Biotechnology, A.A.S.

The greater Kansas City area and specifically Johnson County have numerous biological-, pharmaceutical- and chemical-related formulating, manufacturing, research and testing companies. Many of these facilities employ scientific technicians to support the endeavors of their professional scientists and engineers.

JCCC’s science technology program is designed to develop scientific support personnel for the metropolitan area.

This program offers specific knowledge and training designed to provide you with entry-level skills for employment as a technician. It also provides the breadth of background sufficient to encourage change and flexibility.

The biotechnology associate of applied science degree program will prepare students to work in biotechnology laboratories associated with universities, medical centers, private research institutions, and a variety of industrial applications. Upon completion of this 65-67 hour degree, students will be able to find entry-level or higher positions in diverse fields of biotechnology. Along with basic and more advanced science courses, students will take specialized courses such as laboratory safety and biotechnology methods.

Note: Metropolitan Community College students should seek specific counsel from the JCCC program personnel for the appropriate course plan and numbers.

Metropolitan Community College students should refer to Cooperative Program Information.

(Major Code 2110; State CIP Code 41.0101)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

First Semester

ENGL 121Composition I*3
MATH 130Technical Mathematics I* ( or higher)3
BIOL 135Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology4
CHEM 122Principles of Chemistry*5
Total Hours15

Second Semester

BIOT 160Introduction to Biotechnology*2
BIOT 165Laboratory Safety*1
BIOL 144Human Anatomy and Physiology*5
PHYS 133Applied Physics*5
ENGL 123Technical Writing I*3
Physical Education Elective ^1
Total Hours17
^

Physical Education Elective

Third Semester

BIOT 230Microbiology for Biotechnology*5
BIOL 145Human Anatomy and Physiology Dissection*1
BIOL 205General Genetics*4
CHEM 140Principles of Organic Biological Chemistry*5
Social Science/Economics Elective ^3
Total Hours18
^

Social Science/Economics Elective

Fourth Semester

BIOT 260Biotechnology Methods*5
CIS 124Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications3
BIOT 265Biotechnology Internship*4
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours15
^

Humanities Elective

Total Program Hours: 65

Courses

BIOT 160   Introduction to Biotechnology* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: (CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) and Prerequisite or corequisite BIOL 135 *All prerequisites and corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This course is an introduction to biotechnology, including career exploration, history and applications of DNA/RNA technology, molecular biology, and bioethics. Topics include cloning, DNA, antibodies, gene therapy, plant biotechnology, the human genome project, DNA fingerprinting, genetic testing, diverse products made through biotechnology, and the ethical implications of this technology. The course is intended for those interested in pursuing a career in an industrial, academic, or biomedical research laboratory. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

BIOT 165   Laboratory Safety* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: (CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) and Prerequisite or corequisite BIOL 135 *All prerequisites and corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This course will emphasize laboratory safety and procedures. Additionally, regulations that govern the biotechnology laboratory will be discussed. Biological, chemical and radiation safety will all be handled through lectures, videotapes, demonstrations and field trips. There will also be exposure to good manufacturing practices (GMP), quality assurance and control procedures (QA/QC), and OSHA and FDA regulations. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

BIOT 230   Microbiology for Biotechnology* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 and BIOT 160 and BIOT 165 All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This is an introductory course in microbiology for biotechnology students. It provides a background in many areas of microbiology with an emphasis on molecular aspects and applications for biotechnology. Industrial and food microbiology will also be examined. The structure, physiology, antimicrobial agents, immunology and host-parasite relationship of microorganisms will also be studied, with an emphasis on bacteria. Students will learn aseptic techniques and apply them in the isolation, growth and maintenance of pure cultures of bacteria. Students will also perform various molecular and genetic techniques as well as chemical tests to identify these bacteria. The growth phases of bacteria and response of bacteria to changes in environmental conditions will be examined. 3 hrs lecture, 4 hrs lab /wk.

