Residential Electrical Design Certificate

This two semester certificate is designed to provide the student basic skills for employment as an electrical design technician for single family and multi-family housing. The electrical design process for residential construction includes design for single-phase electrical services, feeders, branch circuits, appliances, lighting, communication/data and fire safety.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 5070; State CIP Code 46.0302)

First Semester

DRAF 120Introduction to Drafting2
DRAF 130Introduction to CAD Concepts - AutoCAD*3
ELTE 122National Electrical Code I4
ELTE 123Electromechanical Systems4
ELTE 125Residential Wiring *4
Total Hours17

Second Semester

DRAF 129Interpreting Architectural Drawings2
DRAF 230Intermediate CAD: AutoCAD*3
ELEC 123Smart House Technology3
ELTE 202Electrical Estimating*3
Total Hours11

Total Program Hours: 28

Courses

ELTE 122   National Electrical Code I (4 Hours)

This is an introductory course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code. Students should develop a working knowledge of the code that will permit them to apply it to everyday applications. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to use the code to design service entrances, feeders and branch circuits and discern between wiring methods used in difference occupancies. 4 hrs. lecture /wk.

ELTE 123   Electromechanical Systems (4 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify electrical components and their relationships to the various repair and troubleshooting techniques. The materials in this course will prove useful to service technicians whose background in electricity is limited. The course includes material from basic electrical theory to troubleshooting complex electrical circuits. This course will provide practice in the application of electrical theory as well as in the interconnection of components of heating and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. This is a beginning course in electrical theory that is required for HVAC, electrical and power plant technology but is appropriate for all interested students. Common components found in the HVAC industry are used to develop these skills. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 125   Residential Wiring Methods* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 123 or ELTE 123

This is an introductory course on residential wiring methods that includes practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should acquire the necessary skills to wire a residence to meet the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code for residential occupancies. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 200   Commercial Wiring Methods* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 123 or ELTE 123

This course covers commercial wiring methods. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to read commercial blueprints and apply the current National Electrical Code to commercial wiring systems. The student will gain working knowledge and hands-on experience with commercial wiring techniques. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 202   Electrical Estimating* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 122 and ELTE 125 or ELTE 200 or department approval

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to manually and electronically (using industry standard computer software) develop an electrical estimate for a residential and commercial design. Emphasis will be placed on compiling a take-off list of materials from blueprints, completing a bill of material and completing the final bid process. This includes a bid accuracy analysis to determine the job's selling price. The student will be able to determine material cost, labor cost, the proper application of direct cost, overhead and profit. Also, to conclude the estimate, the student will be able to write bid proposals and change orders. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs lab/wk.

ELTE 205   Industrial Electrical Wiring* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 122 or ELTE 125 or ELTE 200

This advanced course covers industrial wiring methods. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to read industrial blueprints and apply the current National Electrical Code to industrial wiring systems. The student will gain working knowledge and hands-on experience with industrial wiring techniques. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELTE 210   Code Certification Review* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 122

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to use the current National Electrical Code to do calculations involving loads, lighting and circuit sizing. The course will cover typical load calculations used in both residential and commercial settings. The student should also be able to interpret and apply the National Electrical Code rules to special wiring systems including Hazardous Locations, Elevators, Remote-control circuits and Fire Alarm systems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELTE 215   Generators, Transformers and Motors* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 123 and one of the following: ELTE 122 or ELTE 125 or ELTE 200 or equivalent experience and department approval

This is an advanced course on the use of generators, transformers and motors. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to interpret and apply the rules of the current National Electrical Code to wiring systems composed of these electrical components. Also, the student will gain a working knowledge of the theory of these single-phase and 3-phase electrical components and their practical applications in everyday use in the electrical industry. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELTE 271   Electrical Internship I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: department approval

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, minimum 15 hrs. on-the-job training/wk.

ELTE 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ELTE 122

  • Title: National Electrical Code I
  • Number: ELTE 122
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Description:

This is an introductory course on the use and interpretation of the current National Electrical Code. Students should develop a working knowledge of the code that will permit them to apply it to everyday applications. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to use the code to design service entrances, feeders and branch circuits and discern between wiring methods used in difference occupancies. 4 hrs. lecture /wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the terms that are important for the proper application of the Code.
  2. Describe basic safety requirements for electrical installations.
  3. Generalize the use and identification of grounded conductors.
  4. Define the rules that apply to branch circuits.
  5. Describe the rules that apply to feeder circuits.
  6. Use the rules for outside branch circuit, feeder and service calculations.
  7. Apply the rules for overcurrent protection, grounding and bonding.
  8. Discern between the different types of wiring methods and the rules for temporary wiring.
  9. Describe the rules for the use of conductors in flat conductor cable, electrical nonmetallic tubing (ENT), and armor cable (type AC).
  10. Apply the rules for metal-clad cable (type MC), nonmetallic sheath cable (types NM and NMC), service entrance cable (type SE and USE) and underground feeder and branch circuit cable (type UF).
  11. Explain the use of intermediate metal conduit, rigid metal conduit, rigid nonmetallic conduit and electrical metallic tubing.
  12. Describe the use of flexible metal conduit, liquidtight flexible metal conduit, liquidtight flexible nonmetallic conduit and surface raceways.
  13. Describe the use of multi-outlet assemblies and metallic or nonmetallic wireways.
  14. Describe the use of outlet, device, pull and junction boxes, conduit bodies and fittings.
  15. Apply the rules for the use of cabinets, cutout boxes, auxiliary gutters, switches, switchboards and panelboards.
  16. Describe the use of flexible cords, flexible cables, fixture wires, lighting fixtures, lampholders, lamps and receptacles.
  17. Summarize the use of appliances, fixed electric space heating equipment, motors, motor circuits and controllers.
  18. Apply the NEC rules for air conditioning, refrigeration equipment and transformer overcurrent protection. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General terms of the National Electrical Code
   A. Explain the history of NEC.
   B. Differentiate code changes from previous codes.
   C. Explain terms and layout of NEC.
   D. Use the NEC to find information.
   E. Explain what professionals use the NEC.
   F. Define the purpose of the NEC.
   G. Distinguish different interpretations of the NEC.
   H. Explain code arrangement and enforcement.
   I. Distinguish between mandatory and explanatory material.
   J. Describe safety and wiring planning.

II. Chapter 1 General
   A. Interpret definitions of the NEC using Article 100.
   B. Summarize the NEC requirements for electrical installations.
      1. Explain the approval of equipment by the authority having
jurisdiction.
      2. Describe the identification, installation and use of equipment.
      3. Explain nominal voltages and conductor methods.
      4. Distinguish different conductor insulation and wiring methods.
      5. Explain interrupting rating.
      6. Explain deteriorating agents and mechanical execution of work.
      7. Describe the mounting of cooling equipment.
      8. Explain electrical conductor termination.
      9. Define access and working space.
      10. Define guarding and manufacturer's markings.

III. Wiring and Protection
   A. Generalize the use of Article 200 for identification of grounded
conductors.
      1. Explain the connection to grounded system.
      2. Describe the use of the grounded conductor.
      3. Explain the use of white or gray conductors.
      4. Describe terminal identification and polarity.
   B. Article 210, Branch Circuits
      1. Explain scope and definitions.
      2. Describe branch circuit classification.
      3. Explain multiwire branch circuits.
      4. Explain color code for branch circuits.
      5. Explain voltage limitations and use of receptacles.
      6. Describe GFCI receptacle protection.
      7. Explain conductor ampacity and overcurrent protection.
      8. Calculate outlet device rating and maximum branch circuit Loads.
      9. Calculate permissible loads and multioutlet branch circuit.
      10. Justify the number of dwelling unit receptacle outlets.
      11. Explain the requirements of rooftop, attic and crawl space
receptacles.
      12. Calculate lighting outlet requirements.
   C. Article 215,  Feeder Conductors
      1. Describe the scope and minimum rating and size of feeders.
      2. Calculate overcurrent protection.
      3. Describe feeder conductor grounding means.
      4. Identify feeder high leg.
      5. Explain ground-fault protection of equipment.
   D. Article 220, Branch Circuit, Feeder and Service Demands
      1. Explain the scope and definitions of section 220.
      2. Explain voltages and computations of loads.
      3. Calculate branch circuit requirements.
      4. Calculate general lighting demands.
      5. Describe commercial receptacle demand factors.
      6. Describe motors and fixed electric space heating requirements.
      7. Complete a dwelling unit small appliance and laundry load.
      8. Calculate a dwelling unit appliance demand.
      9. Calculate a dwelling unit electric clothes dryer demand.
      10. Calculate a dwelling unit electric range demand.
      11. Explain a commercial unit electric range demand.
      12. Explain a non-coincident load.
      13. Size a feeder neutral load.
      14. Verify an optional calculation for a dwelling unit.
   E. Article 225, Outside Branch Circuits and Feeders
      1. Explain the scope and definitions of section 225.
      2. Calculate the loads of an outside branch circuit.
      3. Describe conductor covering and minimum size conductors.
      4. Explain the use of lighting equipment installed outdoors.
      5. Interpret the requirements for more than one building or other
structure.
      6. Explain the wiring requirements on buildings.
      7. Identify the point of attachment and clearances from a building.
      8. Describe mechanical protection.
      9. Explain raintight raceways and arranged to drain.
      10. Describe underground circuits and use of trees for support.
   F. Article 230, Service Installations
      1. Explain the scope and definitions of section 230.
      2. Explain the rules for sizing a service.
      3. Explain the number of services allowed on a building.
      4. Identify the rules for single building or structure not to be
supplied through another building.
      5. Identify conductors considered outside a building.
      6. Explain service conductors separate from other conductors.
      7. Describe raceway seals and clearance from building openings.
      8. Calculate overhead conductors size and rating.
      9. Identify clearance requirements and points of attachment.
      10. Identify the use of service masts as supports for the point of
attachment.
      11. Describe underground service size and rating.
   G. Overcurrent Protection
      1. Explain the scope of Article 240
      2. Locate the section on standard ampere ratings.
      3. Describe supplementary overcurrent protection.
      4. Explain ground fault protection of equipment.
      5. Describe the rules for underground conductors.
      6. Differentiate between damp and wet location.
      7. List the rules for Edison base fuses.
      8. List the rules for type S fuses.
      9. Describe the use of a circuit breaker.
      10. Define series rated equipment.
   H. Grounding and Bonding
      1. Explain the purpose of grounding.
      2. Differentiate between grounding and bonding.
      3. Define the term objectionable currents.
      4. Explain the rules for service system grounding.
      5. Define separately derived system.
      6. Explain the term made and other electrodes.
      7. List the rules for supplemental grounding electrodes.
      8. Define maximum resistance to ground.
      9. List the requirements for grounding and bonding on the line side
of the service.
      10. List the requirements for grounding and bonding on the load side
of the service.
      11. Define hazardous locations.
      12. Describe equipment bonding jumpers.
      13. List the rules for bonding of piping and building steel.
      14. Define a lightning protection system.
      15. Describe grounding of ranges and clothes dryers.
      16. Explain the rules for bonding receptacles and boxes.

