Describe the requirements of the “Clear signal” portion of the
interlocking process.
   F. Describe the requirements of the “Train movement and recording”
portion of the interlocking process.
   G. Describe the requirements of the “Unlock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   H. Analyze the possibility of a failure within each section of the
interlocking process and determine the consequence.

V. Automatic Interlocking Plant (AlP) Circuits
   A. Examine AlP circuit prints and determine whether circuits are vital
or non-vital.
   B. Describe AlP control circuits and trace the circuit.
   C. Describe AlP operating circuits and trace the circuit.
   D. Describe AlP locking circuits and trace the circuit.
   E. Describe AlP indicating circuits and trace the circuit.
   F. Describe AlP unlocking circuits and trace the circuit.
   G. Examine individual AlP circuits and describe how each circuit
satisfies FRA requirements.
   H. Trace the event recorder circuit and determine what events will be
recorded.

VI. BNSF and FRA Inspections, Tests and Forms
   A. Perform the switch circuit controller inspection and test (TP-103).
   B. Perform the searchlight signal rollover inspection (TP-102).
   C. Perform searchlight signal operating characteristics test (TP-102).
   D. Perform a route locking test (TP-379).
   E. Interpret indication locking test signals (TP-380).
   F. Perform approach locking test (TP-377).
   G. Perform a time locking test (TP-378).
   H. Perform a traffic locking test (TP-381).
   I. Perform a grounds test (TP-107).
   J. Perform an insulation resistance test (TP-108).
   K. Test and inspect time releases, relays and devices (TP-109).
   L. Complete required forms for above test and inspection procedures.

VII. Classification Yards
   A. Describe the general function and need of Classification Yards.
   B. State the requirements of a Master Processor and PC computers.
   C. Identify the positions required to operate a Classification Yard.
   D. Define common Classification Yard terms.
   E. Describe the general layout of a typical Classification Yard.
   F. Identify significant Classification Yard equipment and areas.
   G. Describe the duties and responsibilities of Classification Yard
signal employees.

VIII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems (HRGCWS) - General
Requirements
   A. Use the correct terms when referring to HRGCWS.
   B. Use standard HRGCWS nomenclature.
   C. Describe the basic function of all HRGCWS.
   D. Explain the four basic design requirements for all HRGCWS.
   E. Explain the general safety requirements for HRGCWS.
   F. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for HRGCWS.

IX. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Conventional Crossing
   A. Discuss the requirements for insulated joint, track battery and
relay placement at a HRGCWS.
   B. Discuss and demonstrate BNSF’s requirement for “positive island
section ring”.
   C. Discuss and trace the circuit requirements for directional stick and
ESR-WSR pickup, holding and light engine holding circuits.
   D. Discuss and demonstrate the possible causes for “receding ring,
tailring, ringout, or ringthrough”.
   E. Discuss and demonstrate the possible causes of and remedies for
“in-the-hook” situations.
   F. Wire and demonstrate the operation of relay and electronic flashers
in lighting circuits.
   G. Discuss and trace the circuit requirements for proper operation of
the bell circuit.
   H. Discuss the requirements and operational considerations for
interconnecting with road crossing systems.

X. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Lamps, Reflectors and
Lens
   A. Wire, discuss and troubleshoot a HRGCWS lighting circuit.
   B. Discuss the cable and wire requirements for HRGCWS.
   C. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS lamps.
   D. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS reflectors.
   E. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS lens.
   F. Discuss BNSF HRGCWS lighting unit alignment procedure and
requirements.

XI. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Gates
   A. Wire HRGCWS gate control circuits.
   B. Test the gate control circuit for proper gate delay.
   C. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper motor down
operation.
   D. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper dynamic
braking operation.
   E. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper dampening
operation.
   F. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper lighting
circuit operation.
   G. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper bell
operation.
   H. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper motor up
operation.
   I. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper pickup and
holding circuit operation.
   J. Adjust and test the gate for proper horizontal and vertical torque
and buffer operation.

XII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Motion Reactive
   A. Identify system components.
   B. Setup unit using manufacturer’s installation manual to BNSF design
requirements.
   C. Test for proper operation using manufacturer’s specifications and
BNSF test procedures.
   D. Verify system complies with BNSF/FRA Rules, Standards and
Instructions by simulation of train movements.

XIII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Constant Warning Time
Devices
   A. Identify system components.
   B. Setup unit using manufacturer’s installation manual to BNSF design
requirements.
   C. Test for proper operation using manufacturer’s specifications and
BNSF test procedures.
   D. Verify system complies with BNSF/FRA Rules, Standards and
Instructions by simulation of train movements.

XIV. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Adjuncts, Test
Equipment, Analyzers and Monitors
   A. Discuss the general requirements for UAX and AXC operation.
   B. Discuss the general requirements for DAX operation.
   C. Discuss the general requirements for Wrap circuit operation.
   D. Operate a Joint Coupler Tester to test HRGCWS shunts and couplers.
   E. Operate analog, digital and Frequency Selective voltmeters to setup,
test and troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   F. Operate an Insulated Joint Tester to troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   G. Operate a Shunt Locator to troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   H. Analyze data and verify system parameters using a laptop computer.

XV. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Installation,
Inspection, Testing and Accident and Incident Reporting.
   A. Interpret BNSF Installation Instructions 7.3, 7.4, 7.5.
   B. Interpret BNSF Test Procedure 234.
   C. Apply BNSF Test and Inspection, Instruction 7.1.
   D. Complete BNSF Post Accident Test-Signal Form 406.
   E. Interpret BNSF Out of Service Signal Instructions 7.2 and 7.2A.
   F. Complete Inspection Record-Signal Form 405.
   G. Complete Test Record Summary-Signal Form 406.

XVI. Additional Signal Training Opportunities
   A. Discuss available safety training programs.
   B. Discuss available continuing training programs.
   C. Discuss available specific equipment training.
   D. Discuss available advanced electronics training.
   E. Discuss available computer based training.
   F. Discuss available Tuition Refund training benefits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 180

  • Title: Introduction to Railroad Electronics*
  • Number: RREL 180
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 2.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to state basic safety procedures in electronics, explain basic principles of electronics, perform basic electronic calculations and use basic electronic tools. 2.5 hrs. lecture, 2.5 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. State the basic safety procedures to protect one's self and equipment.
  2. Organize study time for maximum benefit.
  3. Define current, voltage, resistance, power and energy.
  4. Identify and apply metric prefixes.
  5. Use a multimeter to measure DC and AC voltage and current.
  6. Use a multimeter to measure resistance.
  7. Use basic electronic hand tools.
  8. Build a simple circuit using the Analog Trainer.
  9. Perform fundamental soldering.
  10. Perform basic electrical calculations using a calculator. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electronic Safety Concepts
   A. Identify electrical shock.
   B. Identify burns.
   C. Identify fire.
   D. Identify energy storage and grounding.

II. Study skills
   A. Demonstrate the importance of proper study.
   B. Demonstrate using textbooks.
   C. Demonstrate performing ALL work.
   D. Demonstrate test taking.

III. Electronic calculations
   A. Demonstrate using a scientific calculator.
   B. Demonstrate signed numbers.
   C. Demonstrate rounding and significant figures.
   D. Demonstrate formula  manipulation.
   E. Demonstrate equation solving.
   F. Demonstrate exponents.
      1. Finding values of trig functions using a calculator.
   H. Demonstrate complex numbers.

IV. Basic Electronic Principles
   A. Describe composition of mater.
   B. Describe conductors and insulators.
   C. Describe basic electrical circuits.
   D. Describe units and the metric system.

V. Basic Electronic Tools
   A. Operate soldering equipment.
   B. Operate hand tools.
   C. Operate multi-meters.
   D. Operate oscilloscopes.

