Associate of Arts with Emphasis in Administration of Justice

The Administration of Justice program offers courses which reflect a balanced approach to the criminal justice system. Courses in law enforcement, the courts, and corrections are available. This program prepares students to become a criminal justice professional or transition to a four-year degree. A full range of elective courses offer the student an ability to explore individual interests. The ADMJ faculty members are all experienced in an area of the criminal justice system; they bring real-world expertise to the classroom.

Important: Students graduating with an Administration of Justice degree must complete an approved cultural diversity course. Some of the approved courses are able to meet both the cultural diversity requirement and a general education requirement.

Cultural Diversity Course Requirement at JCCC

(Major Code 2120; State CIP Code 43.0107)

Associates of Arts Degree

First Semester

ENGL 121Composition I*3
ADMJ 121Introduction to Administration of Justice3
NOTE: If you are certified under the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Act, you are eligible to receive assessment of prior learning credit for some or all of these courses.
ADMJ 124Criminal Justice and Corrections3
ADMJ 127Criminology3
Humanities Elective (cannot be a philosophy course) ^3
Total Hours15
^

Humanities Elective (cannot be a philosophy course)

Second Semester

ENGL 122Composition II*3
MATH 171College Algebra* (or higher)3
SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
or SPD 121 Public Speaking
or SPD 125 Personal Communication
ADMJ 141Criminal Law*3
NOTE: If you are certified under the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Act, you are eligible to receive assessment of prior learning credit for some or all of these courses.
ADMJ 235Community Based Corrections3
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Total Hours16
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

Third Semester

ADMJ Program Elective (see below)3
PHIL 124Logic and Critical Thinking3
PSYC 130Introduction to Psychology3
ADMJ 228Criminal Justice Communications *2
ADMJ 150Criminal Procedure3
NOTE: If you are certified under the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Act, you are eligible to receive assessment of prior learning credit for some or all of these courses.
Science and/or Math Elective ^3
Total Hours17
^

Science and/or Math Elective

Fourth Semester

ADMJ Program Elective (see below)6
ADMJ 255Ethics and Criminal Justice3
Science course with Lab ^4
Social Science Elective (cannot be a psychology course) ^^3
Total Hours16
^

Science course with Lab

^^

Social Science Elective

ADMJ Program Electives

ADMJ 122Police Operations*3
ADMJ 130Crime Prevention3
ADMJ 133Juvenile Delinquency3
ADMJ 143Crime Analysis3
ADMJ 145Fundamentals Private Security3
ADMJ 148Physical and Sexual Violence within the Family3
ADMJ 154Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation3
NOTE: If you are certified under the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Act, you are eligible to receive assessment of prior learning credit for some or all of these courses.
ADMJ 170Drugs and Crime3
ADMJ 180Correctional Casework*3
ADMJ 201Police Interrogation3
ADMJ 221Forensic Science and Crime Scene Investigation3
ADMJ 223The World of Crime*3
ADMJ 230Criminal Behavior*3
ADMJ 275Police Management*3
ADMJ 285Administration of Justice Internship*3

Total Program Hours: 64

Courses

ADMJ 121   Introduction to Administration of Justice (3 Hours)

This course provides a detailed description of the components of the American criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections. Students utilize critical thinking skills to discern the balance between individual rights and public order as it pertains to the criminal justice process. Students demonstrate knowledge of criminal justice processes through examinations, assigned papers and reports. Additionally, students are required to participate in field and classroom experiences designed to explore the various career opportunities within the criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 121H   HON: Introduction to Administration of Justice (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors Department approval

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ADMJ 122   Police Operations* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

This course examines the major components involved in police operations. The students examine the role of police in society and the application of key concepts to policing scenarios. Focus is placed on patrol, investigative activities, communications, routine and emergency police calls, specialized police operations, police operations in culturally diverse communities, legal restraints, stress in police work, and ethical responsibilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 124   Criminal Justice and Corrections (3 Hours)

This course will explore the correctional system and trace the evolution of criminal sanctions from early English common law to the present. An examination of local, state, and federal correctional systems will provide an overview of society's response to criminal behavior. Students will be introduced to a detailed examination of jails, prisons, and community corrections. 3 hrs. lecture/ wk.

ADMJ 127   Criminology (3 Hours)

This class will explore various explanations for criminal behavior including choice, biosocial, psychological, social structure and social process theories. Society's responses to crime will also be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. ADMJ 127 and SOC 127 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

ADMJ 130   Crime Prevention (3 Hours)

Topics of special interest include the techniques public service agencies use to operate crime-prevention programs and provide technically accurate, cost-effective security recommendations to the community. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 133   Juvenile Delinquency (3 Hours)

This class will provide an analysis of detention procedures, disposition, custody and treatment of juvenile offenders throughout the United States with a specific interest in area systems. The origin and development of juvenile agencies, as well as the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of juvenile courts will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 133H   HON: Juvenile Delinquency (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ADMJ 141   Criminal Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121 or LAW 121

After taking this course, the student will be able to state the two basic elements necessary for any crime and the philosophy behind these two elements. After a detailed exploration of common law crimes and selected Kansas and Missouri statutes, the student will be able to classify common law crimes and state the difference between a felony and a misdemeanor. The student will understand the significance of the separation of powers doctrine and its application to criminal law and the constant interplay of the U.S. Constitution in criminal law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 143   Crime Analysis (3 Hours)

Students will learn crime profiling skills and specialized techniques of conducting research, analyzing data and producing crime analysis products. Students will survey existing computer applications and learn practical use and evaluation of these applications. Students will become familiar with the common written reports, charts and graphs used to describe crime analysis products. Students will survey the variety of customers served by crime analysts and the integral part crime analysis plays within the community. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 145   Fundamentals Private Security (3 Hours)

In addition to understanding the general field of private security, the student will be able to differentiate between the security needs of industry, private business, government and selected educational institutions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 148   Physical and Sexual Violence within the Family (3 Hours)

A description and causal analysis of the different physical, psychological, and sexual abuse acts that may occur within the primary family unit will be provided in this course. The study will include possible causative factors; psychological and social effects on the various family members; psychological, social and legal implications; treatments; and the relationship between abuse and crime. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 150   Criminal Procedure (3 Hours)

Criminal Procedure is an exploration of the structure of the judicial process, the sources and constitutional development of criminal procedure, criminal investigation, remedies for violations of constitutional rights, the pretrial and trial process, sentencing and appeals, and counter-terrorism. Students will learn through discussion of important U.S. Supreme Court cases that have shaped the way the Constitution is interpreted followed by analysis of hypothetical fact patterns that require the student to apply the knowledge they have gained. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 154   Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation (3 Hours)

This course is designed to give fundamental information that serves as an overview of the entire field as well as a solid foundation for specialized course work. The course focuses on investigation of property crimes, homicide investigation, crimes against children and sex-related offenses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 170   Drugs and Crime (3 Hours)

This course explores the relationship between drugs and crime. Students will analyze how drugs impact criminal activity at the local, state, federal, and international level. Local, state and federal laws regulating substance use will also be examined. Students will become familiar with the effects of drugs on the body. Interventions for individuals harmfully involved with drug use will be explored. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 180   Correctional Casework* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ADMJ 124

This course helps prepare students for positions in correctional agencies. Students will learn how corrections officials, parole officers, probation officers, facility based caseworkers and treatment providers perform their roles. Students will examine various types of offenders housed in correctional facilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 201   Police Interrogation (3 Hours)

This class will assist students in developing the specific verbal and written communication skills used in the criminal justice field. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing, interrogation, and report writing skills. Course content will focus on interviewing victims, witnesses and suspects and utilizing the information to write accurate and complete narrative reports. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 221   Forensic Science and Crime Scene Investigation (3 Hours)

This course provides an overview of forensic science by focusing on the current technologies police rely on to apprehend criminal perpetrators and to link them through trace evidence to crime scenes. Emphasis is on crime scene investigation, physical evidence, organic and inorganic analysis, forensic toxicology and use of DNA in investigations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 223   The World of Crime* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

This course provides the study of crime and the criminal justice systems of countries other than the United States, and with issues related to crime throughout the world. Emphasis will be placed on a comparison of the three main aspects of the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections) between specific countries. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 228   Criminal Justice Communications* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121

This class will assist students in developing the specific verbal and written communication skills used in the criminal justice field. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing and report writing skills, focusing on the unique types of writing required gathering pertinent information and then recording that information by writing a variety of report narratives, represented by those prepared by individuals working in a profession within the criminal justice system. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 230   Criminal Behavior* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PSYC 130

This course explores the relationship between psychology, criminal behavior, and the criminal justice system. The foundation of the course will be a detailed examination of the various theories used to explain the causation of criminal behavior. Special emphasis will be placed on exploring how this understanding is applied in various settings within the criminal justice system; including police departments, the courts, and corrections. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 235   Community Based Corrections (3 Hours)

This course is a comprehensive examination of community based corrections. The history of probation and parole is discussed as a foundation for the expanded coverage of correctional services offered in the community. Emphasis is given to modern correctional paradigms including diversion, intermediate sanctions, reentry and restorative justice. Practical field experience will broaden the students' understanding of this population and successful best practices of existing federal, state and county agencies will be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 255   Ethics and Criminal Justice (3 Hours)

This course explores the study of ethics, particularly as it applies to the field of criminal justice. Focus is placed on providing a basic framework for understanding morality and ethics, then applying those concepts to the development of critical thinking and decision-making skills as they relate to the field of criminal justice. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 265   Advanced Police Training* (12 Hours)

Prerequisites: Selective Admissions - open only to currently employed full-time police officers attending the Police Academy under sponsorship of a law enforcement agency

This course consists of 60 clock hours of law enforcement training provided in addition to the 540 hours required by the Kansas Minimum Standards Training Act for recruits attending the Police Academy. While the required 600-hour curriculum is provided without fee, enrollment in advanced training is required of all those attending the academy. The curriculum covers law, criminal investigations, patrol procedures, defensive tactics, report writing and specialized training required by local law enforcement agencies.

ADMJ 275   Police Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

This class will assist students in developing an understanding through practical analysis of modern criminal justice administration theory as well as supervisory and management principles. Students will apply these principles to the unique operating problems of contemporary criminal justice organizations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ADMJ 285   Administration of Justice Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Fifteen credit hours in ADMJ courses or department approval and a grade point average of 2.0 or higher

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate federal, state or local criminal justice agencies or not-for-profit organizations, and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career in the field of criminal justice. The student spends the equivalent of 12 hours per week for 14 weeks performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 168 hours.

