Railroad Electronics (RREL)

Courses

RREL 110   Introduction to Railroad Signal Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the first of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe basic company organization, operating and safety rules pertaining to signalmen, basic principles of electricity and measurement as well as protective devices. Also he or she should have a basic understanding of signal systems, track circuits, and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) rules. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab/total.

RREL 112   Track Circuits and Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RREL 110 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the second of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and explain the operation of various track circuits, relay and control circuits, traffic control systems, locks, and applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

RREL 114   Traffic Control, Switch Machines & Locks* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 112 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the third of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to describe and maintain automatic block signaling systems, centralized traffic systems, power switches and locks. He should also be familiar with ground testing and isolation, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

RREL 116   Interlocking, Classification, Crossings & Gates* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: RREL 114 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

This course is the last of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform interlocking plant and route plant analysis, explain classification yards, grade crossing warning systems, gates, and other devices, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs instructional lab/total.

RREL 110

  • Title: Introduction to Railroad Signal Systems*
  • Number: RREL 110
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the first of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe basic company organization, operating and safety rules pertaining to signalmen, basic principles of electricity and measurement as well as protective devices. Also he or she should have a basic understanding of signal systems, track circuits, and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) rules. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the basic functions of BNSF, the geographic areas it serves, its corporate organization, its signal section organization, and how one will fit into the BNSF organization.
  2. List, explain and apply BNSF's personal safety requirements for employees and the public while on the job.
  3. Describe the past, present, and future implications of railroad signaling and how it relates to safe and efficient train operations.
  4. Identify the function, purpose, and safety precautions required to operate all laboratory equipment and systems, safely operate the equipment, and identify BNSF and American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association (AREMA) nomenclature and circuit plan symbols.
  5. Identify and describe the equipment, systems, and technologies that a signalman is required to install, maintain, and repair.
  6. Describe and apply basic electrical laws and terms, including Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Law, calculate circuit parameters, interpret resistor color code, and convert numbers back and forth into scientific notation.
  7. Describe how high voltage alternating current is transmitted, reduced to lower voltages, and rectified to a direct current at a usable value for signal applications. Also, demonstrate understanding of the operation of protective devices for lightning and other voltage transients.
  8. Identify signal battery types, styles, composition, voltages, and charging, maintenance, and disposal requirements.
  9. Describe the design, construction, and operation of a direct current neutral relay.
  10. Construct, adjust, and troubleshoot a conventional direct current track circuit.
  11. List and explain the construction and maintenance rules, standards, inspections, and tests that are required for track circuit systems; explain how these requirements must be met and maintained; and, recognize that permission must be received from Signal Engineering to deviate from these requirements.
  12. Identify that all American railroad signal systems must conform to minimum safety and operating standards as required by the FRA; that these minimum standards are enforced by a system of periodic inspections and tests; and, that BNSF often requires more stringent inspections and tests than does the FRA.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen's Agreement with BNSF regarding
Apprentice and Student Training.        
   A. State individual performance and attendance requirements.
   B. Identify home-study requirements.
   C. State conduct requirements while attending training sessions.
                
II. Company Organization of Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Company.
   A. State geographic areas served by BNSF and major commodities
transported.
   B. Describe titles and functions of senior officers.
   C. Describe the organization of the Signal Section at system and
division levels.
   D. Identify the place of one’s immediate supervisor in the BNSF
organization.
   E. List the basic responsibilities of one’s immediate supervisor.
   F. Describe one’s own responsibilities to the organization.
        
III. Operating and Safety Rules
   A. Identify and correctly interpret the specific rules from
“Maintenance of Way Operating Rules” that apply to the Signal
Section.
   B. Identify and correctly interpret the specific rules from
“Maintenance of Way Safety Rules” that apply to the Signal Section.
   C. Locate and correctly interpret general information found in Division
Timetables.
   D. Express the most important rules that are related to the Technical
Training Center.
        
IV. Overview of Train Operation and Signaling
   A. Define the term “train”.
   B. Describe the evolution of and reason for signaling.
   C. Identify the effect signaling has on railroad safety, operational
efficiency, and productivity.
   D. Identify the economic justifications for single vs. double main
lines, multiple tracks, yards, and branch lines.
   E. Identify the significant technological breakthroughs in signal
systems development.
   F. Identify the future directions and requirements of signal and train
control systems.
        
V. Signal Lab Equipment and Circuit Plan Symbols
   A. Identify and safely operate the automatic block signal simulator.
   B. Identify and safely operate the automatic interlocking plant
simulator.
   C. Identify and safely operate the traffic control simulator.
   D. Identify and safely operate both power operated switch machines.
   E. Identify and safely operate the electric switch lock.
   F. Identify and safely operate conventional and electronic track
circuit simulators.
   G. Identify and safely operate the highway crossing warning simulator.
   H. Identify electric train simulators.
   I. Identify the solar array.
   J. Interpret circuit plans, profiles, and detail sheets.
   K. Interpret BNSF and AREMA symbols and nomenclature used to describe
apparatus and functions.
        
VI. Overview of Signal Systems and Equipment
   A. Identify the types, functions, operating locations, nomenclature,
and associated hardware for:
      1. Interlockings.
      2. Manual Block Systems.
      3. Automatic Block Systems.
      4. Traffic Control Systems.
   B. Describe and explain:
      1. Classification Yard Systems.
      2. Highway Crossing Warning Systems.
      3. Detection equipment and adjuncts.
        