IV. Wiring Methods and Materials
   A. Article 300, Wiring Methods
      1. Define voltage and temperature limitations.
      2. Describe the rules for underground installations.
      3. List the rules for securing and supporting.
      4. Describe the danger of multiwire branch circuits.
      5. Explain length of free conductors.
      6. Calculate the number and size of conductors allowed in a
raceway.
      7. Explain Induced currents in metal parts.
   B. Article 527, Temporary Wiring
      1. Explain time constraints.
      2. List the rules for ground-fault protection of personnel.
   C. Article 310, Conductors for General Wiring
      1. Differentiate between stranded and solid conductors.
      2. Define the rules for conductors in parallel.
      3. Explain insulation temperature limitation.
      4. Calculate conductor ampacity using temperature and bundling
adjustment factors.
   D. Surface Raceways
      1. Define flat conductor cable (FCC).
      2. List the uses and limitations of FCC.
      3. Describe the branch circuit ratings of FCC.
      4. Define electrical nonmetallic tubing (ENT).
      5. Describe the uses and limitations of type AC cable, MC cable, NM
cable, SE and USE cable, UF cable.
      6. List the installation requirements for intermediate metal conduit
and rigid metal conduit, rigid nonmetallic conduit, and electrical metallic
tubing.
      7. Describe the use of flexible metal conduit, liquidtight flexible
metal conduit and liquidtight nonmetallic flexible conduit.
      8. Describe the use of a multi-outlet assembly.
      9. Define wireway.
   E. Outlet, Device, Pull and Junction Boxes.
      1. Differentiate between nonmetallic and metal boxes.
      2. Define classified location for box installation.
      3. Calculate the number of conductors allowed in a box.
      4. Size a junction box.
      5. Calculate the size of a pull box when making an angle pull and a
straight pull.
      6. Explain auxiliary gutters.
   F. Switchboards and Panelboards
      1. Define working clearance.
      2. Distinguish between a lighting panelboard and appliance branch
circuit panelboard.
      3. Describe overcurrent protection of a panelboard.
      4. Explain grounding of panelboards.

V. Article 400, Equipment
   A. Flexible cords and Fixture wire
      1. Describe types of flexible cords.
      2. Define fixture wire.
      3. Identify allowable ampacities of fixture wire.
      4. List the rules for overcurrent protection.
   B. Light Fixtures, Lamps and Receptacles
      1. Describe specified fixture locations.
      2. Explain fixture supports.
      3. Describe a receptacle installation.
      4. Explain the protection of recessed fixtures.
      5. Describe electric discharge lighting.
   C. Appliances
      1. Identify the branch circuit requirements for an appliance.
      2. Describe overcurrent protection.
      3. Explain disconnecting means.
      4. Describe the rules for baseboard heaters.
   D. Motors, Motor Circuits and Controllers
      1. Size a conductor for a motor.
      2. Size an overload for a motor.
      3. Identify a motor overload.
      4. Calculate the size of a branch circuit short-circuit and ground
fault protective device.
      5. Size a feeder conductor for a group of motors.
      6. Calculate the overcurrent protection for the feeder.
      7. Explain disconnecting means.
      8. Describe locked rotor current.
      9. Distinguish between FLC and FLA.
   E. Article 450, Transformers
      1. List the rules for overcurrent protection on a transformer.
      2. Explain ventilation requirements.
      3. Size the conductors for the primary side of a transformer.
      4. Size the conductors for the secondary side of a transformer.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter Test         40% of grade
Homework             30% of grade
Class Participation  10% of grade
Final Exam           20% of grade
                     100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 123

  • Title: Electromechanical Systems
  • Number: ELTE 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify electrical components and their relationships to the various repair and troubleshooting techniques. The materials in this course will prove useful to service technicians whose background in electricity is limited. The course includes material from basic electrical theory to troubleshooting complex electrical circuits. This course will provide practice in the application of electrical theory as well as in the interconnection of components of heating and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. This is a beginning course in electrical theory that is required for HVAC, electrical and power plant technology but is appropriate for all interested students. Common components found in the HVAC industry are used to develop these skills. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the atomic theory and its relationship to physical objects and electron flow.
  2. Explain the concepts of basic electronic circuits.
  3. Describe the use of the volt-ohm meter and clamp-on ammeter in the heating, cooling and refrigeration industry.
  4. Identify the symbols of common loads used in heating, cooling and refrigeration systems.
  5. Explain the basic difference between alternating current, power distribution and voltage systems.
  6. Determine the electrical need for installation of a heating, cooling and refrigeration system.
  7. Describe the basic characteristics of a single and 3-phase motor.
  8. Determine the components needed to start and stop an electric motor.
  9. Explain the operation of contactors, relays and overloads.
  10. Explain the operation of transformers, thermostats, pressure switches and other electric control devices.
  11. Describe the safest controls in an electrical circuit.
  12. Troubleshoot electric control devices.
  13. Describe the basic control systems used in residential air conditioning systems.
  14. Draw basic control circuits, including compressor, evaporator, fan motor, condenser fan motor and safety control circuits.
  15. Describe and troubleshoot solid-state controls and systems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Electricity
   A. Explain the flow of electrons and how it is accomplished.
   B. Explain electrical potential, current flow, and resistance and how
each is measured.
   C. Explain electrical power and how it is measured.
   D. Explain Ohm's law.
   E. Calculate the potential, current and resistance of an electrical
circuit using Ohm's law.
   F. Calculate the electrical power of a circuit and the BTU/hour rating
of an electrical resistance heater.

II. Electric Circuits
   A. Explain the characteristics of a series circuit.
   B. Explain the characteristics of a parallel circuit.
   C. Describe how series circuits are utilized as control circuits in the
air-conditioning industry.
   D. Describe how parallel circuits are utilized as power circuits in the
air-conditioning industry.
   E. Explain the relationship and characteristics of the current,
resistance and electromotive force in the series circuit.
   F. Explain the relationship and characteristics of the current,
resistance and electromotive force in a parallel circuit.
   G. Calculate the current, resistance and electromotive force in a
series circuit.
   H. Calculate the current, resistance and electromotive force in a
parallel circuit.
   I. Explain the characteristics of a series-parallel circuit.
   J. Describe how series-parallel circuits are utilized in the
air-conditioning industry.

III. Electric Meters
   A. Explain the operation of the basic analog meter.
   B. Explain how analog electric meters transfer a known value in an
electric circuit to the meter movement.
   C. Describe the operation of an analog voltmeter.
   D. Describe the operation of an analog and a digital clamp-on ammeter.
   E. Describe the operation of an analog ohmmeter.
   F. Explain the operation of a digital volt-ohm meter.
   G. Give the advantages and disadvantages of the analog and digital
meters.
   H. Describe the conditions of resistance that can exist in an
electrical circuit in reference to continuity.
   I. Describe the source of energy for the operation of the analog
voltmeter, ammeter and ohmmeter.

IV. Component, Symbols of Circuitry of Air Conditioning Wiring Diagrams
   A. Explain what electrical loads are and their general purpose in
heating, cooling and refrigeration systems.
   B. Give examples of common loads used in heating, cooling and
refrigeration systems.
   C. Explain the purpose of the relays and contactors in heating, cooling
and refrigeration systems.
   D. Identify the symbols of relays and contactors in heating, cooling
and refrigeration systems.
   E. Explain the purpose of switches and the types used in heating,
cooling and refrigeration systems.
   F. Identify the symbols of switches and the types used in heating,
cooling and refrigeration systems.
   G. Identify the symbols and purpose of other miscellaneous controls in
heating, cooling and refrigeration systems.
   H. Identify the different types of wiring diagrams used in the industry
and the purpose of each.
   I. Read simple schematic diagrams.
   J. Read advanced schematic diagrams.