ADMJ 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ADMJ 121

  • Title: Introduction to Administration of Justice
  • Number: ADMJ 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a detailed description of the components of the American criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections. Students utilize critical thinking skills to discern the balance between individual rights and public order as it pertains to the criminal justice process. Students demonstrate knowledge of criminal justice processes through examinations, assigned papers and reports. Additionally, students are required to participate in field and classroom experiences designed to explore the various career opportunities within the criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify and discuss the major components of the criminal justice system.
  2. Describe the diverse careers available in criminal justice.
  3. Recognize cross-cultural perspectives of crime.
  4. Discuss the relevance of maintaining crime statistics.
  5. Compare and contrast the Uniform Crime Reports, the National Crime Victimization Survey and the National Incident Based Reporting System.
  6. List and explain the essential elements of a crime.
  7. Explain the legal defenses against criminal responsibility.
  8. Discuss the importance of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments as they apply to criminal justice.
  9. Trace the evolutionary trends in law enforcement in the United States.
  10. Describe how law enforcement agencies are organized in the United States at the federal, state and local levels.
  11. Identify how a police officer uses discretion in carrying out his/her daily tasks.
  12. Discuss the recent trends in reports of police brutality and the use of deadly force.
  13. Discuss and apply search and seizure law relevant to the rights afforded under the Fourth Amendment.
  14. Discuss and apply the law of interrogation relevant to the rights afforded under the Fifth Amendment.
  15. Define and explain the importance of the exclusionary rule.
  16. Describe the courtroom work group and the roles each participant plays.
  17. Outline the judicial process from pretrial to sentencing.
  18. Compare and contrast various sentencing options.
  19. Trace the roots of the modern correctional philosophies.
  20. Identify trends in community-based corrections.
  21. Discuss the prison culture and its effect on inmates.
  22. Discuss the nature and scope of the juvenile justice system.
  23. Discuss the war against drugs and its effect on the criminal justice system.
  24. Describe the effect terrorism has had on contemporary law enforcement activities and individual civil liberties.

Content Outline and Competencies:

The Study of Crime in America
   A. Define the goals of the criminal justice system.
   B. Discuss the steps involved in the American criminal justice
process.
   C. Contrast the goals of the Due Process Model and the Crime Control
Model of criminal justice.
   D. List methods for determining the extent of crime.
   E. Discuss the legal requirements of a criminal act and defenses to a
criminal charge

II. Policing in America
   A. Describe the purpose and organization of police agencies.
   B. Discuss the individual rights afforded under the Fourth Amendment.
   C. List and apply the primary exceptions to the Fourth Amendment
warrant requirement.
   D. Discuss and apply important aspects of interrogation law under the
Fifth Amendment.
   E. Discuss the issues and challenges confronting contemporary
policing.

III. Adjudication of Criminal Defendants
   A. Discuss the structure and function of local, state and federal
courts.
   B. Identify and describe the process of a criminal trial.
   C. Discuss the philosophy and goals of criminal sentencing.
   D. List and describe modern sentencing options.

IV. Corrections in America
   A. Discuss the function of probation, parole and community
corrections.
   B. Discuss the structure and function of prisons and jails in America.
   C. Describe the social structure and subculture inside America's
prisons.
   D. Identify important legal restrictions pertaining to prisoners'
rights.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade. The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing: complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned. In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 121H

No information found.

ADMJ 122

  • Title: Police Operations*
  • Number: ADMJ 122
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

Description:

This course examines the major components involved in police operations. The students examine the role of police in society and the application of key concepts to policing scenarios. Focus is placed on patrol, investigative activities, communications, routine and emergency police calls, specialized police operations, police operations in culturally diverse communities, legal restraints, stress in police work, and ethical responsibilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the historical developments in law enforcement operations.
  2. Compare and contrast different types of patrol and their effectiveness.
  3. Explain the philosophy of community policing and problem solving.
  4. Analyze the serious nature of police stress and burnout.
  5. Explain police pursuit procedures.
  6. Explain the use of force continuum.
  7. Analyze challenges of law enforcement interaction with special and/or diverse populations.
  8. Explain the foundations of effective police communication.
  9. Explain law enforcement's role in response to routine police calls.
  10. Explain the legal constraints that impact police operations.
  11. Discuss the problems that face our society such as illegal gangs and illegal substance abuse.
  12. Explain law enforcement's role in response to community emergencies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Basics Behind Effective Police Operations
   A. Examine and describe police operations in historical context.
   B. Identify and describe communication as the foundation of police
operations.
   C. Identify and describe performing operational skills within the law.

II. The Aspects of Basic Police Operations
   A. Examine patrol as the backbone of police operations.
   B. Examine crime, disorder and quality-of-life issues.
   C. Describe the role and expectations of officers regarding violence at
home, in the classroom, in the workplace.
   D. Identify and describe the role and expectations of officers in
emergency situations.
   E. Examine police operations in culturally diverse communities.

III. The Role of Specialized Police Operations
   A. Identify and examine gangs and drugs and their impact on police
operations.
   B. Describe the role and expectations of officers responding to children
and juveniles's problems.
   C. Explain the role of criminal investigation.

IV. The Personal Side of Police Operations
   A. Examine physical and mental health issues for keeping fit for duty.
   B. Examine and describe the impact of liability on police operations.
   C. Examine and describe the role of ethics for police officers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of five exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical
and evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, and group activities.

In computing the grades, the following scale will be used:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 124

  • Title: Criminal Justice and Corrections
  • Number: ADMJ 124
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will explore the correctional system and trace the evolution of criminal sanctions from early English common law to the present. An examination of local, state, and federal correctional systems will provide an overview of society's response to criminal behavior. Students will be introduced to a detailed examination of jails, prisons, and community corrections. 3 hrs. lecture/ wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Trace the development of criminal sanctions from early history to the present.
  2. Explain the local, state, and federal correctional systems and outline the differences in the operational processes of each.
  3. Discuss the constitutional rights of offenders in the United States and analyze how these protections impact the health, safety, and security of the offender and society.
  4. Evaluate the impact of correctional technology on the criminal justice system.
  5. Assess various criminal justice populations including inmates, victims, special needs offenders, juveniles, and correctional staff and discuss management techniques and strategies applicable to each.
  6. Trace the offender as he/she moves through the criminal justice system.
  7. Discuss alternatives to incarceration including diversion, community based corrections, intermediate sanctions, and intensive supervised probation.
  8. Examine the potential impact of technology on the field of corrections.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History and Evolution of the Correctional System
   A. Examine the early period (2000 B.C. to A.D. 1700) of society’s
response to unacceptable behavior from early tribal responses to the
reactions of a scientific enlightenment age.
   B. Outline the emergence of imprisonment as a form of punishment for
crime from 1700 to 1800.
   C. Summarize the age of prisons from 1800 to the present.
   D. Review the shifting ideologies and philosophies in recent history.

II. Legal and Court Systems
   A. Define the types of offenses that bring a person into the judicial
system.
   B. Explain the filtering or funneling process as the offender moves
through the justice system understanding that very few reach
incarceration.
   C. Distinguish between indeterminate and determinate sentencing
procedures.
   D. Examine the appellate review process.

III. The Correctional Subsystems
   A. Examine the structure and process involved in jails and detention
facilities.
   B. Describe the most frequently used option before incarceration –
probation – how it developed, where it is today and its future.
   C. Review the types of intermediate sanctions.
   D. Compare and contrast detention, probation and parole.
   E. Analyze issues related to privatization of the correctional
institution.

IV. The Correctional Client
   A. Examine the major health, safety and security issues for
incarcerated males.
   B. Review the major health, safety and security issues for incarcerated
females.
   C. Analyze the changing attitudes toward juvenile offenders
Attributable to the increase of violence and gang-related crime.
   E. Describe the special categories of offenders such as the mentally
ill or the elderly and efforts to deal with them within the confines of
the institutions.

V. The Future of Corrections
   A. Discuss the relevant issues and problems of the correctional system
in the context of the present and future social environment.
   B. Examine the issue of overcrowding from a sociological perspective.
   C. Describe the implication of the incarceration of more and more
people for society.
   D. Access the potential impact of technology upon the correctional
system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1.  A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 40% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 30% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 127

  • Title: Criminology
  • Number: ADMJ 127
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This class will explore various explanations for criminal behavior including choice, biosocial, psychological, social structure and social process theories. Society's responses to crime will also be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. ADMJ 127 and SOC 127 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

The overall objective of this course is to examine the various causes
of criminal behavior by exploring the classical choice theories,
biosocial, psychological, social structural and social process
theories.
The overall objective of this course is to examine the various causes
of criminal behavior by exploring the classical choice theories,
biosocial, psychological, social structural and social process
theories.

  1. Define the term criminology and demonstrate an understanding of the work and viewpoint of the criminologist.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of basic terminology, concepts and methods in criminology.
  3. Compare and contrast three current methodologies for measuring criminal behavior.
  4. Debate the causation of criminal behavior using rational choice, biological, psychological, social structure and social process theories.
  5. Describe various types of crime such as violent crime, white collar and organized crime.
  6. Trace society's various responses to crime throughout history.
  7. Understand society’s response to crime by explaining the correctional system.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Issues in Criminology
   A. Define criminology.
      1. Differentiate criminology and deviance.
   B. Describe the historical foundation of criminology.
      1. Explain the classic approach to criminology.
      2. Describe the Marxist/conflict tradition.
      3. Explain biological positivism.
      4. Identify the sociological contributions to criminology.
   C. Describe the various techniques for measuring criminal behavior.
      1. List the different measures of criminal behavior.
      2. Critique the Uniform Crime Report.
      3. Identify advantages and disadvantages of self-report and
victimization surveys.

II. Causation for Criminal Behavior
   A. Explain the rational choice explanation of crime.
      1. Summarize routine activities and its contribution to rational
choice theory.
      2. Distinguish between general and specific deterrence.
      3. Explain the policy implication of choice theory.
   B. Describe the trait approach to criminal behavior.
      1. Recognize the biological contribution to criminal behavior.
      2. Distinguish the various psychological theories which explain
crime.
      3. Examine the relationship between intelligence and criminal
behavior.
   C. Social structure theories.
      1. Compare and contrast social disorganization theory, social strain
theory, and cultural deviance theory.
      2. Evaluate the link between social structure theories and social
policy.
   D. Social process theories.
      1. Identify the different branches of social process theory used in
criminology.
         a. Analyze crime from the perspective of social learning theory.
         b. Consider social control theory as an explanation of crime.
         c. Discuss labeling theory as an explanation of criminal
behavior.
      2. Explain the relationship between social process theories of
criminology and social policy.
   E. Social conflict theories.
      1. Identify the basic element of Marxist theory.
      2. Trace the development of social conflict theory in criminology.
      3. Explain modern conflict theory.
      4. Describe the variations of the Marxist approaches to
criminology.
   F. Integrated theories.
      1. Summarize the integrated theory approach in criminology.
         a. Describe the latent trait approach to studying criminal
behavior.
         b. Illustrate the life-course theory of criminal behavior.
      2. Examine the history of criminological thought leading to
integrated theory.