VII. Basic Electrical Laws and Terms
   A. Describe the structure of matter.
   B. Compare Electron Theory to Conventional Theory.
   C. Define “voltage”, “current”, and “resistance”.
   D. Identify common electrical symbols.
   E. Apply Ohm’s Law to calculate voltage, current, and resistance.
   F. Restate electrical measurements in different units.
   G. Describe a basic circuit.
   H. Describe a series circuit.
   I. Describe a parallel circuit.
   J. Describe a combination circuit.
   K. Apply Kirchoff’s Law to a series circuit.
   L. Apply Kirchoff’s Law to a parallel circuit.
   M. Calculate circuit parameters.
   N. Calculate power in series and parallel circuits.
   0. Interpret resistor color codes.
   P. Apply scientific notation.
   Q. Explain simple circuit analysis.
   R. Explain DC track circuit analysis.
        
VIII. Energy Distribution
   A. Describe how commercial AC and DC power is generated and
transmitted.
   B. Describe how transformers work.
   C. Describe turns ratio for step-up and step-down transformers.
   D. Describe power transfer within a transformer.
   E. Describe transformer internal losses.
   F. Identify and describe the functions of half-wave, full-wave, and
bridge rectifiers.
   G. Identify and describe the functions of fuses, cutouts, lightning
arresters, and surge suppressors.
   H. Describe how lightning works, grounding techniques to minimize
damage from lightning strikes, and how the grounding of equipment is
applied to signal cases and instrument houses.
        
IX. Batteries and Battery Charging Circuits
   A. Describe battery symbols and nomenclature used in signaling.
   B. Describe the difference between primary and secondary batteries.
   C. Describe the difference between lead acid and nickel cadmium
batteries.
   D. Describe the difference between vented and non-vented batteries.
   E. Interpret voltage readings, charging current, and discharging
current.
   F. Describe temperature compensation and effects.
   G.Describe proper precautions when handling or transporting.
   H. Explain maintenance requirements.
   I. Describe how to connect cells in series, parallel, series-parallel,
and split configurations.
   J. State proper procedures for load testing of secondary batteries.
   K. Define proper record keeping.
   L. Describe types of battery charging systems.
   M. Explain proper testing of battery charging circuits.
        
X. Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter (VOM) Use and Care
   A. Demonstrate the proper handling, precautions and care of a VOM.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the function and proper positioning of all
knobs on the meter.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the function of the needle-stop on the
VOM.
   D. Draw and explain a basic internal circuit for the voltage, current,
and resistance scales.
   E. Describe the function and replacement of the internal batteries and
fuse.
   F. Describe the function of the overload protection device.
   G. Demonstrate selecting the correct meter with the appropriate
sensitivity for specific tasks.
   H. Describe how to properly connect the VOM to measure resistance,
voltage, and current.
   I. Employ the VOM to measure values of resistance, voltage, and
current.
   J. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedures for transporting a
VOM.
   K. Select the appropriate meter for the appropriate task.
        
XI. Direct Current Neutral Relays
   A. Describe the design of a relay.
   B. Identify and explain the function of all parts and components of a
relay.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the electrical operation of a relay.
   D. Describe the electromagnetic operation of a relay.
   E. Interpret the information on the name plate of a relay.
   F. Test the operating characteristics of a relay and interpret pickup,
holding, and drop_away current values.
   G. Demonstrate the operation of a direct and indirect repeater
circuit.
        
XII. Conventional Direct Current Track Circuit
   A. Identify and describe the function of all components in a track
circuit.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a track
circuit.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of a track circuit during normal,
dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the fail-safe principle of a track circuit
during normal conditions, shunts, and opens.
   E. Describe and demonstrate the normal maintenance and test procedures
for a track circuit.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure;
use this procedure to find and repair an open and shunted track circuit.
   G. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a series foul
track circuit.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the operation, inspection, troubleshooting,
and testing of a series foul track circuit.
   I. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of a parallel foul
track circuit.
   J. Describe and demonstrate the operation, inspection, troubleshooting,
and testing of a centerfeed track circuit.
   K. Describe the basic advantages and disadvantages of coded track
circuits.
        
XIII. BNSF Rules, Standards, Inspections, and Tests for DC Track Circuits
   A. Describe and explain the construction and maintenance practices
for:
      1. Rail, frog, and fouling bonding.
      2. Insulated joint placement and maintenance.
      3. Insulated joint inspection and testing.
      4. Dead section requirements.
   B. Describe and perform hands on exercises involving:
      1. Track circuit wire installation and ringing.
      2. Track circuit wire connections.
      3. Establishing track circuit shunting sensitivity.
      4. Track circuit inspections and tests.
        
XIV. Federal Railroad Administration Rules, Standards, and Instructions
   A. Identify the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 233.
   B. Identify the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 235.
   C. Discuss the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 236.0
through 236.26.
   D. Describe and demonstrate in detail the requirements contained in R,
S & I Part 236.51 through 236.76.
   E. Describe and identify the defects contained in Classification of
Defect Codes, R, S & I Part 236.51 through 236.76.
   F. Discuss the general requirements contained in R, S & I Part 236.101
through 236.110.
   G. Discuss the differences between violations and willful violations.
   H. Identify and describe actions that would be considered for Civil and
Criminal Penalties.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 112