BIOT 260   Biotechnology Methods* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOT 160 and BIOT 165

Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOT 230 *All prerequisites and/or corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This course is an introduction to the theory and laboratory techniques in molecular biology, protein biochemistry and immunology with an emphasis on gene expression and regulation, recombinant DNA, RNA transcription, and protein translation. Laboratory emphasis will be on molecular biological techniques utilized in modern research and industrial laboratories. Techniques include growth and maintenance of E. coli, gene cloning, DNA and protein electrophoresis protein purification and enzymatic and immunology assays. Lecture and laboratory exercises on the principles and practices of initiation, cultivation, maintenance, preservation of cell culture lines and applications will also be covered. 3 hrs lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

BIOT 265   Biotechnology Internship* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOT 260 and BIOT 160 and BIOT 165 and department approval

The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job and career-related skills while in a work setting. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The work will be developed cooperatively with academic, industrial and private institutional biotechnology laboratories. 20 hrs./wk.

BIOT 160

  • Title: Introduction to Biotechnology*
  • Number: BIOT 160
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) and Prerequisite or corequisite BIOL 135 *All prerequisites and corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course is an introduction to biotechnology, including career exploration, history and applications of DNA/RNA technology, molecular biology, and bioethics. Topics include cloning, DNA, antibodies, gene therapy, plant biotechnology, the human genome project, DNA fingerprinting, genetic testing, diverse products made through biotechnology, and the ethical implications of this technology. The course is intended for those interested in pursuing a career in an industrial, academic, or biomedical research laboratory. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize the foundations of modern biotechnology.
  2. Explain the biochemical principles that form the basis for biotechnology.
  3. Describe the common methods and applications of biotechnology with regards to microorganisms, plants and animals.
  4. Describe the common methods and applications of biotechnology with regards to medicine, forensics and the human genome project.
  5. Locate and interpret the regulations that govern the products of biotechnology.
  6. Acknowledge both sides of the ethical implications of biotechnology.
  7. Research a biotechnology company, and complete job application procedure.
  8. Present a biotechnology topic using PowerPoint 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Beginnings of Modern Biotechnology
   A. Outline the early history of biotechnology prior to the development
of the germ theory.
   B. Describe the scientific developments that occurred after the germ
theory and provided the foundations of modern biotechnology.
 
II. Basic Methodologies of Gene Expression
   A. Describe DNA structure and the replication process.
   B. Explain the process of RNA transcription.
   C. Explain translation and the components necessary for the process to
occur as well as describe the four levels of protein structure.
   D. Cite examples of the regulations of gene expression including the
lac and trp operons.
 
III. Basic Principles of Recombinant DNA Technology
   A. Describe the function and use of bacterial restriction
endonucleases.
   B. Describe the natural occurrence of cloning and the human
applications of the process.
   C. Explain the methods of cell transformation.
   D. Explain the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).
   E. Review the different DNA sequencing methods, especially the Sanger
method.
   F. Summarize the various methods used to study proteins including
chromatography and gel electrophoresis.
 
IV. Common Methods and Applications of Microbial Biotechnology
   A. Review the commercial production of methods using microogranisms.
   B. Identify a variety of products from microorganisms.
   C. Describe examples of bioremediation and their impact on the
environment.
 
V. Common Methods and Applications of Plant Biotechnology
   A. Describe the techniques used in plant tissue culture.
   B. Identify a variety of uses of plant genetic engineering.
   C. Review the safety issues that must be addressed with food plants.
 
VI. Common Methods and Applications of Animal Biotechnology
   A. Describe gene transfer methods in animals.
   B. Define the role of transgenic animals.
   C. Discuss various methods of animal propagation.
 
VII. Common Methods and Applications of the Human Genome Project
   A. Describe the goals of the Human Genome Project (HGP).
   B. Define genetic markers and maps as they relate to the HGP.
   C. List applications of HGP including genetic testing, screening and
therapy.
 
VIII. Common Methods and Applications of Medical Biotechnology
   A. Review the process and use of gene therapy.
   B. Compare and contrast the types of vaccines in use including their
method of manufacture.
   C. Summarize the types of synthetic drugs and their development.
 
IX. Forensic Science and DNA Profiling
   A. Discuss the legal and technical requirements of forensic science
pertaining to:
      1. Evidence gathering and conservation.
      2. Interpretation of evidence.
      3. Reliability of technology employed.
   B. Describe the methods used in DNA profiling.
   C. Outline DNA databases and their use in profiling.
 