III. Types of Crime
   A. Violent criminal behavior.
      1. Identify the root causes of violence in society.
      2. Distinguish the different forms of violent criminal behavior.
   B. White-collar crime.
      1. Distinguish between white-collar crime and organized crime.
      2. Describe the different types of white-collar crime.
      3. Identify the conditions that cause white-collar crime.
      4. Explain how white-collar crime is controlled.
      5. Describe the various concepts of organized crime.
      6. Outline the history of organized crime in the United States.

IV. Society’s Response to Crime
   A. The correctional system.
      1. Outline the history of punishment and corrections.
      2. Describe the history of correction and prison systems in the
United States.
      3. Differentiate between probation and parole.
      4. Apply sociological insights into the social organization of
prison life.
      5. Review the link between society’s correction system and the
rule of law.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1.  A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 40% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 30% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Individual instructors of ADMJ 127 may select supplemental texts or materials to complement the principal text(s) in their assigned sections.
  2. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 130

  • Title: Crime Prevention
  • Number: ADMJ 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Topics of special interest include the techniques public service agencies use to operate crime-prevention programs and provide technically accurate, cost-effective security recommendations to the community. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of basic crime prevention concepts.
  2. Use crime risk management techniques in evaluating risks.
  3. Describe capabilities and limitations of special security devices, systems and procedures.
  4. Perform security surveys assessing risks and making cost-effective recommendations.
  5. Identify management and administrative issues involved in the operation of a crime prevention unit.
  6. Work with other governmental agencies involved in reducing criminal opportunity.
  7. Cite factual knowledge (terminology, classifications, methods, trends).
  8. Explain fundamental principles, generalizations or theories.
  9. Develop specific skills, competencies and points of view needed by professionals in the field closely related to this course.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Unit One
   A. Introduction to Crime Prevention (Chapter 1)
      1. Describe the meaning of crime prevention.
      2. Explain how crime prevention works.
      3. Define the crime prevention practitioner.
   B. The Evolution of Crime Prevention (Chapter 2)
      1. Overview ancient tradition.
      2. Overview English tradition.
      3. Describe crime prevention in America.
      4. Contrast crime prevention and criminology.
      5. Compare crime prevention and the police mission.
      6. List and explain the assumptions of crime prevention.
   C. Roles in Crime Prevention (Chapter 3)
      1. Cite the various roles of the practitioner.
      2. Cite the roles of others.

II. Unit Two
   A. Designing Crime Risk Management Systems (Chapter 4)
      1. Define crime risk management.
      2. Cite the client of crime risk management.
      3. Describe the client-practitioner relationship.
      4. Define crime pattern analysis.
      5. Cite concerns with conducting the security survey.
      6. Explain the process for determination of probable maximum loss.
      7. Overview designing the crime risk management system.
      8. Discuss possible recommendations to clients.
   B. Security Devices and Procedures (Chapter 5)
      1. List and discuss physical security systems.
      2. Describe boundary markers as barriers.
      3. List various perimeter barriers and define the 10 considerations
for the following:
         a. Roofs
         b. Walls
         c. Perimeter access system
         d. Internal barriers
         e. Building security codes
         f. Electronic security codes
         g. Surveillance systems
         h. Intrusion detection systems
         i. Security procedures
         j. Asset control
         k. External security
         l. Security system protection
      4. List and describe security survey guidelines.

III. Unit Three
   A. Applying Environmental Design Concepts (Chapter 6)
      1. Discuss the transition from client to community.
      2. Describe the levels of physical design application.
      3. Review crime risk reduction through physical design.
      4. Discuss crime risk reduction in the future physical environment.
      5. Describe crime risk reduction by users of the physical
environment.
      6. Explain crime prevention through environmental design.
   B. Developing Citizen Participation (Chapter 7)
      1. Describe citizen-police cooperation.
      2. Overview the preparation phase.
      3. Contrast the various citizen participation strategies.
      4. Discuss the model approach to neighborhood organization.
   C. Planning the Community Program (Chapter 8)
      1. Describe methods of designing the organization.
      2. Define crime problems and list priorities.
      3. Describe methods for developing program objectives.

IV. Unit Four
   A. Managing the Community Program (Chapter 9)
      1. Review manpower resources.
      2. Identify financial and other resources.
      3. Analyze performance and cost control measures.
      4. Define impact measure.
      5. Discuss work assignments.
      6. List and discuss reporting mechanisms.
   B. Evaluating Impact (Chapter 10)
      1. Discuss the purpose of evaluation.
      2. Discuss cause and effect.
      3. List and describe specific impacts.
      4. Describe the total impact.
      5. Cite the evaluation resources.
   C. Discuss the Potential of Crime Prevention in the Future

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Three announced examinations
      Unannounced quizzes
      In-class and homework assignments
      Term project
      Two article reviews

Grade Criteria:
      90-100% = A
      80- 89% = B
      70- 79% = C
      65- 69% = D
       0- 64% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 133

  • Title: Juvenile Delinquency
  • Number: ADMJ 133
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This class will provide an analysis of detention procedures, disposition, custody and treatment of juvenile offenders throughout the United States with a specific interest in area systems. The origin and development of juvenile agencies, as well as the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of juvenile courts will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain and use appropriately the methodology in the prevention of juvenile delinquency, how to cope with it when it appears, minimize its untoward effects and inhibit the evolution of adult criminals in future years.
  2. Describe, explain and compose, both general and specific, the legislative, executive and judicial processes; the incidence of crime; the enforcement agencies; and measures recommended for the prevention, identification and treatment of juvenile delinquency.
  3. Explain the law, statutes and codes of the State of Kansas and the United States in general as they pertain to delinquency and the handling of juveniles in Johnson County, Kansas.
  4. Define and explain those social forces and institutions which influence delinquent behavior and identify those agencies which contribute to the prevention, reformation and rehabilitation of the juvenile offender.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Scope of the Problem of Juvenile Delinquency
   A. Cite the facts and fallacies of juvenile delinquency.
   B. Define juvenile delinquency.
   C. Contrast various statistical measurements used in the field of
juvenile delinquency.

II. Personality Development
   A. Contrast the developmental process of a normal personality versus a
delinquent personality.
      1. Normal
      2. Delinquent
   B. Cite individual differences among delinquents.

III. Delinquency Characteristics
   A. Define social disorganization.
   B. Discuss lower-class and the integrated criminal community.
   C. Contrast middle-class and upper-class delinquency.

IV. Family Problems
   A. Describe the family setting in delinquency.
   B. Contrast delinquency of girls and delinquency of boys.

V.Patterns of Delinquency I
   A. List and discuss offenses injurious to others.
   B. List and discuss offenses injurious to delinquent.

VI. Patterns of Delinquency II
   A. Define drug abuse.
   B. List and categorize dangerous drugs.
   C. Overview volatile chemicals.
   D. Discuss characteristics of each of the following:
      1. Marijuana
      2. LSD
      3. Narcotics
      4. Control
      5. Detection
      6. Definitions
      7. Glossary

VII. Group and Isolated Delinquencies
   A. Contrast group, isolated and the non-delinquent acts.
   B. Overview legal aspects of juvenile operations by the police.

VIII. Review the Police Role in Dealing with Delinquency

IX. Organization for Control
   A. Review where juvenile units fit into department organization.
   B. Describe selection and training of personnel.
   C. Explain the Delinquency Control Institute.
   D. Cite and describe short-term institutes.
   E. Discuss federal training grants.
   F. Review steps for organizing in-service training.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four announced examinations
      Unannounced quizzes
      In-class and homework assignments
      Term project
      Two article reviews

Criteria for Grade:
      90-100% = A
      80- 89% = B
      70- 79% = C
      65- 69% = D
       0- 64% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students should provide personal transportation to field trips in Johnson County. College transportation will be provided for other field trips.
  2. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 133H

No information found.

ADMJ 141

  • Title: Criminal Law*
  • Number: ADMJ 141
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121 or LAW 121

Description:

After taking this course, the student will be able to state the two basic elements necessary for any crime and the philosophy behind these two elements. After a detailed exploration of common law crimes and selected Kansas and Missouri statutes, the student will be able to classify common law crimes and state the difference between a felony and a misdemeanor. The student will understand the significance of the separation of powers doctrine and its application to criminal law and the constant interplay of the U.S. Constitution in criminal law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate in writing the student’s ability to recognize specific crimes and the degree of offenses involved.
  2. Discuss the elements of each crime and category of crimes.
  3. Recognize and discuss basic rules of criminal procedure and the process whereby a state seeks to convict and punish an individual for a criminal offense.
  4. Explain the principles of criminal liability and how these principles affect criminal law.
  5. Define the terms used in the criminal code.
  6. Analyze and explain the different roles played by prosecutors and defense attorneys in criminal law.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Review the legal system of the United States
      1. Introduce the legal system in the United States
      2. Discuss Federalism, the Separation of Powers Doctrine and the
Supremacy clause from the Constitution
      3. Analyze the effect the above doctrines have on the government’s
ability to regulate behavior
   B. Understand the structure of the federal and state courts
   C. Review and list the various sources for criminal law
      1. Distinguish between criminal law and civil law
      2. Distinguish between criminal law and criminal procedure
      3. Review and list the effect selected sources have on the law

II. Fundamental Analysis of the Mental and Physical Elements of Criminal
Offenses
   A. Review the two basic elements of any offense
   B. Understand what is the required mental state for criminal liability
      1. List the mental liabilities under the Model Penal Code
      2. Compare the mental liability in Kansas and Missouri to common law
and the Model Penal Code
   C. Define and discuss what qualifies as a physical act for criminal
liability
   D. Differentiate what mental processes and physical acts would not
qualify

III. Review of Selected Categories of Crimes
   A. Review and state the elements necessary for criminal liability for
crimes against the person
      1. Recognize the necessary elements of each crime
      2. Demonstrate how “intent” is proven
   B. Review and state the elements necessary for criminal liability from
crimes against property and habitation
      1. Recognize the necessary elements of each crime
      2. Demonstrate how “intent” is proven
   C. Review and state the elements necessary for criminal liability for
crimes against the public
      1. Recognize the necessary elements of each crime
      2. Demonstrate how “intent” is proven
      3. Understand the effect religion has on morality crimes

IV. Parties to a Crime and Inchoate Crimes
   A. Analyze the various parties to one crime
      1. State the necessary elements for each party
      2. Explain the rationale for the differences in criminal liability
for each party
   B. Differentiate between a crime and an inchoate crime
      1. Comprehend the four tests used in inchoate crimes
      2. Demonstrate the differences in the four tests in a factual
scenario

