Smart House Technology Integrator Certificate

This certificate documents training that the recipient has received to qualify for the area of installing and integrating a wide range of home networking, automation and remote control systems into homes.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 4400; State CIP Code 47.0199)

Fall Semester

ELEC 123Smart House Technology3
ELEC 126Microcomputer A+ Preparation4
ELTE 123Electromechanical Systems4
or HVAC 123 Electromechanical Systems
ELTE 125Residential Wiring *4
Total Hours15

Spring Semester

ELTE 122National Electrical Code I4
IT 140Networking Fundamentals4
ELEC 185LAN Cabling and Installation3
INDT 155Workplace Skills1
Total Hours12

Total Program Hours: 27

Courses

ELEC 118   Mobile Auto Electronics Installation (3 Hours)

This course covers after-market AM-FM and HD radios, audio amplifiers, security systems, DVD video systems and GPS navigation systems. Other topics covered will include how to determine the customers? requirements and then advising them of the best equipment to purchase. Students will receive hands-on instruction on installing and configuring mobile electronics systems. 2 hrs. lecture & 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

ELEC 120   Introduction to Electronics (3 Hours)

This is a beginning course in electronics technology that is appropriate for both electronic majors and other interested students. An overview of basic electronic theory, principles and components is presented. In addition, the laboratory exercises will emphasize the operation and use of the primary pieces of electronic test equipment and the fabrication of selected circuits. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab-lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 122   Circuit Analysis I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 120 and either MATH 133 or MATH 130 or MATH 171

This course covers resistive circuits having DC sources. Analysis topics include Ohm's law, Kirchoff's law, the superposition theorem, Thevenin's theorem and Norton's theorem. The current, voltage and resistance relationships in series, parallel and combination circuits will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELEC 123   Smart House Technology (3 Hours)

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of home technology and its integration and use. Lectures, demonstrations and lab work will be used to teach the types of home technology being sold and installed. This course is designed to assist new users to implement this technology in their own homes and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field as contractors or installers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELEC 125   Digital Electronics I (4 Hours)

This is a beginning course in which students will study and practice the basic concepts of digital electronics. Topics will include digital number systems, logic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, digital arithmetic, counters and registers. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

ELEC 126   Microcomputer A+ Preparation (4 Hours)

This course is designed to be a general introduction to personal computer hardware and operating system software. The course teaches the operation, installation and upgrade of all the major components of a typical PC. The course also provides the basic knowledge to prepare the student for passing the A+ test, which is the industry standard certification for personal computer technicians. Since A+ Certification is based upon the Windows Operating System and Intel/AMD-type microprocessors, these will be the basis of the course. The course will cover both of the A+ Certification testing areas: PC Hardware (Core Test) and Operating Systems (OS Test). 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 127   Robots for Humans (4 Hours)

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of robotics. The class will use lectures, demonstrations and lab work to teach the basics of robotics. This course is designed to assist new users in making use of this technology in their own lives and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field. 3 hrs lecture, 2 hrs open lab/wk.

ELEC 130   Electronic Devices I* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 140

This is the first course in electronic devices. Topics include diodes and transistors, special purpose diodes and diode application circuits. Both bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and field effect transistors (FETs) are examined and application circuits for both transistor types are constructed. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 131   Introduction to Sensors and Actuators (3 Hours)

This course examines types and uses of industrial sensors and actuators. Topics include temperature, pressure, optical, position and flow sensors. Operation of AC and DC motor drives will also be covered. The course will also include wiring and troubleshooting of sensors and actuators. Lecture topics will be supported by hands-on lab projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 133   Programmable Controllers (3 Hours)

This is an introductory course in programmable logic controllers. The course is designed for individuals without extensive electrical or controller backgrounds. Hardware aspects and programming aspects of controller operation are covered. The foundational controller logic symbols and controller logic operations necessary to interpret and write ladder logic programs are taught in this class. Students will enter, edit and test controller programs through assigned laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 140   Circuit Analysis II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 122 and (MATH 131 or MATH 172 or MATH 173)

The analysis techniques presented in Circuit Analysis I will be applied to complex circuits driven by AC and pulsed sources. The responses of circuits having resistance, inductance and capacitance will be analyzed. Other topics include transformers and electrical filters. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ELEC 165   Advanced Programmable Controllers* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 133

This course is a continuation of ELEC 133. Principle topics include sequences, file and block transfers, analog control and PID functions. In addition, methods of networking of PLCs and advanced user interfaces will be covered. Lecture topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 185   LAN Cabling and Installation (3 Hours)

This course is designed to provide specialized skills for installing and testing local area network cabling and wireless installation. Twisted-pair, coax and fiber cables will be introduced and contrasted based on their characteristics and applications. Laboratory exercises for terminating and testing network cables and installing wireless systems will accompany the lectures. Students will be trained how to use common wiring tools and testing instruments. Methods of documenting LAN systems will also be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 225   Digital Electronics II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 125

Students will continue their study of digital concepts and will learn how to build digital circuitry using digital integrated circuit chips and basic concepts of computer organization. In additional, emphasis will be placed on learning how to troubleshoot digital circuits and digital systems. Each student will build a digital computer through a series of laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

ELEC 230   Electronic Devices II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 130

This class is a continuation of the electronic devices sequence. Topics include operational amplifiers, thyristors and voltage regulators. Operational amplifier applications include comparators, summing amplifiers, integrators, differentiators and active filters. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 240   Electronic Communication Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 230

This course provides a study of electronic communication systems. Topics include the electromagnetic spectrum, decibels, noise, amplitude modulation, antennas, transmission lines and the global positioning satellite system. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 250   Microcomputer Maintenance* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 126

This course is a continuation of the study of personal computers and will further the student's ability to maintain and repair them. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for computer-maintenance certification. Topics will include interaction of hardware and operating systems, resource conflicts, networking capabilities, common hardware and software problems, hardware differences of portable computers, and upgrading computers. The course topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 271   Electronics Internship I* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: department approval

This course affords the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. It will provide selected advanced electronics technology students with appropriate on-the-job experience with area employers, under instructional oversight, that will promote the student's career goals. 18 hrs. approved and appropriate work activity/wk.

ELEC 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ELEC 118

  • Title: Mobile Auto Electronics Installation
  • Number: ELEC 118
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers after-market AM-FM and HD radios, audio amplifiers, security systems, DVD video systems and GPS navigation systems. Other topics covered will include how to determine the customers? requirements and then advising them of the best equipment to purchase. Students will receive hands-on instruction on installing and configuring mobile electronics systems. 2 hrs. lecture & 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the purpose and features of the most common devices found in Automotive Mobile Electronics.
  2. Select the correct tools for the job and then use safely.
  3. Perform common tasks found in Automotive Mobil Electronics, to include finding "shorts" and "opens", speaker connections, Ohm's and Watts Law and checking the operation of the charging system.
  4. Plan and install an aftermarket AM/FM/HD (High Definaiion) radio.
  5. Plan and install a power amplifier with speakers.
  6. Plan and install a satellite radio.
  7. Plan and install an automotive security system with remote start.
  8. Plan and install a DVD player with a flat screen display.
  9. Plan and install a GPS navigation system. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Mobile Electronics and the Modern Automobile
   A. Explain in layman's terms the purpose, features and reasons for
upgrading in the following areas of Mobile Electronics:
      1. Advanced Audio and Video systems.
      2. Global Position Systems (GPS) and Navigation Systems.
      3. Satellite and HD Radio.
      4. DVD Players.
      5. Automotive Security Systems.
      6. Remote Staring Systems.
   B. Advise the customer on type of equipment available and their
options.

II. Common Tools Mobile Electronics
   A. Explain the purpose and correctly use hand tools.
   B. Explain the purpose and correctly use power tools.
   C. Explain the purpose and demonstrate the correct operation of
electronic meters.

III. Common Tasks in Mobile Electronics
   A. Solve speakers connection problems using Ohms Law.
   B. Connect speakers to amplifiers using Watts Law.
   C. Connect devices to power, ground and signal using shielded cable.
   D. Locate and correct a "short" in a wiring circuit.
   E. Locate and correct an "open" in a wiring circuit.
   F. Perform a "State of Health" on an automotive electrical system.

