Business Plan Certificate

The business plan certificate program focuses on evaluating an idea for a business and concludes with writing a business plan to start and/or grow a business.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 4810; State CIP Code 52.0701)

First Semester

ENTR 120Introduction to Entrepreneurship2
ENTR 180Opportunity Analysis2
Total Hours4

Second Semester

ENTR 142Fast Trac Business Plan3
Total Hours3

Total Program Hours: 7

Courses

ENTR 010   Business Plan Certificate (7 Hours)

The business plan certificate program focuses on evaluating an idea for a business and concludes with writing a business plan to start and/or grow a business. The certificate is comprised of the three entrepreneurship courses: ENTR 120 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 2 credit hours, ENTR 180 Opportunity Analysis 2 credit hours, and ENTR 142 Fast Trac Business Plan 3 credit hours Major Code 4810.

ENTR 120   Introduction to Entrepreneurship (2 Hours)

The student will understand the role of entrepreneurial businesses in the United States and the impact on our national and global economy. The student will evaluate the skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture. Additionally, the student will review the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship as a career choice as well as entrance strategies to accomplish such a choice. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 130   Entrepreneurial Mindset (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be introduced to the entrepreneurial mindset in its true economic and social context by studying the unlimited opportunities that an entrepreneurial mindset can provide. The student will study the skills, attitudes and behaviors that successful entrepreneurs have historically possessed, as well as the issues, circumstances and obstacles that shaped their time. Additionally, the student will analyze modern-day successful entrepreneurs who faced hardship and adversity by embracing an entrepreneurial mindset. The characteristics of the entrepreneurial mindset will be dissected and applied to the student's own mindset and entrepreneurial potential. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 131   Financial Management for Small Business* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: ACCT 111 or ACCT 121

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and evaluate the various sources available for funding a small business; demonstrate an understanding of financial terminology; read, prepare and analyze a financial statement; and write a loan proposal. In addition, the student should be able to explain the importance of working capital and cash management. The student should also be able to identify financing needs, establish credit policies, and prepare sales forecasts. This course is required for a vocational certificate and associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 142   Fast Trac Business Plan (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to evaluate a business concept and write a sound business plan. In the process of doing so, students will be able to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a business concept; collect and organize market research data into a marketing plan; and prepare the financial projects for their business concept. In addition, students will be able to identify and evaluate various resources available for funding small businesses. The course is required for the business plan certificate, the vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship and the associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 160   Legal Issues for Small Business (2 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the forms of business ownership and the legal and tax implications for each. In addition, the student should be able to explain laws covering issues such as personnel, contracts and protection of intellectual property. The student should also be able to explain the reporting requirements for local, state and federal agencies. This course is required for the associate of applied science degree and the vocational certificate in business. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 180   Opportunity Analysis (2 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to assess the current economic, social and political climate for small businesses. In addition, the student should be able to explain how demographic, technological and social changes create opportunities for small business ventures. This course is required for the associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 185   Fundamentals of Direct Sales (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will learn the history of the direct sales industry as well as its current status and economic impact. Trends, both historic and current, will be reviewed and analyzed. Students will research a variety of direct sales companies to include their history, leadership, products, and methods of operation. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industry, the role of the direct sales independent contractors working within this industry, and the impact of this industry on today's economy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 195   Franchising* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MKT 230

In this course, the student should be able to research the franchising method of doing business from the perspective of both the franchisor and the franchisee. The student will analyze independent management efforts necessary for a successful franchise business venture as well as understand the interdependent contractual obligations that are legally binding between the franchisor-franchisee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 210   Entrepreneurship Internship I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: department approval

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. A minimum of 240 hours of on-the-job training is required. This course is required for an associate of science degree in business entrepreneurship. Either ENTR 210 or BUSE 210, Entrepreneurship Internship I, or ENTR 215 or BUSE 215, Entrepreneurship Internship II, is required for a vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship.