V. Focus on Criminal Responsibility and Defenses
   A. Distinguish between a defense, an alibi and an affirmative defense
   B. List the three insanity defenses
      1. Compare and contrast the M’Naghten, irresistible impulse and
the Model Penal Code tests
      2. Discuss the rationale for the insanity defense and whether this
rationale is being met with the “guilty but insane” plea
      3. Apply the three tests in a factual situation
   C. State other matters that affect criminal responsibility such as
intoxication
   D. Compare and contrast when the law allows force and deadly force
against people
   E. Analyze selected constitutional defenses to certain crimes

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Four unit examinations              50 points each
2. One comprehensive final examination  100 points
3. Quizzes                               10 points each
4. Written assignments                   10 points each
5. A research paper over a major area   100 points
   of study in the class

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 143

  • Title: Crime Analysis
  • Number: ADMJ 143
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will learn crime profiling skills and specialized techniques of conducting research, analyzing data and producing crime analysis products. Students will survey existing computer applications and learn practical use and evaluation of these applications. Students will become familiar with the common written reports, charts and graphs used to describe crime analysis products. Students will survey the variety of customers served by crime analysts and the integral part crime analysis plays within the community. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define crime analysis.
  2. Explain the role of the analysts in law enforcement.
  3. Identify, compare and contrast the types of analysis related to law enforcement.
  4. Identify the stages of crime analysis.
  5. Explain how spatial analysis provides a practical overlay to crime analysis.
  6. List sources of data/information commonly used by analysts.
  7. Create a sample crime bulletin.
  8. Explain how crime analysis can assist investigators in clearing cases.
  9. Organize information and identify key pieces of information to make arrests.
  10. Explain the resources available to analysts and how these resources are used.
  11. Identify and explain the key qualities possessed by a crime analyst.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Crime and Intelligence Analysis
   A. Definitions
      1. Define crime analysis 
      2. Define intelligence analysis
   B. Discuss needs served by analysis
   C. Discuss essential functions of analysis organizations
   D. Describe law enforcement’s use of crime analysis

II. Crime Analysis
   A. Types
      1. Discuss the administrative use of crime analysis
      2. Describe the strategic use of crime analysis
      3. Explain the tactical use of crime analysis
   B. Administration
      1. Describe the common office locations assigned to crime analysts
      2. List non-crime analysis work
      3. Differentiate between citizen request and internal request
policy
      4. Describe opportunities for internship and volunteer programs
      5. Explain the importance of budget and grants in starting and
maintaining crime analyst activities
      6. List methods of marketing crime analyst activities
   C. Data collection and data integrity
      1. Describe the collection and integrity of crime and arrest data
      2. Describe the collection and integrity of  data collection for
service information
      3. Discuss the use of field interview cards and forms in data
collection
      4. Discuss the manner of obtaining data from accidents
      5. Describe sources of data collection and data integrity
      6. Explain the use of surveys in data collection
      7. Explain the importance of observation in data collection
      8. Define content analysis
      9. List additional data sources
   D. Research methodology
      1. Discuss scanning, analyzing, responding and assessing (SARA)
      2. Contrast the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative
research
      3. Discuss the importance of program evaluation, process and impact
assessment.
   E. Statistics
      1. Describe the common uses of crime analysis statistics
      2. Discuss rate and percent change
      3. Define mean, standard deviation, mode and median
      4. Define correlation
      5. Discuss forecasting and its uses
   F. Spatial analysis 
      1. Define spatial analysis (GIS) Geographic Information Systems
      2. List and discuss the pros and cons of various software
applications
      3. Describe the various types of mapping
   G. Tactical analysis
      1. Explain the tactical analysis of data collection and matrix
      2. Define trend, pattern, series, spree and hotspot analysis
      3. Contrast property crime vs. persons crimes
      4. Discuss the tactical analysis of suspicious persons and
activities
      5. Explain the importance of tactical analysis in obtaining
investigative leads
      6. Explain the use of tactical analysis in obtaining and using
information about the known offender
      7. Define spatial analysis and statistical forecasting
      8. Describe uses of various software and other analysis tools
 
III. Crime Information Presentation
   A. Written
      1. List and describe the various types of memos and reports used by
crime analysts
      2. Discuss the content and uses of crime bulletins
      3. Explain the value and use of e-mail distribution
   B. Graphics and other visual data presentation
      1. Explain appropriate use of Power Point presentations
      2. Discuss the appropriate use of charts and tables in data
presentations
      3. Describe the value of using maps to present data
   C. Person-to-person
      1. Contrast formal vs. informal briefings
      2. Discuss the attributes of appropriate courtroom testimony
      3. Discuss appropriate methods of presenting data at community
meetings
   D. Explain the advantages and uses of the Internet in data collection
and presentation

IV. Overview of Employment Opportunities
   A. Jobs
      1. List jobs available within law enforcement agencies
      2. Discuss jobs available in crime analysis outside of law
enforcement agencies
   B. Hiring process
      1. Discuss the value of background investigations in the hiring
process
      2. List the common educational/experiential qualifications for a
crime  analysis
      3. Define abilities assessment and its importance in the hiring
process 

V. Law enforcement models and considerations
   A. Describe steps to be taken when forming a new crime analysis unit
   B. Define a cite visit and explain its importance
   C. List and discuss various implementation challenges and obstacles
   D. Discuss the pros and cons of the various methods one might use in
staffing a new unit
   E. List the steps needed in setting a standard operation procedure
(SOP)
   F. Discuss the importance of the documentation of work done
   G. Discuss the future of crime analysts
   H. Discuss the role of the International Association of Crime Analysts
(IACA)

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                    44 % of grade
Class participation/attendance  28% of grade
Projects/Assignments            28% of grade
Total                          100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 -  89%
C = 70 -  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 145

  • Title: Fundamentals Private Security
  • Number: ADMJ 145
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

In addition to understanding the general field of private security, the student will be able to differentiate between the security needs of industry, private business, government and selected educational institutions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. State the duties and responsibilities of a security organization.
  2. Understand the philosophical and practical requirements for employment in the security field, including the legal aspects.
  3. Differentiate between the types of security organizations and their approaches to security.
  4. Trace the development of private security from inception to the present day.
  5. Compare and contract at least four different types of security operations.
  6. Comprehend the differences between the duties of public law enforcement and private security.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction of the Security Function
   A. Understand generally the function of private security
   B. Understand generally the various security organizations

II. Historical Development of Private Security
   A. Trace the development of private security
   B. Analyze the current state of private security along with its
historical development
      1. Differentiate the roles of private physical security and personal
security
      2. Comprehend the liability of private security in these roles
      3. Analyze management’s perspective of security and the security
officer’s perspective
   C. Differentiate between governmental law enforcement and private
security
      1. Distinguish the roles, functions and responsibilities of each
      2. Understand the legal liabilities of each
   D. Compare and contrast management’s perspective of security to the
security officer’s perspective

III. Security Participation
   A. Arrange and participate in a security function at JCCC
      1. Write a detailed report of the experience
      2. Compare and contrast the experience to information obtained from
the text
   B. Visit another security organization in the metropolitan area
      1. Write a detailed report about the experience
      2. Include in the report the type of security program involved
      3. Compare and contrast the program to information obtained in
class

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four unit test examinations.
A comprehensive final exam.
Two reports on field assignments.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 148

  • Title: Physical and Sexual Violence within the Family
  • Number: ADMJ 148
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

A description and causal analysis of the different physical, psychological, and sexual abuse acts that may occur within the primary family unit will be provided in this course. The study will include possible causative factors; psychological and social effects on the various family members; psychological, social and legal implications; treatments; and the relationship between abuse and crime. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define the different aspects of family violence.
  2. Explain inter-generational effects of family violence.
  3. Explain socio-cultural risks of family violence.
  4. List and explain conditions most general to family violence situations.
  5. Explain the psychological, social, fiscal, and physical complications faced by victims of domestic abuse in reporting the problem.
  6. Explain the particulars of child, elder, and partner abuse.
  7. Explain the role of various members of society in combating family violence.
  8. Discuss present and future trends of societal reactions and treatment of the abuser.
  9. Discuss the unique problems associated with the investigation and prosecution of sexual assault crimes.
  10. Discuss the immediate and long term effects of sexual violence on the victim.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Child Abuse and Neglect
   A. Define physical child abuse.  
   B. Explain the dynamics and prevalence of physical child abuse.
   C. Discuss causes and consequences of physical child abuse.
   D. List and explain the indicators of physical child abuse.
   E. Define sexual abuse and incest.
   F. List and explain causes of sexual abuse.
   G. Describe the victims and the varied effects of sexual abuse.
   H. List the categories of sexual offenders and their rationale for the
abuse.
   I. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of treatment versus
imprisonment.
   J. Identify the types of child neglect.
   K. Identify common causes and indicators of child neglect.
   L. Define failure to thrive syndrome and identify the characteristics.

II. Spousal Abuse
   A. Analyze statistics relating to spousal abuse.
   B. Describe characteristics of the victim of domestic violence.
   C. Describe the effects of domestic violence on children.
   D. Identify characteristics of perpetrators of domestic violence.
   E. Discuss the police's options when responding to domestic violence
calls.
   F. Discuss the types and functions of restraining orders.
   G. Design policies to prevent future domestic violence.

III. Women and Sexual Violence
   A. Summarize the laws relating to sex crimes.
   B. Discuss the causes of sexual assault and the types of perpetrators.
   C. Explain the distinction between the types of rape.
   D. Discuss the consequences of sexual assault on the victim.
   E. Define stalking and discuss its effects on the victim.
   F. Identify the different types of stalkers and their motivation.

IV. Issues in Family Violence
   A. Discuss the causes and consequences of elder abuse.
   B. Discuss the victim's rights movement and subsequent legislation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade. The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, group activities, etc.