  • Title: Track Circuits and Systems*
  • Number: RREL 112
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RREL 110 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the second of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and explain the operation of various track circuits, relay and control circuits, traffic control systems, locks, and applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Set up, adjust, and troubleshoot one battery -two relay, two battery - two relay, and AC/DC type OS track circuits.
  2. Set up, adjust, and troubleshoot a variety of Audio Frequency Overlay (AFO) type track circuits.
  3. Describe the function and operation of electronic coded track circuits.
  4. Explain the historical development and principles on which modern railroad signal systems are designed
  5. Explain the general principles and design requirements of single direction, current of traffic, ABS signal systems.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of an Overlap type signal system and compare design requirements with other automatic block signal systems.
  7. Determine safe train spacing and detecting based on ABS, A-PB signal system design requirements.
  8. Describe Traffic Direction (TD) type A-PB signal system and compare design requirements with other automatic block signal systems.
  9. Describe the importance, function, and application of vital DC relays.
  10. Describe the basic function and operation of colorlight type wayside signals and the normal maintenance, inspections, and tests required for this type of signal.
  11. Discuss the basic function and operation of searchlight type wayside signals, and the normal maintenance, inspections and tests required for this type of signal.
  12. Describe the basic function and operation of standard line and local relay logic circuits.
  13. Discuss the function and operation of a switch circuit controller, and perform all inspections and tests required for this device and for all circuits controlled through this device.
  14. Demonstrate familiarity with the FRA’s requirements for Automatic Block Signal Systems.
  15. Demonstrate understanding of the principles of design and equipment required of a modern Traffic Control System.
  16. Demonstrate and apply the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure (UTP) for track, local and line circuits troubleshooting.
  17. Describe the functions, types, components and operation of the GRS 5A through 5H power operated switch machines.
  18. Describe the functions, types, components and operation of US&S power operated switch machines.
  19. Describe the functions, types, components and perform the operating requirements of electric switch locks
  20. Describe the function, operation and safety requirements of a Spring Switch Mechanism (SSM), and perform the maintenance, inspections and tests required for this device.
  21. Describe the basic requirements and demonstrate the fundamental operation of Traffic Control Systems controlled, intermediate and distant signals.
  22. Describe and apply the Federal Railroad Administration’s requirements to typical Traffic Control System equipment.
  23. Identify, describe and perform BNSF’s requirements for each standard Inspection and Test Procedure pertaining to Traffic Control System equipment.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. OS Track Circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components in typical OS track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of typical OS
track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical OS track circuits
during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical OS track circuits.
   E. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for a one battery - two relay
OS track circuit.
   F. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for a two battery - two relay
OS track circuit.
   G. Perform BNSF Shunt Foul Test (TP-104) for an AC/DC type OS track
circuit.
        
II. Audio Frequency Overlay Track Circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components in typical AFO track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of typical AFO
track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical AFO track circuits
during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical AFO track circuits.
   E. Describe the normal inspection and maintenance procedures for AFO
track circuits.
   F. Describe and demonstrate BNSF/Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)
requirements for shunting AFO track circuits.
        
III. Electronic coded track circuits
   A. Identify the function of all components of electronic coded track
circuits.
   B. Draw and interpret the electrical characteristics of electronic
coded track circuits.
   C. Interpret the operating parameters of typical electronic coded track
circuits during normal, dry, and wet conditions.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the Universal Troubleshooting Procedure to
find and repair opens and shunts of typical electronic coded track
circuits.
   E. Describe the normal inspection and maintenance procedures for
electronic coded track circuits.
   F. Describe and demonstrate BNSF/FRA requirements for shunting
electronic coded track circuits.
        
IV. Automatic Block Signal Systems (ABS)
   A. State the history of train operations.
   B. Discuss the evolution of manual block signaling.
   C. Describe train operation through the issuing of train orders.
   D. Describe train operation through the issuing of track warrants.
   E. Discuss the evolution and developmental concepts of ABS systems.
        
V. ABS Signal Systems
   A. Define “station”, “block”, and “automatic”.
   B. Interpret single direction signal location requirements.
   C. Sketch basic track and line circuits required for ABS operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the directional circuitry involved for
following movements.
   E. Describe and demonstrate braking distances for following movements.
   F. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   G. Describe train operation “against the current of traffic”.
   H. Describe the action to be taken for fundamental signal rules,
aspects, names, and indications.
   I. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for ABS.
        
VI. Overlap Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define the term “overlap” as used in Overlap signal systems.
   B. Determine signal location requirements with regard to staggered and
paralleled (flat pair) signals.
   C. Draw basic track and line circuits required for Overlap operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the directional circuitry involved for
following movements.
   E. Describe and demonstrate braking distances for following movements.
   F. Describe the overlap requirements for opposing movements.
   G. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   H. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for signal number plates for Overlap
signal systems
   I. Explain three applications for braking distance requirements as
stated in FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to Overlap signal systems.
        
VII. Absolute-Permissive Block (A-PB) Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define “absolute” and “block” as it refers to A-PB.
   B. Define “permissive” and “block” as it refers to A-PB.
   C. Determine signal location requirements.
   D. Sketch basic track and line circuits required for A-PB operation,
determine battery and relay placement, and determine necessary line
breaks.
   E. Describe and demonstrate normal train operation with opposing and
following movements.
   F. Explain and demonstrate the directional and overlap circuitry
involved for following movements.
   G. Describe braking distances involved for following movements.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the overlap circuitry involved for opposing
movements.
   I. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   J. Demonstrate the one requirement of FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to
A-PB signal systems.
   K. Describe the fundamental differences between Overlap and A-PB signal
systems.
        