VI. Soldering Skills
   A. Demonstrate identifying what it is and what it is not.
   B. Demonstrate selecting soldering irons and tips.
   C. Demonstrate identifying allow and flux.
   D. Demonstrate distinguishing types of mechanical connections.
   E. Demonstrate appraising quality of soldered joints.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

In-class exercises and quizzes   Not more than 90% of grade
Lab work                         Not more than 30% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet one full week for approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 181

  • Title: Circuit Analysis DC/AC*
  • Number: RREL 181
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 180 and the approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of the railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and use fundamental DC circuit concepts such as Kirchhoff's laws, power and energy formulas, Ohm's Law, Thevenin's Theorem and Norton's Theorem as they apply to resistive circuits. Also upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze circuits involving resistors, capacitors and inductors driven by time-variant sources. This analysis will involve both time and frequency responses. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. alternate deliver/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Solve basic electronic problems involving current, voltage, resistance, and power.
  2. Explain the relationship between current, voltage, resistance, and power.
  3. Discuss the relationship between electricity and magnetism.
  4. Using a schematic diagram as a guide, construct dc circuits with components such as resistors, relays, switches, lamps, batteries, and capacitors.
  5. Given a wiring diagram of a circuit containing components such as resistors, relays, switches, lamps, batteries, and capacitors, draw an equivalent schematic diagram
  6. Use a multi-meter to measure current, voltage and resistance.
  7. Describe the construction, operation, and purpose of resistors, potentiometers, switches, fuses, relays, capacitors, inductors, and batteries.
  8. State the difference between alternating and direct current.
  9. List the advantages that alternating current has over direct current.
  10. Describe the operation of a basic ac generator.
  11. Determine the effective value, peak value, peak-to-peak value, frequency, and period of an ac signal.
  12. Explain how ac meters are used to measure current, voltage, and power.
  13. Analyze series and parallel ac circuits that contain only resistance, and solve these circuits for voltage, current, and power.
  14. Define capacitance, explain the electrical property known as capacitance, and state how the components called capacitors are formed.
  15. Define inductance, explain the electrical property called inductance, and explain how inductors are formed.
  16. Analyze inductive circuits and determine the resistance, inductive reactance, current, voltage, true power, reactive power, phase angle, and power factor of the circuit.
  17. Analyze capacitive circuits and determine the resistance, capacitive reactance, current, voltage, true power, reactive power, phase angle, and power factor of the circuit.
  18. Analyze RLC circuits and determine resistance, inductive reactance, capacitive reactance, true power, reactive power, current, voltage, phase angle, power factor, power factor correction, and resonant frequency.
  19. List the characteristics of both series and a parallel resonant circuits.
  20. Explain basic transformer action.
  21. Determine the current, voltage, impedance, and power ratios for a transformer.
  22. Determine the turn ratio necessary for an impedance match.
  23. List the electrical properties of a transformer and name five general uses of the transformer. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Composition of Matter
   A. Describe elements and compounds
   B. Describe atoms, electrons, protons, and neutrons
   C. Explain the Bohr Model of Atom
   D. Describe the difference between elements

II. Identify Each Of the Following Electrostatic Principles:
   A. Electrical Charge
   B. Law of Electrical Charges
   C. The Ion
   D. Action of Electrostatic Charges

III. Identify Current Flow Concepts In:
   A. Freeing electrons
   B. Conductors and insulators
   C. The battery
   D. Random drift and directed drift

IV. Explain the Concept Of The Electric Circuit

V. Identify the Following Concepts In Measuring Current:
   A. The coulomb
   B. The ampere
   C. The ammeter

VI. Identify the following concepts in Electrical Force
   A. Electromotive Force (EMF)
   B. Potential difference
   C. Voltage

VII. List Methods of Producing EMF
   A. Magnetism
   B. Chemical
   C. Friction
   D. Light
   E. Pressure
   F. Heat
   G. Effects of EMF

VIII. Explain Batteries
   A. Dry cell
   B. Lead acid battery

IX. Analyze Connecting Batteries in:
   A Series aiding connection
   B Series opposing connection
   C. Parallel connection
   D. Series-Parallel connection

X. Voltage Concepts
   A. Describe voltage rises and voltage drops
      1. Voltage rise
      2. Voltage drop
      3. Voltage drops equal voltage rises
   B. Explain the concept of ground
   C. Describe measuring voltage

XI. Identify the Basic Concepts Of Resistance, Including:
   A. The Ohm
   B. Resistivity
   C. Conductance
   D. Factors determining resistance
   E. Resistance of wire

XII. List Resistor Types And Ratings, Including:
   A. Wire-Wound resistors
   B. Carbon-Composition resistors
   C. Deposited-Film resistors
   D. Variable resistors
   E. Resistor ratings
      1. Resistance
      2. Tolerance
      3. Wattage

XIII. Analyze Connecting Resistors in the Following Manner:
   A. Resistors in series
   B. Resistors in parallel
   C. Equal Resistors in parallel
   D. Series-Parallel connections

XIV. Explain Ohm’s Law As It Applies To:
   A. Determining current
   B. Finding voltage
   C. Finding resistance

XV. Describe Power concepts including:
   A. Work and power
   B. Power, current, and voltage
   C. Power dissipation in resistors
   D. Deriving more equations

XVI. Identify Magnetic Field Concepts:
   A. Magnets
   B. Lines of force
   C. Magnetic materials
   D. Theory of magnetism

XVII. Relate Electricity and Magnetism In:
   A. Current flow and magnetism
   B. The electromagnet
   C. Magnetic quantities
      1. Flux
      2. Flux density
      3. Magnetomotive force
      4. Field Intensity or magnetizing force
      5. Permeability
      6. Reluctance
   D. Ohm’s Law for magnetic quantities
   E. Comparison of units

XVIII. Identify the Following Induction Concepts:
   A. Magnetic induction
   B. Electromagnetic induction
   C. The AC generator
   D. The DC generator

XIX. List the Magnetic and Electromagnetic Applications
   A. Relay
   B. Reed switch and relay
   C. Record pickup
   D. Loudspeaker
   E. Magnetic tape
   F. DC Motor
   G. Meter
   H. Computer memories
   I. Magnetic deflection of electronic beams

XX. Describe The Basic Meter Movement and application

XXI. Describe the Following Ammeter Concepts:
   A. Measuring current
   B. Increasing the range of the ammeter
   C. Computing the shunt resistance
   D. Ammeter accuracy

XXII. Describe the Following Voltmeter concepts
   A. Extending the range
   B. Calculating the multiplier
   C. Multiple-Range voltmeters
   D. Sensitivity (Ohms per volt)
   E. Loading effect of voltmeters

XXIII. Explain the Ohmmeter, Including:
   A. Basic circuit
   B. Scale calibration
   C. Creating higher ranges
   D. Creating lower ranges
   E. Shunt ohmmeter

XXIV. Discuss Multi-Meters
   A. Basic Circuit
   B. Electronic Multimeter
   C. Measurement Inaccuracies

XXV. Describe and Analyze Simple Circuits
   A. Series circuit
   B. Parallel circuit
   C. Series-Parallel circuit

XXVI. Analyze Voltage Dividers

XXVII. Compare Bridge Circuits
   A. Balanced bridge
   B. Unbalanced bridge
   C. Wheatstone bridge
   D. Self-Balancing bridge
   E. Temperature Sensing bridge

XXVIII. Describe and Apply the Following Circuit Analysis Theorems:
   A. Kirchoff’s voltage law
   B. Kirchoff’s current law
   C. Superposition theorem
   D. Thevenin’s theorem
   E. Norton’s theorem
      1. Current sources and voltage sources
      2. Finding the Norton equivalent
      3. Norton-Thevenin conversions

XXIX. Inductance
   A. Describe inductance, inductors, and self-induction
   B. Calculate time constant of an inductor
   C. Analyze inductors in combination
      1. Inductors in series
      2. Inductors in parallel
      3. Inductors in series-parallel

XXX. Capacitance
   A. Describe capacitors, and units of capacitance
   B. Calculate charging and discharging time for the capacitor
   C. Identify factors determining capacitance
   D. Identify types of capacitors
      1. Variable capacitors
      2. Fixed capacitors
   E. Analyze capacitors in combination
      1. Capacitors in parallel
      2. Capacitors in series

XXXI. Describe the Importance of AC
   A. What is AC
   B. Why is AC used
   C. Where is AC used

XXXII. Describe Generating AC, including:
   A. Electromagnetic induction
   B. A Simple AC generator
      1. Generator construction
      2. Generator operation
   C. The sinusoidal waveform
      1. Frequency
      2. Cycle

XXXIII. Determine AC Values
   A. Peak values
   B. Peak-To-Peak values
   C. Average values
   D. Effective values
   E. Period
   F. Frequency

XXXIV. Describe Non-Sinusoidal Waveforms
   A. The square wave
   B. The triangular wave
   C. The sawtooth wave
   D. Fluctuating DC waves

XXXV. AC Meters
   A. List AC meter types
      1. Rectifier-Type, moving-coil meters
         a. The basic meter movement
         b. The rectifiers
         c. The complete AC meter
         d. Electrical Characteristics
      2. Moving-Vane meters
         a. The radial-vane meter movement
         b. The concentric-vane meter movement
         c. Electrical characteristics
      3. Thermocouple meters
         a. Meter operation
         b. Electrical characteristics
      4. Clamp-On meters
         a. Meter operation
         b. Electrical characteristics
   B. Demonstrate using AC meters
      1. Measuring current
      2. Measuring voltage
      3. Measuring power

XXXVI. Describe Oscilloscopes, Including:
   A. Oscilloscope operation
   B. Using the oscilloscope
      1. Measuring voltage
      2. Measuring the period
      3. Measuring the frequency
      4. Measuring phase relationships

XXXVII. Analyze Resistance In AC Circuits
   A. Basic AC circuit calculations
   B. Series AC circuit calculations
   C. Parallel AC circuit calculations
   D. Power In AC circuits