IV. Aftermarket AM/FM/HD Radio (head) Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the device(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair any problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

V. Power Amplifier with Speakers Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the device(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair any problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

VI. Satellite Radio Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the device(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair any problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

VII. Security System with Remote Start Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the device(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair any problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

VIII. DVD Player and Flat Screen Display Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the devices(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair any problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

IX. Navigation System Installation
   A. Plan the job.
   B. List the tools and supplies needed.
   C. Find the necessary connections to the auto electrical system.
   D. Mount the device(s).
   E. Connect the device(s) to the electrical system.
   F. Mount and connect any system accessories to the device(s).
   G. Power up the device and check for correct operation.
   H. Find and repair problems.
   I. Explain and demonstrate the correct operation of the device(s).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Participation 10-30% of grade
Examinations        30-50% of grade
Lab Projects        30-50% of grade
Total               100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80- 89%
C = 70- 79%
D = 60- 69%
F =  0- 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 120

  • Title: Introduction to Electronics
  • Number: ELEC 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in electronics technology that is appropriate for both electronic majors and other interested students. An overview of basic electronic theory, principles and components is presented. In addition, the laboratory exercises will emphasize the operation and use of the primary pieces of electronic test equipment and the fabrication of selected circuits. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab-lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Operate primary pieces of electronics test equipment: Oscilloscope, DC power supply, Signal generator and Digital multimeter.
  2. Demonstrate fundamental soldering techniques.
  3. Use basic electronic hand tools.
  4. Assemble elementary electronic kits.
  5. Perform basic circuit parameter measurements.
  6. Identify basic electronic components and their values.
  7. Define essential electronic terms.
  8. Describe basic electronic theories and principles. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electronic Foundations
   A. Describe atomic structure.
   B. Define current, voltage and resistance.
   C. Calculate using powers of 10.
   D. Name metric prefixes.
   E. Identify AC waveforms.
   F. State Ohm's Law.
   G. Write power formulas.
   H. Identify the resistor color code.
   I. Recognize schematic symbols.

II. Electronic Processes
   A. Solve series resistive circuits.
   B. Solve parallel resistive circuits.
   C. Describe frequency response.
   D. Demonstrate soldering.
   E. Describe filters.
   F. Interpret schematics.
   G. Summarize block diagrams.

III. Electronic Devices
   A. Explain cathode ray tube.
   B. Identify resistors.
   C. Identify inductors.
   D. Identify transformers.
   E. Identify capacitors.
   F. Explain power supplies.
   G. Identify diodes.
   H. Identify transistors.
   I. Identify integrated circuits.

IV. Operate Lab Equipment
   A. Oscilloscope
   B. Signal generator
   C. DC power supplies
   D. Digital multimeter

V. Make Lab Measurements
   A. Period
   B. Voltage
   C. Current
   D. Resistance

VI. Construct Lab Experiments
   A. Resistive circuits
   B. Rectifier circuits
   C. Digital circuits
   D. Amplifiers
   E. Oscillators

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

One written test              15-25% of grade
A laboratory equipment test   15-25% of grade
Laboratory reports            20-40% of grade
A comprehensive final exam    20-40% of grade
                                100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 122

  • Title: Circuit Analysis I*
  • Number: ELEC 122
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 120 and either MATH 133 or MATH 130 or MATH 171

Description:

This course covers resistive circuits having DC sources. Analysis topics include Ohm's law, Kirchoff's law, the superposition theorem, Thevenin's theorem and Norton's theorem. The current, voltage and resistance relationships in series, parallel and combination circuits will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Solve electrical problems using metric prefixes and powers of ten notation.
  2. Define the electrical concepts of voltage, current and resistance.
  3. Utilize Ohm’s Law in the analysis of electrical circuits.
  4. Compute the power and energy used in electrical circuits.
  5. Compute current, voltage and resistance in series circuits.
  6. Compute current, voltage and resistance in parallel circuits.
  7. Compute current, voltage and resistance in a series-parallel circuit.
  8. Use circuit network theorems to solve electrical circuits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Illustrate the application of electronics.
      1. Describe common electronics measuring equipment.
      2. Describe common electronic circuit components.
      3. Describe the complete electronic circuit.
   B. Identify metric prefixes used in electronic measurements.
   C. Calculate power of ten represented by metric prefixes.
   D. Solve problems using values expressed in metric prefixes and power
of ten.
      1. Add number in power of ten or metric prefixes.
      2. Subtract number expressed in power of ten or metric prefixes.
      3. Multiply number expressed in power of ten or metric prefixes.
      4. Divide number expressed in power of ten or metric prefixes.

II. Voltage, Current, and Resistance
   A. Describe the atomic model of matter including:
      1. Atom
      2. Nucleus
      3. Protons
      4. Electrons
   B. Explain the concept of electric charge including:
      1. Protons
      2. Electrons
      3. Coulomb’s Law
   C. Explain the meaning of voltage including:
      1. Energy per charge
      2. Electromotive force
   D. Explain the meaning of current including:
      1. Charge per time
      2. Movement of charger
      3. Conventional versus electron flow
   E. Explain the meaning of resistance including:
      1. Opposition to current flow
      2. Carbon resistance
      3. Wire resistance
   F. Describe the basic electrical circuit including:
      1. Conductors
      2. Voltage source
      3. Current flow
      4. Resistance
   G. Describe how basic circuit measurements are made using:
      1. Voltmeter
      2. Ampmeter
      3. Ohmmeter

III. Ohm’s Law
   A. Utilize Ohm’s Law
   B. Compute current flow in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law
   C. Compute voltage in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law
   D. Compute resistance in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law.

IV. Power and Energy
   A. Define power as it is applied in an electrical circuit.
   B. Define energy as it is applied in an electrical circuit.
   C. Compute voltage drop across a resistance in an electrical circuit.
   D. List energy sources used in electric circuits.
   E. Describe the purpose of the power supply in an electric circuit.

V. Series Resistive Circuits
   A. Define a series resistive circuit.
   B. Compute the total resistance of a series circuit.
   C. Use Ohm’s Law to determine total current in a series circuit.
   D. Describe how series power supplies are combined in a series
circuit.
   E. Use Ohm’s Law to predict voltage drops in a series resistive
circuit.
   F. Use Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law in a series circuit of resistances.
   G. Describe how a series circuit acts as a voltage divider.
   H. Use the Voltage Divider Law to compute the voltage drop of resistors
in a series circuit.
   I. Compute the individual and total power in a series circuit.
   J. Describe the meaning of circuit ground in a series circuit.
   K. Identify a defective component by troubleshooting a series circuit.

VI. Parallel Resistive Circuits
   A. Describe a parallel resistive circuit.
   B. Explain the voltage drops in a parallel resistive circuit.
   C. Compute total resistance of a parallel circuit.
   D. Use Ohm’s Law to predict the total current in a parallel resistive
circuit.
   E. Use Ohm’s Law to predict the individual branch currents in a
parallel resistive circuit.
   F. Use Kirchhoff’s Law to verify currents in a parallel circuit.
   G. Describe current division in a parallel circuit.
   H. Describe current sources.
   I. Explain how current sources in parallel are combined.
   J. Compute power used in a parallel resistive circuit.
   K. Identify defective components by troubleshooting a parallel
resistive circuit.

VII. Series-Parallel Circuits
   A. Describe a series-parallel resistive circuit.
   B. Use Ohm’s Law to compute the total resistance of a series-parallel
resistive circuit.
   C. Explain the effects of placing a load on a series resistive
circuit.
   D. Predict the output voltage of a loaded voltage divider.
   E. Describe a ladder resistive network.
   F. Explain the operation of a wheatstone bridge resistive circuit.
   G. Predict which component has failed by troubleshooting a
series-parallel resistive circuit.

VIII. Circuit Theorems and Conversions
   A. Explain the meaning of an ideal voltage source.
   B. Explain the meaning of a non-ideal voltage source.
   C. Explain the meaning of an ideal current source.
   D. Explain the meaning of a non-ideal current source.
   E. Convert a non-ideal voltage source into a non-ideal current source.
   F. Convert a non-ideal current source into a non-ideal voltage source.
   G. Explain the application of the superposition theorem.
   H. Solve electrical circuits using the superposition theorem.
   I. Explain Thevenin’s Theorem.
   J. Solve for voltage and current in a branch of an electrical circuit
by using Thevenin’s Theorem.
   K. Describe the maximum power transfer theorem.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentage not to exceed:
   Examinations         70%-80% of grade
   Projects/Assignments 20%-30% of grade
                          100%

   Grading Scale:
      90%-100% = A
      80%- 89% = B
      70%- 79% = C
      60%- 69% = D
     Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 123

  • Title: Smart House Technology
  • Number: ELEC 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of home technology and its integration and use. Lectures, demonstrations and lab work will be used to teach the types of home technology being sold and installed. This course is designed to assist new users to implement this technology in their own homes and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field as contractors or installers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand the various areas for the application of home technology.
  2. Describe the various types of home technology systems currently available and their uses.
  3. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working with home technology systems.
  4. Install basic computer networking hardware such as Network Interface Cards (NIC’s), cables and hubs/routers.
  5. Install a representative sample of home technology hardware.
  6. Program a representative sample of home technology systems.
  7. Develop a plan for the installation and use of home technology systems.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Application of home technology
   A. Control lighting systems
   B. Adjust environmental control systems including HVAC and Automated
window systems.
   C. Monitor security systems
   D. Install distributed entertainment systems
      1. Video systems
      2. Audio systems
   E. Route and Access data/Internet systems
   F. Interface communications systems
      1. Phone systems
      2. Intercoms
   G. Control appliance systems