VIII. Traffic Direction Block Signal System Design Requirements
   A. Define “absolute” and “block” as it refers to TD.
   B. Define “permissive” and “block” as it refers to TD.
   C. Determine signal location requirements.
   D. Draw basic track and line circuits required for TD operation,
determine battery and relay placement and determine necessary line
breaks.
   E. Describe and demonstrate normal train operation with opposing and
following movements.
   F. Explain and demonstrate the directional and overlap circuitry
involved for following movements.
   G. Describe braking distances involved for following movements.
   H. Describe and demonstrate the overlap circuitry involved for opposing
movements.
   I. Describe the requirements for reverse movements.
   J. Demonstrate the one requirement of FRA Rule 236.204 with regard to
Traffic Direction A-PB signal systems.
   K. Describe the fundamental differences between Overlap and Traffic
Direction signal systems.
        
IX. Nomenclature, Function, and Application of Relays
   A. Describe the basic parts of a DC neutral relay and their functions.
   B. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay.
   C. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as a direct repeater.
   D. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as an indirect
repeater.
   E. Describe the operation of a DC neutral relay as a sensing device.
   F. Describe the application of a DC neutral relay as a low voltage
device controlling one or more high voltage devices.
   G. Describe applications of DC neutral relays used in local circuits.
   H. Describe applications of DC neutral relays used in line circuits.
   I. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of
biased relays.
   J. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of
polar relays.
   K. Identify and describe the parts, operation, and applications of slow
release relays.
        
X. Colorlight Type Signals
   A. Describe and demonstrate the:
      1. Function and application of signal.
      2. Placement of lenses.
      3. Operation of the control circuit.
      4. Reduction of phantom aspects.
      5. Proper signal alignment principles.
   B. Describe and explain
      1. Proper operation of the lighting and light-out circuits.
      2. Appropriate colorchecks.
      3. Appropriate inspections and maintenance requirements.
      4. Proper method for disabling the signal.
      5. Signal adjuncts such as plates, indicators, stub posts, lights
and markers.
        
XI. Searchlight Type Signals
   A. Describe and demonstrate the:
      1. Function and application of signal.
      2. Function and placement of lenses.
      3. Function and placement of roundels.
   B. Describe the operation of:        
      1. The control circuit.
      2. The signal mechanism.
      3. Repeater circuits.
      4. Lighting and light-out circuits.
   C. Outline:
      1. Appropriate maintenance requirements.
      2. Appropriate inspection and tests required.
      3. Proper method for disabling the signal.
        
XII. Line and Local Control Circuits
   A. Construct and explain the operation of a two wire line control
circuit.
   B. Construct and explain the operation of a three wire line control
circuit.
   C. Construct  and explain the operation of a four wire line control
circuit.
   D. Describe the function and FRA rule related to each line break in a
two, three and four wire line control circuit.
   E. Construct and explain the function and operation of a signal
location battery distribution network.
   F. Construct and demonstrate the operation of approach lighting.
   G. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a light out circuit.
   H. Construct and demonstrate the operation of directional stick,
traffic stick and polechanger circuit logic.
   I. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a three aspect lighting
circuit.
   J. Construct and demonstrate the operation of a four aspect lighting
circuit.
        
XIII. Universal Troubleshooting Procedure
   A. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing track circuit troubles.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing local circuit problems.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the UTP for locating, isolating and
clearing line circuit problems.
        
XIV. Switch Circuit Controller (SWCC)
   A. Describe the function of a SWCC.
   B. Identify SWCC components and demonstrate the operation.
   C. Identify all SWCC nomenclature and symbols.
   D. Describe the installation requirements of a SWCC.
   E. Wire and demonstrate the proper operation of all circuits controlled
by a SWCC and demonstrate the appropriate adjustment procedure for each
circuit.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the proper operation of the centering
device on a SWCC.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the maintenance requirements for a SWCC.
   H. Describe and perform the inspections and tests for a SWCC.
   I. Describe and perform the inspections and tests for a shunt foul
circuit controlled by a SWCC.
        
XV. FRA Rules, Standards and Instructions For Automatic Block Signal
Systems
   A. Describe FRA Standards 236.201 through 236.207 and apply these
standards directly to BNSFs A-PB system to ensure that it
conforms.
   B. Describe the FRA Classification of Defects for 236.201 through
236.207 and apply these defect codes to the appropriate area of
BNSFs A-PB system.
   C. Identify which FRA requirements (236.0 through 236.110) apply to
BNSF’s A-PB system.
        
XVI. Introduction To Traffic Control Systems (Centralized Traffic Control,
CTC)
   A. Describe the principles of Traffic Control Systems (TCS) and the
advantages over ABS.
   B. Identify and operate the equipment required for an operational TCS.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the function of ABS intermediate signals.
   D. Describe the functions and state the reasons for installing electric
switch locks.
   E. Demonstrate the basic operation of a control point including its
controlled signals and power operated switch machines.
   F. Identify the basic equipment required at a centralized
dispatcher’s office required to communicate with field operable units.
   G. Describe the basic communications medium between dispatcher’s
office and field locations.
   H. Identify the equipment required at a field location necessary to
complete the communications network.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the safety and integrity features of a TCS
including office requests, field interlocking and fail-safe requirements.
                                                
XVII. General Railway Signal (GRS) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify the three functions of any main line power operated switch
machine (POSM).
   B. Identify the four types of single control POSM’s.
   C. Identify the four types of dual control POSM’s.
   D. Identify the primary components of a POSM layout.
   E. Demonstrate and explain the hand operation of a POSM.
   F. Demonstrate and explain the power operation of a POSM.
   G. Identify and demonstrate the mechanical locking requirements of a
POSM.
   H. Demonstrate the general operation of the switch circuit controller
including the motor, braking, overload and indication circuits.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the special features of a POSM.
   J. Perform the POSM adjustment procedures.
   K. Discuss the lubrication and maintenance requirements of a POSM.
   L. Describe and demonstrate the periodic inspections and tests required
of a POSM.
        