Evaluation criteria for writing: complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 150

  • Title: Criminal Procedure
  • Number: ADMJ 150
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Criminal Procedure is an exploration of the structure of the judicial process, the sources and constitutional development of criminal procedure, criminal investigation, remedies for violations of constitutional rights, the pretrial and trial process, sentencing and appeals, and counter-terrorism. Students will learn through discussion of important U.S. Supreme Court cases that have shaped the way the Constitution is interpreted followed by analysis of hypothetical fact patterns that require the student to apply the knowledge they have gained. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the history and structure of the U.S. Constitution, including the purpose and significance of the Bill of Rights.
  2. Analyze the due process clause of the 14th Amendment and outline which amendments of the U.S. Constitution are affected by the 14th and which are not.
  3. Define the concepts of legal precedent and stare decisis.
  4. Explain the state and federal court systems and the role of the U.S. Supreme Court in both systems.
  5. Understand the components of a legal citation and prepare a legal brief of a U.S. Supreme Court opinion.
  6. Explain the Fourth Amendment's guarantees and the importance to law enforcement, including the history and effect of the exclusionary rule.
  7. Identify the types of contacts law enforcement may have with the public and the legal justification for each.
  8. Identify the legal requirements for making an arrest with and without a warrant.
  9. Identify the requirements for getting a search warrant and the procedure for executing the warrant.
  10. Identify the legal exceptions to the Fourth Amendment's warrant requirement, explain when each exception applies, and discuss the authority of law enforcement as a result of the exception.
  11. Discuss the provision of the Fifth Amendment and the import of the Miranda ruling.
  12. Identify the rights afforded under the Sixth Amendment.
  13. Discuss the Eighth Amendment as it relates to sentencing and incarceration concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History and General Application of The United States Constitution
   A. Understand the foundation of the United States Government and
Constitution.
   B. Describe the ratification process for the Constitution and what is
necessary today to amend, modify or change the Constitution or its
amendments.
   C. Describe the general elements of Federalism, the Separation of
Powers Doctrine and the Supremacy Clause from the Constitution.
   D. Define and provide examples of due process of law as contained in
the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
   E. Explain the limitations of the due process clause of the 14th
Amendment on the first ten amendments as interpreted by case decisions of
the United States Supreme Court.

II. Government to Search, Seize and Detain Persons and Property
   A. Enumerate the provisions in the Constitution, which regulate local
and federal governments' ability to search, seize and detain persons and
property.
   B. Describe the history and effect of the exclusionary rule as a remedy
against unreasonable governmental searches and seizures.
   C. List what is constitutionally necessary for a valid arrest warrant
and a valid search warrant.
   D. Describe the conditions when the government may legally arrest
without a warrant for a felony or misdemeanor crime.
   E. Describe when the government may legally search and seize items
without a search warrant.

III. Right to Counsel and the Law of Interrogation
   A. Identify when the right to assistance of counsel is required by the
Constitution.
   B. Analyze under what conditions or situations may the government
legally detain and question an individual before advising the person of
their constitutional right to counsel.

IV. Investigation and Adjudication of Criminal Suspects
   A. Discuss the case law regarding suspect identifications and the right
to counsel under the Sixth Amendment.
   B. Define the concept of entrapment as a defense to a crime.
   C. List the events that occur in the pretrial process and discuss the
purpose of each event.
   D. List the events that occur at trial and the legal requirements
relating to each step of the trial process.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60% Unit exams
5-25%  Chapter Quizzes
15-25% Written Assignments
100%   Total

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 154

  • Title: Fundamentals of Criminal Investigation
  • Number: ADMJ 154
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to give fundamental information that serves as an overview of the entire field as well as a solid foundation for specialized course work. The course focuses on investigation of property crimes, homicide investigation, crimes against children and sex-related offenses. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Trace the history and structure of criminal investigation.
  2. Identify the basic goals of criminal investigation.
  3. Discuss the legal aspects of criminal investigation and the significance of the exclusionary rule.
  4. Explain methods for collecting, preserving, and recording physical evidence found at the crime scene.
  5. Describe various methods of locating witnesses and conducting effective and legal interviews.
  6. Describe the process for witness identification of suspects and the legal restrictions of each.
  7. Discuss current capabilities of the crime lab and its importance to criminal investigation.
  8. Discuss basic concepts associated with injury and death investigation.
  9. Discuss basic concepts associated with the investigation of sex crimes.
  10. Discuss basic concepts associated with the investigation of child abuse and other crimes against children.
  11. Identify the basic steps in investigating the crimes of robbery, burglary, auto theft, arson, and drug crimes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Trace the history and structure of criminal investigation.
   B. Identify the basic goals of criminal investigation.
   C. Discuss the legal aspects of criminal investigation and the
significance of the exclusionary rule.

II. The Crime Scene
   A. Identify the duties of the first officer to arrive at a crime
scene.
   B. List and describe the steps of a crime scene search and methods for
recording the crime scene.
   C. Explain methods for collecting, preserving, and recording physical
evidence found at the crime scene.

III. Conducting the Investigation
   A. Discuss the importance of keeping an investigator's notebook.
   B. Define crime scene reconstruction and discuss its relevance to
criminal investigation.
   C. Discuss basic concepts associated with injury and death
investigation.
   D. Discuss basic concepts associated with the investigation of sex
crimes.
   E. Discuss basic concepts associated with the investigation of child
abuse and other crimes against children.
   F. Identify the basic steps in investigating the crimes of robbery,
burglary, auto theft, arson, and drug crimes.
   G. Explain the purpose and steps of case preparation.

IV. Witnesses Locating and Interviewing
   A. Describe various methods of locating witnesses.
   B. Differentiate between the interview process and the interrogation
process and cite the legal restrictions on each.
   C. Identify different approaches and techniques that can be used during
an interview or interrogation.
   D. Describe the process for witness identification of suspects and the
legal restrictions of each.

V. Scientific Aids Laboratory and Technical
   A. Explain the polygraph testing procedures and its importance in
criminal investigation.
   B. Define DNA and discuss how it is involved in the investigation of
both current and past crimes.
   C. Discuss current capabilities of the crime lab and its importance to
criminal investigation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical
and evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, group activities, etc.

Evaluation criteria for writing: complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 170

  • Title: Drugs and Crime
  • Number: ADMJ 170
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course explores the relationship between drugs and crime. Students will analyze how drugs impact criminal activity at the local, state, federal, and international level. Local, state and federal laws regulating substance use will also be examined. Students will become familiar with the effects of drugs on the body. Interventions for individuals harmfully involved with drug use will be explored. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define the term drug and distinguish the levels of drug use.
  2. List the major categories of drugs and explain their effects on the body.
  3. Compare and contrast different models of drug dependence.
  4. Analyze the different types of drug treatment programs.
  5. Trace the history of drug use and the corresponding legislation.
  6. Examine the relationship between drugs and crime.
  7. Assess trends in prevention, treatment and drug legislation.
  8. Compare cultural differences in choice and use of drugs.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Drugs
   A. Define the term drug.
   B. Examine the drug abuse continuum.
   C. Estimate the extent of the drug problem.
      1. Evaluate demographics of individuals using drugs.
      2. Discuss instruments used to measure the extent of drug use in
communities.

II. Drugs and Their Effects
   A. Explain and identify the classification system used for drugs.
   B. Explore different models of drug dependence.
   C. Discuss diseases commonly associated with drug dependence.
   D. Explore the misuse of legal drugs.
   E. Explain the relationship between neurotransmitters and drugs.
   F. Explain half-life as it relates to addictive substances.
   G. Examine polydrug use and explain its consequences.
   H. Discuss tolerance and explain how it relates to drug dependence.
   I. Describe withdrawal as it relates to the major category of drugs.
   J. Define and explain FAS/FAE.

III. Drug Prevention and Treatment
   A. Explain the transtheoretical model of Stages of Change as it relates
to drug dependence.
   B. Demonstrate proficiency with Motivational Interviewing techniques.
   C. Describe the role of detoxification as it relates to drug
dependence.
   D. Describe the elements of outpatient programs.
   E. Discuss the efficacy of residential treatment programs.
   F. Review self-help groups.

IV. The History of Drug Legislation
   A. Examine the laws, demographics and sentences for various drug
classifications.
      1. Outline the history of alcohol legislation.
         a. Discuss the Temperance movement.
         b. Critique the strategy of prohibition.
      2. Trace the history of legislation as it relates to opium. 
         a. Examine various countries' response to morphine and heroin
use.
         b. Describe the Opium wars.
      3. Examine use of marijuana.
         a. Outline early legislation related to marijuana.
         b. Compare and contrast current state and federal marijuana
laws.
         c. Analyze the politics of marijuana legislation.
      4. Trace the history of legislation as it relates to
methamphetamines.
         a. Examine current trends in methamphetamine production.
         b. Review current legislation pertaining to methamphetamines.
   B. Analyze the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of
1970.
   C. Assess the impact of the War on Drugs in our communities and other
countries.
   D. Evaluate the efficacy of DARE programs and discuss research data
concerning this program.

V. The Relationship Between Drugs and Crime
   A. Analyze the business of drugs.
      1. Discuss international and domestic drug trafficking.
      2. Describe the drug-terrorism connection.
      3. Analyze current patterns of production and distribution of
cocaine, methamphetamines and opiates.
   B. Examine drugs and law enforcement.
      1. Discuss the mission of the following agencies as it relates to
drug use/sale: FBI, ATF, DEA, IRS.
   C. Examine drug abuse policy at the local, state, federal, and
international level.
      1. Explore the efficacy of drug interdiction through use of
empirical data.
      2. Critique the strategy of demand reduction.

VI. Drugs and Corrections
   A. Analyze the purpose and function of drug courts.
   B. Discuss the role of community corrections and offender drug use.
   C. Discuss the function of institutional drug counselors.
   D. Explore the connection between drugs and crime in corrections.

VII. Cultural Differences in Drug Use
   A. Examine drug cultures of ethnically diverse group.
   B. Discuss how to approach culturally and ethnically diverse
population's use of mood-altering substances.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical
and evaluative nature.

2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.

4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 180

  • Title: Correctional Casework*
  • Number: ADMJ 180
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ADMJ 124

Description:

This course helps prepare students for positions in correctional agencies. Students will learn how corrections officials, parole officers, probation officers, facility based caseworkers and treatment providers perform their roles. Students will examine various types of offenders housed in correctional facilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Analyze the rationale for the information contained in the Presentence Investigation.
  2. Explain the current uses and purposes of contemporary classification/assessment within a correctional setting.
  3. Conduct a mock offender assessment using a contemporary assessment system.
  4. Develop a mock case plan for an offender, based on a mock assessment and the offender's history.
  5. Demonstrate effective interviewing skills.
  6. Identify pre-release and reintegration needs of a mock offender.
  7. Describe a strategy to reduce the risk of re-offending, based on a formal offender assessment.
  8. Describe staff behaviors that have a major positive and negative impacts on correctional careers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Offender Assessment
   A. Compare and contrast contemporary offender assessment, such as those
used in Kansas, Missouri, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
   B. Identify the role of classification and reclassification within a
correctional facility.
   C. Select classification tools supported by empirical data.
   D. Describe components of an offender assessment including
criminogenic, dynamic, and static factors.
   E. Differentiate evidence-based assessments from those based on
anecdotal experience.
   F. Review and analyze assessment systems including LSI-R, Vermont
J-SOAP; Federal Bureau of Prisons, Kansas Department of Corrections and
Missouri Department of Corrections.
   G. Perform an assessment of a mock offender, including scoring and
recommendations, using an instrument provided.
   H. Assess pre-release needs of a mock offender and recommend
programming needs for successful reintegration.
   I. Develop a pre-release plan based on mock assessment and data
provided.