II. Types of home technology systems currently available and their uses
   A. Install and control X10
   B. Install and control HomePlug
   C. Install and control CEBus
   D. Install and control LONworks
   E. Install and control Ethernet (10/100 BaseT)
   F. Install and control Wi-Fi (80211.a/b/g/n)

III. Safety procedures when working with home technology systems
   A. Practice electrical safety
   B. Practice general Safety

IV. Demonstration of a representative sample of home technology hardware
   A. Install a basic X10 circuit
   B. Install a basic peer-to-peer network

V. Programming a representative sample of home technology systems
   A. Program X10 modules and controller
   B. Configure a peer-to-peer network

VI. Install basic computer networking hardware
   A. Install a Network Interface Card (NIC)
   B. Make network cables as needed

VII. Development of a plan for the installation and use of home technology
systems
   A. Design an overall plan to meet a set of requirements
   B. Determine the software and hardware needed to support the plan
   C. Create drawings and other documentation as needed

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading Scale:

Tests and Quizzes: 60-80%
Class Exercises:   20-40%
  Total:            100%

A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 –  89%
C = 70 –  79%
D = 60 –  69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Credit for Prior Learning: Any student who has already passed the Home Technology Integration Plus (HTI+) Certification test will be considered to have met the requirements of this course. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 125

  • Title: Digital Electronics I
  • Number: ELEC 125
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in which students will study and practice the basic concepts of digital electronics. Topics will include digital number systems, logic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, digital arithmetic, counters and registers. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Convert between the binary, decimal, twos complement hexadecimal, and BCD number system.
  2. Perform arithmetic in the binary, hexadecimal, 2's complement and BCD number system.
  3. Determine the outputs of gate logic circuits.
  4. Make truth tables for Boolean expressions.
  5. Determine the Boolean expression for the output of a logic circuit.
  6. Determine the outputs of flip-flop circuits.
  7. Analyze the operation of counters and registers.
  8. Troubleshoot and find faults in gate circuits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Number Systems
   A. Count in binary and hexadecimal.
   B. Represent numbers in the binary, hexadecimal, BCD, and twos
complement number systems.
   C. Convert between binary, decimal, and hexadecimal.
   D. Convert between twos complement and decimal.
   E. Perform arithmetic in the binary, hexadecimal, BCD, and twos
complement number systems.
   F. Use ASCII code to represent symbols.

II. Logic Gates and Interfacing
   A. Describe the basic logic operations, OR, AND, and NOT.
   B. Use truth tables to represent the basic logic operations.
   C. Recognize the symbols representing the basic logic gates.
   D. Analyze circuits containing logic gates.
   E. Build logic gate circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.
   F. Troubleshoot and find faults inserted into circuits using the basic
logic gates.
   G. Describe the exclusive-OR and exclusive-NOR operations.

III. Flip-Flops
   A. Analyze the operation of RS flip-flops.
   B. Analyze the operation of JK flip-flops.
   C. Analyze the operation of D flip-flops and D latches.
   D. Analyze the operation of one-shot flip-flops.
   E. Analyze flip-flop circuits.
   F. Build flip-flop circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.

IV. Arithmetic Circuits
   A. Analyze adder circuits.
   B. Build adder circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator software.

V. Counters and Registers
   A. Describe the basic function of a register.
   B. Analyze the operation of asynchronous counter circuits.
   C. Analyze the operation of synchronous counter circuits.
   D. Analyze the operation of synchronous/asynchronous counter circuits.
   E. Build counter circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four tests 60-70% of grade
Laboratory projects     30-40% of grade
                          100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
    0- 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 126

  • Title: Microcomputer A+ Preparation
  • Number: ELEC 126
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to be a general introduction to personal computer hardware and operating system software. The course teaches the operation, installation and upgrade of all the major components of a typical PC. The course also provides the basic knowledge to prepare the student for passing the A+ test, which is the industry standard certification for personal computer technicians. Since A+ Certification is based upon the Windows Operating System and Intel/AMD-type microprocessors, these will be the basis of the course. The course will cover both of the A+ Certification testing areas: PC Hardware (Core Test) and Operating Systems (OS Test). 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Install, upgrade and patch Windows 9X and XP.
  2. Navigate through drives and folders, make and delete folders, format drives and copy files in Windows 9X and XP.
  3. Use configuration tools and troubleshoot Windows 9X and XP.
  4. Describe the features and functions of common microprocessors.
  5. List the differences among the common types of microcomputers.
  6. Understand the functions of the PC Chipset.
  7. Configure computers using the CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) setup.
  8. Use diagnostic software and hardware to analyze and troubleshoot microcomputers.
  9. Install memory in a computer in the forms of SIMMS, DIMMS and RIMMS.
  10. Identify and contrast common bus structures.
  11. Display an understanding of hardware interrupts and port addresses.
  12. Evaluate video monitor operation and compare the various types.
  13. Compare the common video standards including concepts of resolution, speed, dot pitch, graphic accelerators, local bus and coprocessors.
  14. Display an understanding of hard drive and floppy drive characteristics.
  15. Install and configure hard drives, floppy/Zip drives and Optical drives.
  16. Configure parallel, serial and USB ports.
  17. Setup and upgrade printers and their associated software.
  18. Troubleshoot common hardware and software problems using installed Windows utilities and add-on diagnostic software.
  19. Perform preventative maintenance on PC hardware.
  20. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working on a PC system.
  21. Install basic computer networking hardware such as Network Interface Cards (NIC’s), cables and hubs.
  22. Configure basic Peer-to-Peer and Client-Server computer networks. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Operating Systems
   A. Install, upgrade and patch Windows 9x and XP. 
   B. Navigate through drives and folders, make and delete folders, format
drives and copy files in Windows 9X and XP.
   C. Use configuration tools and troubleshoot Windows 9X and XP.

II. Basic Computer Structure
   A. Describe the features and functions of common microprocessors.
   B. List the differences among the common types of microcomputers.
   C. Understand the functions of the PC Chipset.
   D. Configure computers using the CMOS setup.

III. Computer Memory
   A. Use diagnostic software and hardware to analyze and troubleshoot
microcomputers.
   B. Install memory in a computer in the forms of SIMMS, DIMMS and
RIMMS.

IV. Peripheral Installation
   A. Identify and contrast common bus structures.
   B. Display an understanding of hardware interrupts and port addresses.

V. Computer Video
   A. Evaluate video monitor operation and compare the various types.
   B. Compare the common video standards including concepts of resolution,
speed, dot pitch, graphic accelerators, local bus and coprocessors.

VI. Data Storage
   A. Display an understanding of hard drive and floppy drive
characteristics.
   B. Install and configure hard drives, floppy/Zip drives and Optical
drives.

VII. Input/Output Ports
   A. Configure parallel ports.
   B. Configure serial ports.
   C. Configure USB ports.

VIII. Printers
   A. Setup printers and their associated software.
   B. Upgrade printers and their associated software.

IX. PC Maintenance
   A. Troubleshoot common hardware and software problems using installed
Windows utilities and add-on diagnostic software.
   B. Perform preventative maintenance on PC hardware.
   C. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working on a PC system.

X. Computer Networks
   A. Install basic computer networking hardware such as Network Interface
Cards, cables and hubs.
   B. Configure basic Peer-to-Peer and Client-Server computer
networks.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Labs:

Lab work is an extremely important part of this course and will account
for a significant portion of the course point total.  The labs will be
performed in the time period following the session’s lecture and turned
in to the Instructor.

Grading Scale:

Tests and Quizzes: 40-60%
Laboratory Work:   40-60%
 Total:             100%

  A = 90 – 100%
  B = 80 –  89%
  C = 70 –  79%
  D = 60 –  69%
  F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 127

  • Title: Robots for Humans
  • Number: ELEC 127
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of robotics. The class will use lectures, demonstrations and lab work to teach the basics of robotics. This course is designed to assist new users in making use of this technology in their own lives and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field. 3 hrs lecture, 2 hrs open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the various types of robot systems currently available and their uses.
  2. Explain the various types of robotic hardware and software.
  3. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working with robot systems.
  4. Design and build a simple robot to solve a particular problem.
  5. Program a simple robot to solve a particular problem. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Robot Systems 
   A. Define the difference between autonomous and remote-control
systems.
   B. List the applications of autonomous robots.
   C. List the applications of remote control robots.
   D. Determine the correct type of robot system for a given application.

II. Areas of Robotic Hardware and Software
   A. Compare Central Processing Units (CPUs) by word size, programming
capabilities, Input/Output abilities and other criteria.
   B. Explain the purposes and functions of motors and actuators.
   C. List the types of sensors and their applications.
   D. Evaluate software and hardware control systems.

III. Proper Safety Procedures when Working with Robotics Systems
   A. Demonstrate proper tool safety techniques.
   B. Display proper electrical safety techniques.
   C. Install and set limit switches and sensors to support safety
requirements.

IV. The Design and Construction of a Simple Robot to Solve an Assigned
Problem.
   A. Analyze an assigned problem.
   B. Determine the hardware requirements of the assigned problem.
   C. Develop a hardware design to meet the problem requirements.
   D. Assemble and test the hardware design.