XXXVIII. Explain Capacitors In AC Circuits
   A. Current-Voltage relationships in capacitive AC circuits
   B. Capacitive reactance
   C. Ohm’s law in capacitive circuits

XXXIX. Analyze RC Circuits, Including:
   A. Series RC circuits
   B. Vector diagrams
   C. Impedance
   D. Phase shift
   E. Power in AC circuits
   F. Parallel RC circuits

XL. Describe Applications Of Capacitive Circuits, Including:
   A. Capacitive voltage dividers
   B. RC filter
      1. Low-Pass filter
      2. High-Pass filter
   C. Circuits combining AC and DC
      1. Decoupling network
      2. Coupling network
   D. Phase shift networks

XLI. Explain Inductors In AC Circuits, Including:
   A. Current-Voltage relationship
   B. Inductive reactance
   C. Ohm’s law in inductive circuits
   D. Mutual inductance
   E. Inductors in series and parallel
      1. Inductors in series
      2. Inductors in parallel
   F. Q

XLII. Analyze RL Circuits With:
   A. Series RL circuits
   B. Vector diagram
   C. Impedance
   D. Phase shift
   E. Power in inductive circuits
   F. Parallel RL circuits

XLIII. Describe RLC Tuned Circuit
   A. Series RLC circuits
   B. Parallel RLC circuits
   C. Resonance

XLIV. Analyze Q and Bandwidth in Series Resonant Circuits, including the
following:
   A. Q in series resonant circuits
   B. Bandwidth and Q
      1. Measuring bandwidth
      2. Half power points
   3. Bandwidth equals F0/Q

XLV. Describe Parallel Resonance, including:
   A. Ideal circuit
   B. Flywheel effect
   C. Practical tank circuits
   C. Q in parallel resonant circuits
   D. Bandwidth in parallel resonant circuits
   E. Distributed capacitance and self resonance of coils

XLVI. Describe LC Filters, Including:
   A. Types of filters
   B. Band pass filter
   C. Band stop filter
   D. Low-Pass filter
   E. High-Pass filter

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Open book unit tests and labs      15 to 35% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes     10 to 25% of grade
Lab Final                          10 to 25% of grade
Comprehensive written Final Exam   25 to 40% of grade
                                        100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The course will meet for one full week of approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab, approximately six months of guided correspondence study, and then another full week of lecture, labs, and tests. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 182

  • Title: Semiconductor Devices and Circuits*
  • Number: RREL 182
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 181 and the approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the characteristics of basic semiconductor devices, explain practical circuits using semiconductor devices and analyze these circuits for DC and AC quantities. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab., 3 hrs. alternate delivery/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the electrical characteristics of materials which are classified as semiconductors.
  2. Name the primary advantages of semiconductor devices.
  3. Explain how the most important semiconductor devices operate.
  4. Basically describe how the most important semiconductor devices are constructed.
  5. Handle semiconductor components properly without exceeding their maximum ratings or damaging them with improper handling procedures.
  6. Recognize the most commonly used semiconductor packages.
  7. Recognize the schematic symbols that are used to represent a wide variety of semiconductor devices.
  8. Test various semiconductor devices to determine if they are functioning properly.
  9. Identify basic transistor amplifier circuits, describe their operation, and list the characteristics of each.
  10. Discuss direct current amplifiers, audio amplifiers, video amplifiers, intermediate frequency amplifiers, and radio frequency amplifiers, including their application in practical electronic systems..11. Explain the operation of differential amplifiers, comparators, summing and difference amplifiers, and active filter circuits.
  11. Analyze and design simple inverting and non-inverting amplifiers that use operational amplifiers.
  12. Identify and explain the operation of power supply rectifiers, filters, and regulation circuits.
  13. Discuss the basic principles of oscillation, identify and describe the operation of commonly used LC, RC, and crystal oscillators.
  14. Demonstrate a knowledge of pulse shapers, multivibrators, the Schmitt trigger, and ramp generators.
  15. Explain amplitude and frequency modulation, the heterodyne principle, and modulation and detection circuits.
  16. Construct transistor and integrated circuit amplifiers, oscillators, active filters, and pulse-shaping circuits; power supplies and power supply regulation circuits; and a basic amplitude modulation and demodulation system.
  17. Use a multimeter and an oscilloscope to analyze the operation of electronic circuits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe the Importance of Semiconductors and Semiconductor
Materials
   A. Explain Germanium and Silicon Atoms and Crystals
   B. Conduction in Intrinsic Germanium and Silicon
      1. Low Temperature Characteristics
      2. High Temperature Characteristics
      3. Holes
      4. Current Flow
   C. Conduction in Doped Germanium and Silicon
      1. N-Type Semiconductors
      2. P-Type Semiconductors

II Explain the PN Junction
   A. Junction Diodes
   B. Depletion Region
   C. Barrier Voltage

III. Describe Diode Biasing Characteristics
   A. Forward Bias
   B. Reverse Bias
   C. Germanium Diode
      1. Forward Characteristics
      2. Reverse Characteristics
   D. Silicon Diode
      1. Forward Characteristics
      2. Reverse Characteristics
   E. Diode Ratings
   F. Temperature Considerations
      1. Diode Symbols
      2. Diode Construction
         a. Grown Junctions
         b. Alloyed Junctions
         c. Diffused Junctions
      3. Diode Packaging

IV. Identify Diode Applications
   A. Rectification
   B. Other Applications for Diodes

V. Identify Zener Diode Characteristics
   A. Voltage-Current Characteristics
   B. Zener Voltage
   C. Power Dissipation in Zener Diodes
   D. Current Limitations in Zener Diodes
   E. Effects of Temperature on Zener Voltage
   F. Temperature Compensated Zener Diodes
   G. Zener Diode Impedance
   H. Zener Diode Packages

VI. Describe Voltage Regulation with Zener Diodes
   A. The Basic Zener Diode Regulator
   B. Designing a Zener Regulator Circuit

VII. Recognize Special Diodes and their characteristics, including:
   A. The Tunnel Diode and it’s characteristics
      1. Voltage-Current Characteristics
      2. What is Negative Resistance?
      3. Construction
      4. Applications
   B. The Varactor Diode
      1. Electrical Characteristics
      2. Operating Efficiency
      3. Construction
      4. Applications
   C. High Frequency Diodes
      1. PIN Diodes
      2. Schottky Diodes
      3. Gunn Effect Devices
      4. IMPATT Diodes

VIII. Describe Bipolar transistors, including:
   A. Transistor Construction and Packaging
   B. Basic Transistor Action
   C. Biasing NPN Transistors
   D. Biasing PNP Transistors
   E. Transistor Amplification

IX. Recognize Transistor Circuit Arrangements, including:
   A. Common Base Circuits
   B. Common Emitter Circuits
   C. Common Collector Circuits

X. Describe Bipolar Transistor Testing
   A. Test Procedures
      1. Testing NPN Transistors.
      2. Testing PNP Transistors
   B. Identifying a Transistor

XI. Identify the Characteristics of Bipolar Transistor Circuits
   A. Common-Base Circuits
   B. Characteristics of Common-Emitter Circuit
   C. Characteristics of Common-Collector Circuits
   D. Maximum Transistor Ratings
      1. Emitter and Collector Breakdown Voltage
      2. Maximum Collector and Emitter Currents
      3. Maximum Collector Dissipation
      4. Temperature Ratings

XII. Explain Amplifier Configurations
   A. Common-Emitter Circuits
      1. Circuit operation
      2. Current gain
      3. Voltage gain
      4. Power gain
      5 Input resistance
      6 Output resistance
   B. Common-Base Circuits
      1. Circuit operation
      2. Current gain
      3. Voltage gain
      4. Power gain
      5. Input resistance
      6. Output resistance
   C. Common-Collector Circuits
      1. Circuit Operation
      2. Current gain
      3. Voltage gain
      4. Power gain
      5. Input resistance
      6. Output resistance

XIII. Describe Amplifier Biasing
   A. Base-Biased Circuits
   B. Feedback Bias
   C. Voltage-Divider Biasing
   D. Class of Operation

XIV. List Amplifier Coupling:
   A. Resistance-Capacitance Coupling
   B. Impedance Coupling
   C. Direct Coupling
   D. Transformer Coupling

XV. Describe Direct Current Amplifiers
   A. Basic Circuit Configuration.B. Multiple-Stage Amplifiers
      1. Darlington amplifiers
      2. Differential amplifiers

XVI. Identify Audio Amplifiers
   A. Voltage Amplifiers
   B. Power Amplifiers
   C. Single-Ended Power Amplifiers
   D. Push-Pull Power Amplifiers
      1. Transformer output
      2. Complementary amplifiers
      3. Quasi-complementary amplifiers
   E. Volume Control Circuits
   F. Tone Control Circuits

XVII. Recognize Other Amplifier Circuits
   A. RF and IF Amplifiers
   B. Tuned Amplifiers
   C. Typical RF Amplifiers
   D. Frequency Multipliers
   E. IF Amplifiers