II. Case Planning
   A. Explain the process and rationale for linking assessment data and
case planning.
   B. Review and identify evidence-based program opportunities available
to offenders housed in correctional facilities.
   C. Identify and select community and facility-based resources for
common offender needs such as mental health, substance dependence, and
employment.
   D. Analyze the criminogenic characteristics of offenders and
demonstrate how they can be addressed while minimizing the risk to the
community.
   E. Apply an understanding of Motivational Interviewing.
      1. Demonstrate Motivational Interviewing strategies and techniques.
      2. Apply active listening skills in a mock interview setting.
   F. Conduct a classification of a mock offender using information
provided.
   G. Develop a case plan for a mock offender, based on a Presentence
Investigation.
   H. Identify and analyze evidence-based counseling techniques and
strategies appropriate for offenders.

III. Career Enhancement
   A. Compare and contrast healthy and unhealthy working relationships
with offenders.
   B. Assess strategies to maintain perspective while working with
offenders, manage stress and avoid burnout.
   C. Identify elements of successful careers in corrections.
   D. Identify the role and responsibilities of an Offender Workforce
Development Specialist.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1.  A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 40% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 30% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90-100%   
  B = 80-89%                    
  C = 70-79%                    
  D = 60-69%                    
  F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 201

  • Title: Police Interrogation
  • Number: ADMJ 201
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This class will assist students in developing the specific verbal and written communication skills used in the criminal justice field. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing, interrogation, and report writing skills. Course content will focus on interviewing victims, witnesses and suspects and utilizing the information to write accurate and complete narrative reports. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Compare and contrast the interview and interrogation process.
  2. Demonstrate active listening skills used in interviewing.
  3. Identify effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills used in interviewing.
  4. Utilize psychological principles to conduct an effective interrogation.
  5. Describe the 3 principles of persuasion used in an interrogation.
  6. Identify effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills used in interrogation.
  7. Construct an accurate report from information obtained from an interview and/or interrogation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interviewing
   A. Design questions to be used in an interview using elements of a
crime.
   B. Describe the physical setting of a room used in an interview.
   C. Demonstrate active listening skills.
   D. Identify 5 nonverbal communication behaviors.
   E. Describe 5 methods of verbal communication.
   
II. Interrogation
   A. Identify psychological factors used in interrogation.
   B. Explain the benefits of using psychological principals in
interrogation.
   C. Define the methods of persuasion used in police interrogation.
   D. List 3 approaches to interrogation.
   E. Describe 5 verbal indicators of deception.
   F. Describe 5 nonverbal indicators of deception.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40%  Three Exams including questions of a factual,         
     analytical and evaluative nature.
30%  Assignments        
30%  Class participation, group activities, field trips         
In computing the grades, the following scale will be used:

A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 – 89%
C = 70 – 79%
D = 60 – 69%
F =  0 – 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Suggested prerequisite: ENGL 121 Composition I

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 221

  • Title: Forensic Science and Crime Scene Investigation
  • Number: ADMJ 221
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides an overview of forensic science by focusing on the current technologies police rely on to apprehend criminal perpetrators and to link them through trace evidence to crime scenes. Emphasis is on crime scene investigation, physical evidence, organic and inorganic analysis, forensic toxicology and use of DNA in investigations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the organizational structure of a police laboratory.
  2. Recognize and explain the concept of probability as applied to forensics.
  3. Define and explain significant concepts used to establish an identity.
  4. Describe the role of the crime laboratory in criminal investigations.
  5. Interpret comparison characteristics and their significance in the identification or elimination of clue material.
  6. Identify tools and instruments used in the commission of crimes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Organization, Utilization, and Function of the Laboratory
   A. Describe the organization of a laboratory.
      1. List the various specialists and generalists and describe their
function.
      2. Explain what a dual role is.
      3. Discriminate between wet laboratory and dry laboratory.
      4. Cite the various support areas.
   B. Explain utilization of the laboratory.
      1. Explain what is meant by flow of clue material.
      2. Describe the various systems uses of laboratory. 
      3. Explain what is meant by nonutilization.
      4. Define evidence submission decay curve.
      5. Discuss the contribution of research in the field of forensics.
   C. Explain the function of the laboratory.
      1. Describe the function of the police.
      2. Discuss the function of the courts.
      3. Analyze the criminal justice system as it relates to the
laboratory's function.

II. Terminology of the Laboratory
   A. Discuss the nature of identification.
   B. Define probability.
   C. Describe individualization.
   D. Explain comparison characteristics.
   E. Distinguish identity and classification.
   F. List class characteristics.
   G. Discuss reference points.
   H. Explain elimination processes.

III. Evidence Identification
   A. Define friction ridges and tell why they are important.
   B. Cite what is meant by physical individuality.
   C. Tell how handwriting can be used as evidence.
   D. Explain what may be learned from chemical processing.
   E. List the types of evidence which may be lifted from wearing
apparel.
   F. Explain the procedure used for a physical comparison of materials.

IV. Instruments Involved in the Commission of Crime
   A. Define instruments of mobility.
   B. Identify instruments to gain access.
   C. Describe instruments used to execute the crime.
   D. Discuss instruments used to effect concealment.

V. Comparison Characteristics and Their Significance
   A. Define miscellaneous trace.
   B. Describe physical watch.
   C. Explain mutual transfer material.
   D. Discuss various traces which may be carried from the scene.
   E. Identify evidence which may be found on glass.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade. The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, group activities, etc.

Evaluation criteria for writing: complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned. In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:
90 - 100% = A
80 -  89% = B
70 -  79% = C
60 -  69% = D
under 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 223

  • Title: The World of Crime*
  • Number: ADMJ 223
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

Description:

This course provides the study of crime and the criminal justice systems of countries other than the United States, and with issues related to crime throughout the world. Emphasis will be placed on a comparison of the three main aspects of the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections) between specific countries. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify other nations approach to crime and justice to increase student understanding of other cultures and provide a basis for dealing with the increasing global crime problem.
  2. Compare and contrast international crime rates with the United States.
  3. Describe the different policing approaches in the six model countries.
  4. Identify the different criminal justice processes in the six model countries.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to understand modern dilemmas in international criminal justice.
  6. Utilize the criminal justice processes in other countries to broaden our understanding of the world and benefit from others experience.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Comparative Study of World Crime
   A. Measure and compare crime in and across nations.
   B. Examine important aspects of each type of justice system--common
law, civil law, socialist law, and sacred (Islamic) law which gives a more
solid understanding of the similarities and differences of each system.
   C. Analyze six "model" countries--China, England, France, Germany,
Japan, Saudi Arabia--to illustrate the different types of law and justice
systems in the context of specific countries, as well as the historical,
political, economic, social, and cultural influences on each system.
   D. Develop diversity awareness of the six "model" countries.
   E. Explore the knowledge of criminal justice in one country by
investigating and evaluating that system in terms of another country,
culture, or institution.

II. Aspects of the Criminal Justice System
   A. Explain law enforcement functions, organization, and community
involvement.
   B. Explain the criminal procedures.
   C. Identify the legal actors.
   D. Describe the court systems.
   E. Identify the sentencing process.
   F. Describe the problem of prison.

III. Modern Dilemmas in International Criminal Justice
   A. Identify the terrorism issue.
   B. Identify the scope of the organized crime problem worldwide.
   C. Explore the juvenile justice system from an international
perspective.

IV. Contemporary Influences and Future Developments in Transnational Crime
and Justice
   A. Examine international dilemmas as terrorism, organized crime,
narcotics traffic and juvenile justice in international perspective.
   B. Discuss some of the international crime issues that may come to the
forefront in the next decade.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of five exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade. The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, and group activities.

In computing the grades, the following scale will be used:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 228

  • Title: Criminal Justice Communications*
  • Number: ADMJ 228
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121

Description:

This class will assist students in developing the specific verbal and written communication skills used in the criminal justice field. Emphasis will be placed on the development of interviewing and report writing skills, focusing on the unique types of writing required gathering pertinent information and then recording that information by writing a variety of report narratives, represented by those prepared by individuals working in a profession within the criminal justice system. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate active listening skills used in interviewing.
  2. Identify effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills used in interviewing.
  3. Connect writing skills learned in composition courses to technical report writing.
  4. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information in order to determine appropriate content of report narratives.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to write a variety of criminal justice reports.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Role of Verbal Communications and Interview Skills

A. Design questions to be used in an interview using elements of a crime.

B. Demonstrate active listening skills and be able to communicate clearly and effectively both verbally and through written documentation with diverse populations.

C. Identify five nonverbal communication behaviors.

D. Describe five methods of verbal communication.

II. The Role of Report Writing and Written Communications in a Criminal Justice Environment

A. Identify and define the purpose and types of criminal justice reports.

B. Demonstrate an ability to formulate questions designed to elicit information from witnesses, victims and suspects.

C. Distinguish between factual information and unsupported opinions.

D. Demonstrate writing in first person and in past tense.

E. Describe events in chronological order.

F. Demonstrate ability to revise and edit drafts in a timely fashion, writing with short, clear, concise and concrete words.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Assignments                    40%-50%
Examinations/quizzes           40%-50%
Attendance/participation       0%-20%

Total                                                                                      100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 230

  • Title: Criminal Behavior*
  • Number: ADMJ 230
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PSYC 130

Description:

This course explores the relationship between psychology, criminal behavior, and the criminal justice system. The foundation of the course will be a detailed examination of the various theories used to explain the causation of criminal behavior. Special emphasis will be placed on exploring how this understanding is applied in various settings within the criminal justice system; including police departments, the courts, and corrections. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Compare and contrast theories of criminal behavior including biological, psychological and sociological perspectives.
  2. Identify specific categories of both violent and non-violent crimes.
  3. Discuss the typologies and specific profiles frequently associated with criminal offenders.
  4. Describe how the interaction of parents, family, peers, educators and other agents of socialization impacts juvenile delinquency.
  5. Explain how the onset, maintenance, treatment, and manifestation of psychiatric disorders correlate with antisocial or criminal conduct.
  6. Differentiate between a legal and psychiatric understanding of competency.
  7. Discuss the various mechanisms used by the police in the identification of criminals, as well as in the prevention or reduction of criminal behavior.
  8. Trace the progression of an offender through the various stages of the legal system.
  9. Explain how the correctional system addresses criminal behavior including an assessment of dangerousness, offender registrations, and halfway houses.
  10. Cite specific examples of recently emerging strategies for addressing the prevention and intervention of criminal behavior.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Theories of Criminal Behavior
   A. Examine the biological origins of criminal behavior.
      1. Discuss biocriminology.
      2. Review genetic theory.
      3. Consider the Diathesis-Stress model .
   B. Discuss psychological theories of criminal behavior.
      1. Review personality theory.
      2. Evaluate psychoanalytic theory.
      3. Identify common criminal thinking errors.
   C. Critique sociological theories of criminal behavior.
      1. Evaluate anomie theory 
      2. Discuss Strain theory
      3. Compare and contrast various subcultural explanations for crime.
II. Types of Offenders and Types of Criminal Behavior
   A. Examine violent crime and criminals.
      1. Murder
      2. Sex Crimes
      3. Violence in the criminal justice system
      4. Domestic violence
      5. Cult violence and hate crimes
   B. Discuss nonviolent crime and criminals.
      1. Substance related crimes and criminals
      2. Organized crime
      3. White collar crime
      4. Fraud
      5. Internet crime
      6. Stalking
      7. Property crimes
      8. Prostitution
   C. Examine juvenile delinquency.
      1. Review the role of parental responsibility.
      2. Define status crimes.
      3. Assess the impact of school violence.
      4. Explain the adjudication process for juveniles.
   D. Discuss mental illness.
      1. Analyze the prevalence of mental illness in criminal populations
      2.Evaluate common mental disorders in the criminal justice system
      3. Explain the role and concept of competency in criminal behavior.
III. Criminal justice system approaches to criminal behavior
   A. Analyze policing practices as they relate to criminal behavior..
      1. Review community policing.
      2. Evaluate police training and education.
      3. Discuss the art and science of criminal profiling.
   B. Trace the offender through the legal system.
      1. Examine pretrial matters.
      2. Distinguish between probation and diversion programs.
      3. Summarize the trial process.
      4. Outline post-trial matters.
      5. Critique the death penalty
   C. Evaluate the role of the correctional system.
      1. Compare and contrast retribution and rehabilitation.
      2. Explain the role and purpose of parole.
      3. Examine the prison system.
         a. Review the federal prison system.
         b. Review the state prison system
         c. Discuss prison conditions
         d. Analyze prison subcultures
      4. Discuss the process reentry.
   D. Outline possible future directions in the study of criminal
behavior.
      1. Examine forensic psychological education and training.
      2. Debate new theories of crime, law, and behavior.
         a. Explain procedural justice.
         b. Evaluate commonsense justice.
         c. Discuss therapeutic justice.
      3. Assess community prevention and community intervention programs.
         a. Critique the use of therapeutic communities.
         b. Describe restorative justice.
         c. Examine victim-offender mediation programs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 40% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical
and
evaluative nature.

2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 30% of the final grade.

3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.

4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and
clear writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 235

  • Title: Community Based Corrections
  • Number: ADMJ 235
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a comprehensive examination of community based corrections. The history of probation and parole is discussed as a foundation for the expanded coverage of correctional services offered in the community. Emphasis is given to modern correctional paradigms including diversion, intermediate sanctions, reentry and restorative justice. Practical field experience will broaden the students' understanding of this population and successful best practices of existing federal, state and county agencies will be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Trace the history and development of community corrections from the 1400s to the present.
  2. Describe the philosophy, historical background, goals and benefits of offender diversion.
  3. Define the major strategies of community corrections including diversion, probation, intermediate sanctions, early release, parole and reentry.
  4. Compare the current trends in intermediate sanctions, reentry and restorative justice in corrections.
  5. Describe a variety of prison release programs including pardon, amnesty, commutation, reprieve, furlough, work release, halfway house and shock parole.
  6. Explain the role of the probation and parole officer in the community corrections process.
  7. Outline the basics of risk management within community corrections.
  8. Identify and analyze empirical data concerning various offenders.
  9. Discuss special populations within community corrections including individuals with substance dependence, sex offenders, mentally ill, the elderly, and gangs.
  10. Distinguish adult and juvenile offenders and discuss programs targeted for both populations.
  11. Evaluate the effectiveness of probation, parole, reentry and other community corrections programs.
  12. Discuss the implications of politics, technology, economy and crime on the future of community corrections.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Foundations of Community Corrections
   A. Categorize the offender in the community.
      1. Analyze offenders through the use of statistics and examine their
behavior within our communities.
      2. Examine the various phases of community corrections as they
relate to the criminal justice system.
      3. Discuss the goals and objectives of punishment.
      4. Define the major strategies of community corrections including
diversion, probation, intermediate sanctions, early release, parole and
reentry.
   B. Describe offenders in the community throughout history.
      1. Explore the development of the democratic ideal in corrections.
      2. Study the origins of parole.
      3. Trace the history and development of probation from its inception
to the present.
      4. Examine the reform, rehabilitation, and reintegration eras from a
historical perspective.
      5. Discuss current trends in corrections and identify examples of
best practices.
   C. Classify types of crimes and criminals.
      1. Describe classification systems for offenses and offenders.
      2. Evaluate instruments used to classify offenders.
      3. Analyze challenges related to classifying offenders.
   D. Analyze community corrections.
      1. Explore legislative, fiscal and political components of community
corrections.
      2. Analyze community corrections utilizing evidence of
effectiveness.
   E. Explore risk reduction in community corrections.
      1. Outline the basics of risk management for the offender
population.
      2. Explain the role of supervision levels as a technique to mitigate
risk.
      3. Use empirical data to analyze the efficacy of risk reduction
strategies and techniques.
      4. Discuss risk management as a tool for public accountability.
      5. Examine the role of the case manager.

II. Implementation of Community Corrections
   A. Explain the goals of diversion.
      1. Discuss the philosophy and historical background of diversion.
      2. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of restitution and
community service.
   B. Explore intermediate sanctions.
      1. Summarize the historical background of intermediate sanctions.
      2. Discuss a variety of intermediate sanctions.
      3. Evaluate the efficacy of intermediate sanctions.
   C. Explain probation.
      1. Distinguish a centralized and decentralized approach to
probation.
      2. Evaluate the benefits and challenges of combining probation and
parole.
      3. Discuss the investigation and supervision functions of the
probation officer.
      4. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of probation.
      5. Discuss revocation of probation.
      6. Assist jurisdictions to improve supervision strategies through
better and more targeted data collection and analysis.
   D. Examine parole.
      1. Discuss the types of parole release: discretionary, mandatory and
expiration.
      2. Explain other types of prison release programs including pardon,
furlough, work release, and halfway house.
      3. List various barriers to success for newly paroled offenders.
      4. Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of parole.
      5. Analyze the effectiveness of parole.
   F. Examine special offenders' populations in the community.
      1. Summarize research grounded programs for substance abusers, sex
offenders, and the mentally ill.
      2. Identify innovative approaches to assist in supervising tribal
and immigrant communities.
      3. Describe evidence-based approaches for supervision of gang
members within the community.
   G. Examine the juvenile offender in the community.
      1. Outline the differences between adult and juvenile offenders.
      2. Examine the development of the juvenile court.
      3. Discuss evidence based programs targeting juveniles.
   H. Explore the future of community corrections.
      1. Discuss the effect of politics and technology on the future of
community corrections.
      2. Examine the effect of crime on the economy.
      3. Construct new paradigms for community corrections grounded in
evidence-based approaches.
      4. Discuss standards of professional conduct, appropriate education
and training for community corrections professionals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical
and evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, group activities, etc.

Evaluation criteria for writing: complete, concrete, correct and clear
writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grades will be calculated using the following scale:

  A = 90-100%    
  B = 80-89%  
  C = 70-79%  
  D = 60-69%  
  F = 0-59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 255

  • Title: Ethics and Criminal Justice
  • Number: ADMJ 255
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course explores the study of ethics, particularly as it applies to the field of criminal justice. Focus is placed on providing a basic framework for understanding morality and ethics, then applying those concepts to the development of critical thinking and decision-making skills as they relate to the field of criminal justice. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Examine the role and purpose of ethics in criminal justice.
  2. Identify and apply the steps involved in ethical decision making.
  3. Assess a variety of moral/ethical concerns that arise within a study of the criminal justice system.
  4. Learn to think critically when making value decisions.
  5. Identify unethical behavior in the CJ system.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Concept of Ethics
   A. Examine relevant ethical theories and perspectives which have
emerged throughout western civilization.
      1. Discuss the relevance and value of ethics in the context of
crime, law and justice.
      2. Compare and contrast the relationship between ethics and the
law.
   B. Evaluate common beliefs about ethics.
   C. Distinguish between ethical and other types of values.
   D. Recognize sources of morality.
   E. Discuss the development of morality.
      1. Explore moral behavior in criminal justice settings.
         a. Discuss examples of moral behavior within law enforcement.
         b. Discuss examples of moral behavior within corrections.
         c. Discuss examples of moral behavior within human services.
      2. Contrast moral behavior in criminal justice with moral behavior
in other fields.
   F. Explore the relationship between virtue and behavior.
   G. Analyze virtue as it relates to the criminal justice system.
      1. Apply principles of virtue to law enforcement.
      2. Apply principles of virtue to corrections.
      3. Apply principles of virtue to human services.
   H. Summarize psychological well-being as it relates to ethics.
      1. Apply principles of psychological well-being to law enforcement
personnel.
      2. Apply principles of psychological well-being to corrections
personnel.
      3. Apply principles of psychological well-being to human services
personnel.
   I. Examine diversity as it relates to ethical behavior in law
enforcement.
   J. Examine diversity as it relates to ethical behavior in corrections.
   K. Examine diversity as it relates to ethical behavior in human
services.
   L. Analyze how sexism can affect ethical behavior.
   M. Analyze how ageism can affect ethical behavior.
   N. Explore racial discrimination in the criminal justice system.
      1. Relate how apartheid influences ethical decisions and behavior.
      2. Discuss discrimination in relation to: bail; jury selection;
imprisonment disparities, and death penalty disparities.

II. Examine the Elements of Critical Thinking
   A. Explore foundational thought necessary for critical reflection.
   B. Explain ethical choice-making in criminal justice settings.
      1. Identify the steps involved in ethical decision-making.
         a. Apply the steps involved in ethical decision-making to law
enforcement situations.
         b. Apply the steps involved in ethical decision-making to
corrections situations.
         c. Apply the steps involved in ethical decision-making to human
services situations.
      2. Recognize uncritical thinking.

III. Apply Ethics to Criminal Justice
   A. Identify the basic ethical principles involved in criminal justice.
      1. Examine the role and purpose of ethics in the criminal justice
system.
      2. Analyze how ethics informs our understanding of moral issues in
criminal justice.
      3. Discuss philosophical ideas that are related to various crime and
justice controversies.
   B. Demonstrate ethical decision-making using situations relating to law
enforcement.
   C. Demonstrate ethical decision-making using situations relating to
corrections.
   D. Demonstrate ethical decision-making using situations relating to
human services.

IV. Evaluate the Ethics of Duty
   A. Examine codes of conduct in law enforcement.
   B. Examine codes of conduct in corrections.
   C. Examine codes of conduct in human services.