V. use of a Simple Robot to Solve an Assigned Problem
   A. Analyze an assigned problem.
   B. Determine the software requirements of the problem.
   C. Develop a software design to meet the problem requirements.
   D. Develop software to meet the software design requirements.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading Scale:

Tests and Quizzes: 40-50%
Class Exercises:   10-20%
Final Project:     30-50%
            Total:  100%

A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 – 89%
C = 70 – 79%
D = 60 – 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 130

  • Title: Electronic Devices I*
  • Number: ELEC 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 140

Description:

This is the first course in electronic devices. Topics include diodes and transistors, special purpose diodes and diode application circuits. Both bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and field effect transistors (FETs) are examined and application circuits for both transistor types are constructed. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the electrical characteristics of materials which are classified as semiconductors, conductors, and insulators.
  2. Describe the characteristics of PN junctions (diodes).
  3. Explain, analyze, and troubleshoot the following diode applications: a) Rectifiers; b) Power supply filters; c) Limiters; d) clampers; e) Voltage multipliers.
  4. Interpret and use a diode data sheet.
  5. Explain how the following special purpose diodes operate: a) Zener diode; b) Varactor diode; c) LED; d) Photodiode; e) Schotky diode; f) Pin diode; g) Steprecovery diode; h) Tunnel diode; i) Laser diode.
  6. Describe the characteristics of bipolar transistors.
  7. Analyze bipolar transistor biasing circuits.
  8. Explain and analyze the operation of small-signal bipolar amplifiers.
  9. Explain and analyze the operation of power amplifiers.
  10. Describe the characteristics and analyze the biasing of field-effect transistors (FETs).
  11. Explain and analyze the operation of small-signal FET amplifiers.
  12. Analyze the frequency response characteristics of amplifiers. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Semiconductors
   A. Discuss the basic structure of atoms
   B. Discuss semiconductors, conductors, and insulators and how they
basically differ
   C. Discuss covalent bonding in silicon
   D. Describe how current is produced in a semiconductor

II. Diodes
   A. Describe the properties of N-type and P-type semiconductors
   B. Describe a pn junction and how it is formed
   C. Discuss the bias of a pn junction
   D. Analyze the current-voltage characteristic curve of a pn junction
(diode)
   E. Discuss the operation of diodes and explain the three diode models

III. Diode Applications
   A. Explain and analyze the operation of half-wave rectifiers
   B. Explain and analyze the operation of full-wave rectifiers
   C. Explain and analyze the operation and characteristics of power
supply filters
   D. Explain and analyze the operation of diode limiting and clamping
circuits
   E. Explain and analyze the operation of diode voltage multipliers
   F. Troubleshoot diode circuits using accepted techniques
   G. Construct diode circuits

IV. Diode Data Sheets
   A. Extract specifications from a data sheet

V. Special Purpose Diodes
   A. Describe the characteristics of a zener diode and analyze its
operation
   B. Explain how a zener is used in voltage regulation and limiting and
analyze zener circuits
   C. Describe the variable-capacitance characteristics of a varactor
diode and analyze its operation in a typical circuit
   D. Discuss the operation and characteristics of LEDs and photodiodes
   E. Discuss the basic characteristics of the current regulator diode,
the Schottky diode, the pin diode, the steprecovery diode, the tunnel
diode, and the laser diode
   F. Troubleshoot zener diode regulators
   G. Construct Special Purpose diode circuits

VI. Bipolar Junction Transistors
   A. Describe the basic structure of the bipolar junction transistor
   B. Explain how a transistor is biased and discuss the transistor
currents and voltages
   C. Discuss transistor parameters and characteristics and use these to
analyze a transistor circuit
   D. Discuss how a transistor is used as a voltage amplifier
   E. Discuss how a transistor is used as an electronic switch
   F. Identify various types of transistor packages
   G. Troubleshoot various faults in transistor circuits

VII. Bi-polar Transistor Bias Circuits
   A. Discuss the concept of DC bias in a linear amplifier
   B. Analyze a base bias circuit
   C. Analyze an emitter bias circuit
   D. Analyze a voltage-divider bias circuit
   E. Analyze a collector-feedback bias circuits
   F. Troubleshoot various faults in bias circuits
   G. Construct bi-polar transistor bias circuits

VIII. Small-signal Bipolar Amplifiers
   A. Understand the concept of small-signal amplifiers
   B. Identify and apply internal transistor parameters
   C. Understand and analyze the operation of common-emitter amplifiers
   D. Understand and analyze the operation of common-collector amplifiers
   E. Understand and analyze the operation of common-base amplifiers
   F. Discuss multistage amplifiers and analyze their operation
   G. Troubleshoot amplifiers circuits
   H. Construct small-signal bipolar amplifiers

IX. Power Amplifiers
   A. Explain and analyze the operation of large-signal class A
amplifiers
   B. Explain and analyze the operation of class B and Class AB
amplifiers
   C. Discuss and analyze the operation of class C amplifiers
   D. Troubleshoot power amplifiers
   E. Construct power amplifiers

X. Field-Effect Transistors (FETs)
   A. Define, discuss, and apply important JET parameters
   B. Discuss and analyze JET bias circuits
   C. Explain the operation of MOSFETs
   D. Define, discuss, and apply important MOSFET parameters
   E. Discuss and analyze MOSFET bias circuits
   F. Troubleshoot FET circuits
   G. Construct FET circuits

XI. Small-signal FET Amplifiers
   A. Explain the operation of FET small-signal amplifiers
   B. Describe the amplification properties of an FET
   C. Explain and analyze the operation of common-source FET amplifiers
   D. Explain and analyze the operation of common-drain FET amplifiers
   E. Explain and analyze the operation of common-gate FET amplifiers
   F. Troubleshoot FET amplifiers
   G. Construct FET amplifiers

XII. Amplifier Frequency Response
   A. Discuss the frequency response of an amplifier
   B. Express the gain of an amplifier in decibels (dB)
   C. Analyze the low-frequency response of a BJT amplifier
   D. Use Miller's theorem to determine amplifier capacitances
   E. Analyze the high-frequency response of a BJT amplifier
   F. Analyze an amplifier for total frequency response
   G. Analyze multistage amplifiers for frequency response
   H. Measure the frequency response of an amplifier

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentage not to exceed:
   Written tests, two or more       25% - 50% of grade
   In-class exercises and quizzes    0% - 40% of grade
   Homework                          0% - 25% of grade
   A comprehensive final            30% - 50% of grade
   Lab experiments                  20% - 40% of grade
   Special projects                  0% - 20% of grade
                                   100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 131

  • Title: Introduction to Sensors and Actuators
  • Number: ELEC 131
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines types and uses of industrial sensors and actuators. Topics include temperature, pressure, optical, position and flow sensors. Operation of AC and DC motor drives will also be covered. The course will also include wiring and troubleshooting of sensors and actuators. Lecture topics will be supported by hands-on lab projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the components of a closed loop control system.
  2. Describe typical control system hardware: sensors, controllers and actuators.
  3. Describe types and operation of temperature, pressure, optical, position, and flow sensors.
  4. Compare electric, pneumatic, and hydraulic actuators.
  5. Wire and operate AC and DC motor drives.
  6. Describe proper wiring and cabling of sensors and actuators.
  7. Outline safety procedures when working with automated control systems.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Automatic Control Systems
   A. The nature of feedback
      1. Control systems in general
      2. Open loop system
      3. Closed loop system
      4. Typical control systems

II. Identify Typical Control Hardware
   A. Mechanical parameter sensors
      1. Motion and position sensors
      2. Force sensors
   B. Hydraulic and pneumatic sensors
      1. Pressure sensors
      2. Level sensors
      3. Flow sensors
   C. Temperature sensors
      1. Heat and temperature
      2. Bimetallic temperature sensors
      3. Thermocouples
   D. Miscellaneous sensors
      1. Light sensors
      2. Humidity/moisture sensors
      3. Time measurement
      4. Counters
   E. Actuators
      1. Introduction
      2. Electromechanical actuators
      3. Hydraulic-pneumatic actuators

III. Describe and Connect The Operator Interface
   A. Introduction
   B. Alarm units
   C. Graphic displays
   D. Recording and indicating equipment
 
IV. Describe and wire AC/DC Motor Drives
   A. Operation of motor drives
   B. Programming AC motor drive
   C. Troubleshooting motor drives

V. Prevent and Troubleshoot System Failures
   A. Introduction
   B. Preventive maintenance
   C. Test equipment
   D. Troubleshooting

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three examinations  40-60% of grade
Lab exercises                    40-60% of grade
                                   100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 133