XVIII. Describe Differential Amplifiers
   A. Basic Differential Amplifier Circuits
   B. Single-Input, Single-Output Operation
   C. Single-Input, Differential-Output Circuit
   D. Differential-Input, Differential-Output Operation
   E. Current Sources and Voltage Sources
   F. Practical Current Source
   G. Practical Differential Amplifiers
   H. Common-Mode Input Operation
   I. Differential-Input Operation
   J. Common-Mode Rejection Ratio
   K. IC Differential Amplifiers

XIX. Describe Operational Amplifier Characteristics
   A. Basic Op Amp
   B. Closed-Loop Operation
      1. Inverting Configuration
      2. Non-inverting Configuration
      3. Bandwidth Limitations
   C. Operational Amplifier Circuits
   D. Applications of Operational Amplifiers
      1. Summing Amplifier (adder)
      2. Active Filters
      3. Difference Amplifiers
      4. Other Applications

XX. Describe Basic Rectifier Circuits and Power Supplies
   A. Half-Wave Rectifiers
      1. Basic circuit
      2. Effective, peak, and average values
      3. Rectifier with transformer
      4. Ripple frequency
   B. Full-Wave Rectifier
   C. Bridge Rectifier
   D. Comparison of Rectifiers
   E. Power Supply Filters
      1. The Capacitor as a Filter
      2. Full-Wave Supply with Capacitor Filter
      3. Percent Ripple
      4. RC Filters
      5. LC Filters
   F. Voltage Multipliers
      1. Half-Wave Voltage Doubler
      2. Full-Wave Voltage Doubler
      3. Voltage Tripler
      4. Higher Order Voltage Multiplication
   G. Voltage Regulation
      1. Load Regulation
      2. The Zener Regulator
      3. Series Voltage Regulation
         a. The Emitter Follower Regulator
         b. The Feedback Regulator
      4. Feedback Regulator With Op Amp
      5. Short Circuit and Overload Protection
         a. Fuses
         b. Circuit breakers
         c. Protective Circuits
         d. Shunt Regulators
   6. IC Regulators

XXI. Describe Oscillator Fundamentals
   A. The Basic Oscillator
   B. LC Oscillators
      1. The Series-Fed Hartley
      2. The Shunt-Fed Hartley
      3. The Colpitts Oscillator
      4. The Clapp Oscillator
   C. Crystal Controlled Oscillators
      1. The Hartley Crystal Oscillator
      2. The Colpitts Crystal Oscillator
   D. The Pierce Oscillator
   E. RC Oscillators
      1. The Phase-Shift Oscillator
      2. The Wien-Bridge Oscillator
   F. Nonsinusoidal Oscillators

XXII. Identify Non-Sinusoidal Waveforms
   A. Frequency Domain Analysis
   B. The square wave
   C. The sawtooth wave
   D. Other waveforms
   E. Waveform Spectrum

XXIII. Describe Wave-shaping Circuits
   A. RC Wave-shaping
   B. Differentiator
   C. Integrator
   D. Diode Clipping Circuits
   E. Clampers

XXIV. List Rectangular-Wave Generators
   A. Astable Multi-vibrator
   B. Monostable Multi-vibrator
   C. Bistable Multivibrator
   D. Schmitt Trigger
   E. The 555 Timer

XXV. Identify Other Fundamental Electronic Circuits
   A. Ramp Generators
   B. Sawtooth Generator

XXVI. Describe the Basics of Amplitude Modulation
   A. The Radio Wave
   B. The Diode Modulator
   C. Sidebands
   D. Bandwidth
   E. Percent of Modulation
   F. The AM Transmitter
   G. Modulator Circuits
   H. The AM Detector
   I. Tuned RF Receiver
   J. Superheterodyne Receiver
   K. Mixers and Frequency Converters

XXVII. Describe the Basics of Frequency Modulation
   A. The FM Waveform
   B. Frequency Modulator
   C. The FM Transmitter
   D. The FM Receiver

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Open book unit tests and labs     15 to 35% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes    10 to 25% of grade
Lab Final                         10 to 25% of grade
Comprehensive written final       25 to 40% of grade.100%

At least 50% of the possible lab points must be earned to receive a
passing grade for the course.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The course will meet for one full week of approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab, approximately six months guided correspondence study, and then another full week of lecture, labs, and tests. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 183

  • Title: Digital Techniques*
  • Number: RREL 183
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 182 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze basic digital circuitry consisting of arrangements of gates and flip-flops using TTL and CMOS integrated circuits, as well as relay logic. This analysis will include the application of elementary Boolean algebra, truth tables and timing diagrams. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab., 3 hrs. alternate delivery/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the advantages and benefits of using digital techniques in electronic equipment.
  2. Name the major applications of digital techniques in electronics.
  3. Convert between the binary and decimal number systems and recognize the most commonly used binary codes.
  4. Name the major components used in implementing digital circuits and explain how they operate.
  5. Explain the operation of digital logic gates.
  6. Identify the more commonly used integrated circuit families used in digital equipment and discuss their operation, characteristics, and features.
  7. Use Boolean algebra to express logic operations and minimize logic circuits in design.
  8. Explain the operation of flip-flops.
  9. Discuss the operation and application of binary and BCD counters, shift registers, and other sequential logic circuits.
  10. Name the most frequently used combinational logic circuits and explain their operation.
  11. Design both combinational and sequential logic circuits for a given application from definition and concept to the selection of the integrated circuits.
  12. Identify the various types of semiconductor memories (RAMs, ROMs, bubbles, etc.), explain how they operate and give examples as to how they are used.
  13. Name the various types of data conversion such as digital-to-analog converters, analog-to-digital converters, multiplexers, and sample/hold circuits, tell how they operate and give examples of their application.
  14. Troubleshoot digital circuits using standard test equipment and special instruments such as logic probes, logic and signature analyzers.
  15. Define various microprocessor/computer terms such as I/O, I/O device, I/O port, instruction, stored program concept, word, byte, MPU, ALU, memory, address, read, write, fetch execute, mnemonic, opcode and bus.
  16. Explain the purpose of the following circuits in a typical microprocessor: accumulator, program counter, instruction decoder, controller/sequencer, data register, and address register.
  17. Using a simplified block diagram of a microprocessor, trace the data flow that takes place between the various circuits during the execution of a simple program.
  18. Describe the difference between the various forms of addressing such as inherent, immediate, and direct.
  19. Write simple programs that can be executed by the Microprocessor Trainer.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Digital Techniques
   A. Compare analog and digital devices and techniques.
   B. List where digital techniques are used.
      1. Communications
      2. Telemetry systems
      3. Test instruments
      4. Industrial controls
      5. Consumer electronic equipment
   C. Define why use digital techniques.
      1. Greater accuracy
      2. Greater dynamic range
      3. Greater stability
      4. Convenience
      5. Automation
      6. Design simplicity
      7. New approaches

II. Demonstrate Use Of The Binary Number System, Including:
   A. Positional number systems
   B. Fractional numbers
   C. Converting between the binary and decimal number systems
      1. Binary to decimal
      2. Decimal to binary
   D. Binary number sizes
   E. Number identification

III. Explain Binary Codes
   A. Binary coded decimal
   B. Special binary codes
      1. Gray code
      2. ASCII code

IV. Describe Data Representation using:
   A. Electromechanical devices
   B. Transistors
   C. Logic levels
   D. Positive and negative logic
   E. Parallel vs. serial data representation
   F. Logic circuits

V. Analyze the Bipolar Transistor Switch, In Terms Of Each Of the
Following:
   A. Modes of operation
      1. Cut-off
      2. Linear
      3. Saturation
   B. Saturated switching circuits
   C. Switching speed
   D. Non-Saturating switching circuits

VI. Demonstrate Design of a Saturated Switch Logic Inverter

VII. Describe These Logic Circuits:
   A. The inverter
   B. Decision-Making logic elements
      1. The AND Gate
      2. The OR Gate
   C. The dual nature of logic gates
   D. Additional logic elements
      1. NAND gate
      2. NOR gate
   E. How NAND/NOR gates are used

VIII. Identify Practical Logic Circuits
   A. Relays and switches
   B. Discrete component logic circuits
   C. Integrated circuits

IX. Define Logic Circuit Characteristics, including:
   A. Logic levels
   B. Propagation delay
   C. Power dissipation
   D. The speed-power trade-off
   E. Noise immunity
   F. Fan Out
      1. Current source logic
      2. Current sink logic

X. Describe Integrated Circuits, including:
   A. Manufacturing methods
      1. Monolithic
      2. Thin and thick film techniques
      3. Hybrid circuits
   B. Integrated circuit packaging
      1. T05
      2. Flat-Pack
      3. DIP
   C. Temperature ranges
   D. Families
      1. Transistor-Transistor-Logic
      2. Special TTL variations
         a. Low power TTL
         b. High power TTL
         c. Schottky TTL
         d. Three state TTL and data busses
      3. Emitter coupled logic
      4. Metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuits
         a. PMOS and NMOS circuits
         b. Complementary MOS
      5. Integrated injection logic