X. Regulations and Patent Processes That Govern Biotechnology
   A. Identify the regulatory agencies that govern biotechnology.
   B. Recognize the risks of biotechnology products to the public and
interpret how regulations work to decrease the risk.
   C. Outline the process used in patent plants and animals.
 
XI. Ethical Issues Associated with Biotechnology
   A. Evaluate the public concerns with engineered plants and foods.
   B. Summarize the ethical, legal and social implications of the Human
Genome Project.
   C. Acknowledge both sides of the argument regarding the ethical use of
biotechnology.
 
XII. Career Exploration
   A. Research and write a paper on a biotechnology firm.
   B. Prepare career materials such as a resume′ and cover letter.
   C. Prepare and give a presentation on a biotechnology topic.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams            75%-90% of grade
Research paper   10%-25% of grade

Grading Scale:      
   A = 90 – 100%     
   B = 80 -  89%   
   C = 70 -  79%   
   D = 60 -  69%   
   F =  0 -  59% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

BIOT 165

  • Title: Laboratory Safety*
  • Number: BIOT 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (CHEM 122 or CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) and Prerequisite or corequisite BIOL 135 *All prerequisites and corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will emphasize laboratory safety and procedures. Additionally, regulations that govern the biotechnology laboratory will be discussed. Biological, chemical and radiation safety will all be handled through lectures, videotapes, demonstrations and field trips. There will also be exposure to good manufacturing practices (GMP), quality assurance and control procedures (QA/QC), and OSHA and FDA regulations. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize the responsibilities in maintaining a safe laboratory to determine its impact on the personnel, community and environment.
  2. Describe the characteristics of the various hazards in the laboratory, including their identification, proper use, storage and disposal.
  3. Recognize the value and need for adequate laboratory documentation and record keeping, including procedure and safety manuals.
  4. Identify the risks in the laboratory and perform a risk assessment analysis.
  5. Summarize the duties of the regulatory and non-regulatory rule-making agencies that impact laboratory safety.
  6. Write a Laboratory Safety manual. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safe Laboratory Practices
   A. Outline good housekeeping techniques.
   B. Describe proper personal practices in the laboratory, including:
      1. Appropriate clothing and footwear.
      2. Food and beverage usage.
      3. Personal hygiene practices.
   C. Follow accepted handling practices of laboratory animals.
   D. Explain documentation and record-keeping methods.
   E. Write a laboratory safety manual to demonstrate learned methods.
 
II. Principles of Occupational Safety
   A. Follow physical, electrical and fire safety regulations.
   B. Describe the importance of signs and notices.
   C. Develop plans for facility maintenance and correction of physical
safety problems.
 
III. Safety Equipment
   A. Choose and utilize appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
   B. Choose and utilize appropriate laboratory safety equipment,
including:
      1. Chemical fume hoods.
      2. Biological safety cabinets.
      3. Fire equipment.
 
IV. Chemical Hazards
   A. Categorize the various types of chemical hazards, their use and
handling in the laboratory including:
      1. Corrosives, irritants and similar chemicals.
      2. Toxic chemicals.
   B. Follow accepted methods for neutralization of toxic chemicals.
   C. Follow regulations and techniques for waste management.
 
V. Radioactive Chemical Hazards
   A. Categorize the various types of radioactive chemical hazards, their
use and handling in the laboratory, including:
      1. Characteristics of radioisotopes.
      2. Handling and storage techniques.
      3. Dosimetry.
   B. Describe the importance of radiation monitoring and surveillance.
   C. Explain proper record-keeping methods required by federal
regulations.
   D. Adhere to accepted methods of decontamination of radioactive
materials.
   E. Follow regulations and techniques for waste management.
 
VI. Perform Simple Risk Assessment Analysis
   A. Identify hazardous agents and their specific risks.
   B. Assess the individual susceptibility of the researchers.
   C. Review experimental procedures and their associated risks.
   D. Identify routes of entry of hazardous agents into the body.
 