V. Alternating Current, Power Distribution and Voltage Systems
   A. Explain the basic difference between direct and alternating
currents.
   B. Explain how alternating current is produced.
   C. Explain the difference between single-phase and three-phase power
distribution systems.
   D. Explain inductance, reactance and impedance. 
   E. Explain a basic power distribution system.
   F. Explain the common voltage systems.

VI. Installation of Heating, Cooling and Refrigeration Systems
   A. Explain the standard wire size as defined by the American Wire Gauge
(AWG).
   B. Give the advantages and disadvantages of copper and aluminum
conductors.
   C. Explain the factors that are considered when sizing an electrical
circuit conductor.
   D. Size electrical conductors for circuits used in the industry by the
National Electrical Code and the manufacturer's instructions.
   E. Calculate the voltage drop in an electrical circuit.
   F. Explain the types of enclosures for disconnect switches that are
available.
   G. Explain the types, sizes and enclosures of disconnect switches that
are used in the    industry.
   H. Explain the types of electrical panels that are used to distribute
electrical power to circuits in the structure.
   I. Install breakers in an electrical breaker panel.

VII. Basic Electric Motors
   A. Explain magnetism and the part it plays in the operation of electric
motors.
   B. Explain torque and the purpose of different types of single-phase
motors.
   C. Explain the operation of a basic electric motor.
   D. Describe the operation, install, reverse the rotation, if possible,
and diagnose problems in a shaded-pole motor.
   E. Describe the purpose of capacitors in the operation of a
single-phase motor and be able to explain the difference between a
starting and running capacitor.
   F. Diagnose the condition of any capacitor and use capacitor rules and
be able to substitute a capacitor if a direct, replacement is not
available.
   G. Explain the operation, install, troubleshoot and repair, if
possible, split-phase and capacitor-start motors.
   H. Explain the operation , install, troubleshoot and repair, if
possible, permanent split-capacitor motors.
   I. Explain the operation, install, troubleshoot and repair if possible,
capacitor-start-capacitor-run motors.
   J. Describe the operation, install, reverse and troubleshoot
three-phase motors.
   K. Determine the common, start and run terminals of a single-phase
compressor motor.

VIII. Components for Electric Motors
   A. Identify and explain the operation of motor starting relays and
other starting components that are used on single-phase hermetic
compressor motors.
   B. Select the correct potential relay for an application, with
information available on the potential relay to be replaced.
   C. Troubleshoot and install motor starting relays on hermetic
compressor motors.
   D. Lubricate and identify the type of bearings used in electric
motors.
   E. Identify the type of motor drive used on industry applications.
   F. Calculate the variables in a v-belt drive application to obtain the
desired equipment rpm.
   G. Recognize and adjust a v-belt application to the proper tension and
alignment.

IX. Contactors, Relays and Overloads
   A. Explain the parts and the operation of contactors and relays.
   B. Explain the application of contactors and relays in control
systems.
   C. Install a contactor or relay in a control system.
   D. Draw a schematic wiring diagram using contactors and/or relays to
control loads in a control system.
   E. Describe the types of applications of overloads.
   F. Troubleshoot contactors and relays.
   G. Identify the common types of overloads used to protect loads.
   H. Explain the operation of the overloads.
   I. Determine the best type of overload for a specific application.
   J. Draw schematic wiring diagrams using the proper overload to protect
loads.
   K. Troubleshoot common types of overloads.
   L. Explain the operation of a magnetic starter.
   M. Size the overload devices to be used in a magnetic starter for motor
protection.
   N. Wire a magnetic starter using switches, thermostats and push-button
stations.
   O. Troubleshoot magnetic starter and push-bottom stations.

X. Thermostats, Pressure Switches and Other Electric Control Devices
   A. Explain the purpose of a transformer in a control circuit.
   B. Size a transformer for a control circuit.
   C. Troubleshoot and replace a transformer in a residential
air-conditioning control circuit.
   D. Explain the basic function of a line and low-voltage thermostat in a
control system.
   E. Identify the common types of thermostats used in the industry.
   F. Draw schematic diagrams using line and low-voltage thermostats and
operating and safety controls.
   G. Install line and low-voltage thermostats on heating, cooling and
refrigeration equipment.
   H. Set the heating anticipators and cooling anticipators, if
adjustable, on a residential low-voltage control system.
   I. Explain the modes of operation and be able to set or program a clock
thermostat.
   J. Explain the function and operation of pressure switches.
   K. Install and set the pressure switches in control systems used as
operating and safety controls.
   L. Troubleshoot pressure switches.
   M. Troubleshoot the following controls in control systems used in the
industry: 
      1. Humidistat
      2. Oil safety switches
      3. Time-delay relays
      4. Time clocks
      5. Solenoid values

XI. Heating Control Devices
   A. Explain the purpose of the electrical controls in warm air and
hydronic heating applications that are necessary to safely operate and
maintain the desired temperature in a conditioned space.
   B. Describe the pilot safety controls and methods of ignition of the
burners in a gas furnace.
   C. Describe the operation of primary controls used to supervise the
operation of an oil burner.
   D. Draw a wiring diagram of an oil-fired, warm-air furnace.
   E. Draw a wiring diagram of a gas-fired, warm-air furnace.
   F. Explain the operation of an electric furnace or electric resistance
duct heater and the methods of control that are commonly used.
   G. Draw the wiring diagram of an electric furnace.
   H. Troubleshoot a gas furnace.
   I. Troubleshoot an oil furnace.
   J. Troubleshoot an electric furnace or electric resistance duct
heater.

XII. Troubleshooting Electric Control Devices
   A. Troubleshoot electric motors.
   B. Troubleshoot contactors and relays.
   C. Troubleshoot overloads.
   D. Troubleshoot thermostats.
   E. Troubleshoot pressure switches.
   F. Troubleshoot transformers.
   G. Troubleshoot electric heating controls.
   H. Troubleshoot gas heating controls.
   I. Troubleshoot oil heating controls.

XIII. Air Conditioning Control Systems
   A. Explain the electrical circuitry of a residential condensing unit.
   B. Make all electrical connections to install a condensing unit in a
residential application.
   C. Troubleshoot a residential condensing unit.
   D. Draw the control systems used in light commercial air-cooled and
water-cooled packaged units.
   E. Make all electrical connections for a complete residential
installation.
   F. Draw the control systems used in gas heat electric air-conditioning
packaged units.
   G. Troubleshoot residential air-conditioning system.

XIV. Control Systems:  Circuitry and Troubleshooting
   A. Describe the control circuitry used in residential applications.
   B. Draw the basic circuitry of control systems used on light commercial
and commercial and industrial applications.
   C. Identify the method of control for commercial and industrial
systems.
   D. Describe the procedures used in troubleshooting conditioned air
systems.
   E. Describe the best troubleshooting procedures to use for a particular
problem.
   F. Troubleshoot residential conditioned air control systems.
   G. Troubleshoot basic light commercial conditioned air control
systems.

XV. Solid-State Controls and Systems
   A. Identify and describe the operation of basic electronic system
components.
   B. Identify and describe the operation of common one-function
electronic controls that are used in the industry.
   C. Troubleshoot one-function electronic controls.
   D. Describe the function and operation of an electronic defrost board
used in a heat pump.
   E. Describe the operation of an electronic motor protection module used
on motors.
   F. Troubleshoot electronic defrost modules.
   G. Troubleshoot electronic motor protection modules.
   H. Explain and troubleshoot basic electronic control systems used in
residential conditioned air systems.
   I. Identify electronic control systems used in commercial and
industrial equipment and structures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Periodical quizzes         10% of grade
Chapter and/or unit tests  40% of grade
Lab assignments            40% of grade
Final Exam                 10% of grade
TOTAL                     100%

Grade Criteria:
   100% - 90%   = A
    89% - 80%   = B
    79% - 70%   = C
    69% - 60%   = D
    59% - Below = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 125

  • Title: Residential Wiring Methods*
  • Number: ELTE 125
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 123 or ELTE 123

Description:

This is an introductory course on residential wiring methods that includes practical application and hands-on experience in implementing the code requirements. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should acquire the necessary skills to wire a residence to meet the minimum requirements as set forth in the current National Electrical Code for residential occupancies. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe the general information for electrical installations.
  2. Identify electrical symbols and outlets.
  3. Compute the required number and location of lighting and small appliance circuits.
  4. Describe conductor sizes and types, wiring methods, wire connection, voltage drop and neutral sizing for services.
  5. Demonstrate switch control of lighting circuits, receptacle bonding and induction heating as a result of unusual switch connections.
  6. Describe ground-fault circuit interrupters, transient voltage surge suppressors, isolated ground receptacles and immersion detection circuit interrupters.
  7. Describe the use of lighting fixtures, ballast’s and lighting branch circuits used in residential units.
  8. Demonstrate the use of Multiwire branch circuits.
  9. Describe the use of special-purpose outlets in residential units.
  10. Describe the use of wiring for oil, gas and electrical air conditioning systems.
  11. Demonstrate the use of wiring for television, telephone and low voltage signal systems used in residential units.
  12. Demonstrate the use of smoke detectors and security systems in residential use.
  13. Describe the use of service-entrance equipment and relevant calculations.
  14. Describe wiring practices used in swimming pools, spas and hot tubs.
  15. Demonstrate safe work practices. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Information for Electrical Installations
   A. Describe the working drawings
   B. Explain specifications
   C. Identify symbols and notations
   D. Explain the American National Standards Institute
   E. Explain how the Code uses metric (SI) measurements
   F. Identify Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL)
   G. Use safe work practices in the lab