XVIII. Union Switch and Signal (US&S) Power Operated Switch Machines
(POSM)
   A. Identify the three functions of any main line power operated switch
machine (POSM).
   B. Identify the single control POSM’s.
   C. Identify the dual control POSM’s.
   D. Identify the primary components of a POSM layout.
   E. Demonstrate and explain the hand operation of a POSM.
   F. Demonstrate and explain the power operation of a POSM.
   G. Identify and demonstrate the mechanical locking requirements of a
POSM.
   H. Demonstrate the general operation of the switch circuit controller
including the motor, overload and indication circuits.
   I. Describe and demonstrate the special features of a POSM.
   J. Perform the POSM adjustment procedures.
   K. Discuss the lubrication and maintenance requirements of a POSM.
   L. Describe and demonstrate the periodic inspections and tests required
of a POSM.
        
XIX. Electric Switch Lock (EWL)
   A. Describe the basic functions of an EWL.
   B. Demonstrate the types of EWL’s and describe their uses.
   C. Identify the components of an EWL.
   D. Demonstrate the working requirements of an EWL.
   E. Define and demonstrate the force-down feature of an EWL.
   F. Define and demonstrate the emergency release of an EWL.
   G. Define and demonstrate the door switch of an EWL.
   H. Wire and demonstrate the unlock circuits of an EWL.
   I. Demonstrate the maintenance requirements of an EWL.
   J. Perform the inspections and tests required of an EWL.
        
XX. Spring Switch Mechanism
   A. State the definition of a SSM.
   B. Identify the symbol and nomenclature associated with a SSM.
   C. Describe the basic function of a SSM.
   D. Identify the components and state the basic operation of a SSM.
   E. State the safety considerations associated with a SSM.
   F. Wire and troubleshoot a SSM switch point indicator circuit.
   G. Trace and explain SSM signal control circuits.
   H. Describe the installation and maintenance requirements for a SSM.
   I. Describe the required inspections and tests for a SSM.
        
XXI. Traffic Control Systems Signal Operation
   A. Describe and demonstrate the basic operation of controlled and
intermediate signals.
   B. Describe the basic requirements of a distant signals.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the operation of directional stick circuits
and follow-up train movements.
        
XXII. FRA Rules, Standards And Instructions For Equipment In Traffic
Control Systems
   A. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to power operated switch machines.
   B. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to electric switch locks.
   C. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to spring switches.
   D. Describe and apply FRA Rules, Standards and Inspections that pertain
to searchlight signals.
   E. Discuss and apply FRA defect codes for electric switch locks, power
operated switch machines, spring switches and searchlight signals.
        
XXIII. BNSF Inspection and Test Procedures
   A. Use BNSF’s standard Test Procedure to perform the following
inspections and tests:
      1. Electric switch lock inspection.
      2. Power operated switch machine obstruction test.
      3. Power operated switch machine point detector integrity test.
   B. Perform the following inspections and tests per BNSF’s standard
Test Procedure:
      1. Searchlight signal inspection.
      2. Searchlight signal operating test.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
        Total                  100%

Grade Criteria:           A = 90 – 100%        
                          B = 80 –  89%               
                          C = 70 –  79%               
                          D = 60 -  69%         
                          F =  0 –  59%      

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 114

  • Title: Traffic Control, Switch Machines & Locks*
  • Number: RREL 114
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 112 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the third of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to describe and maintain automatic block signaling systems, centralized traffic systems, power switches and locks. He should also be familiar with ground testing and isolation, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs. instructional lab studio/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and demonstrate the principles of Automatic Block Signaling (ABS) design and operation.
  2. Describe the principles of Centralized Traffic Control (CTC) design and operation.
  3. Describe the correct placement, individual requirements and specific uses of all wayside signals currently in operation in CTC territory.
  4. Describe all aspects of General Railway Signal (GRS) power operated switch machines, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  5. Describe all aspects of Union Switch and Signal (US&S) power operated switch machines, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  6. Describe all aspects of electric switch locks, and perform all required maintenance, inspections and tests.
  7. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the organization and operation of CTC system circuits
  8. Describe the function and importance of maintaining signal circuits ground free and perform BNSF/FRA ground tests to isolate and clear both positive and negative grounds.
  9. Describe and perform CTC inspections and tests as required by BNSF Railways and the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).
  10. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the requirements for a signal colorcheck and cutover. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Track Circuits and Automatic Block Signaling (ABS)
   A. Discuss and demonstrate the basic differences between single
direction ABS, Overlap, A-PB and Traffic Direction systems.
   B. Identify basic track and line circuits required for ABS operation,
determine battery and relay placement and determine necessary line
breaks.
   C. Interpret basic local lighting, directional and traffic stick
circuits required for ABS operation.    
   D. Wire and adjust switch circuit controllers for typical circuits used
in ABS systems
   E. Discuss the requirements for spring switches.
   F. Demonstrate an application of each BNSF / FRA Rule, Standard and
Instruction pertaining to ABS.
   G. Perform all required BNSF/FRA Inspection and Test procedures
pertaining to ABS.

II. Review of Centralized Traffic Control (CTC) Principles
   A. Describe the underlying concept of CTC.
   B. State the advantages of CTC over ABS.
   C. Describe the fail-safe requirements of CTC.
   D. Describe all major components within a CTC System and determine
whether or not each is required to be fail-safe.
        