VII. Regulatory Agencies for the Laboratory
   A. Recognize the role of rule-making agencies in laboratory safety,
including:
      1. Federal - OSHA, EPA, NIH, CDC, FDA, NRC, USDA.
      2. State and local.
      3. Private - UL, NSF.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams/Quizzes         50%-60% of grade
Laboratory Manual     40%-50% of grade


   A = 90 – 100%     
   B = 80 -  89%   
   C = 70 -  79%   
   D = 60 -  69%   
   F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

BIOT 230

  • Title: Microbiology for Biotechnology*
  • Number: BIOT 230
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 135 and BIOT 160 and BIOT 165 All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This is an introductory course in microbiology for biotechnology students. It provides a background in many areas of microbiology with an emphasis on molecular aspects and applications for biotechnology. Industrial and food microbiology will also be examined. The structure, physiology, antimicrobial agents, immunology and host-parasite relationship of microorganisms will also be studied, with an emphasis on bacteria. Students will learn aseptic techniques and apply them in the isolation, growth and maintenance of pure cultures of bacteria. Students will also perform various molecular and genetic techniques as well as chemical tests to identify these bacteria. The growth phases of bacteria and response of bacteria to changes in environmental conditions will be examined. 3 hrs lecture, 4 hrs lab /wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe important historical developments which led to the formulation of the germ theory of disease and those discoveries that lead to the development of the science of biotechnology.
  2. Perform basic microbiological techniques including staining methods, cultivation, enumeration, and growth curves.
  3. Review the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
  4. Review organic chemistry and biochemistry as related to bacteria and apply this knowledge to identification, fermentation and other applications in biotechnology.
  5. Explain the basics of microbial genetics to include the concepts of transformation, conjugation, transduction, the basic types and causes of mutations and their use in biotechnology.
  6. Describe the advanced ideas involved in the replication of DNA and in protein synthesis in enough detail to understand the basic ideas of gene splicing and the development of resistance to antimicrobials.
  7. Apply the knowledge of molecular biology and genetics to biotechnology applications or techniques as well as explain the underlying concepts.
  8. Describe the basic structure and characteristics of viruses, how viruses infect cells, with emphasis on animal viruses and bacteriophage.
  9. Explain the basic fundamentals of antibiotics to include mechanisms of action, development of resistance and perform the laboratory determination of sensitivities.
  10. Describe the basic non-specific defenses of the host.
  11. Describe the basic specific defenses of the host.
  12. Describe mechanisms by which bacteria cause disease, and relate various bacteria and viruses to the diseases they cause and the virulence factors used to cause disease.
  13. Compare and contrast the various microorganisms that are used in biotechnology.
  14. Describe mechanisms by which bacteria are utilized in industrial fermentation applications, water and food microbiology.
  15. Document, analyze, and present data that is generated from course experiments.
  16. Demonstrate good laboratory etiquette and safety working with equipment, materials, and other personnel associated with the procedures conducted in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Microbiology
   A. Review development of the germ theory of disease and molecular
microbiology.
   B. Recall the early work to disprove the theory of spontaneous
generation.
   C. Recognize the contributions to the germ theory by Pasteur and Koch.
   D. Recognize the contributions to molecular microbiology by Griffith,
Avery and McLeod, Hershey and Chase, Lederberg, Watson and Crick, and
others.

II. Basic Techniques and Concepts
   A. Demonstrate various staining techniques, including a Gram stain and
an Acid-Fast stain.
   B. Demonstrate pure culture techniques, such as the loop-streak
technique for the isolation of pure cultures and loop-inoculated pour
plates.
   C. Cultivate and maintain a variety of bacterial and yeast cultures.
   D. Perform bacterial population counts, using both the serial dilution
method and a Petroff-Hauser counter to determine bacteria numbers.
   E. Complete a bacterial growth curve and analyze results, to include
monitoring bacterial growth using qualitative and quantitative methods.

III. Cell Structure and Function
   A. Review of the structures and their function of prokaryotic and
eukaryotic cells.
   B. Relate the bacterial structures to staining properties and
antibiotic resistance.

IV. Introduction to Biochemistry
   A. Describe the major groups of organic compounds.
   B. State the types of enzymes and their functions.
   C. Recognize the common chemical functional groups.
   D. Recall the common biochemical reactions of a cell.
   E. Review the processes of glycolysis, fermentation, the Kreb's cycle,
and oxidative      phosphorylation.
   F. Identify the products of bacterial fermentation and their industrial
applications.
     