II. Electrical Symbols and Outlets
   A. Explain electrical symbols on a print
   B. Calculate the size of junction boxes and switch (device) boxes
(Article 314)
   C. Describe the rules of nonmetallic outlet and device boxes
   D. Install Ganged switch (device) boxes
   E. Size boxes for conduit wiring
   F. Describe special-purpose outlets
   G. Select a box size when all the conductors are the same size
   H. Select a box size when conductors are different sizes
 
III. Compute the Required Number and Location of Lighting and Small
Appliance Circuits
   A. Explain the basics of wire sizing and loading
   B. Calculate the floor area of a dwelling-unit
   C. Determine the minimum number of lighting circuits in a dwelling
   D. Determine the number of small appliance circuits for a dwelling
   E. Summarize where receptacle and lighting outlets must be installed in
residences

IV. Conductor Sizes and Types, Wiring Methods, Wire  Connections, Voltage
Drop, Neutral Sizing for the Service
   A. Describe the permissible loads on branch-circuits (Sections 210.23,
NEC)
   B. Calculate the voltage drop on a branch circuit
   C. Describe armored cable (Article 320)
   D. Install cables through wood and metal framing members (Section
300.4)
   E. Install connectors for nonmetallic-sheathed and armored cable
   F. Explain the use of electrical metallic tubing (Article 358),
intermediate metal conduit (Article 342), rigid metal conduit (Article
344) and rigid nonmetallic conduit (Article 352)
   G. Describe the use of Liquidtight flexible metal conduit (Article 350,
Part A)
 
V. Switch Control of Lighting Circuits, Receptacle Bonding and Induction
Heating
   A. Explain conductor identification (Article 200 and 210)
   B. Install toggle switches (Article 404)
   C. Bonding a receptacle to a metal box
   D. Describe nongrounding and self-grounding receptacles
 
VI. Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters, Transient Voltage Surge
Suppressors, Isolated Grounded Receptacles, Immersion Detection Circuit
Interrupters
   A. Explain Code requirements for ground-fault circuit interrupters
(Section 210.8)
   B. Install ground-fault circuit interrupter in a residential circuit
   C. Explain the rules for replacing existing receptacles
   D. Describe an Immersion detection circuit interrupter
   E. Describe an appliance leakage circuit interrupter (ALCI)
   F. Explain how an isolated ground receptacle functions
   

VII. Lighting Fixtures and Ballast’s
   A. Show the Code requirements for installing recessed fixtures
   B. Describe ballast protection
   C. Explain lighting fixture voltage limitations

VIII. Lighting Branch Circuit for the Front Bedroom
   A. Draw the wiring diagram of a lighting circuit
   B. Explain the lighting branch circuit A16 for the front bedroom
   C. Determine the wall box size for three switches
   D. Show proper grounding at wall boxes
   E. Show the proper positioning of split-circuit receptacles
   F. Explain the positioning of receptacles near electric baseboard
heating
   G. Explain the limitations of fixtures in clothes closets.

IX. Lighting Branch Circuit for the Master Bedroom
   A. Show the selection of boxes for the master bedroom
   B. Estimate the  cable lengths for a branch circuit
   C. Explain the rules for installing paddle fans

X. Lighting Branch Circuits in Bathrooms and Hallways
   A. Explain the different types of lamps and their colors
   B. Explain the rules for hanging fixtures in bathrooms
   C. Explain the equipment grounding requirements for a bathroom circuit

XI. Lighting Branch Circuit for the  Front Entry and Porch
   A. Describe the installation of circuit A15
   B. Explain the routing of the branch circuit

XII. Lighting Branch Circuit and Small Appliance Circuits for the Kitchen
   A. Calculate the small appliance branch circuits for convenience
receptacles in a kitchen
   B. Explain split-circuit receptacles and multiwire circuits
   C. Explain the rules for receptacles and outlets in a kitchen
   D. Describe general grounding considerations in a kitchen

XIII. Lighting Branch Circuit in the Living Room
   A. Describe track lighting (Article 410, Part R)
   B. Show how dimmer controls are used
   C. Explain incandescent lamp load inrush current

XIV. The Dryer Outlet and Lighting Circuit for the Laundry, Washroom, Rear
Entry Hall and Attic
   A. Explain the Code requirements for the dryer circuit
   B. Describe the Code rules for the attic lighting and pilot light
switches

XV. Lighting Branch Circuit for the Garage
   A. Explain the lighting installation in a typical residential garage
   B. Describe the receptacle outlet requirements
   C. Describe the function of the overhead garage door opener

XVI. Correction Factors (due to high temperatures)
   A. Calculate the maximum size overcurrent protection device
   B. List other Code limitations for sizing overcurrent protection
   C. Calculate examples of derating
   D. Explain the use of a multi-outlet assembly
   E. Describe the rules for empty conduits

XVII. Special-Purpose Outlets - Water Pump, Water Heater
   A. Explain a water pump circuit
   B. Explain the operation of a water heater circuit

XVIII. Special-Purpose Outlets for Ranges, Counter-Mounted Cooking Unit
and Wall-Mounted Oven
   A. Explain the wiring requirements for a counter-mounted cooking unit
circuit
   B. Calculate the demand for a wall-mounted oven circuit
   C. Select the circuit requirements when more than one wall-mounted oven
and counter-mounted cooking unit are supplied by one circuit.

XIX. Special-Purpose Outlets for the Bathroom Ceiling Heat/Vent/Lights,
the Attic Fan and the Hydromassage Tub
   A. Explain the use of the bathroom ceiling heater circuits
   B. Describe the attic exhaust fan circuit
   C. Explain the humidity control
   D. Describe an appliance disconnecting means
   E. Describe the hydromassage tub circuit

XX. Special-Purpose Outlets for Electric Heating and Air Conditioning
   A. Explain the different types of electric heating systems
   B. Explain the control of the electrical heating systems
   C. Calculate the circuit requirements for baseboard units
   D. Calculate the circuit requirements for electric furnaces
   E. Explain the term heat pump
   F. Describe room air conditioners wiring requirements
   G. Describe the rules for the disconnect to be within sight and readily
accessible
   H. Explain noncoincident loads

XXI. Oil and Gas Heating Systems
   A. Explain the principles of operation
   B. Identify the major components
   C. Explain the control-circuit wiring

XXII. Television, Telephone and Low-Voltage Signal Systems
   A. Identify the television (Symbol (TV))
   B. Explain Code rules for the installation of antennas and lead-in
wires (Article 810)
   C. Install a telephone jack
   D. Install a signal system (chimes) to a transformer

XXIII. Heat/Smoke Detectors and Security Systems
   A. Describe the importance of heat and smoke detectors
   B. Describe the types of smoke detectors
   C. Describe the types of heat detectors
   D. Explain the installation requirements
   E. Explain the combination direct/battery/feedthrough detectors
 
XXIV. Service-Entrance Equipment
   A. Define an overhead service
   B. Define a mast-type service entrance
   C. Explain an underground service
   D. Select a main service disconnect location
   E. Install a meter
   F. Calculate the cost of using electrical energy
   G. Describe a grounding electrode system, Article 250, Part H
   H. Illustrate grounding the service when nonmetallic water pipe is
used
   I. Select the proper branch-circuit overcurrent protection
   J. Explain the interrupting ratings for fuses and circuit breakers

XXV. Service-Entrance Requirements For a Dwelling 
   A. Select the size of service-entrance conductors and service
disconnecting means
   B. Explain how to read the meter

XXVI. Swimming Pools, Spas, and Hot Tubs
   A. Identify electrical hazards
   B. Explain Code-defined pools
   C. Describe grounding and bonding of swimming pools
   D. Explain lighting fixtures for underwater use
   E. Identify Underwriters Laboratories standards
   F. Summarize the requirements for Section 680

XXVII. Specifications for Electrical Work: Single-Family Dwelling
   A. Interpret the Electrical Engineers Instructions
   B. Use the specifications for a branch circuit installation

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter Tests                        30%
Quizzes/Homework/Class Participation 25%
Lab Assignments                      25%
Final Exam                           20%
  TOTAL                             100%

A = 90% or higher
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = 60% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 200

  • Title: Commercial Wiring Methods*
  • Number: ELTE 200
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 123 or ELTE 123

Description:

This course covers commercial wiring methods. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to read commercial blueprints and apply the current National Electrical Code to commercial wiring systems. The student will gain working knowledge and hands-on experience with commercial wiring techniques. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe commercial building plans and specifications.
  2. Identify commercial electrical and architectural drawings.
  3. Describe and install commercial branch circuits feeders.
  4. Describe switches and receptacles used in commercial applications.
  5. Describe and install commercial appliance circuits.
  6. Describe and install surface metal raceway, multi-outlet assemblies, communication circuits and floor outlets.
  7. Compute branch circuit calculations and lay out a raceway system.
  8. Solve commercial lighting calculations and complete light fixture installations.
  9. Demonstrate panelboard selection and installation and special circuit installation.
  10. Demonstrate commercial electrical service installation.
  11. Define emergency power systems and overcurrent protection.
  12. Describe low voltage remote-control lighing systems and sizes feeders for cooling systems.
  13. Demonstrate safe work practices. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Commercial Building Plans and Specifications
   A. Identify commercial building specifications (Overview).
   B. Interpret specifications.
   C. Describe supplementary general conditions.
   D. Demonstrate safety practices in the lab.