  • Title: Programmable Controllers
  • Number: ELEC 133
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This is an introductory course in programmable logic controllers. The course is designed for individuals without extensive electrical or controller backgrounds. Hardware aspects and programming aspects of controller operation are covered. The foundational controller logic symbols and controller logic operations necessary to interpret and write ladder logic programs are taught in this class. Students will enter, edit and test controller programs through assigned laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify the hardware components of a programmable logic controller.
  2. Assemble the components of a programmable logic controller.
  3. Describe memory usage and I/O mapping of a PLC.
  4. Describe wiring of inputs and outputs to a PLC.
  5. Identify and use the numbering systems used in PLCs (binary, octal, hexadecimal, decimal).
  6. Enter and test programs written in relay ladder logic into a PLC.
  7. Understand and describe relay logic and symbols used by PLCs.
  8. Incorporate and program timers and counters in PLC ladder programs.
  9. Perform arithmetic and logical operations with a PLC.
  10. Edit existing PLC ladder programs.
  11. Save and load PLC programs to/from floppy disk.
  12. Write elementary programs for a PLC, given a process description and requirements.
  13. Add comments to ladder program.
  14. Print PLC programs with various options to a local printer. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Explain Basics Of:
   A. Background/history
   B. Purpose of programmable controller
   C. Relay logic versus ladder logic
   D. Definition of a controller
   E. Components of a programmable controller

II. Describe and Program Controller Hardware, Including:
   A. Input/output modules
      1. Field wiring interface
      2. Rack configurations
      3. Solid state relay switching 
      4. Troubleshooting
      5. Indicator lamps
      6. Terminal numbering
   B. Central processor
      1. Fixed memory (ROM)
      2. Alterable memory (RAM)
      3. Battery back-up
      4. Memory capability
      5. Indicator lights
      6. Function mode switch
   C. Power supply
      1. Rectification and filtering
      2. Power for CPU and 1/0 modules
      3. Back-up power
   D. Programming terminal
      1. Screen display
      2. Keyboard modes
      3. Cable connections

III. Explain Controller Memory Organization
   A. Fixed memory
   B. Alterable memory
   C. Data table
      1. Processor work areas
      2. Input image table
      3. Output image table
      4. Timers and counters
      5. Scratch pad areas
   D. User memory
      1. Program instructions
      2. Controller scanning
   E. Numbering systems in controller hardware
      1. Octal
      2. Binary
      3. BCD
   F. Memory addresses
      1. Words
      2. Bits

IV. Write Controller Programs Using Instructions:
   A. Relay logic instructions
      1. Examine On
      2. Examine Off
      3. Energize
      4. Output latch
      5. Output unlatch
      6. Branch start
      7. Branch stop
      8. Evaluating instructions in a program
   B. Controller Timer Instructions
      1. Timer On-delay
      2. Timer Off-delay
      3. Retinitive On-delay timer
      4. Retinitive timer reset
      5. Evaluating instructions in a program
   C. Controller counter instructions
      1. Count-up instruction
      2. Count-down instruction
      3. Retentive nature of counters
      4. Counter reset
      5. Evaluating instructions in a program
   D. Data manipulation instructions
      1. The GET instruction
      2. The PUT instruction
      3. Evaluating data manipulation instructions in a program
   E. Data comparison instructions
      1. Less-than instruction
      2. Equal-to instruction
      3. Get byte instruction
      4. Limit test instruction
      5. Evaluating data comparison instruction in a program
   F. Arithmetic instructions
      1. Add
      2. Subtract
      3. Multiply
      4. Divide
      5. Overflow
      6. Evaluating arithmetic instructions in a program
   G. Output override and input-output update instructions
      1. Master Control Reset (MCR)
      2. Zone Control Last state (ZCL)
      3. Input update immediate
      4. Output update immediate
      5. I/O scan allocation
      6. Effects of zones on retentive and non-retentive outputs
      7. Evaluating in a program

V. Edit Controller Programs, including:
   A. Entry corrections
   B. Remove commands
   C. Remove rungs
   D. Clear memory
   E. Insert commands
   F. Change commands
   G. Cursor operation modes

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four examinations   80% of grade
Laboratory exercises             20% of grade
                                100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 140

  • Title: Circuit Analysis II*
  • Number: ELEC 140
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 122 and (MATH 131 or MATH 172 or MATH 173)

Description:

The analysis techniques presented in Circuit Analysis I will be applied to complex circuits driven by AC and pulsed sources. The responses of circuits having resistance, inductance and capacitance will be analyzed. Other topics include transformers and electrical filters. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the sine and nonsinusoidal waveform.
  2. Use phasors and complex numbers in the description of sine waveforms (AC).
  3. Describe the capacitor and define its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  4. Describe the inductor and define its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  5. Describe the transformer and define its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  6. Explain the operation of resistor-capacitor (RC) circuits having AC sources applied.
  7. Explain the operation of resistor-inductor (RL) circuits having AC sources applied.
  8. Explain the operation of resistor-inductor capacitor (RLC) circuits with AC sources applied.
  9. Describe the operation of filters made from R-L-C component combinations with AC sources applied.
  10. Describe the operation of R-L-C component combinations with pulse sources applied. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A.  The sine wave
      1. State the trigonometric expression of a sine wave.
      2. Describe the peak value.
      3. Describe the instantaneous value.
      4. Describe the phase angle.
      5. Describe the angular velocity.
      6. Describe the frequency.
      7. Describe the period.
      8. Describe phase shift including:
         a. Lag angle
         b. Lead angle
   B. Describe voltage expressed as sine functions.
   C. Describe currents expressed as sine functions.
   D. Describe nonsinusoidal waveforms including:
      1. Square wave
      2. Triangle wave
      3. Step wave      

II. Phasors and Complex Numbers
   A. Explain how sine waves are expressed as phasors.
   B. Describe the complex number plane.
   C. Describe sine waves expressed in rectangular form.
   D. Describe sine waves expressed in polar form.
   E. Calculate the polar form of a sine wave from the rectangular form.
   F. Calculate the rectangular form from the polar form.
   G. Use complex numbers to perform mathematical operations such as:
      1. Adding phasors
      2. Subtracting phasors
      3. Multiplying phasors
      4. Dividing phasors

III. Capacitors
   A. Define capacitance in terms of its physical and electrical
attributes including:
      1. Dielectric type
      2. Plate surface area
      3. Plate surface separation
      4. Voltage breakdown rating
      5. Farad rating
   B. List types of capacitors according to dielectric used.
   C. Define capacitance in terms of stored charge and voltage.
   D. Compute capacitive reactance.
   E. Describe how capacitive reactance changes with:
      1. Applied frequency
      2. Capacitor size
   F. Explain how capacitors are combined.
      1. Explain how capacitors in parallel are combined.
      2. Explain how capacitors in series are combined.
   G. Solve circuits having AC or DC sources.
      1. Solve series circuits for:
         a. Voltage division
         b. Charge distribution
         c. Current flow
      2. Solve parallel circuits for:
         a. Voltage distribution
         b. Charge distribution
         c. Current flow
   H. Explain how to test a capacitor.
      1. Describe how to use an ohmmeter to test a capacitor.
      2. Describe how to use a capacitor analyzer to test a capacitor.

IV. Inductors
   A. Define inductance in terms of an inductor’s physical and
electrical attributes including:
      1. Number of coils
      2. Diameter of coils
      3. Core permeability
      4. Current in the coil
      5. Self-induction
      6. Flux density
   B. List types of inductors according to core type.
   C. Compute inductive reactance.
   D. Describe how an inductor’s reactance changes with:
      1. Frequency
      2. Inductor size
   E. Explain how inductors are combined.
      1. Explain how inductors in series are combined.
      2. Explain how inductors in parallel are combined.
   F. Solve circuits having AC sources.
      1. Solve circuits having series inductors for:
         a. Current flow
         b. Voltage division
      2. Solve circuits having parallel inductors for:
         a. Current flow
         b. Voltage distribution
   G. Explain how to test an inductor.
      1. Describe how to use an ohmmeter to test an inductor.
      2. Describe how to use an inductance bridge analyzer to test a
capacitor.
 
V. Transformers
   A. Explain the attributes of a transformer including:
      1. Primary
      2. Secondary
      3. Core
      4. Turns ratio
      5. Voltage insulation rating
      6. Power rating
   B. Describe classification of transformers.
      1. Explain a step-up transformer.
      2. Explain a step-down transformer.
      3. Explain an isolation transformer.
   C. Solve circuits using transformers with loaded secondaries
predicting:
      1. Load currents
      2. Load voltage
      3. Secondary power
      4. Primary voltages
      5. Primary currents
      6. Primary power
   D. Describe how a transformer transforms impedance levels.
      1. Explain secondary impedance.
      2. Explain reflected impedance.
      3. Use a transformer to match impedance levels.
   E. Describe attributes of a non-ideal transformer.
   F. Describe common variations of the basic transformer including:
      1. Autotransformer
      2. Multiwinding transformer
   G. Explain how to troubleshoot a transformer.
      1. Explain how to use an ohmmeter to troubleshoot a transformer.
      2. Explain how to use a volt meter to troubleshoot a transformer.