III. Centralized Traffic Control Analysis-Signals
   A. Determine the necessity, correct placement and braking distance
requirements for intermediate, holding, controlled and distant signals.
   B. Discuss the utilization of bridge, dwarf and back-to-back signals.
   C. Determine the correct placement of insulated joints with regard to
signals.
   D. Describe the use and requirements of holding signals.
   E. Identify and describe all combinations of signal rules, aspects,
names and indications.
   F. Identify and describe all signal attachments such as number plates,
letter plates, marker plates and marker lights.
   G. Interpret circuitry for intermediate, holding and controlled
signals.
   H. Discuss the appropriate Maintenance of Way Operating Rules that
pertain to CTC operation.
        
IV. General Railway Signal (GRS) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify and explain the operating characteristics of GRS 5A through
5H power operated switch machines (POSM).
   B. Identify and explain the function of all components in the motor,
gear and electrical compartments.
   C. Explain and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   D. Explain and demonstrate proper power operation.
   E. Describe the mechanical locking requirements of the throw rod, throw
bar, locking bar dog and lock rods.
   F. Explain and demonstrate a thorough and complete mechanical
inspection including the “Screwdriver Test”.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the POSM “Obstruction Test”.
   H. Describe the theory of operation, voltage and current requirements,
and electrical circuit of the motor while in the power mode.
   I. Describe the theory of operation, components, and electrical circuit
of the motor while in the generator (dynamic braking mode).
   J. Describe and demonstrate the entire operation of the circuit
controller.
   K. Describe and demonstrate the proper motor and shunt contact
adjustment procedure.
   L. Describe, demonstrate and adjust the overload circuit.
   M. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the point detector rods,
clips and rocker assembly.
   N. Describe and demonstrate the proper point detector contacts
adjustment.
   0. Describe and demonstrate a thorough electrical inspection.
   P. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Point Detector Integrity Test
(TP-103).
   Q. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedure for disabling the POSM
including disabling the appropriate signal control circuits and providing
proper notification.
   R. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Power Operated Switch Indication
Locking Test (TP-380).
        
V. Union Switch and Signal (US&S) Power Operated Switch Machines (POSM)
   A. Identify and explain the operating characteristics of US&S M23-A and
M23-B power operated switch machines (POSM).
   B. Identify and explain the function of all components in the motor,
gear and electrical compartments.
   C. Explain and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   D. Explain and demonstrate proper power operation.
   E. Describe the mechanical locking requirements of the throw rod, slide
bar, rack, dogs and lock rods.
   F. Explain and demonstrate a thorough and complete mechanical
inspection.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the POSM “Obstruction Test”.
   H. Describe the theory of operation, voltage and current requirements,
and electrical circuit of the motor while in the power mode.
   I. Describe the theory of operation, components and electrical circuit
of the motor while in the generator (dynamic braking mode).
   J. Describe and demonstrate the entire operation of the circuit
controller.
   K. Describe and demonstrate the proper motor and shunt contact
adjustment procedure.
   L. Describe, demonstrate and adjust the overload circuit.
   M. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the point detector rods.
   N. Describe and demonstrate the proper point detector contacts
adjustment.
   0. Describe and demonstrate a thorough electrical inspection.
   P. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s “Point Detector Integrity
Test”.
   Q. Describe and demonstrate the proper procedure for disabling the POSM
including disabling the appropriate signal control circuits and providing
proper notification.
   R. Describe and demonstrate BNSF’s Power Operated Switch Indication
Locking Test (TP-380).
        
VI. Electric Switch Lock (EWL)
   A. Describe the function, styles and uses of various EWL’s.
   B. Describe and demonstrate proper hand operation.
   C. Identify and describe the mechanical locking components and
requirements.
   D. Describe and demonstrate operation of the emergency release.
   E. Describe and demonstrate the electrical locking components,
requirements and operation.
   F. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the release track.
   G. Describe and demonstrate the operation of the force down feature.
   H. Describe the maintenance and inspection requirements for an EWL
location.
   I. Discuss the requirements of BNSF/FRA Electric Lock Test Procedure
(TP-105).
   J. Identify and discuss the FRA Requirements and test procedures of a
Release Section (TP-16).
        
VII. CTC Circuit Analysis
   A. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to clear
controlled, intermediate and distant signals.
   B. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to make power
operated switch machines operate and indicate normal and reverse.
   C. Describe and demonstrate the circuitry necessary to operate electric
switch locks.
   D. Troubleshoot typical CTC circuitry and clear faults in signal and
switch control, lighting and locking circuits.
        
VIII. Signal Circuit Ground Testing and Isolation (TP-107)
   A. Describe and demonstrate the requirements for proper battery
maintenance.
   B. Inject and explain the consequence of a ground on signal line
circuits.
   C. Inject and explain the consequence of a ground on a local signal
circuits.
   D. Perform the standard ground test, “snap” test and auxiliary
battery test (TP-107).
   E. Isolate and clear a positive ground on a line and local circuit.
   F. Isolate and clear a negative ground on a line and local circuit.
   G. Isolate and clear a combination positive and negative ground.
   H. Properly complete appropriate paperwork.
                