II. Electrical and Architectural Drawings (Prints) - Drugstore
   A. Interpret the elevation drawings on the drugstore prints.
   B. Identify the location of the electrical requirements on the
drugstore prints.

III. Commercial Branch Circuits and Feeders
   A. Calculate a branch-circuit from the load demand.
   B. Explain the rules for branch circuits.
   C. Determine conductor size and type.
   D. Use correction factors for ambient temperature.
   E. Explain derating factors (ampacity adjustment) for more than three
current-carrying conductors in one raceway.
   F. Calculate overcurrent protection and circuit rating.
   G. Explain conductor selection procedure.
   H. Calculate voltage drop.
   I. Determine voltage loss.
   J. Describe energy savings considerations.

IV. Electrical Drawings for the  Bakery
   A. Locate the electrical requirements on the bakery prints.
   B. Explain the engineer's notes on  the bakery prints.

V. Switches and Receptacles
   A. Install receptacles in a wall space.
   B. Explain hospital grade receptacles.
   C. Install ground-fault circuit interrupters receptacles (NEC Section
210.8).
   D. Explain the rules for receptacles in electric baseboard heaters.

VI. Installation of a Branch-Circuit 
   A. Describe rigid metal conduit.
   B. Describe intermediate metal conduit.
   C. Use electrical metallic tubing (NEC Article 348) in a branch
circuit.
   D. Describe flexible connections (NEC Articles 350 and 351).
   E. Describe rigid nonmetallic conduit.
   F. Calculate a raceway size.
   G. Select a box style and size.

VII. Appliance Circuits (Bakery)
   A. Identify Bakery Appliances (NEC Article 422) on the blueprint.
   B. Explain the use of the exhaust fan (connected to a lighting branch
circuit).
   C. Describe the basics of motor circuits.
   D. Calculate the conductor size for several motors on one feeder.
   E. Explain disconnecting means.
   F. Describe grounding for motors.

VIII. Electrical Drawings for the  Insurance Office 
   A. Interpret the electrical engineers drawing on the prints.
   B. Explain loading schedule.

IX. Requirements for Special Systems
   A. Explain multi-outlet assemblies.
   B. Describe communication systems.
   C. Explain the requirements for the computer room circuits.

X. Lamps for Lighting
   A. Differentiate between incandescent and fluorescent lighting.
   B. Distinguish the various types, sizes and forms of Low-voltage
incandescent lamps.
   C. Describe high-intensity discharge lamps (HID).
   D. Install a lighting circuit.
   E. Explain the restrictions of luminaries in clothes closets.

XI. The Electric Service installation
   A. Explain liquid-filled transformers.
   B. Install a dry-type transformer.
   C. Size the transformer overcurrent protection.
   D. Size the service entrance conductors.
   E. Provide the proper size grounding electrode conductor.

XII. Overcurrent Protection:  Fuses and Circuit Breakers
   A. Size fuses and circuit breakers for a given load.
   B. Differentiate the types of fuses.
   C. Illustrate a delta, three-phase, grounded "B" phase system.
   D. Explain series-rated breakers.
   E. Identify the characteristics of current-limiting breakers.

XIII. Use of Equipment and Conductor Short-Circuit Protection
   A. Explain conductor withstand rating.
   B. Use charts to determine a conductor's short time current rating.
   C. Explain the rules for tap conductors.

XIV. Low-Voltage Remote-Control Lighting
   A. Illustrate a low-voltage remote-control lighting circuit.
   B. Construct a wiring diagram for low-voltage lighting and explain its
function.

XV. Components of the Cooling System
   A. Explain refrigeration.
   B. Identify the evaporator.
   C. Explain the condenser.
   D. Summarize the electrical requirements for air-conditioning and
refrigeration equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter Test                           30% of grade
Quizzes/Homework/Class Participation   25% of grade
Lab Assignments                        25% of grade
Final Exam                             20% of grade
TOTAL                                 100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses.
  2. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 202

  • Title: Electrical Estimating*
  • Number: ELTE 202
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 122 and ELTE 125 or ELTE 200 or department approval

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to manually and electronically (using industry standard computer software) develop an electrical estimate for a residential and commercial design. Emphasis will be placed on compiling a take-off list of materials from blueprints, completing a bill of material and completing the final bid process. This includes a bid accuracy analysis to determine the job's selling price. The student will be able to determine material cost, labor cost, the proper application of direct cost, overhead and profit. Also, to conclude the estimate, the student will be able to write bid proposals and change orders. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define the duties and responsibilities of the electrical estimator.
  2. Describe the different Types of Bids.
  3. Complete the steps in compiling an Electrical Estimate
  4. Complete the steps for a Bid
  5. Develop a Bid Accuracy Analysis after the Estimate.
  6. Complete a manual Estimate of a residential single-family dwelling using spreadsheet software.
  7. Complete an Estimate for a commercial wiring project with the aid of industry specific software and write a Bid Proposal and a change order.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Duties and Responsibilities of the Electrical Estimator
   A.Describe how to determine the cost of the job (estimate).
   B. Describe the process for purchasing material for the job.
   C. Describe the bid accuracy process.
   D. Define project management.

II. Types of Bids
    A. Describe a Competitive Bid
    B. Describe a Design-Build Bid
    C. Describe a Negotiated Work Bid
    D. Define “Time and Material” or Fixed Fee Proposal
    E. Describe a Unit Pricing Bid

III. Individual Components of an Electrical Estimate
    A. Explain the scope of the work.
       1. Interpret the symbols on a blueprint.
       2. Explain the use and conditions of the specifications.
    B. Complete a material take-off
       1. Compile a list of materials from a set of blueprint symbols.
       2. Coordinate (with the blueprints) a list of materials from the
specifications.
       3. Coordinate (with the blueprints and specifications) a list of
materials from shop drawings.
    C. Complete a bill of material
       1. Create a bill of material manually from the take-off.
       2. Create a computer assisted bill of material from the take-off.
    D. Compile a pricing list for labor and material.
       1. Determine the price of materials manually.
       2. Determine the price of materials with a computer and related
software.
       3. Complete a working model of a labor-unit.
    E. Complete an extending and totaling process.
       1. Calculate a material cost extension.
       2. Calculate the labor-hour extension.
    F. Complete an estimate summary.
       1. Calculate the adjustments for labor-hours based on the working
conditions.
       2. Determine the general conditions (additional labor
requirements).
       3. Calculate the total labor cost.
       4. Calculate the labor burden.
       5. Calculate the total material cost.
       6. Determine the direct job expenses.
       7. Calculate the estimated prime cost.
       8. Calculate the overhead.

IV. Complete a Bid
    A. Determine a reasonable profit, to include:
       1. Competition and the economy
       2. Management
       3. Job size
       4. Risk
    B. Determine miscellaneous cost, to include:
       1. Allowances and contingencies
       2. Back-charges
       3. Bonds
       4. Completion penalty
       5. Finance cost
       6. Gross receipts or net profit tax
       7. Inspector problems
       8. Retainer cost
    C. Complete a bid accuracy analysis, to include:
       1. Cost distribution
       2. Cost per square foot
       3. Labor analysis

V. Complete a Residential Electrical Estimate Manually
   A. Determine the scope of work.
   B. Prepare a take-off of materials from a residential plan
(blueprint).
   C. Prepare the bill of material.
   D. Calculate the pricing, labor, extending and totaling.
   E. Create an estimate summary worksheet that includes:
      1. Total labor-hours
      2. Labor cost
      3. Adjusted material cost
      4. Direct job cost
      5. Estimated prime cost
      6. Overhead
      7. Estimated cost and bid price
   F. Perform a bid analysis

VI. Complete a Commercial Electrical Estimate, Computer Assisted
    A. Determine the scope of work.
    B. Input the take-off quantities into the computer software.
    C. Verify the bill of material on the computer program.
    D. Input the estimate summary.
    E. Perform a bid analysis.