XI. Select A Digital Integrated Circuit For A Specific Application
   A. Trends
   B. Complex functions
   C. Trade-Offs

XII. Relate Digital Logic Circuits and Boolean Equations
   A. Review of basic functions
   B. Boolean Formats
   C. Sum-of-Products
   D. Product-of-Sums

XIII. Apply Truth Tables To Logic Gates

XIV. Apply Boolean Rules

XV. Minimizing Logic Expressions

XVI. Use Digital Components, Including
   A. NAND/NOR gates
   B. Flip-Flops
   C. Set-Reset flip-flops
   D. D Type flip-flops
   E. JK flip-flops

XVII. Describe More Complex Combinational And Sequential Circuits,
Including:
   A. Registers
   B. Counters
      1. Binary counters
         a. Frequency dividers
         b. Maximum Count
         c. Down counters
         d. Up-Down counter
         e. Synchronous counters
         f. Counter control functions
      2. Typical Integrated Circuit Counters
      3. BCD Counters
         a. Cascading BCD counters
         b. The BCD counter as a frequency divider
         c. Typical integrated circuit BCD counter
      4. Special counters
         a. Modulo 3 counter
         b. Modulo 5 counter
   C. Shift registers
      1. Shift register operation
      2. Bipolar logic shift registers
      3. Shift register applications
         a. Scaling operations
         b. Shift register memory
         c. Sequencer/Ring counter
         d. Counters
      4. MOS shift registers
      5. Dynamic MOS shift registers
      6. Static MOS shift registers
   D. Clocks and one shots
      1. Clock oscillator circuits
         a. Discrete component circuits
         b. IC clock circuits
      2. One shot multivibrators
      3. One shot applications
   E. Decoders
      1. BCD to decimal decoder
      2. Octal and hex decoders
      3. BCD to 7-segment decoder
   F. Encoders
   G. 7-Segment decoder-driver and display
   H. Multiplexers
      1. Operation
      2. Applications
         a. Parallel to serial conversion
         b. Serial binary word generator
         c. Boolean function generator
   I. Exclusive OR and exclusive NOR
      1. Binary adder
      2. Parity generator/checker
      3. Binary comparators
   J. Code Converters

XVIII. List memory types and explain differences in characteristics for:
   A. Read only memories
      1. Bipolar ROM
      2. MOS ROM’s
   B. Read/Write memories
      1. Static memories
      2. RAM organization
      3. R/W memories
      4. Typical Memory Configurations
   C. Dynamic Memories
      1. Dynamic RAM organization
      2. 64k and larger RAMs
   D. Programmable read only memories
      1. Bipolar PROMs
      2. MOS PROMs
      3. PROM programmers
   E. Memory organization

XIX. Define Memory Characteristics and Specifications
   A. Volatility
   B. Access time
   C. Memory size
   D. Memory configuration
   E. Device technology

XX. Describe Data Conversion, Including:
   A. Digital-to-Analog conversion
      1. Binary weighted resistor DAC
      2. Improved weighted resistor DAC
      3. R/2R ladder DAC
      4. DAC specifications and error sources
   B. Multiplying DACs
   C. Analog-to-Digital conversion
      1. Comparators
      2. Counter-Ramp feedback ADC
      3. Successive approximation converter
      4. Flash converter
      5. Dual slope ADC
      6. Voltage-to-Frequency conversion
      7. ADC specifications
      8. Sampling and multiplexing

XXI. Identify Typical Problems In Digital Circuits
   A. Operator problems
   B. Construction problems
   C. Defective components
   D. Mechanical problems
   E. Power supply problems
   F. Timing problems
   G. Environmental problems
   H. Digital IC problems
      1. External IC problems
      2. Internal IC problems

XXII. Describe Use Of Digital Test Instruments
   A. Multimeters
   B. Oscilloscopes
   C. Logic clips and monitors
   D. Logic probe
   E. Logic pulser
   F. Current tracer
   G. Logic analyzer
   H. Signature analyzer

XXIII. List Procedures For Digital Troubleshooting
   A. Data collection
   B. Isolating the problem
   C. Making the repair
   D. Final testing

XXIV. Identify Basic Digital Techniques To Computer Operation
   A. What is a digital computer?
   B. How do computers “think?”
   C. Basic computer system organization
   D. Computer terms
   E. Instructions
   F. Computer operating cycles
   G. Hardware vs. software

XXV. Describe Computer Organization
   A. Architecture
   B. Instruction set
   C. Programming
   D. Fetch cycle
   E. Execution cycle
   F. Control unit

XXVI. Explain Programming Concepts
   A. Addressing modes
   B. Straight line programs
   C. Flags
   D. Loops and branching
   E. subroutines

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Open book unit tests and labs       15-35% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes      10-25% of grade
Lab Final                           10-25% of grade
Comprehensive written final         25-40% of grade
                                      100%

At least 50% of the possible lab points must be earned to receive a
passing grade for the course.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The course will meet for one full week of approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab, approximately six months guided correspondence study, and then another full week of lecture, labs, and tests. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 284

  • Title: Electronic Communications*
  • Number: RREL 284
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 183 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to state the principles of amplitude, frequency, phase and pulse modulation and describe the technologies of transmitters, receivers, antennas, local area networks, wide-area networks and telephone systems. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. activity/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of amplitude, frequency, and pulse modulation.
  2. Analyze the composition of complex waveforms.
  3. Describe the operation of AM and FM transmitters and receivers.
  4. Construct basic communications circuits.
  5. Explain the differences between frequency and phase modulation.
  6. Determine both frequency and time division multiplexing as function of increasing communications channel capacity.
  7. List the characteristics and uses of transmission lines.
  8. Explain electromagnetic radiation and propagation and list the various types of propagation.
  9. List the basic types of antennas including dipoles, verticals, and directional arrays.
  10. Describe basic communications systems including television and FM stereo broadcasting, and data communications.
  11. State the characteristics of a communication channel for both analog and digital transmissions.
  12. Explain signaling techniques used with AC and DC signals.
  13. Identify the different digital communication codes in common usage, and list their typical uses, advantages, and disadvantages.
  14. Compare the common schemes used for error detection and correction in data communication.
  15. Compare the most common modulation systems used with AC and DC signals.
  16. Explain how Pulse Code Modulation works and state its strengths and weaknesses.
  17. Describe the process of multiplexing signals.
  18. Compare the types of transmission media used in the world's communication systems.
  19. Describe the organization and operation of the telephone system, and state its use in data communication.
  20. List the varieties of data-transmission networks and compare their operation and suitability for data communication.
  21. List the various types of transmission impairments that affect data transmissions, and state how their effects can be corrected.
  22. Describe the electrical connection of digital data communication equipment to the network, and list the standards commonly used to specify the interfaces between digital equipments.
  23. State the uses of communication protocols, and identify those commonly used.
  24. Analyze the major issues in the security of computer systems interconnected by data communications systems, and describe how these systems may be protected from unauthorized access.
  25. List the major data networks operating today, and their use by the average consumer. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Electronic Communication
   A. Information transfer
   B. Modulation
   C. Types of Modulation

II. Recognize Various Waveforms
   A. Sine wave
   B. Square wave
   C. Sawtooth wave

III. Evaluate Amplitude Modulation
   A. The AM waveform
   B. Percent of modulation
   C. Sidebands
   D. Bandwidth

IV. Define Angle Modulation
   A. Frequency modulation
   B. Phase modulation
   C. Modulation index
   D. Sidebands
   E. Bandwidth

V. Summarize The Communications System
   A. Input/Output device
   B. Transmitter
   C. Channel
   D. Noise
   E. Receiver

VI. Recognize AM Circuits
   A. The diode modulator
   B. The absorption modulator
   C. The collector modulator
   D. The series modulator
   E. The progressive series modulator

VII. Describe Suppressed Carrier AM, Including:
   A. Disadvantages of standard AM
      1. Carrier power
      2. Bandwidth
      3. Propagation problems
   B. Balanced modulators
      1. Twin FET balanced modulator
      2. Diode-Ring balanced modulator
      3. IC balanced modulators
   C. Disadvantages of suppressed carrier AM

VIII. Explain Single Sideband
   A. Filter method SSB transmitter
      1. Sideband Filters
      2. Frequency Conversion
      3. Sideband Selection
   B. Phasing method of SSB
   C. Linear Amplifiers
   D. SSB Power Ratings

IX. Build and Examine AM Detectors
   A. The diode detector
   B. The transistor detector
   C. The synchronous detector
   D. The product detector