VI. RC Circuit Analysis
   A. Define RC circuits including:
      1. Series RC components
      2. Parallel RC components
   B. Describe the response of an RC circuit to an applied sinusoidal
input.
   C. Describe the impedance of a series RC circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   D. Describe the impedance of a parallel RC circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   E. Describe how impedance is used to find circuit current.
      1. Solve a series RC circuit for total current.
      2. Solve a parallel RC circuit for total current and branch
currents.
   F. Draw a circuit phasor diagram.
   G. Explain the meaning of total circuit phase angle.
   H. Describe the meaning of circuit phase lead in an RC circuit.
   I. Compute power in RC circuits.
   J. Describe applications of RC circuits in electronics.
   K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RC circuit.

VII. RL Circuit Analysis
   A. Define RL circuits including:
      1. Series RL components
      2. Parallel RL components
   B. Describe the response of an RL circuit to an applied sine wave
source.
   C. Describe the impedance of a series RL circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   D. Describe the impedance of a parallel RL circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   E. Explain how impedance is used to find circuit current.
      1. Solve a series RL circuit for total current.
      2. Solve a parallel RL circuit for total current and branch
currents.
   F. Draw a circuit phasor diagram.
   G. Explain the meaning of total circuit phase angle.
   H. Explain the meaning of circuit phase lag in an RL circuit.
   I. Compute power in an RL circuit.
   J. Describe applications of RL circuits in electronics.
   K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RL circuit.

VIII. RLC Circuits and Resonance
   A. Define RLC circuits including:
      1. Series RLC components
      2. Parallel RLC components
   B. Describe the response of an RL circuit to an applied sinusoidal
generator.
   C. Describe the impedance of a series RLC circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   D. Describe the impedance of a parallel RLC circuit as a phasor in:
      1. Polar form
      2. Rectangular form
   E. Describe resonance of RLC circuits including: 
      1. Impedance at resonance
      2. Frequency of resonance
   F. Compute RLC circuit currents using impedance.
   G. Describe circuit properties in a phasor diagram.
   H. Explain total circuit phase lead or lag of an RLC circuit.
   I. Compute power in an RLC circuit.
   J. Describe application of RLC circuits in electronics.
   K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RLC circuit. 
 
IX. Filters
   A. Describe the purpose of filters in an electronic circuit.
   B. List the categories of filters including:
      1. Low pass filters
      2. High pass filters
      3. Band pass filters
      4. Band stop filters
   C. Compute the critical frequency and roll-off rate for each category
of filter.
   D. Draw a Bode plot of each category of filter.

X. Pulse Response of Reactive Circuits
   A. Describe the response of RC and RL circuits to an input pulse.
      1. Describe the time constant
      2. Predict and describe circuit current.
      3. Predict and describe circuit component voltages.
   B. Define categories of pulse response circuits including:
      1. RC and RL integerators
      2. RC and RL differentiators
   C. Describe the time response diagram for a single pulse input.
   D. Describe the time response diagram for a repetitive pulse input.
   E. Describe applications of pulse response circuits in
electronics.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations         70% - 80 % of grade
Projects/Assignments 20% - 30% of grade
                        100 %
Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%
  B = 80 –  89%       
  C = 70 –  79%       
  D = 60 –  69%       
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 165

  • Title: Advanced Programmable Controllers*
  • Number: ELEC 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 133

Description:

This course is a continuation of ELEC 133. Principle topics include sequences, file and block transfers, analog control and PID functions. In addition, methods of networking of PLCs and advanced user interfaces will be covered. Lecture topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the file concepts of a programmable controller.
  2. Program using logical addressing.
  3. Program using relay logic instructions of a file driven controller.
  4. Program using timer and counter instructions of a file driven controller.
  5. Program using arithmetic, move and logic instruction.
  6. Program using comparison instructions.
  7. Describe how to perform copy, logic and arithmetic operations on files of the controller's memory.
  8. Describe how to perform file search and compare instructions.
  9. Program using block transfer instructions.
  10. Program using message instructions.
  11. Program using program control instructions.
  12. Program using sequences instructions.
  13. Describe the operation of analog input and output modules.
  14. Perform diagnostics using processor status files and codes.
  15. Describe processor communications methods. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Introductory Topics
   A. PLC basic hardware review
   B. PLC basic memory organization review

II. Describe File Organization
   A. Program files
   B. Data files
   C. Logical addressing

III. Program using Relay Logic Instructions
   A. Examine if closed
   B. Examine if open
   C. Output energize
   D. Output latch and unlatch
   E. Branching

IV. Write programs using Timers and Counters
   A. Timers
      1. On-delay
      2. Off-delay
      3. Retentive timer
   B. Counters
      1. Count-up
      2. Count-down
      3. Counter reset

V. Describe and use Arithmetic, Conversion and Move Instructions
   A. Arithmetic instructions
      1. Add
      2. Subtract
      3. Multiply
      4. Divide
      5. Compute
   B. Conversion instruction
      1. Convert to BCD
      2. Convert from BCD
   C. Move instructions

VI. Implement Comparison Instructions in programs
   A. Equal
   B. Not equal
   C. Less than
   D. Greater than
   E. Limit text
   F. Compare

VII. Use File Instructions
   A. File arithmetic
   B. File logic
   C. File copy
   D. File search
   E. File compare

VIII. Incorporate Shift Instructions in programs
   A. FIFO
   B. Bit shift
      1. Bit shift left
      2. Bit shift right

IX. Describe Sequencer Instructions
   A. Sequencer load
   B. Sequencer input
   C. Sequencer output

X. Explain Program Control Instructions
   A. Master zone control
   B. Jump to subroutine
   C. Selectable timed interrupt
   D. Fault routine

XI. Demonstrate Block Transfer Instructions
   A. Block transfer read
   B. Block transfer write
   C. Bi-directional block transfer
   D. Continuous block transfer

XII. Demonstrate Analog Instructions
   A. Analog input module
   B. Analog output module
   C. Block transfer programming

XIII. Describe Message Instructions
   A. Data entry
   B. Date monitor
   C. Control block

XIV. Describe Processor Communications
   A. Scanner mode
   B. Adaptor mode
   C. Remote I/O mode
   D. Peer communication

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four exams  80% of grade
Laboratory projects      20% of grade
                        100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 185

  • Title: LAN Cabling and Installation
  • Number: ELEC 185
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to provide specialized skills for installing and testing local area network cabling and wireless installation. Twisted-pair, coax and fiber cables will be introduced and contrasted based on their characteristics and applications. Laboratory exercises for terminating and testing network cables and installing wireless systems will accompany the lectures. Students will be trained how to use common wiring tools and testing instruments. Methods of documenting LAN systems will also be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the components of structured cabling systems.
  2. Contrast the characteristics of common LAN cabling systems.
  3. Identify common local area network devices.
  4. Identify industry standards for local area networks.
  5. Read blueprints.
  6. Identify and evaluate types of LAN cabling.
  7. Explain grounding, bonding and electrical protection.
  8. Prepare for the installation.
  9. Pull cable.
  10. Terminate cable.
  11. Test cable.
  12. Troubleshoot cable.
  13. Perform administrative tasks. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify the Components of a Structured Cabling System
   A. Identify entrance facilities, backbone, horizontal, work areas.
   B. Identify equipment rooms and telecommunications closets.
   C. Identify cross-connects.

II. Contrast the Characteristics of Common LAN Cabling Systems
   A. Identify the characteristics of LAN systems.
   B. Identify the characteristics of Ethernet (Thicknet, Thinnet,
10BaseT) systems.
   C. Identify the characteristics of Token Ring systems.

III. Identify Common Local Area Network Devices
   A. Identify the characteristics of the network interface card.
   B. Identify the characteristics of hubs.
   C. Identify the characteristics of LAN connectivity devices.

IV. Identify Industry Standards for Local Area Networks
   A. Identify ANSI and EIA/TIA wiring standards.
   B. Identify the standards of the National Electrical Code as it
pertains to Local Area Networks.

V. Read Blueprints
   A. Read and interpret symbols.
   B. Read and interpret abbreviations.

VI. Identify and Evaluate Types of LAN Cabling
   A. Identify the characteristics of twisted pair (UTP, STP-A), coaxial
and fiber optic (single mode and multimode) cables.
   B. Identify the characteristics of attenuation, cross-talk, impedance,
capacitance.
   C. Identify cable connectors (UTP, STP-A, coaxial, optical fiber).
   D. Explain connector pin configurations.
   E. Identify color codes.

VII. Explain Grounding, Bonding and Electrical Protection
   A. Identify hazardous environments.
   B. Identify personal protective equipment.
   C. Explain common safety practices.

VIII. Prepare for the Installation
   A. Perform a site survey.
   B. Build closets.
   C. Install grounding infrastructure.

IX. Pull Cable
   A. Pull backbone and horizontal twisted pair cable.
   B. Pull optical fiber cable.
   C. Install firestopping.