VII. Write a Bid Proposal for an Electrical Commercial Estimate
     A. Explain the acceptance of the proposal.
     B. Complete a change order.
     C. Explain the use of exclusions.
     D. Determine any fixtures and equipment supplied by others.
     E. Describe the installation practices by the electrical contractor.
     F. Determine the national and local codes to be followed.
     G. Define a non-compete clause.
     H. Determine the payment schedule and its terms.
     I. Determine a performance construction schedule.
     J. Determine the selling price of the bid.
     K. Complete a detailed scope of work.
     L. Explain all temporary wiring needed.
     M. Explain the termination of agreement.
     N. Explain the warranty.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams (Chapter test and Final exam)        30%
        Homework/Quizzes                20%
        Projects/Assignments            50%     
        Total                           100%

90% +           = A
80 - 89 %       = B
70 - 79 %       = C
60 - 69 %       = D
Below 60 %      = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 205

  • Title: Industrial Electrical Wiring*
  • Number: ELTE 205
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 122 or ELTE 125 or ELTE 200

Description:

This advanced course covers industrial wiring methods. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to read industrial blueprints and apply the current National Electrical Code to industrial wiring systems. The student will gain working knowledge and hands-on experience with industrial wiring techniques. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Read site plans and select materials for underground wiring.
  2. Describe the components of a unit substation, the use of high voltage fuses, proper ground connections and making tap adjustments.
  3. Use various types of busways and busway components.
  4. Describe methods to determine the number and types of panelboards used in industrial applications.
  5. Describe the construction and the location of panelboards, how to supply power to them and adjust circuit breaker magnetic trips.
  6. Describe the installation of a three phase trolley busway, lighting trolley busway and strain relief cord drops.
  7. Calculate wire sizing, describe the different types of wire insulation, the use of correction factors, and the use of a Megger for testing insulation.
  8. Install a fire alarm system.
  9. Layout the motors, controllers and branch circuits used in an industrial building.
  10. Compute ampere rating, conductor size, overload size and breaker size for single and multi motor installations.
  11. Describe the use and propose of precipitation units.
  12. Define the concept of power factor and power factor correction.
  13. Define Arc-Flash and explain the NFPA guidelines for the use of Arc- Flash personal protection equipment.
  14. Define the use of circuit breakers, fuses and ground fault devices to protect the electrical system.
  15. Describe the requirements to protect a building from lightning.
  16. Apply lighting principles for use in industrial applications.
  17. Define the major components and operation of programmable logic controllers.
  18. Define hazardous locations and the use of electrical components used in different hazardous locations.
  19. Select and use safe work practices for each activity. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Reading plans and sitework plans.
   A. Explain construction plans.
   B. Identify plan symbols.
   C. Define sitework.
   D. Interpret the site plan.
   E. Demonstrate appropriate safety practices.

II. The Unit Substation
   A. Describe the high-voltage section.
   B. Explain the transformer section.
   C. Locate the low-voltage section.
   D. Explain the high-voltage metering equipment.

III. Feeder Bus System
   A. Install a feeder duct.
   B. Explain circuit breaker cubicles.
   C. Install a plug-in busway.
   D. Explain the use of bus plugs.

IV. Panelboards
   A. Describe a 600 volt panelboard.
   B. Calculate a branch-circuit protective device for a given load.
   C. Explain the need for a panelboard protective device.
   D. Differentiate between a power panelboard and a lighting panelboard.

V. Trolley Busways 
   A. Describe a three-phase trolley busway.
   B. Identify the trolley busway runs on the blueprint.
   C. Describe lighting in the manufacturing area.
   D. Describe lighting in the boiler room.

VI. Using Wiring Tables and Determining Conductor Sizes
   A. Calculate a conductor size.
   B. Describe insulation types.
   C. Explain correction factors.
   D. Calculate the ampacity of a conductor when more than three
conductors are in a raceway.
   E. Explain the use of underground conductors.
   F. Calculate a conductor size.
   G. Calculate voltage drop on long wire lengths.
   H. Compute the resistance of a conductor.
   I. Explain the rules for parallel conductors.
   J. Perform a resistance and voltage test on a wire installation.

VII. Signaling Systems
   A. Define the use of a master clock.
   B. Explain programmable system.
   C. Describe a paging system.
   D. List the components of a fire alarm system.
   E. Describe the function of a fire alarm components.

VIII. Motor and Controllers
   A. Describe the rules for using machines and their motors.
   B. Identify three types of three-phase motors.
   C. Describe the operation of a single-speed squirrel-cage induction
motor.
   D. Determine the direction of rotation for three-phase motors.
   E. Wire a dual-voltage three-phase motors.
   F. Wire a dual-voltage single-phase motors.
   G. Determine the direction of rotation for single-phase motors.
   H. Identify the terminals for a DC motor.
   I. Determine the direction of rotation on a DC motor.
   J. Explain DC power supplies.

IX. Motor Installation
   A. Identify the motor tables in Article 430 of the NEC.
   B. Find the FLC for a direct-current motor.
   C. Find the FLC for a single-phase AC motor.
   D. Explain the operation of a two-phase motor.
   E. Wire a three-phase magnetic motor starter.
   F. Compute the conductor size for a single motor.
   G. Size the overload for a three-phase motor.
   H. Explain locked rotor current.
   I. Select short-circuit protection for a three-phase motor.
   J. Calculate the feeder size for multiple motors.

X. Special Equipment
   A. Explain the purpose of a precipitation unit.
   B. Describe a fan assembly.
   C. Calculate the loading on air conditioning circuits.
   D. Calculate the power factor for a three-phase motor.
   E. Describe the function of synchronous condensers.
   F. Identify the tie-in on an air conditioning unit.
   G. Explain correcting power factor with capacitors.
   H. Explain the term power factor.
   I. Explain how to install a capacitor to a motor circuit.
   J. Test a capacitor.

XI. Arc-Flash Protection
   A. Define an arc-flash hazard
   B. Explain the different types of barriers used in arc-flash
protection
   C. Describe the different categories for arc-flash PPE

XII. System Protection
   A. Describe system protection.
   B. Describe three types of circuit breakers.
   C. Graph a circuit breaker time-current characteristic.
   D. Graph a fuse time-current characteristic.
   E. Explain a ground-fault protector time-current characteristics
chart.
   F. Describe non series rated coordination of an electrical system.

XIII. Lightning Protection
   A. Explain the basic atomic structure of elements.
   B. Explain how lightning is generated.
   C. Define the components of building protection.
   
XIV. Site Lighting
   A. Describe the lamp selection from the blueprint.
   B. Describe the illuminance selections.
   C. Define power limitation.
   D. Describe luminaire placement for the interior and exterior of a
building.
   E. List the components of an electrical installation.

XV. Hazardous Locations
   A. Explain who has authority for equipment approval.
   B. Describe intrinsically safe circuits and equipment.
   C. Explain the selection process for equipment.
   D. Explain the NEC requirements for seals.
   E. Describe a Division I, Class I circuit breaker panel.
   F. Describe a Division I, Class II lighting fixture.
   G. Explain the installation of explosion proof lighting fixtures.
   H. Describe explosion proof motor controls.
   I. Identify the NEC requirements for flexible cords and receptacles in
hazardous locations.
   J. List three types of hazardous areas.
   K. Describe the installation and maintenance of explosion-proof
equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter Tests                          30% of grade
Quizzes/Homework/Class Participation   25% of grade
Lab Assignments                        25% of grade
Final Exam                             20% of grade
TOTAL                                 100%

90% +           = A
80 - 89 %       = B
70 - 79 %       = C
60 - 69 %       = D
Below 60 %      = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses.
  2. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 210

  • Title: Code Certification Review*
  • Number: ELTE 210
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 122

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to use the current National Electrical Code to do calculations involving loads, lighting and circuit sizing. The course will cover typical load calculations used in both residential and commercial settings. The student should also be able to interpret and apply the National Electrical Code rules to special wiring systems including Hazardous Locations, Elevators, Remote-control circuits and Fire Alarm systems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate an understanding for simple and complex electrical circuits using basic electrician’s math, commonly used electrical terms and Ohm’s Law.
  2. Explain the rules for classified Hazardous Locations and Intrinsically safe circuits, NEC articles 500 through 504.
  3. Manipulate Single-Phase and Three-Phase Electrical and Power Formulas to solve problems found in the current National Electrical Code for dwellings (both one-family and multi-family), commercial and industrial buildings.
  4. Calculate the size of electrical raceways containing different gauge conductors and solve for outlet box fill, pull box sizing, voltage drop and circuit impedance.
  5. Solve problems in over-current protection (branch circuits, feeders and services) using fuses and inverse-time circuit breakers.
  6. Solve problems in calculating loads (lighting, receptacle and appliance) in branch circuits, feeders and services.
  7. Calculate the conductor size, thermal overload, branch circuit over-current protection device, feeder conductor size and feeder over-current protection device for single-phase and three-phase motors.
  8. Identify the rules for the electrical requirements of elevators in a commercial building, from NEC Article 620.
  9. Solve problems in calculating Service Entrance Loads, the number of services permitted for a commercial building, service-drop heights, locating the meter base, and supporting service raceways.
  10. Solve problems using electrical formulas and the current National Electrical Code to determine Transformer installations for Electrical Services.
  11. Identify the rules for class 1, 2, and 3 remote-control circuits including fire alarms; NEC Articles 725 and 760.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electrician's Math
   A. Calculate a decimal from a fraction.
   B. Define the term kilo.
   C. Calculate percentages using a decimal.
   D. Use a multiplier in a calculation.
   E. Explain a reciprocal.
   F. Find the square of a number.
   G. Calculate the square root of a number.
   H. Explain the practice of rounding off.
   I. Transpose a formula.