X. Describe Superheterodyne Receivers, including:
   A. Block diagram
   B. Frequency conversion circuits
   C. Intermediate frequency selection
   D. IF amplifiers
   E. Automatic gain control
   F. Double conversion receivers
   G. Receiver specifications
      1. Sensitivity.2. Selectivity
      3. Image rejection
      4. IF rejection
      5. Dynamic range

XI. Analyze a Communications Receiver
   A. Specifications
   B. Circuit analysis
   C. AGC Circuit

XII. Recognize Angle Modulation Transmitters
   A. Reactance modulator
   B. Varactor modulator
   C. Phase modulator
   D. The complete transmitter

XIII. List various Demodulators
   A. Slope detector
   B. Double-tuned detector
   C. Foster-Seeley discriminator
   D. Ratio detector
   E. Phase-Locked loop demodulator

XIV. Explain Receivers
   A. Block diagram
   B. Limiter
   C. Automatic frequency control
   D. AM/FM broadcast tuner
   E. An FM transceiver
      1. Schematic analysis

XV. Describe Analog Pulse Modulation
   A. Sampling
   B. Pulse amplitude modulation
   C. Pulse time modulation
      1. Pulse duration modulation
      2. Pulse position modulation

XVI. Describe Digital Pulse Modulation
   A. Pulse code modulation
   B. Other DPM systems

XVII. Explain Multiplexing
   A. Time division multiplex
   B. Frequency division multiplex

XVIII. Analyze Transmission Lines
   A. The balanced transmission line
   B. Standing waves
   C. Standing wave ratio
   D. Transmission line resonant circuits
   E. SWR measurement
   F. Coaxial transmission lines
   G. Comparison of coaxial and balanced lines

XIX. Describe Antennas
   A. Antenna principles
   B. Antenna radiation
   C. Antenna polarization
   D. The dipole antenna
   E. The vertical antenna
   F. Antenna arrays
      1. Parasitic arrays
      2. Driven arrays

XX. Summarize Radio Propagation In:
   A. Ground waves
   B. Space waves
   C. Sky waves
   D. The ionosphere
   E. Sky wave propagation
      1. Multiple-Hop transmission
      2. Fading
   F. Ionospheric variations
   G. VHF-UHF propagation
   H. Extending VHF-UHF communications
      1. Tropospheric scatter propagation
      2. Satellite communications

XXI. Describe FM Stereo Broadcasting
   A. The stereo multiplex system
   B. The stereo transmitter
   C. The stereo receiver
   D. SCA
   E. Pre-emphasis and de-emphasis

XXII. Describe Television Broadcasting
   A. Television transmission
   B. The video signal
   C. The TV transmitter
   D. The TV receiver

XXIII. Summarize Data Communications
   A. History
   B. Requirements
   C System types
   D Modes of operation
   E Modems
   F Data communications codes

XXIV. Examine The Concept of Information and Channel Capacity
   A. Channel capacity
   B. The capacity of a communications channel
      1. Shannon’s law
      2. Bits and baud

XXV. Explain DC Signaling, including:
   A. Characteristics of DC signals
   B. Baseband signaling
   C. DC transmission line effects: resistance, inductance, and
capacitance
   D. The arrival curve
   E. Dealing with distortion
      1. Bias distortion
      2. Reducing distortion effects

XXVI. Explain AC Signaling, including:
   A. Baseband and carrier signaling
   B. Review of AC signal characteristics
   C. Telephones and the characteristics of human speech
   D. The concept of bandwidth
   E. AC transmission line effects: Resistance, capacitance, and
inductance
   F. Types of distortion
   G. Transmission line loading

XXVII. Describe Serial and Parallel Transmission
   A. DC signals: serial transmissions
   B. DC signals: parallel transmissions
   C. AC signals: serial and parallel
   D. Serial and parallel compared
   E. Self-Test review
   F. Answers

XXVIII. Define Data Communication Terminal Equipment
   A. Telegraph equipment
   B. Teletypewriters
   C. Punched card terminals
   D. Magnetic media terminals
   E. CRT-based terminals
      1. Dumb terminals
      2. Smart terminals
      3. Buffered terminals
   F. Facsimile machines
   G. Computer-to-Computer communications

XXIX. List Communications Standards
   A. The need for standards
   B. Standards organizations
      1. CCITT
      2. Bell system practices
      3. ISO
      4. ANSI
      5. ASA
      6. EIA
      7. IEEE
      8. UL
   C. The effect of language differences
      1. Alphabet size
      2. Alphabet composition
   D. Standard data transmission codes
      1. Morse code
      2. Teletypewriter code
      3. BCD code
      4. EBCDIC
      5. ASCII code
      6. Four-out-of-Eight codes

XXX. Describe Code Translation
   A. Methods of code conversion
      1. Algorithmic
      2. Dictionaries
   B. Code translation: Where can it be done
   C. Where the code conversion is best done

XXXI. Explain Error Detection and Correction
   A. Approaches to error detection
      1. Parity checking
      2. Checksums
      3. Cyclic redundancy checking
      4. Hamming code
      5. Convolutional codes
   B. Error Correction
      1. What can and can’t be done
      2. Methods of correcting errors
   C. Error detection and correction: Effects on transmission speed and
efficiency
   D. Self-Test review
   E. Answers

XXXII. Define Modulation of AC Signals
   A. Characteristics of AC signals
   B. The concept of a carrier
   C. Types of modulation
      1. Amplitude modulation
      2. Frequency modulation
      3. Phase modulation

XXXIII. Define Modulation of DC Signals
   A. Characteristics of DC signals
   B. AC representation of DC signals
      1. Fourier analysis
      2. Bandwidth of a DC signal
   C. Types of modulation
      1. Pulse amplitude modulation
      2. Pulse position modulation
      3. Pulse duration modulation
   D. Examples of DC modulation

XXXIV. Describe Pulse Code Modulation
   A. Quantization
      1. Quantization noise
      2. Variable-Level quantization
   B. Sampling – theory and practice
   C. Coding
   D. PCM: advantages and disadvantages

XXXV. Define Multiplexing
   A. A short history of multiplexing
   B. The 4-KHz channel: A basic building block
   C. Space-Division multiplexing
      1. Concept
      2. Practice
      3. Advantages and disadvantages
   D. Frequency-Division multiplexing
      1. Concept
      2. Practice
      3. Advantages and disadvantages
   E. Time-Division multiplexing
      1. Concept
      2. Practice
      3. Commercial PCM systems
      4. Advantages and disadvantages
   F. Data concentrators

XXXVI. Describe Modems
   A. What modems are used for
   B. Modulation techniques in common use
   C. Modems: Typical equipment
   D. Multiple modulation

XXXVII. List Types Of Wire and Cable
   A. Open-Wire line
   B. Paired cables
   C. Cable losses
   D. Coaxial cables
   E. Cable loading

XXXVIII. Summarize Terrestrial Transmission
   A. High-Frequency radio
   B. Microwave radio
   C. Noise and interference
   D. Equipment reliability.E. UHF radio
   F. Tropospheric scatter radio
   G. Waveguides

XXXIX. Summerize Satellite Transmission
   A. The satellite system
   B. Peculiarities of satellite systems
      1. Transmission time
      2. Transmission losses
      3. Noise
      4. Demand assignment schemes
   C. Broadcast versus direct transmissions
   D. Demand assignment schemes

XL. Describe Optical Transmission Systems
   A. Bandwidth and frequency
   B. Modulation and multiplexing
   C. Wrapup: Optical communications

XLI. Compare Transmission Media For Data Communications

XLII. Discuss the Telephone System
   A. Organization
      1. Local loops
      2. Central offices
      3. Toll offices
      4. Long-Distance carriers
      5. Cellular telephone exchanges
   B. International telephone systems
   C. Types of exchanges and switchgear
      1. Manual switchgear
      2. Rotary switchgear
      3. X-Y switchgear
      4. Crossbar switchgear
      5. Electronic switchgear
   D. How the system is structured
   E. Traffic intensity

XLIII. Explain Call Processing
   A. When you pick up your phone
   B. Routing through the network
   C. Types of control networks
   D. Supervisory signaling
   E. Special facilities
   F. Leased lines
   G. WATS lines

XLIV. Describe Sending Digital Data Over the Telephone System
   A. Advantages
   B. Disadvantages

XLV. Define Dedicated, Switched Networks
   A. Theory
   B. On-Line versus batch data communications
   C. Advantages of switched, dedicated networks
   D. Disadvantages of dedicated, switched networks
   E. Functioning dedicated, switched networks: SAGE, airline and railway
reservations, and industrial control systems

XLVI. Define Message-Switched Networks
   A. Message switching: A definition
   B. Advantages of message-switched networks
   C. Disadvantages of message-switched networks
   D. Message switching in action: the torn-tape teletype
   E. AUTODIN, Western Union, and Bulletin Boards

XLVII. Define Packet-Switched Networks
   A. Theory
   B. How packet switching works
   C. Advantages of packet-switched networks
   D. Disadvantages of packet-switched networks
   E. ARPANET: A packet-switched network