X. Terminate Cable
   A. Terminate copper cable.
   B. Terminate coaxial cable.
   C. Terminate optical fiber cable.

XI. Test Cable
   A. Test and certify copper cable.
   B. Test and certify optical fiber cable.

XII. Troubleshoot Cable
   A. Troubleshoot copper cables.
   B. Troubleshoot optical fiber cables.

XIII. Perform Administrative Tasks
   A. Document results.
   B. Complete daily reports.
   C. Describe the ordering and management of inventory materials and
supplies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests       30% of grade
Lab         30% of grade
Projects    40% of grade
    Total  100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 225

  • Title: Digital Electronics II*
  • Number: ELEC 225
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 125

Description:

Students will continue their study of digital concepts and will learn how to build digital circuitry using digital integrated circuit chips and basic concepts of computer organization. In additional, emphasis will be placed on learning how to troubleshoot digital circuits and digital systems. Each student will build a digital computer through a series of laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct and troubleshoot digital systems containing TTL and CMOS integrated circuits.
  2. Analyze and use decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and demultilplexers.
  3. Analyze and use digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.
  4. Identify the characteristics of various memory devices.
  5. Draw the block diagram of a basic computer.
  6. Write and assemble programs for a basic computer.
  7. State the cycle-by-cycle operation of a simple computer.
  8. Troubleshoot and find faults in digital circuits and systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Integrated Circuit Logic Families
   A. List voltage and current characteristics for TTL and CMOS integrated
circuit logic families.
   B. Use data manuals to find information about specific integrated
circuit chips.
   C. Build and troubleshoot digital circuits using integrated circuit
chips.

II. Memory Devices
   A. Describe the characteristics of ROM, EPROM and EEPROM.
   B. Describe the characteristics of static RAM and dynamic RAM.
   C. Define terms used in describing memory.

III. Computer Mathematics
   A. Perform binary and twos complement addition.
   B. Analyze the addition process taking overflow into account.
   C. Use hexadecimal representation to twos complement numbers.

IV. Digital Computer Organization
   A. Describe the Von Neuman architecture.
   B. Define terms relating to computer organization.
   C. Write assembly and machine language programs for a simple computer.
   D. Draw the block diagram of a simple computer.
   E. List cycle-by-cycle actions of a simple computer.
   F. Analyze the control circuitry of a simple computer.

V. Data Handling Logic Circuits
   A. Analyze decoder circuits and IC chips.
   B. Analyze encoder circuits and IC chips.
   C. Analyze multiplexer and IC chips.
   D. Analyze demultiplexer circuits and IC chips.
   E. Analyze BCD-to-7 segment decoder drivers.

VI. Interfacing with the Analog World
   A. Analyze digital-to-analog conversion circuits.
   B. Analyze analog-to-digital conversion circuits.
   C. Calculate resolution, percent resolution, step size and output
levels.
   D. Define the concept of accuracy in the conversion process.

VII. System Analysis and Troubleshooting
   A. Build simple digital computer.
   B. Troubleshoot simple digital computer.
   C. Program and operate simple digital computer.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four tests    60-70% of grade
Laboratory projects        30-40% of grade
                             100%
Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
    0- 59% = E

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 230

  • Title: Electronic Devices II*
  • Number: ELEC 230
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 130

Description:

This class is a continuation of the electronic devices sequence. Topics include operational amplifiers, thyristors and voltage regulators. Operational amplifier applications include comparators, summing amplifiers, integrators, differentiators and active filters. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe opamp characteristics.
  2. Discuss opamp frequency characteristics.
  3. Analyze several kinds of opamp circuits.
  4. Analyze active filter circuits.
  5. Describe opamp oscillator circuits.
  6. Discuss IC voltage regulators.
  7. Describe various multilayer semiconductor devices. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Operational Amplifiers (Opamp)
   A. Describe the basic opamp and its characteristics.
   B. Discuss the differential amplifier and its operation.
   C. Discuss several opamp parameters.
   D. Explain negative feedback in opamp circuits.
   E. Analyze the noninverting, the voltage follower and the inverting
opamp configurations.
   F. Describe impedances of the three opamp configurations.
   G. Discuss opamp voltage and current compensation.
   H. Troubleshoot opamp circuits.
   I. Construct basic opamp circuits.

II. Opamp Frequency Response, Stability and Compensation
   A. Discuss the basic areas of opamp frequency responses.
   B. Analyze the open-loop response of an opamp.
   C. Analyze the closed-loop response of an opamp.
   D. Discuss positive feedback and stability in opamp circuits.
   E. Explain opamp phase compensation.
   F. Measure the frequency response of an opamp circuit.

III. Opamp Applications
   A. Analyze and explain the operation of several comparator circuits.
   B. Analyze and explain the operation of several types of summing
circuits.
   C. Analyze and explain the operation of intergrators and
differentiators.
   D. Analyze and explain the operation of an instrumentation amplifier.
   E. Analyze and explain the operation of an isolation amplifier.
   F. Analyze and explain the operation of an OTA.
   G. Analyze and explain the operation of log and antilog amplifiers.
   H. Troubleshoot opamp circuits.
   I. Construct several opamp circuits.

IV. Active Filters
   A. Describe the gain-versus-frequency responses of the basic filters.
   B. Describe the three basic shape characteristics and other filter
parameters.
   C. Analyze active low-pass filters.
   D. Analyze active high-pass filters.
   E. Analyze active band-pass filters.
   F. Analyze active band-stop filters.
   G. Discuss two methods for measuring frequency response.
   H. Measure the frequency response of the basic active filters types.

V. Oscillators and Phase-Locked Loops
   A. Describe the basic concept of an oscillator.
   B. Discuss the principles on which the operation of oscillators is
based.
   C. Describe and analyze the operation of basic RC oscillators.
   D. Describe and analyze the operation of basic LC oscillators.
   E. Describe and analyze the operation of basic nonsinusoidal
oscillators.
   F. Describe and analyze the operation of a 555 timer IC as an
oscillator.
   G. Explain the basic concept of a phase-locked loop.
   H. Construct several oscillator circuits.

VI. Voltage Regulators
   A. Describe the basic concept of voltage regulation.
   B. Discuss the principles of series voltage regulators.
   C. Discuss the principles of shunt voltage regulators.
   D. Discuss the principles of switching regulators
   E. Discuss IC voltage regulators.
   F. Discuss applications of IC voltage regulators.
   G. Construct voltage regulator circuits.

VII. Four and More Layer Semiconductor Devices
   A. Describe the basic structure and operation of the Shockley diode.
   B. Describe the basic structure and operation of an SCR.
   C. Discuss several SCR applications.
   D. Describe the basic operation of an SCS.
   E. Describe the basic structure and operation of diacs and triacs.
   F. Describe a phototransistor and its operation.
   G. Describe the LASCR and its operation.
   H. Discuss various types of optical couplers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentages Not to Exceed:
   A minimum of two written tests   25-50% of grade
   In-class exercises and quizzes    0-40% of grade
   Homework                          0-25% of grade
   A comprehensive final            30-50% of grade
   Lab experiments                  20-40% of grade
   Special projects                  0-20% of grade
   Total                              100%

Grading Scale:    
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 240

  • Title: Electronic Communication Systems*
  • Number: ELEC 240
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 230

Description:

This course provides a study of electronic communication systems. Topics include the electromagnetic spectrum, decibels, noise, amplitude modulation, antennas, transmission lines and the global positioning satellite system. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. State the broad issues in modern communications systems.
  2. Calculate frequency, wavelength or propagation velocity, given two of the three variables.
  3. Identify the electromagnetic spectrum and frequency allocations for various communication systems.
  4. Define bandwidth.
  5. Define simplex, half-duplex and full-duplex.
  6. Identify time vs. frequency domain representations of a signal.
  7. Measure the relative amplitude of a signal in both time and frequency domain.
  8. Calculate signal gain and loss using decibels.
  9. Identify the sources and effects of various types of system noise.
  10. State how noise and signal level are measured and compared.
  11. State the need for modulation.
  12. Define amplitude, frequency and phase modulation.
  13. State the advantage and disadvantages of each type of modulation.
  14. Draw a functional block diagram of basic transmitter and receiver.
  15. Identify various approaches and techniques used in amplitude modulation, such as SSB and SSBSC.
  16. Apply test techniques unique to FM and AM.
  17. Identify by electrical appearance various wires and cables used in transmission of electronic signals.
  18. State the characteristics of each type of cable.
  19. Apply transmission line theories.
  20. Define how an antenna radiates or captures electromagnetic energy.
  21. Define the various ways that a radiated signal propagates through the atmosphere and space.
  22. Calculate antenna performance.
  23. Explain the three segments of the current GPS system.
  24. Identify navigation signals.
  25. Define essential GPS terminology.
  26. Describe the operation of various types of GPS receivers.
  27. Explain how position is determined.
  28. Use simple hand-held GPS navigational devices. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spectrum Analysis
   A. The electromagnetic spectrum
      1. Define electromagnetic waves.
      2. Identify electromagnetic spectrum allocations.
      3. Describe bandwidth and information capacity.
      4. Define simplex, duplex and half duplex systems.
   B. Spectrum analysis
      1. Compare time and frequency domain signals.
      2. Use a spectrum analyzer.
      3. Calculate signal strength in various units.