II. Basic Electrical Formulas
   A. Explain the function of an electrical circuit.
   B. Define conductance and resistance.
   C. Calculate Ohm's Law problems.
   D. Explain the PIE circle formula.
   E. Calculate power changes in watts.
   F. Describe the use of electrical testing meters.

III. Electrical Circuits
   A. Describe a series circuit.
   B. Summarize the rules that apply to series circuits.
   C. Explain a parallel circuit.
   D. Calculate a parallel resistance.
   E. Summarize the rules that apply to parallel circuits.
   F. Identify a series-parallel circuit.
   G. Calculate the resistance of a series-parallel circuit.
   H. Define a multiwire circuit.
   I. Calculate a neutral current.
   J. Explain the dangers of multiwire circuits.

IV. Alternating Current Fundamentals
   A. Describe current flow.
   B. Define alternating current.
   C. Graph an AC wave form.
   D. Explain armature turning frequency.
   E. Explain phase differences in degrees.
   F. Define induction.
   G. Define conductor impedance.
   H. Explain how to charge a capacitor.
   I. Describe the various purposes and function of capacitors in a
circuit.

V. Hazardous Locations  
   A.Define the three types of classified hazardous locations.
   B.Explain the difference between a Division 1 and a Division 2
condition in the hazardous locations. 
   C.Explain the material groups (A through G) used in hazardous locations
and what hazard class they belong to.
   D.Describe the wiring methods required for each class of hazardous
location (explosion proof vs. ignition proof).
   E.Explain the use of conduit seals.
   F.Explain the NEC rules for grounding and bonding in hazardous
locations.

VI. Motors and Transformers
   A. Explain motor speed control.
   B. Describe how to reverse rotation on a direct current motor.
   C. Describe how to reverse rotation on an alternating current motor.
   D. Calculate the volt-amperes for a motor.
   E. Explain watts per horsepower.
   F. Define nameplate amperes.
   G. Differentiate primary winding versus secondary winding  on a
transformer.
   H. Differentiate primary voltage versus secondary voltage on a
transformer.
   I. Define power losses.
   J. Describe turns ratio.
   K. Explain transformer kVA rating.
   L. Calculate the current on a transformer using kVA.

VII. Raceway, Outlet Box and Junction Box Calculations
   A. Explain the use of raceway fill using Chapter 9 of the NEC.
   B. Calculate raceway and nipple fill.
   C. Calculate fill for an existing raceway.
   D. Size an outlet box.
   E. Explain conductor equivalents.
   F. Make a junction box size calculation based on a straight pull.
   G. Make a junction box size calculation based on an angle pull.
   H. Explain conduit body sizing.

VIII. Conductor Sizing and Protection
   A. Describe conductor insulation properties.
   B. Calculate the allowable ampacity for a given conductor.
   C. Define terminal ratings from NEC 110-14 (C).
   D. Calculate the voltage drop on a conductor.
   E. Describe overcurrent protection from NEC Article 240.
   F. Define conductor ampacity.
   G. Explain ambient temperature de-rating factor.
   H. Explain conductor bunching de-rating factor, Note 8, of Table
310-16.
   I. Calculate the ampacity of a conductor using all derating factors.

IX. Motor Calculations
   A. Size a motor branch circuit conductor.
   B. Define motor overcurrent protection.
   C. Explain overload protection, NEC Section 430-32 (A).
   D. Define branch circuit short-circuit ground-fault protection.
   E. Size a feeder conductor.
   F. Size the feeder overcurrent protection.
   G. Summarize the six steps for NEC motor calculations.

X. Elevators, NEC Article 620
   A. Define the NEC rules for branch circuit wiring in machine room
spaces.
   B. Explain the NEC rules for wiring a hoist-way pit.
   C. Describe the requirements for the elevator disconnecting means.
   D. Explain the requirements for Ground Fault Circuit Interruption for
personnel in an elevator room.

XI. One-Family Dwelling-Unit Load Calculations
   A. Explain the general requirements  for a load calculation.
   B. Explain how a fraction of an ampere is used in a calculation.
   C. Calculate the demand for an appliance circuit.
   D. Calculate the demand for cooking equipment.
   E. Explain the demand rules for a laundry receptacle.
   F. Explain the number of circuits required in a dwelling.
   G. Calculate a service demand load using the standard method.
   H. Calculate a service demand load using the optional method.
   I. Calculate the neutral load for a service.

XII. Multifamily Dwelling-Unit Load Calculations
   A. Calculate the service demand load using the standard method.
   B. Calculate the service demand load using the optional method.
   C. Summarize the requirements for multifamily dwelling-unit load
calculations.

XIII. Commercial Load Calculations
   A. Explain air conditioning versus heating demands.
   B. Calculate the demand for multiple  commercial dryers.
   C. Explain the demand factors for kitchen equipment.
   D. Calculate the receptacle VA load of a commercial building.
   E. Calculate the general lighting load for a bank.
   F. Size the neutral conductor for a commercial service.
   G. Calculate the service demand load for a restaurant.
   H. Calculate the service demand load for a school.

XIV. Class 1, 2, and 3 Remote-Control Circuits, NEC Article 725 
   A. Define the circuit requirements for Class 1, 2, and 3 remote-control
circuits.
   B. Distinguish the difference between Class 1 power sources and Class 2
and 3 power sources.
   C. Explain the NEC rules for separation from other power systems.
   D. Explain the listing and marking requirements for Class 2 and Class 3
cables.
   E. Explain the NEC rules for Fire Alarm circuits, NEC Article 760.
   F. Describe the requirements for Non-power-limited Fire Alarm
circuits,(NPLFA).
   G. Describe the requirements for Power-limited Fire Alarm circuits,
(PLFA).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes and Examinations      40% of grade
Homework/Class Participation  40% of grade
Final Exam                    20% of grade
TOTAL                        100%

90% +      = A
80 - 89 %  = B
70 - 79 %  = C
60 - 69 %  = D
Below 60 % = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 215

  • Title: Generators, Transformers and Motors*
  • Number: ELTE 215
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 123 and one of the following: ELTE 122 or ELTE 125 or ELTE 200 or equivalent experience and department approval

Description:

This is an advanced course on the use of generators, transformers and motors. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to interpret and apply the rules of the current National Electrical Code to wiring systems composed of these electrical components. Also, the student will gain a working knowledge of the theory of these single-phase and 3-phase electrical components and their practical applications in everyday use in the electrical industry. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Design a three-phase generator installation using a wye connected system and a delta connected system to include calculating the size of the over-current protection device, the conductor size and the NEC requirements for grounding.
  2. Design a three-phase transfer switch installation and its required branch circuits for a legally required generator system.
  3. Explain the operating principle of a three-phase transformer.
  4. Design a three-phase transformer installation to include the proper kVA rating of the transformer, over-current protection, conductor size and proper grounding using the requirements of the NEC.
  5. Demonstrate how to connect a three-phase, four wire, wye connected transformer and the NEC requirements for bonding, grounding electrode conductors and grounding electrodes.
  6. Explain the basic operating principle of a three-phase induction motor.
  7. Design a three-phase circuit for a group of motors to include the type of starting method, conductor sizes, over-current protection and size of overloads.
  8. Design a control circuit for a three-phase motor.
  9. Explain the steps for troubleshooting a single-phase induction motor and a three-phase induction motor. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Generators 
   A. Generator Principles
      1. Explain the basic operation of a generator.
      2. Explain the use of brushes and commutators in generators.
      3. Differentiate between single-phase output power and three-phase
output power.
      4. Differentiate between a generator and a motor.
      5. Explain the difference between a wye connected system and a delta
connected system.
      6. Explain how to properly locate a generator for installation using
the requirements of the NEC.
      7. Calculate the size of the over-current protection device for a
generator.
      8. Calculate the conductor size for a generator.
   B. Emergency System Generators and the National Electrical Code
      1. Explain the purpose of the emergency system generator.
      2. Explain how to size an emergency system generator.
      3. Explain the use of a transfer switch.
   C. Legally Required and Optional Stand-by Systems
      1. Explain the purpose of a legally required generator system.
      2. List the requirements of the NEC pertaining to transfer switches
and its related equipment.
      3. List the requirements of the NEC for over-current protection
devices and grounding that pertain to transfer switches, NEC Article 701.
   D. Generators Supplying Essential Loads for Hospitals
      1. Explain the requirements for emergency systems.
      2. Differentiate a life safety branch circuit and a critical branch
circuit.
      3. Explain an isolated power system.
      4. List the NEC requirements for generator grounding for 480 volt to
1,000 volt systems, NEC Article 517.
      5. Explain the methods of high-impedance grounding.