IX. BNSF and FRA Inspections, Tests and Forms
   A. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
switch circuit controller inspection and test (TP-103).
   B. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
shunt fouling circuit test (TP-104).
   C. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
power operated switch obstruction test (TP-382).
   D. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for power
operated switch point detector integrity test (TP-103).
   E. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
searchlight signal rollover inspection (TP-102).
   F. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
searchlight signal operating characteristics test (TP-102).
   G. Perform the procedure and complete the required paperwork for the
ground test (TP-107).
   H. Describe the route locking test for section, route and sectional
release (TP-379).
   I. Describe the time locking test for control point and electric switch
lock (TP-378).
   J. Describe the approach locking test for control point and electric
switch lock (TP-377).
   K. Describe the indication locking test for switches and signals
(TP-380).
   L. Describe the BNSF traffic locking test (TP-381).
        
X. Colorcheck and Cutover
   A. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck after construction or after the disarranging of vital circuits
or components.
   B. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck for adjacent control points at the ends of a passing siding.
   C. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a
colorcheck for adjacent control points between passing sidings.
   D. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of an electric switch lock with approach locking.
   E. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of adjacent control points at ends of a passing siding.
   F. Describe the fundamental requirements and procedures for a cutover
of adjacent control points between passing sidings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet for a minimum of 7 ½ , eight hour days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

RREL 116

  • Title: Interlocking, Classification, Crossings & Gates*
  • Number: RREL 116
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3.5
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RREL 114 and approval of the railroad training administrator and the JCCC department approval.

Description:

This course is the last of a series of four designed to provide entry (apprentice) level training to new signal employees, or those seeking to enter this trade. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform interlocking plant and route plant analysis, explain classification yards, grade crossing warning systems, gates, and other devices, as well as applicable rules and standards. 44 hrs. lecture 16 hrs instructional lab/total.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the function, need, use, basic equipment required and rules in effect at a manual interlocking plant.
  2. Describe the manual interlocking process.
  3. Outline the principles of route signaling systems.
  4. Describe the Automatic Interlocking Plant process.
  5. Describe the function and requirements of vital automatic interlocking plant circuits.
  6. Describe and perform all BNSF Railways (BNSF) and Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) required Inspections and Tests pertaining to interlockings, and correctly complete all required paperwork.
  7. Demonstrate a general understanding of the location, function, equipment and operation of Classification Yards.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of the general terms, nomenclature, function, operating and safety requirements associated with Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems (HRGCWS).
  9. Explain the basic design, safety and operating requirements of conventional track circuited, directional HRGCWS.
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for standard HRGCWS lighting circuits and for lamp, reflector, and lens placement and alignment.
  11. Explain the requirements for HRGCWS gate control, operation, and maintenance.
  12. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory, operation, and maintenance of motion reactive equipment.
  13. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory, operation and maintenance of constant warning time devices.
  14. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theory and operation of HRGCWS adjuncts.
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of the appropriate installation, inspection and test requirements.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.Manual Interlocking Plant Function (MIP)
   A. State the definition of a manual interlocking plant (MIP) and
compare it to a Centralized Traffic Control System.
   B. Explain the function of and need for MIP’s.
   C. State the locations where MIP’s are installed and discuss the
operating and safety benefits derived.
   D. State the basic equipment required at a MIP and describe how each
contributes to the operation of the plant.
   E. Draw a railway/railway MIP and describe its layout and normal
operation.
   F. State the relevant operating rules for a railway/railway MIP.
   G. Describe FRA Standards 236.301 through 236.3 14 and apply these
standards to a railway/railway MIP.
   H. Describe FRA Rules and Instructions 236.326 through 236.342 and
apply these rules and instructions to a railway/railway MIP.
   I. Describe FRA Inspections and Tests 236.3 76 through 23 6.386 and
apply these inspections and tests to a railway/railway MIP.

II. Manual Interlocking Process
   A. Explain the operational priority of trains that is considered when
designing a MIP.
   B. Describe the requirements of the “Request” portion of the
interlocking process.
   C. Describe the requirements of the “Establish” portion of the
interlocking process.
   D. Describe the requirements of the “Lock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   E. Describe the requirements of the “Clear signal” portion of the
interlocking process.
   F. Describe the requirements of the “Train movement and recording”
portion of the interlocking process.
   G. Describe the requirements of the “Unlock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   H. Analyze the possibility of a failure within each section of the
interlocking process and determine the consequences.

III. Entrance/Exit (NX or Route) Plants
   A. Describe the basic operation of a route plant.
   B. Describe the general routing scheme of a route plant.
   C. Discuss the general inspection and test requirements.

IV. Automatic Interlocking Plant Process (AlP)
   A. Explain the operational priority of trains that is considered when
designing an AlP
   B. Describe the requirements of the “Request” portion of the
interlocking process.
   C. Describe the requirements of the “Establish” portion of the
interlocking process.
   D. Describe the requirements of the “Lock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   E. Describe the requirements of the “Clear signal” portion of the
interlocking process.
   F. Describe the requirements of the “Train movement and recording”
portion of the interlocking process.
   G. Describe the requirements of the “Unlock” portion of the
interlocking process.
   H. Analyze the possibility of a failure within each section of the
interlocking process and determine the consequence.

V. Automatic Interlocking Plant (AlP) Circuits
   A. Examine AlP circuit prints and determine whether circuits are vital
or non-vital.
   B. Describe AlP control circuits and trace the circuit.
   C. Describe AlP operating circuits and trace the circuit.
   D. Describe AlP locking circuits and trace the circuit.
   E. Describe AlP indicating circuits and trace the circuit.
   F. Describe AlP unlocking circuits and trace the circuit.
   G. Examine individual AlP circuits and describe how each circuit
satisfies FRA requirements.
   H. Trace the event recorder circuit and determine what events will be
recorded.