XLVIII. Explain Local-Area Networks (LANs)
   A. LANs: What are they?
   B. LANs: How do they work?
   C. Structures
      1. Star
      2. Buss
      3. Ring
   D. Advantages / Disadvantages of LANs
   E. Practical LANs: Ethernet, IBM cluster control program, IBM PC
Network, Corvus Omninet, and AT&T Starlan

XLIX. Define the Problem Of Imperfect Transmission Media
   A. Noise
      1. Types and sources of noise
         a. Thermal
         b. Impulse
         c. Quantization
         d. Crosstalk
         e. Intermodulation
         f. Echoes
      2. Effects of noise on data communications
   B. Combatting noise
   C. Distortion
      1. DC bias distortion
      2. Amplitude distortion
      3. Phase changes

L. List Transmission Media Imperfections
   A. Signal loss
   B. Dropouts
   C. Fading
   D. Outages
   E. Problem channels
   F. Amplitude variations
   G. Transmission delay
   H. Variable transmission delay

LI. Explain Compensating for Transmission Defects
   A. Standards
   B. Conditioned circuits
   C. Regenerative repeaters
   D. Coding and protocols

LII. Describe Typical Error Performance
   A. Telex circuits
   B. Dial-Up telephone circuits
   C. Voice-Grade circuits
   D. Error variations
   E. Outside North America

LIII. List Serial Interface Standards
   A. EIA standard RS-232C
   B. RS-449 – the next generation
   C. Current Loop: The old standby

LIV. Explain Parallel Interface Standards
   A. How a parallel interface works
   B. The centronics interface
   C. Data collection: The IEEE 488 standard

LV. Describe Connecting to the Telecommunications Network
   A. Standard data rates
   B. Signal-to-Noise
   C. High-Speed data transmission
   D. Connecting to PCM systems

LVI. Monitoring Network and Link Status
   A. Link status monitoring
   B. Error performance monitoring

LVII. Describe Communications Protocols
   A. Common protocols
   B. Data communications protocols
   C. The workings of a typical protocol
   D. Protocols for data links
      1. Data system hierarchy
      2. Data link protocols
   E. Protocols for networks
      1. Network protocols
      2. Internet protocols
   F. Microcomputer protocols
      1. ASCII file transfers
      2. Binary data transfer
         a. MODEM protocols
         b. Kermit protocols
         c. CIS protocols

LVIII. Describe Terminals and Functions
   A. Hardware-Based functions
   B. Software-Based functions
   C. Terminal communications options
   D. Wrapup: Terminals

LIX. Examine Data Communications Applications
   A. Business
   B. Finance
   C. Government

LX. Summerize Unauthorized Access To Data
   A. Proliferation of computers
   B. Computer dependence
   C. Data communication
   D. Computer literacy
   E. Computer crime

LXI. Examine Data Security Techniques
   A. Personnel screening
   B. Physical security
   C. Access validation
      1. Passwords
      2. Multiple-Access authorization
      3. Call-Back systems
   D. Encryption
      1. Substitution ciphers
      2. Transposition ciphers
      3. Computational ciphers
      4. Public key ciphers
      5. Data encryption standard
   E. Systems programs
      1. Residual data
      2. Memory area conflicts
      3. Utilities
      4. Data protection

LXII. Evaluate Security Techniques
   A. Risk assessment
   B. Choice of security
   C. Cost
   D. Effects on the system

LXIII. List Public Switched Networks
   A. AT&T communications
   B. MCI digital information services
   C. GTE telenet
   D. Tymnet
   E. Uninet
   F. Western Union
   G. Datapac
   H. CompuServe
   I. CNCP infoswitch data services
   J. ADP autonet

LXIV. List Dedicated Data Communications Services
   A. American satellite
   B. AT&T
   C. CNCP Infodat
   D. GTE Sprint private lines
   E. MCI leased line service
   F. Telecom Canada dataroute
   G. Western Union

LXV. Describe On-Line Data Services
   A. Remote computing
   B. Information retrieval

LXVI. Examine the Future Of Data Communications
   A. The power of information
   B. Telecommuting
   C. Networking
   D. Consumer services
   E. Manufacturing

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Open book unit tests and labs     15-35% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes    10-25% of grade
Lab Final                         10-25% of grade
Comprehensive written final       25-40% of grade
                                    100%

At least 50% of the possible lab points must be earned to receive a
passing grade for the course.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The course will meet for one full week of approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab, approximately six months guided correspondence study, and then another full week of lecture, labs, and tests. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 285

  • Title: Microprocessor Techniques*
  • Number: RREL 285
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 183 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to meet the needs of railroad electronic maintainers. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and troubleshoot 6800 family microprocessor circuitry as well as microprocessor interface circuitry. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab, 3 hrs. activity/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Program a representative microprocessor.
  2. Interface a representative microprocessor with the “outside world.”
  3. Describe the internal register structure of 8-bit microprocessors.
  4. Develop a program flowchart to define a problem.
  5. Input and output data through a Peripheral Interface Adapter (PIA).
  6. Use a peripheral interface adapter (PIA) to provide handshake control of parallel I/O operations.
  7. Describe the operating principles of digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.
  8. Interface digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters to a microcomputer system.
  9. State several applications of digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.
  10. Construct a microcomputer-controlled digital voltmeter (DVM).
  11. Explain the basic concepts of serial communication and how to provide both software and hardware parallel/serial conversions for a microcomputer.
  12. Describe the operating characteristics of the asynchronous communications interface adapter.
  13. Connect the interface adapter to a microcomputer system to provide serial communications.
  14. Describe the operating characteristics of teletypewriters (TTY) printers, CRT data terminals, MODEMs, cassette recorders and floppy disks.
  15. Explain how to interface each of the above peripheral I/O devices to a microcomputer system.
  16. Explain how to interface a color TV receiver to a microcomputer system.
  17. Describe the operating principles of dynamic RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, bubble memories, charge-coupled device memories and Josephson Junction memories.
  18. Explain how to interface dynamic memory and provide dynamic memory refresh.
  19. Interface and program an EPROM.
  20. Describe the operating characteristics of a programmable timer module.
  21. Interface the programmable timer module microcomputer system to generate timed intervals, output waveforms and measure input waveforms.
  22. Describe the internal structure of several microprocessors and single-chip microcomputers.
  23. State and compare the capabilities of the above microprocessors and single-chip microcomputers.
  24. Describe the internal structure, instruction set, addressing modes and I/O lines of the microprocessors. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Number Systems
   A. Positional notation.
   B. Decimal number system.
   C. Binary number system.
   D. Octal number system.
   E. Hexadecimal number system.
   F. Converting between number systems.

II. Discuss Binary Codes 
   A. Binary coded decimal.
   B. Special binary codes.
   C. Alpha numeric codes.

III. Identify Basic Computer Terms and Conventions
   A. Stored program concept.
   B. Computer words.
   C. Word length.
   D. An elementary microcomputer.
   E. The microprocessor unit (MPU).
   F. Memory.
   G. Fetch-execute sequence.

IV. Describe Executing a Program
   A. The fetch phase.
   B. The execute phase.
   C. Fetching the add instruction.
   D. Executing the add instruction. 
   H. Fetching and executing the HLT instruction.

V. List Various Addressing Modes 
   A. Inherent or implied addressing.
   B. Immediate addressing.
   C. Direct addressing.
   D. Sample program using direct addressing.
   E. Executing the sample program.
   I. Combining addressing modesl.

VI. Describe Math Concepts for Digital Circuits
   A. Binary arithmetic.
      1. Binary addition.
      2. Binary subtraction.
      3. Binary multiplication.
      4. Binary division.
      5. Representing negative numbers.
   B. Two's complement arithmetic.
      1. Ten's complement arithmetic.
      2. Two's complement subtraction.
      3. Arithmetic with signed numbers.
   C. Boolean operations review.
      1. AND operation.
      2. OR operation.
      3. Exclusive OR operation.
      4. Invert operation.

VII. Explain Branching
   A. Relative addressing.
   B. Executing a branch instruction.
   C. Branching forward.
   D. Branching backward.
   E. Conditional branching.
      1. Condition codes.
      2. Conditional branch instructions.

VIII. Demonstrate Microcomputer Programming

 IX. Analyze Algorithms: 
   A. Multiplying by repeated addition.
   B. Dividing by repeated subtraction.
   C. Converting BCD to binary.
   D. Converting binary to BCD.

X. Describe Additional Instructions
   A. Add With Carry (ADC) Instruction.
   B. Subtract With Carry (SBC) Instruction.
   C. Arithmetic Shift Accumulator Left (ASLA) Instruction.
   D. Decimal Adjust Accumulator (DAA) Instruction.

XI. Diagram the Architecture of the 6502 CPU
   A. Programming model of the 6502 CPU.
   B. Block diagram of the 6502 CPU.