II. Transformers 
   A. Transformer Theory
      1. List the primary components of a transformer.
      2. Explain turns-ratio in transformer windings.
      3. Explain the characteristics of a wye-connected three-phase
transformer.
      4. Explain the characteristics of a delta-connected three-phase
transformer.
      5. Describe an open-delta connected transformer.
      6. Explain the purpose of balancing loads on single-phase and
three-phase transformer windings.
      7. Explain the purpose of de-rating a transformer in a
high-altitude.
   B. Installing Transformers, NEC Article 450
      1. Describe the markings on a transformer nameplate.
      2. Explain the NEC requirements for transformer guarding and
ventilation.
      3. Explain the NEC requirements for clearances of dry-type
transformers installed indoors.
      4. Explain the different NEC requirements for transformer vaults.
      5. Explain the different types of liquid materials used as
transformer insulation and the NEC requirements for each.
   C. Transformer Vaults
      1. Explain the NEC requirements for construction of transformer
vaults.
      2. Explain the NEC requirements for doorways in a transformer
vault.
      3. List the NEC requirements for ventilation openings, drainage, and
storage in a transformer vault.
   D. Sizing Transformers and Connections
      1. Size the kVA rating of a transformer using wye-connected
secondaries.
      2. Size the kVA rating of a transformer using closed delta-connected
secondaries.
      3. Size the kVA rating of a transformer using open delta-connected
secondaries.
      4. Explain the use of the ten-foot tap rule and the twenty-five foot
tap rule for transformer secondaries.
   E. Protecting Transformers
      1. Calculate the current rating in the primary and secondary winding
of a transformer.
      2. Calculate the available fault current in a transformer.
      3. Explain the NEC requirements for over-current protection in
transformers rated over 600 volts.
      4. Explain the NEC requirements for over-current protection in
transformers rated less than 600 volts.
      5. Explain the NEC requirements for grounding transformers.
   F. Secondary Ties
      1. Define a secondary tie circuit.
      2. Explain the NEC requirements for tie circuit protection.
      3. Define a radial supply system.
      4. Explain a loop supply system.
      5. Define a bus-tie loop.
   G. Windings and Components
      1. Explain how to test a transformer winding for continuity.
      2. Define an additive type and subtractive type winding.
      3. Explain how to test a transformer winding for polarity.
      4. Differentiate phase-to-phase voltage and phase-to-ground
voltage.
      5. Identify the high voltage and low voltage connections.
      6. Demonstrate how to connect a three-phase, closed delta system and
a three-phase, open delta system
      7. Demonstrate how to connect a three-phase, four wire, wye system.
      8. Show how to connect a three-phase, corner grounded delta system.
      9. Define a separately derived AC system.
      10. Explain the NEC requirements for bonding, grounding electrode
conductors and grounding electrodes.
      11. Size the grounding electrode conductor for a transformer.

III. Motors 
   A. Motor Theory
      1. Explain the polarity of the poles in an electromagnet.
      2. Describe a basic induction motor.
      3. Describe a Class B, C, D, and E motor.
      4. Explain IR losses in a motor.
      5. Explain what causes mechanical losses in a motor.
      6. Explain what causes core losses in a motor.
      7. Explain operating torque and slip.
      8. Explain power factor and reactive power.
      9. Differentiate between apparent power and actual power.
   B. Types of Motors
      1. List the primary components of a single-phase motor.
      2. Explain a Split-phase motor.
      3. Describe how to reverse the direction of a single-phase motor.
      4. Explain thermal protection in a motor.
      5. Describe how a capacitor is used to start and run a single-phase
motor.
      6. Describe a permanent split capacitor motor.
      7. Describe a shaded pole motor.
      8. Describe the characteristics of a three-phase motor.
      9. Explain the basic operation of a three-phase squirrel-cage
induction motor
      10. Explain the NEC requirements for the installation of a fire pump
motor.
   C. Design Letters and Code Letters for Motors
      1. Explain starting torque for a motor.
      2. Describe the torque characteristics for a series, shunt and
compound DC motor.
      3. Explain the NEMA Classification of Design B, C, D, and E motors.
      4. Explain locked-rotor current based upon the code letter on a
motor.
   D. Starting Methods for Motors
      1. Explain full-voltage starting.
      2. Explain reactor starting.
      3. Explain resistor starting.
      4. Explain autotransformer starting.
      5. Explain solid state starting.
      6. List the primary components of an adjustable frequency drive.
      7. Describe an inverter.
      8. Explain the function of an eddy-current drive.
      9. Explain wye-delta starting.

IV. Motor Circuits
   A. Over-current Protection for Individual Motors
      1. Explain the use of an instantaneous trip circuit breaker.
      2. Size an over-current protection device for a motor using the
requirements of the NEC, Article 430.
      3. Explain the NEC requirements for using non-time-delay fuses.
      4. Explain the NEC requirements for using time-delay fuses.
      5. Explain the NEC requirements for using instantaneous trip circuit
breakers.
      6. Explain the NEC requirements for using inverse-time circuit
breakers.
      7. Obtain full-load-current ratings for all types of motors by using
tables 430.247 through 430.250 in the NEC.
      8. Size the maximum over-current protection device allowed by the
NEC.
      9. Size an over-current protection device for a group of motors.
   B. Overload Protection for Individual Motors
      1. Define minimum size overload protection.
      2. Explain service factor.
      3. Explain temperature rise.
      4. Define maximum size overload protection.
      5. Explain the term single-phasing.
      6. Size a controller based on a motor's horsepower.
      7. Size an overload for a motor using the motor's nameplate
information.
   C. Motor Feeder and Branch-Circuit Conductors
      1. Size the conductor for a single motor using the NEC.
      2. Size the conductor for adjustable speed drive systems.
      3. Explain the NEC requirements for sizing conductors for continuous
duty and for other than continuous duty motors.
      4. Size the conductors for a group of motors using the NEC.
      5. Determine the largest motor of the group based on the duty
cycle.
      6. Explain the application of demand factors when sizing
conductors.
      7. Explain how to size the conductors for capacitors.
   D. Control Circuit Conductors and Components
      1. Explain the NEC requirements for control circuit conductor
protection.
      2. Explain short-circuit protection.
      3. Define a class 1 control circuit.
      4. Explain a power-limited circuit.
      5. Define a class 2 and class 3 circuit.
   E. Connecting Controls for Operation
      1. List the main components for a magnetic starter.
      2. Draw a two-wire control system.
      3. Draw a three-wire control system.
      4. List the different types of control devices used to start or stop
motors.
      5. Explain a start/stop station.
      6. Explain a jog station.
      7. Explain the function of an auxiliary contact.
      8. Explain a hand-off-automatic switch.
   F. Troubleshooting Motor Windings and Components
      1. Explain how to test for grounds, open-circuits, and
short-circuits in a motor winding.
      2. Explain how to test for open-circuits and short-circuits in a
capacitor.
      3. Explain how to test a centrifugal switch.
      4. Explain how to test the brushes in a universal motor.
      5. Describe the terminal markings of a three-phase motor.
      6. Explain how to troubleshoot a motor control circuit.
      7. Explain the procedure for testing fuses in a motor circuit.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter Exams        40% of grade
Homework             30% of grade
Class Participation  10% of grade
Final Exam           20% of grade
                    100%
Grade Criteria:
   90% +     = A
   80 - 89%  = B
   70 - 79%  = C
   60 - 69%  = D
   Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 271

  • Title: Electrical Internship I*
  • Number: ELTE 271
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: department approval

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, minimum 15 hrs. on-the-job training/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Prepare a resume.
  2. Describe work activities which have been activities, and salary earned.
  3. Utilize classroom/lab knowledge to the work situation.
  4. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment and work.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to work with immediate supervisor, customers (if applicable), and fellow employees.
  6. Apply technical and human relations skills to the employment setting.
  7. Identify the major components of a job interview.
  8. Demonstrate proper conduct during a job interview.
  9. Identify ways to deal with termination of employment.
  10. Demonstrate an understanding of industrial applications and procedures that may have not encountered in other course work.
  11. Describe components of organizational structuomplished on the job.
  12. Complete a job application.
  13. Identify the steps in the job search process.
  14. List sources of job opportunities using local newspapers, job postings, and other available media.
  15. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training position.
  16. Keep accurate records of hours worked, job are including: labor relations, work standards, quality and production control, and work flow patterns.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Internship
   A. Interpret program requirements.
   B. Complete the required forms from the handbook.
   C. Discuss the procedures set forth by the Career Program Facilitator.

II. The Job Search Process
   A. Find three sources of job information.
   B. Identify three job postings in your career program field.
   C. Write a resume.

III. Obtaining Employment
   A. Write a letter of inquiry.
   B. Complete a job application.
   C. Describe a job interview.

IV. Employer/Employee Relationships
   A. Define labor relations.
   B. Explain human relations.
   C. Write examples of conflict and resolution.

V. Employee Growth and Development
   A. Define employment advancement.
   B. Examine personal assessment of your job performance.
   C. Depict management opportunities in your career area.

VI. Leadership in the Work Place
   A. Describe qualities of leadership.
   B. Define fellowship.

VII. Dealing with Termination
   A. Define termination with cause.
   B. Define termination without cause.
   C. Describe how to deal with employment termination.

VIII. The Structure of Business and Industry
   A. Explain organizational theory.
   B. Describe work flow patterns.

IX. Conclusion 
   A. Summarize your employer evaluation.
   B. Write a self evaluation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Classroom assignments, turned in on time and complete.
The assignments will be graded on content, spelling and punctuation  30%
of grade
Employer Evaluations (2), turned in on time and complete              5%
of grade
Student self-evaluation, turned in on time and complete               5%
of grade
Attend all assigned Internship meetings with the Facilitator         10%
of grade
                                                                   
100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A minimum average of 15 hours per week on-the-job training is required. Students are expected to keep the instructor informed about progress and any job changes. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELTE 291

No information found.