II. Decibels and Noise
   A. Decibels
      1. Measure signal magnitudes and ranges.
      2. Describe dB reference values.
      3. Chart with dB.
   B. Noise
      1. Identify noise and its effects.
      2. Contrast noise sources and types.
      3. Measure noise.

III. Amplitude Modulation and Receivers
   A. Amplitude modulation
      1. Describe the basics of and the need for modulation.
      2. Define modulation index and signal power.
      3. Explain AM circuits, SSB and transmitter functions.
   B. Receivers
      1. Define the role of the receiver and receiver stages.
      2. Draw a block diagram of an AM receiver.
      3. Explain AM features and drawbacks.

IV. Frequency and Phase Modulation
   A. Frequency modulation
      1. Define FM.
      2. Explain FM transmitters.
      3. Draw a block diagram of an FM receiver.
   B. Phase modulation
      1. Construct a PLL.
      2. Compare and contrast AM, FM and PM.

V. Media and Transmission Lines
   A. Media
      1. Define wire and cable parameters.
      2. Explain balanced and unbalanced lines.
      3. Compare and contrast twisted pair with coax cable.
   B. Transmission lines
      1. Describe impedance.
      2. Explain when to use microstrip and waveguides.
      3. Define line and load matching.

VI. Propagation and Antennas
   A. Propagation
      1. Define the modes of propagation.
   B. Antennas
      1. Explain the function of antennas.
      2. Identify elementary antenna radiation patterns.
      3. Describe antenna fundamentals and characterization.

VII. The Global Positioning System
   A. GPS segments and how GPS works.
      1. Explain the three segments of the current GPS.
      2. Explain how position is determined.
   B. Navigation signals and terminology
      1. Identify GPS signals.
      2. Define essential GPS terminology.
   C. Receivers
      1. Use a simple hand-held GPS navigational device.
      2. Describe the operation of various types of GPS receivers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentages:
  Tests                             60% - 75% of grade
  Labs                              20% - 30% of grade
  Homework and Class Participation  10% - 20% of grade
                                       100%
Grading Scale:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 250

  • Title: Microcomputer Maintenance*
  • Number: ELEC 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 126

Description:

This course is a continuation of the study of personal computers and will further the student's ability to maintain and repair them. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for computer-maintenance certification. Topics will include interaction of hardware and operating systems, resource conflicts, networking capabilities, common hardware and software problems, hardware differences of portable computers, and upgrading computers. The course topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify operating system's functions and file system.
  2. Explain PC memory and memory conflicts.
  3. Install, configure and upgrade operating software.
  4. Diagnose and troubleshoot common computer software problems.
  5. Identify the networking and internetworking capabilities of various operating systems.
  6. Install, configure and upgrade a computer's hardware.
  7. Diagnose and troubleshoot common computer hardware problems.
  8. Identify safety and maintenance procedures.
  9. Identify and distinguish between various main boards, processors and memory.
  10. Identify and distinguish between various types of printers.
  11. Identify the unique components of portable computers.
  12. Review basic network concepts and terminology.
  13. Identify behaviors that contribute to satisfying customers.
  14. Differentiate between types of memory, identify memory conflicts and optimize memory use. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Operating System Software
   A. Identify the operating system's functions, structure and major
system files.
   B. Navigate in the operating system and show how to get needed
configuration information.
   C. Identify basic concepts and procedures for creating, viewing and
managing files and directories.
   D. Identify the procedures for basic disk management.

II. PC Memory
   A. Differentiate between types of memory.
   B. Identify typical memory conflict problems.
   C. Explain how to optimize memory use.

III. Operating Systems
   A. Identify the procedures for installing operating systems.      
   B. Install an operation system.
   C. Identify the steps to upgrade an operating system.
   D. Identify the basic system boot sequences and alternative ways to
boot the system.
   E. Identify the steps to create an emergency boot diskette.
   F. Identify procedures for loading and /or adding device drivers.
   G. Install a device driver.
   H. Identify the procedures for installing and starting applications.
   I. Install and configure an application.

IV. Diagnosing and Troubleshooting
   A. Recognize and interpret the meaning of common error codes and
startup messages.
   B. Recognize common printing problems and identify the procedures for
correcting them.
   C. Recognize common operating system problems and determine how to
resolve them.
   D. Identify concepts relation to viruses.
   E. Perform a scan for viruses.

V. Networks
   A. Identify the networking capabilities of various operating systems.
   B. Identify concepts and basic procedures for setting up a system for
Internet access.

VI. Peripheral Devices
   A. Identify basic terms, concepts and functions of system hardware
modules.
   B. Identify available system resources and configuring for device
installation.
   C. Identify common ports and their cabling and connectors.
   D. Identify procedures installing mass storage devices.
   E. Install a mass storage device.
   F. Identify procedures for installing common peripheral devices.
   G. Install a peripheral device.
   H. Identify concepts' and procedures' relation to BIOS.

VII. Diagnosing and Troubleshooting Hardware
   A. Identify common symptoms and problems associated with each module
and how to isolate the problem.
   B. Identify basic troubleshooting procedures.
   C. Troubleshoot computer problems.
   D. Identify good practices for eliciting problem symptoms from
customers.

VIII. Safety and Preventive Maintenance
   A. Identify the purpose of various types of preventive maintenance
products and procedures and when to perform them.
   B. Identify procedures and devices for protecting against environmental
hazards.
   C. Identify the potential hazards and proper safety procedures relating
to lasers and high-voltage equipment.
   D. Identify items that require special disposal procedures to comply
with environmental guidelines.
   E. Demonstrate knowledge of electrostatic discharge precautions and
procedures.

IX. Motherboards, Processors and Memory
   A. Distinguish between popular CPUs in terms of their basic
characteristics.
   B. Identify the categories of RAM terminology and physical
characteristics.
   C. Identify the most popular types of motherboards, their components
and their architecture.
   D. Identify the purpose of CMOS and how to change its basic
parameters.
   E. Change CMOS parameters.

X. Printers
   A. Identify basic printer concepts.
   B. Identify printer operations and components.
   C. Identify care and service techniques for the most common printer
types.
   D. Identify common problems with common printer types.
   E. Identify types of printer connections and configurations.
   F. Identify the procedures for changing options, configuring and using
printing subsystems.
   G. Install printer software (local and networked).

XI. Portable Systems
   A. Identify unique components of portable systems.
   B. Identify unique problems with portable systems.

XII. Networking
   A. Identify basic networking concepts.
   B. Identify procedures for configuring a NIC (Network Interface Card).
   C. Install and configure a NIC.
   D. Identify the ramifications of repairs on the network.

XIII. Customer Satisfaction
   A. Identify behaviors that lead to customer satisfaction.
   B. Differentiate effective from ineffective behaviors that contribute
to the maintenance or achievement of customer satisfaction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Method one: Class and lab evaluations as listed below.

All Percentages Not to Exceed

A minimum of two written tests      25% - 50% of grade
In-class exercises and quizzes       0% - 40% of grade
Homework                             0% - 25% of grade
A comprehensive final               30% - 50% of grade
Lab experiments                     20% - 40% of grade
Special projects                     0% - 20% of grade
Total                                    100%

Method two: Third-party certification.

Students who receive the approved computer-maintenance certificate during
the course will receive a grade of A.  Students who receive the approved
computer maintenance certificate within two months of the end of the
course may apply for a grade change to a grade of A.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 271

  • Title: Electronics Internship I*
  • Number: ELEC 271
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: department approval

Description:

This course affords the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. It will provide selected advanced electronics technology students with appropriate on-the-job experience with area employers, under instructional oversight, that will promote the student's career goals. 18 hrs. approved and appropriate work activity/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the work activities accomplished on-the-job to the internship coordinator.
  2. Explain the activities of the company, its products and services.
  3. Perform basic technical electronic tasks in the accomplishment of assigned work assignments.
  4. Demonstrate an increased understanding of the application of the classroom experience to the workplace environment.
  5. Demonstrate a greater preparedness, personally and professionally, for a career position. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The specific nature and degree of emphasis of job-related activities
performed by each student will vary from one employer to another. 
However, in general, it is expected that the student will perform many of
the following functions.

I. Operate Electronic Equipment

II. Troubleshoot and Repair Electronic Equipment

III. Test and Check Electronic Equipment

IV. Perform Equipment Calibration

V. Perform Preventative Maintenance

VI. Maintain Records and Other Data

VII. Refer to Equipment Service Manuals and Other Documents

VIII. Use Interpersonal and Communication Skills Through Interaction With
Other Professionals

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentage not to exceed:
   Instructor's on-site visits and evaluations        30% of grade
   Weekly work log                                    60% of grade
   Evaluation of the student by the work supervisor   60% of grade
                                                     100%

Grading Scale:
   90%-100% = A
   80%- 89% = B
   70%- 79% = C
   60%- 69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Transportation to work site is the responsibility of the student. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ELEC 291

No information found.