V. Microbial Genetics
   A. Review the Watson-Crick model of DNA structure and DNA replication.
   B. Review the processes involved in protein synthesis (transcription
and translation).
   C. Recognize the types of mutations and causes of mutations.
   D. Distinguish between the types of DNA transfer in prokaryotic cells,
including transformation, conjugation and transduction.
   E. Describe the process of gene splicing and its applications.
   F. Perform and analyze data from molecular techniques used in
microbiology, such as gel electrophoresis, nucleic acid extraction,
restriction enzyme analysis and transformation.

VII. Viruses
   A. Categorize the basic structure and characteristics of viruses.
   B. Explain the basic replication methods of bacteriophages and how they
are used for genetic transfer in biotechnology.
   C. Explain the replication of representative animal viruses and how it
plays a role in viral disease and biotechnology.
   D. Maintain cell cultures used to grow viruses in the laboratory. 
   E. Identify viral pathogenesis (cytopathic effect) using cell
cultures.
   F. Grow and titrate bacteriophage preparations.

VIII. Antimicrobials
   A. Review the fundamentals of antimicrobials.
   B. Describe the mechanisms of antimicrobial action.
   C. Describe the mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance.
   D. Define methods to determine antimicrobial susceptibility and
resistance.
   E. Explain how resistance genes and antimicrobials are used as genetic
markers in biotechnology.
   F. Perform techniques to identify antimicrobial susceptibility and
resistance, including minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum lethal
concentration, the Kirby-Bauer test and the epsilometer test.

IX. Host Defense Mechanisms
   A. Recognize the relationship between pathogen and host.
   B. List the various non-specific defense mechanisms of the host, such
as the physical barriers, the chemical barriers, and the cells used in
non-specific defense and their role.
   C. Describe the specific (acquired) defense mechanisms of the host.
   D. Classify the cells of the acquired immune system.
   E. Itemize the characteristics and structure of antibodies.
   F. Explain antigen/antibody reactions.
   G. Describe the induction of the immune response.
   H. Define disorders associated with the immune system.
   I. Describe biotechnological advances in the treatment of immunological
diseases.
   J. Perform various immunological assays, including the immunodiffusion
test, the agglutination reaction, and the enzyme-linked immunosorbant
assay (ELISA).

X. Microorganisms and Human Disease
   A. Identify and describe mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. 
   B. Compare and contrast the concepts of virulence and pathogenicity.
   C. Identify microbial virulence factors associated with pathogenesis.
   D. List and describe representative diseases caused by Gram-positive,
Gram-negative, acid-fast bacilli, and anaerobic bacilli.
   E. Recognize other diseases caused by fungi and parasites.

XI. Industrial, Water and Food Microbiology/Biotechnology
   A. Describe the basic process of industrial fermentation.
   B. Outline the microbial synthesis of primary and secondary
metabolites.
   C. Describe and perform basic techniques in the microbiological
analysis of water and food products.

XII. Laboratory Etiquette
   A. Maintain a neat, detailed, organized and accurate laboratory
notebook.
   B. Participate in maintaining a clean, safe and organized laboratory.
   C. Properly use and care for laboratory equipment.
   D. Identify and properly handle all chemicals according to appropriate
chemical safety guidelines.
   E. Identify and properly handle biologicals according to appropriate
biosafety guidelines.
   F. Dispose of all reagents, chemicals and biologicals, according to
established procedures.
   G. Communicate with others in the laboratory, especially lab partner
and instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

There will be a minimum of four examinations in lab and lecture. 
Exams will be worth 100 points each in lecture and 50 points in lab. 
Material may be taken from the lectures, textbook, handouts and lab
exercises.  In addition, there will be at least one project/presentation
for at least 50 points and a lab manual for at least 100 points.