V. Examining Unethical Behavior and Decisions
   A. Discuss examples of corruption in law enforcement.
   B. Discuss examples of corruption in corrections.
   C. Discuss examples of corruption in human services.
   D. Examine liability as it relates to unethical behavior.
      1. Design a policy to address unethical conduct within law
enforcement.
      2. Design a policy to address unethical conduct within corrections.
      3. Design a policy to address unethical conduct within human
services.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams will constitute at least 50% of the final
grade. The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.

Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.

The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor's discretion for
such items as participation in class discussion, and group activities.

A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F - under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 265

  • Title: Advanced Police Training*
  • Number: ADMJ 265
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 0
  • Contact Hours: 0
  • Lecture Hours: 0

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Selective Admissions - open only to currently employed full-time police officers attending the Police Academy under sponsorship of a law enforcement agency

Description:

This course consists of 60 clock hours of law enforcement training provided in addition to the 540 hours required by the Kansas Minimum Standards Training Act for recruits attending the Police Academy. While the required 600-hour curriculum is provided without fee, enrollment in advanced training is required of all those attending the academy. The curriculum covers law, criminal investigations, patrol procedures, defensive tactics, report writing and specialized training required by local law enforcement agencies.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives



Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 275

  • Title: Police Management*
  • Number: ADMJ 275
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ADMJ 121

Description:

This class will assist students in developing an understanding through practical analysis of modern criminal justice administration theory as well as supervisory and management principles. Students will apply these principles to the unique operating problems of contemporary criminal justice organizations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explore how history has impacted the evolution of Criminal Justice administration.
  2. Compare and contrast the various criminal justice administration theories.
  3. Explain leadership and management techniques.
  4. Demonstrate ethics, integrity, teamwork and professionalism.
  5. Determine the need for diversity and multicultural training.
  6. Differentiate organizational management and operational characteristics of criminal justice agencies.
  7. Explain the rights and legal responsibilities of criminal justice employees.
  8. Summarize the formal and informal evaluation process of criminal justice employees.
  9. Discover the various aspects of contemporary criminal justice hiring practices and process.
  10. Practice oral interview and criminal justice job seeking skills. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Criminal Justice Management
   A. Explain the historical management role and organizational
environment.
   B. Differentiate between public, private and police management.
   C. Describe the Expectation-Integration Model to include community,
organizational and individual expectations.
   D. Explore the art and science of management.

II. Development of Management Theory
   A. Distinguish between the various management theories.
   B. Compare and contrast between the various approaches to management
theory:
      1. Classical Approach
      2. Human Relations Approach
      3. Behavioral Science Approach; and 
      4. Contemporary Approach

III. Police Models and Community Policing
   A. Identify the four different models of policing, which include the
Political Model, Reform Model, Service Model and the Community Policing
Model.
   B. Define the various aspects of Community-Oriented Policing, to
include neighborhood building, Problem-Oriented Policing and Broken
Windows Policing.
   C. Illustrate the various management issues that involve Community
Policing.

IV. Organizational Characteristics, Group Influence and Organization
Change
   A. Explain the various organizational characteristics, such as the
composition, orientation and methods of the organization.
   B. Describe how the beliefs, attitudes and relevant knowledge and
skills can influence organizational culture.
   C. Identify how an organization can manage group behavior and conflict
through employee organizations or communication.
   D. State the issues involving organizational change, such as resistance
to change, controlling the pace of change and identifying the obstacles to
change that are outside the manager's control.

V. Human Resource Development, Selection and Diversity
   A. Illustrate the recruitment and selection process of a contemporary
criminal justice agency.
   B. Practically analyze the various background and testing tools used in
the hiring process.
   C. Describe the importance of cultural diversity in the criminal
justice workplace.
   D. Explain the trends in employee evaluation systems and discover the
different methods of measuring employee performance.
   E. Identify and develop important issues in job-related or task-related
training.
   F. Define a contemporary promotional process, including the assessment
center concept.

VI. Leadership and Management
   A. Compare and contrast the various leadership styles.
   B. Define the trait theories, behavioral theories and the situational
or contingency theories.
   C. Illustrate leadership concepts, including influence and authority,
power and organizational politics.
   D. Predict potential future management challenges, discovering lessons
learned from changing cultures or significant events like the terror
attacks of 9/11.

VII. Criminal Justice Agency Planning and Research
   A. Evaluate the various types of plans and the agency planning
responsibilities.
   B. Describe scientific methodology involving the research process.
   C. Demonstrate the various aspects of systematic planning, including
organizational vision and strategy formulation.
   D. Illustrate the SARA planning process.

VIII. Civil Liability in the Criminal Justice Agency Workplace
   A. Illustrate an understanding of civil liabilities and the costs
associated.
   B. Define the avenues of liability, including state and federal courts
through tort actions.
   C. Demonstrate an understanding for the liabilities of criminal justice
managers and administrators.
   D. Identify emerging liability issues for the Twenty-First
Century.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60% Unit exams including questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.

20-30% Written assignments, including report writing and interview
assignments.

10-20% Class participation, group activities and field trips.

Grading Criteria:
A = 90 to 100%
B = 80 to 89%
C = 70 to 79%
D = 60 to 69%
F = 0 to 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 285

  • Title: Administration of Justice Internship*
  • Number: ADMJ 285
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Fifteen credit hours in ADMJ courses or department approval and a grade point average of 2.0 or higher

Description:

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate federal, state or local criminal justice agencies or not-for-profit organizations, and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career in the field of criminal justice. The student spends the equivalent of 12 hours per week for 14 weeks performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 168 hours.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Apply the academic study of administration of justice to the type of duties performed and observations made during the course of the internship.
  2. Demonstrate the successful integration of academic study in administration of justice classes into work in federal, state or local criminal justice agencies or not-for-profit organizations.
  3. Successfully perform internship tasks and functions under direct supervision in a mature and professional manner.
  4. Apply skills acquired during the internship application process to future career-related employment or community service.
  5. Demonstrate the successful integration of classroom study and field performance through daily records, written reports and discussion.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Apply for and secure an internship site in an appropriate setting
confirmed by a letter of acceptance.
   A. Develop learning objectives, tasks, and strategies appropriate to
the internship in consultation with Internship Coordinator and site
supervisor.
   B. Complete a contract between JCCC & internship agency or
representative signed by the Administration of Justice Internship
Coordinator, student and site supervisor.

II. Successfully perform internship tasks and functions under direct
supervision in a mature and professional manner.
   A. Identify responsibilities, tasks, and duties of the internship.
   B. Maintain a log of hours worked and major responsibilities
completed.
   C. Demonstrate ability to complete successfully the tasks assigned.
   D. Work systematically and logically through the various issues that
arise in the internship setting.
   E. Develop human relations skills needed for the position.
   F. Display sensitivity to the needs of the diversity of individuals
encountered in the internship setting.
   G. Adhere to policies and procedures of the internship site. 
   H. Respect the confidentiality of privileged information.

III. Demonstrate successful integration of classroom study and daily
internship work in journal entries, written reports, and discussions.
   A. Outline the relationship between the student’s individual
education objectives and strategies and the internship duties and
activities.  
   B. Analyze the relationship between classroom knowledge and internship
related tasks.

IV. Prepare documentation for a career choice or future field of study.
   A. Complete a self-assessment of personal growth in the selection of a
career or field of study based on internship experiences.
   B. Complete a self-assessment of professional growth in the selection
of a career or field of study based on observations made and duties
performed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Student Portfolio: Each student will maintain and keep a current
portfolio containing all documents developed during the course of the
internship experience. The portfolio will include, but is not limited to,
each of the following:
   a. Preparation Materials: Orientation materials, application materials
and resume.      
   b. Log: Each student must maintain a daily log signed by their site
supervisor documenting the equivalent of twelve on-site hours worked per
week over a fourteen week period. 
   c. Report: Each student will complete three written reports outlining
the relationship between the specified internship educational objectives
and strategies and their internship activities.  
   d. Paper: Each student will write a 3-page (minimum) paper analyzing
their internship experience from an academic point of view.
   
2. Discussions: The student will attend a minimum of three internship
meetings with the Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator.
 
3. Supervisor Evaluation: The on-site internship supervisor will complete
two evaluations of the student intern’s progress and performance.

4. Self-Assessment: The student will complete a professional and personal
self-assessment based on the internship experience. 

All written assignments will be produced with considerable care and
attention to mechanical as well as intellectual content.  The quality of a
student’s writing will be taken into consideration when assigning grades.


In determining final grades, assignments are weighed as follows:  
      Log(or Journal) of Activities, reports–25-30% of final grade
      Supervisor evaluation/self-assessment–25-30% of final grade
      Discussions/seminars/final reflection paper–40-50% of final grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. As a representative of JCCC, student behavior must adhere to the following standards: a) The JCCC Student Code of Conduct; b) Policies and procedures of the internship placement site; c) Confidentiality of privileged information to which the student is privy.
  2. Transportation to the internship site is the responsibility of the student.
  3. The student must meet all “employment” requirements of the selected internship site. These requirements may include background investigation, records checks, statements of confidentiality, and/or specific prerequisites and/or physical requirements. SOME APPLICANTS MAY BE INELIGIBLE FOR SOME PLACEMENTS DUE TO INTERNSHIP AGENCY OR OFFICE CRITERIA.
  4. Failure of the student to complete requirements and/or dismissal by sponsoring internship agency or office site precludes successful completion of this course and award of college credit.
  5. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Visit with Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator and JCCC Career Services Center regarding eligibility, credit-enrollment, appropriate internship sites, and job search procedures. Complete Internship Program application process. Contact the selected site and satisfactorily complete the placement process, and secure a letter of acceptance. Complete course contact with Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator and enroll in the course. Assume responsibility for securing and maintaining a portfolio of all necessary paperwork for the course. Perform required internship duties and responsibilities in keeping with JCCC and internship placement agency policies and procedures.
  6. JCCC RESPONSIBILITIES: Conduct pre-internship activities with student. Develop a contract describing internship responsibilities, expectations, and requirements signed by the student, internship site supervisor, and Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator. Conduct three meetings and/or seminars with the student to review the student’s progress toward meeting student learning objectives for the internship and the relationship between the student’s academic work and internship activities. Maintain periodic contact with the designated internship site supervisor. Review the student daily logs to determine compliance with internship contact hour requirements.
  7. SITE REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNSHIP AGENCY: Conduct required pre-employment activities with student. Designate an internship site supervisor. Accept and sign student internship contract. Supervise all internship activities previously agreed upon by sponsoring agency and the Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator. Complete a mid-term and final supervisory evaluation and submit to Administration of Justice Internship Coordinator.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ADMJ 291

No information found.