XII. Apply the Instruction Set of the 6502 CPU
   A. Arithmetic instructions.
   B. Data handling instructions.
   C. Logic instructions.
   D. Data test instructions.
   E. Index register and stack pointer instructions.
   F. Branch instructions.
   G. Condition code register instructions.

XIII. Summarize Instructions
   A. New addressing modes.
   B. Extended addressing.
   C. Indexed addressing.
   D. Stack operations.
      1. Cascade stack.
      2. Memory stack.
   E. Subroutines
      1. Jump (JMP) instruction.
      2. JSR and RTS instructions.
   F. Nested subroutines.
      1. Branch to Subroutine (BSR) instruction.
   G. Input/Output (I/O) operations.
      1. Output operations.
      2. Input operations.
      3. Input/output programming.
      4. Program control of I/O operations.
      5. Interrupt control of I/O operations.

XIV. Describe the Use of Interrupts 
   A. Reset
   B. Non-maskable interrupts.
   C. Return from interrupt (RTI) instruction.
   D. Interrupt request (IRQ).
   E. Interrupt mask instructions.
   F. Software interrupt (SWI) instruction.
   G. Wait for interrupt (WAI) instruction.

XV. Describe Interfacing Fundamentals
   A. Buses.
   B. 3-State logic.
   C. The 6502 CPU interface lines.
   D. Instruction timing.
   E. Timing of program segment.
   F. The 6502 data sheet.
   G. Memory
      1. Read Only memory (ROM).
      2. Random Access memory (RAM).
   H. Interfacing with displays.
      1. The 7-segment display.
      2. Driving the 7-segment display.
      3. Using an addressable latch.
      4. Multiplexing displays.
   I. Interfacing With Switches.
   J. Interfacing Requirements.
   K. A Typical Keyboard Arrangement.

XVI. Demonstrate Interfacing
   A. The Peripheral Interface Adapter (PIA).
      1. I/O Diagram.
      2. PIA Registers.
      3. Addressing the registers in the PIA.
      4. Initializing the PIA.
      5. Addressing the PIA.
   B. Using the PIA.
      1. Driving 7-segment displays.
      2. Decoding keyboards.
      3. Decoding a switch matrix.
   C. I/O control techniques.
      1. Program control of I/O operations using the PIA.
      2. Interrupt control of I/O operations using the PIA.
      3. Handshake operations using the PIA.
   D. Digital-to-Analog converters.
      1. General DAC concepts.
      2. Types of DACs.
      3. DAC interfacing.
      4. DAC applications.
         a. Waveform generation.
         b. Programmable gain amplifier and attenuator.
         c. Motor control and positioning.
         d. ADCs.
   E. Analog-to-Digital converters.
      1. General ADC concepts and conversion techniques.
         a. Ramp generation.
         b. Successive approximation.
         c. Integration.
      2. Interfacing to ADC devices.

XVII.  Describe Serial Communications
   A.  Serial data formats and standards.
   B.  Asynchronous/synchronous transmission and ASCII coding.
   C. Serial communications channeling.
   D.  Parallel/Serial conversion.
      1.  Software conversion.
          a. Receive operation.
          b. Transmit operation.
      2. Hardware conversion.
   E.  Serial standard conversion.
       1. TTL <-> RS232C.
       2.  TTL <-> 20 mA Current Loop.
       3. RS232C <-> 20 mA Current Loop.
       4. TTL <-> KCS.
   F. Modulators/demodulators or modems.
   G. Peripheral I/O devices, interfacing.
      1. Teletypewriter.
      2. Printer.
      3. CRT data terminal.
      4. Intelligent terminals.

XVIII. Describe Digital Storage, including;
   A.  Mass storage peripheral devices.
      1. Audio cassette recorder/player.
      2.  Floppy disk.
      3.  Hard disk.
   B. Dynamic RAM.
      1. Static vs. dynamic RAM.
      2. Dynamic memory interfacing.
      3. The MCM4116 dynamic RAM.
      4. Dynamic RAM refresh.
   C. Read Only memory.
      1. ROM devices.
      2. Mask/Programmed ROM.
      3. Programmable ROM or PROM.
      4. Erasable programmable ROM or EPROM.
      5. Electrically Erasable ROM or EEROM.
   D. Miscellaneous memories
      1. Bubble memory.
      2. Charge/Coupled devices, or CCDs.
      3. Josephson Junction devices.

XIX. Describe Programmable Timers 
   A. General programmable timer concepts.
   B. The 6840 programmable timer module or PTM.
      1. I/O diagram.
      2. PTM registers.
         a. Counters.
         b. Latches.
         c. Control registers.
         d. Status registers.
      3. How to address and initialize the 6840 PTM.
         a. 6840 PTM interfacing and addressing.
         b. PTM initialization.
      4. Using the PTM.
         a. Timer Output mode tasks.
         b. Interrupt generation.
         c. Continuous waveform generation.

XX. Describe  Microprocessor  Evolution 
   A. Intel families.
   B. Motorola families.
   C. AMD, Cyrix, IBM.

 XXI. Describe Current Technology in Microprocessors
   A. Compare and contrast features.
   B. How to locate latest information on the internet.
   C. Family, support and applications of current processors.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Open-book unit tests and labs      15 to 35% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes     10 to 25% of grade
Lab final                          10 to 25% of grade
Comprehensive written final        25 to 40% of grade
                                        100%

At least 50% of the possible lab points must be earned to receive a
passing grade for the course.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The course will meet for one full week for approximately eight hours per day of lecture and lab, approximately six months guided correspondence study and then another full week of lecture, labs and tests. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 286

  • Title: Applied Microprocessors*
  • Number: RREL 286
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 285 and approval of the railroad training director and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to provide an introduction to advanced microcomputer concepts and applications. This course is a continuation of topics introduced in the microprocessor course, with specific applications in general-purpose microcomputers (PCs) and dedicated microprocessor-based control systems. Included are hardware and software training in operating systems, peripherals, monitors, processors, storage media, maintenance, diagnostics and troubleshooting. Analog and digital data acquisition and processing, as well as voice digitization and playback, will be demonstrated. Presentations and labs will include incorporation of these functions into a PC, Harmon HLC and the Servo 9000 hot box detector. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish and explain the various hardware components of a microprocessor based system.
  2. Identify various buss structures used in microprocessor systems.
  3. Identify the video subsystem and explain it's basic operation, including interface board, software drives, and monitor.
  4. Name the various types of floppy disk and associated drives, including controllers.
  5. Describe various hard disk drives, and CD/ROM drives and their interface to the system through ST506 (MFM/RLL/ESDI), SCSI, IDE controllers.
  6. Identify imbedded microcontroller applications such as the keyboard and other systems involving their own microprocessors.
  7. Explain the interface to external devices through serial and parallel ports, such as printers and modems.
  8. Summarize analog to digital capture, conversion and manipulation.
  9. Describe and digital I/O control.
  10. Explain various techniques for speech digitization and reconstruction.
  11. Incorporate all basic components into a working system.
  12. Demonstrate the use of various analytic software to determine operational condition or computer components and system.
  13. Describe the purpose and operation of all circuit boards in the Servo 9000.
  14. Install, adjust and troubleshoot Servo hot box detector installations.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Your Computer System
   A. Physical Layout of the System
   B. Keyboards, Cases, and Power Supplies
   C. Microprocessors, Coprocessors, and Memory
   D. Adapter Boards MCI, ISA, VBL

II. Perform Analysis and Troubleshooting
   A. Analyzing systems
   B. Troubleshooting techniques

III. Identify Configuration Problems
   A. Terminate-and-Stay-Resident programs
   B. Device drivers
   C. Detecting and eradicating viruses

IV. List Video Sub-Systems
   A. Video standards
   B. Video monitors
   C. Video boards
   D. Video drivers

V. Describe Disk Sub-Systems
   A. Floppies – media and drive types
   B. Hard disk drives
      1. Heads, cylinders, tracks and sectors
      2. Performance parameters
      3. Interfaces
   C. CD-ROMs

VI. Analyze and Configure Ports and Peripherals
   A. I/O ports – types and terms
   B. Testing and configuring mice and digitizers
   C. Printer interface operation
   D. Modems: Using and troubleshooting

VII. Describe and Install Other Peripherals
   A. Soundblaster system
      1. Voice interface with computer system
         a. Digitization.
         b. Playback
      2. Speech editing
   B. Data acquisition system
      1. I/O interface with PC both analog and digital
      2. Digital storage scope from an A/D converter

VIII. Describe the Servo 9000 and/or VHLC – Dedicated Microprocessor
Systems
   A. Overview of system
   B. Identification and function of circuit boards
   C. Sensors
   D. Adjustments/Calibration
   E. System software
   F. Remote communication

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final Examination                  50-70% of grade*
In class exercises and quizzes     30-50% of grade*
*Percentages to total                100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).