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished
using the following methods:
Tests from lectures and labs            75 – 80%
Homework from lectures and labs         20 – 25%
                                           100%

Grading:
90 – 100%     A
80 – 89%      B
70 – 79%      C
60 – 69%      D
<60%         F

Computer Literacy Expectations:  Students will need basic word processing
and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises
and projects.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

BIOT 260

  • Title: Biotechnology Methods*
  • Number: BIOT 260
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 9
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOT 160 and BIOT 165
Prerequisites or corequisites: BIOT 230 *All prerequisites and/or corequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course is an introduction to the theory and laboratory techniques in molecular biology, protein biochemistry and immunology with an emphasis on gene expression and regulation, recombinant DNA, RNA transcription, and protein translation. Laboratory emphasis will be on molecular biological techniques utilized in modern research and industrial laboratories. Techniques include growth and maintenance of E. coli, gene cloning, DNA and protein electrophoresis protein purification and enzymatic and immunology assays. Lecture and laboratory exercises on the principles and practices of initiation, cultivation, maintenance, preservation of cell culture lines and applications will also be covered. 3 hrs lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the structure, replication and regulation of DNA, RNA and proteins in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms.
  2. Perform basic laboratory techniques related to macromolecular separation and identification as well as explain the concepts underlying these techniques.
  3. Perform basic laboratory techniques related to immunology as well as explain the concepts underlying these techniques.
  4. Perform basic laboratory techniques related to tissue culture as well as explain the concepts underlying these techniques.
  5. Document, analyze and present data that is generated from course experiments using a Laboratory Notebook.
  6. Demonstrate good laboratory etiquette and safety working with equipment, materials and other personnel associated with the procedures conducted in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Central Dogma of Genetics
   A. Describe the structure of DNA and the process of replication.
   B. Explain the process of RNA transcription.
   C. Outline protein translation and describe the four levels of protein
structure.

II. Basic Molecular Biology Techniques
   A. Accurately and safely measure all chemicals as required by course
protocols.
   B. Perform various types of electrophoresis, including agarose and
polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.
   C. Perform various types of chromatography, including gel filtration
and ion exchange chromatography.
   D. Propagate, maintain and manipulate E. coli cultures according to
standard aseptic technique as needed to perform a variety of procedures.

III. DNA Methods
   A. Extract and isolate both chromosomal and plasmid DNA from E. coli.
   B. Analyze and map restriction enzyme cleavage sites on chromosomal
and
plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis.
   C. Perform a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and relate its use in
typing human DNA.
   D. Perform a Southern blot and describe its use in DNA fingerprinting.
   E. Conduct dideoxy-DNA sequencing and apply its use to the Human
Genome
Project and bioinformatics.
   F. Perform a bacterial transformation with a plasmid and analyze the
results to determine the success of the transformation.

IV. Protein Methods
   A. Extract and purify a restriction enzyme from E. coli by ion
exchange
chromatography.
   B. Quantify the amount of protein purified using a standard protein
assay.
   C. Determine the molecular weight of protein using polyacrylamide gel
electrophoresis (PAGE).
   D. Calculate total and specific enzyme activity.

V. Tissue Culture Techniques
   A. Explain methods used to isolate cells and/or tissues from plants
and
animals.
   B. Describe methods used to grow and maintain cells in culture.
   C. Maintain cells in tissue culture for the prescribed amount of time.

VI. Immunology Methods
   A. Perform an Ouchteriony procedure and explain the antigen-antibody
interaction it demonstrates.
   B. Conduct a simulation of HIV-1 detection, including enzyme-linked
immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and Western blot methods.
   C. Perform a quantitative ELISA to determine concentrations of viral
antigens.

VII. Laboratory Etiquette
   A. Maintain a neat, detailed, organized and accurate laboratory
notebook.
   B. Participate in maintaining a clean, safe and organized laboratory.
   C. Properly use and care for laboratory equipment.
   D. Identify and properly handle all chemicals according to appropriate
chemical safety guidelines.
   E. Identify and properly handle all biologicals according to
appropriate biosafety guidelines.
   F. Dispose of all reagents, chemical and biological, according to
established procedures.
   G. Communicate with others in the laboratory, especially lab partner
and instructor.
   H.  Prepare a scientific paper based upon an experiment performed in
the laboratory.