VI. BNSF and FRA Inspections, Tests and Forms
   A. Perform the switch circuit controller inspection and test (TP-103).
   B. Perform the searchlight signal rollover inspection (TP-102).
   C. Perform searchlight signal operating characteristics test (TP-102).
   D. Perform a route locking test (TP-379).
   E. Interpret indication locking test signals (TP-380).
   F. Perform approach locking test (TP-377).
   G. Perform a time locking test (TP-378).
   H. Perform a traffic locking test (TP-381).
   I. Perform a grounds test (TP-107).
   J. Perform an insulation resistance test (TP-108).
   K. Test and inspect time releases, relays and devices (TP-109).
   L. Complete required forms for above test and inspection procedures.

VII. Classification Yards
   A. Describe the general function and need of Classification Yards.
   B. State the requirements of a Master Processor and PC computers.
   C. Identify the positions required to operate a Classification Yard.
   D. Define common Classification Yard terms.
   E. Describe the general layout of a typical Classification Yard.
   F. Identify significant Classification Yard equipment and areas.
   G. Describe the duties and responsibilities of Classification Yard
signal employees.

VIII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems (HRGCWS) - General
Requirements
   A. Use the correct terms when referring to HRGCWS.
   B. Use standard HRGCWS nomenclature.
   C. Describe the basic function of all HRGCWS.
   D. Explain the four basic design requirements for all HRGCWS.
   E. Explain the general safety requirements for HRGCWS.
   F. Describe BNSF/FRA requirements for HRGCWS.

IX. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Conventional Crossing
   A. Discuss the requirements for insulated joint, track battery and
relay placement at a HRGCWS.
   B. Discuss and demonstrate BNSF’s requirement for “positive island
section ring”.
   C. Discuss and trace the circuit requirements for directional stick and
ESR-WSR pickup, holding and light engine holding circuits.
   D. Discuss and demonstrate the possible causes for “receding ring,
tailring, ringout, or ringthrough”.
   E. Discuss and demonstrate the possible causes of and remedies for
“in-the-hook” situations.
   F. Wire and demonstrate the operation of relay and electronic flashers
in lighting circuits.
   G. Discuss and trace the circuit requirements for proper operation of
the bell circuit.
   H. Discuss the requirements and operational considerations for
interconnecting with road crossing systems.

X. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Lamps, Reflectors and
Lens
   A. Wire, discuss and troubleshoot a HRGCWS lighting circuit.
   B. Discuss the cable and wire requirements for HRGCWS.
   C. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS lamps.
   D. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS reflectors.
   E. Discuss BNSF requirements for HRGCWS lens.
   F. Discuss BNSF HRGCWS lighting unit alignment procedure and
requirements.

XI. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Gates
   A. Wire HRGCWS gate control circuits.
   B. Test the gate control circuit for proper gate delay.
   C. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper motor down
operation.
   D. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper dynamic
braking operation.
   E. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper dampening
operation.
   F. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper lighting
circuit operation.
   G. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper bell
operation.
   H. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper motor up
operation.
   I. Adjust and test the gate circuit controller for proper pickup and
holding circuit operation.
   J. Adjust and test the gate for proper horizontal and vertical torque
and buffer operation.

XII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Motion Reactive
   A. Identify system components.
   B. Setup unit using manufacturer’s installation manual to BNSF design
requirements.
   C. Test for proper operation using manufacturer’s specifications and
BNSF test procedures.
   D. Verify system complies with BNSF/FRA Rules, Standards and
Instructions by simulation of train movements.

XIII. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Constant Warning Time
Devices
   A. Identify system components.
   B. Setup unit using manufacturer’s installation manual to BNSF design
requirements.
   C. Test for proper operation using manufacturer’s specifications and
BNSF test procedures.
   D. Verify system complies with BNSF/FRA Rules, Standards and
Instructions by simulation of train movements.

XIV. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Adjuncts, Test
Equipment, Analyzers and Monitors
   A. Discuss the general requirements for UAX and AXC operation.
   B. Discuss the general requirements for DAX operation.
   C. Discuss the general requirements for Wrap circuit operation.
   D. Operate a Joint Coupler Tester to test HRGCWS shunts and couplers.
   E. Operate analog, digital and Frequency Selective voltmeters to setup,
test and troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   F. Operate an Insulated Joint Tester to troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   G. Operate a Shunt Locator to troubleshoot HRGCWS.
   H. Analyze data and verify system parameters using a laptop computer.

XV. Highway/Rail Grade Crossing Warning Systems - Installation,
Inspection, Testing and Accident and Incident Reporting.
   A. Interpret BNSF Installation Instructions 7.3, 7.4, 7.5.
   B. Interpret BNSF Test Procedure 234.
   C. Apply BNSF Test and Inspection, Instruction 7.1.
   D. Complete BNSF Post Accident Test-Signal Form 406.
   E. Interpret BNSF Out of Service Signal Instructions 7.2 and 7.2A.
   F. Complete Inspection Record-Signal Form 405.
   G. Complete Test Record Summary-Signal Form 406.

XVI. Additional Signal Training Opportunities
   A. Discuss available safety training programs.
   B. Discuss available continuing training programs.
   C. Discuss available specific equipment training.
   D. Discuss available advanced electronics training.
   E. Discuss available computer based training.
   F. Discuss available Tuition Refund training benefits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                60-80% of grade
Projects/Assignments     20-40% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:         A = 90 – 100%          
                        B = 80 –  89%         
                        C = 70 –  79%         
                        D = 60 -  69%           
                        F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course will meet eight hours per day for a minimum of 7 ½ days of lecture and lab.
  2. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).