VIII. Common Methods and Applications of Medical Biotechnology
   A. Review the process and use of gene therapy.
   B. Compare and contrast the types of vaccines in uses including their
method of manufacture.
   C. Summarize the types of synthetic drugs and their development.

IX. Forensic Science and DNA Profiling
   A. Discuss the legal and technical requirements of forensic science
pertaining to:
      1. Evidence gathering and conservation.
      2. Interpretation of evidence.
      3. Reliability of technology employed.
   B. Describe the methods used in DNA profiling.
   C. Outline DNA databases and their use in profiling.

X. Regulations and Patent Processes that Govern Biotechnology
   A. Identify the regulatory agencies that govern biotechnology.
   B. Recognize the risks of biotechnology products to the public and
interpret how regulations work to decrease the risk.
   C. Outline the process used in patent plants and animals.

XI. Ethical Issues Associated with Biotechnology
   A. Evaluate the public concerns with engineered plants and foods.
   B. Summarize the ethical, legal and social implications of the Human
Genome Project.
   C. Acknowledge both sides of the argument regarding the ethical use of
biotechnology.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams/Papers            55%- 70% of grade
Laboratory Manual       30%- 45% of grade


   Grading Scale:
      A = 90 – 100%     
      B = 80 -  89%   
      C = 70 -  79%   
      D = 60 -  69%   
      F =  0 -  59%     

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

BIOT 265

  • Title: Biotechnology Internship*
  • Number: BIOT 265
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 20
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 20

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOT 260 and BIOT 160 and BIOT 165 and department approval

Description:

The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job and career-related skills while in a work setting. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The work will be developed cooperatively with academic, industrial and private institutional biotechnology laboratories. 20 hrs./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete all tasks needed to initiate the internship, including planning and coordinating with the facilitator and internship supervisor.
  2. Describe information learned about the laboratory, and the institution or company to which it belongs.
  3. Document the details of the internship, including tasks performed, knowledge gained, and problems encountered and how they were solved.
  4. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.
  5. Evaluate the internship experience, including a comparison of classroom to workplace learning, an assessment of the employer, and a comprehensive self-assessment. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Initiation of the Internship
   A. List goals and objectives to achieve in the internship setting.
   B. Develop a job description and determine specific objectives for the
internship with the facilitator.
   C. Discuss in a meeting with the facilitator and job supervisor the
job
description, objectives, and process for the internship.
   D. Complete the orientation to the company, its policies and the work
assignment.

II. Learning about the Laboratory
   A. Provide an accurate description of the laboratories projects.
   B. Provide an accurate description of the company or institution that
the laboratory belongs to and the laboratory’s role in the company or
institution. 
   C. Provide an accurate description of the task-related policies and
procedures as well as any safety requirements of the laboratory or its
company/institution.

III. Documenting the Internship
   A. Maintain records detailing job-related tasks in the laboratory (lab
manual).
   B. Maintain a record of hours worked and any other human resource
issues That arise.
   C. Document and use classroom knowledge to complete laboratory-related
tasks.
   D. Document new knowledge resulting from laboratory-related tasks or
workshops.
   E. Document problems experienced and solutions applied.

IV. Demonstrating Professional Workplace Skills
   A. Exhibit punctuality, initiative, courtesy, and loyalty in the
workplace.
   B. Meet with laboratory supervisor when necessary to discuss
work-related tasks and follow written and oral instructions.
   C. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   D. Demonstrate adaptability to changes in the work environment.
   E. Follow all employee rules, regulations, policies, and procedures.
   F. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attention to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the laboratory setting, and
recording data.

V. Evaluating the Internship Experience
   A. Describe and assess significant consistencies and/or discrepancies
between classroom competencies and laboratory practices.
   B. Describe and assess the laboratory and its company/institution
related to the internship experience.
   C. Assess and summarize the employer evaluation.
   D. Discuss the entire experience and final report with the facilitator
and laboratory supervisor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Pre-internship Goals and Objectives         5%
Final Report and Lab Manual            50%-60%
Final Employer Evaluation              35%-45%
                                          100%   
A = 90 – 100%     
B = 80 -  89%      
C = 70 -  79%      
D = 60 -  69%      
F =  0 -  59% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.