ENTR 215   Entrepreneurship Internship II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: ENTR 210 and department approval

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. A minimum of 240 hours of on-the-job training is required. This course is required for an associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. Either BUSE 210 or ENTR 210, Entrepreneurship Internship I, or BUSE 215 or ENTR 215, Entrepreneurship Internship II is required for a vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship.

ENTR 220   Entrepreneurial Marketing* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MKT 230

In this course, the student will gain insights essential for marketing an entrepreneurial venture utilizing innovative and financially responsible marketing strategies. The student will analyze marketing philosophies implemented by key successful entrepreneurs. Additionally, the student will prepare a marketing plan to launch the entrepreneurial venture and a marketing plan to implement during the first two years of business operation. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 225   Family Business (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will gain the knowledge and skills needed for the successful management and leadership of a family enterprise by exploring a diverse set of family firms, examining the interrelationships among the owners, the family, and the management team. The student will analyze the management and family practices that ensure success while recognizing the advantages and challenges facing family enterprises. Emphasis is placed on positioning the family enterprise for sustained growth and continuity through generations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENTR 010

No information found.

ENTR 120

  • Title: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
  • Number: ENTR 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

The student will understand the role of entrepreneurial businesses in the United States and the impact on our national and global economy. The student will evaluate the skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture. Additionally, the student will review the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship as a career choice as well as entrance strategies to accomplish such a choice. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the nature of entrepreneurship as a method of business ownership.
  2. Explore the characteristics of an entrepreneur.
  3. Evaluate one’s own motivation for becoming an entrepreneur.
  4. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of entrepreneurship as a career choice.
  5. Identify the structure of entrepreneurial businesses.
  6. Analyze the opportunity and impact of technology on entrepreneurial businesses.
  7. Recognize the management, financial, marketing and legal skills necessary to successfully operate and grow an entrepreneurial business venture.
  8. Recognize the challenge to the entrepreneur of continually analyzing and adapting the products, services and operation of their entrepreneurial business venture.
  9. Identify and evaluate the methods of entering an entrepreneurial venture to include starting a new business, buying an existing business, and becoming a franchisee.
  10. Identify global aspects of an entrepreneurial business.
  11. Review current trends and issues in entrepreneurship. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Entrepreneurship Today
   A. Define the role of the entrepreneur in business
   B. Describe the important role small businesses play in the nation’s
economy
   C. Describe the entrepreneurial profile and evaluate your potential as
an entrepreneur
   D. Identify and explain the issues that are driving the growth of
entrepreneurship

II. How Entrepreneurs Move Ideas to Reality
   A. Describe why creativity and innovation are such an integral part of
entrepreneurship
   B. Understand how entrepreneurs enhance their own creativity and that
of their employees.
   C. Discuss the importance of continually analyzing, adapting, and
improving the entrepreneurial business
   D. Identify methods entrepreneurs utilize to continually improve their
product or service and the strategies of operating their entrepreneurial
business

III. Strategic Marketing and Management for the Entrepreneur
   A. Understand the importance of strategic marketing and management to a
small entrepreneurial business
   B. Explain why and how a small business must create a competitive
advantage in the market
  C. Explain the importance of effective financial management in
developing, growing, and sustaining an entrepreneurial business venture
   D. Recognize and understand the importance of legal skills in the
successful operation of an entrepreneurial business
   E. Identify the opportunity and impact of technology to entrepreneurial
business ventures
   F. Analyze global issues and opportunities for entrepreneurial
businesses

IV. Forms of Business Ownership
   A. Define a sole proprietorship, a partnership, a corporation, and a
franchise
   B. Identify advantages and disadvantages of each form of business
ownership
   C. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of buying an existing
business

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams 25-30%
Individual and Group Case Studies 35-40%
Presentation of Potential Entrepreneurial Venture 10-15%
Entrepreneurship Trends and Issues Project 5-10%
Homework Discussion Questions 10-15%
  Total: 100%

Grade Criteria: 
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F = 59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 130

  • Title: Entrepreneurial Mindset
  • Number: ENTR 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be introduced to the entrepreneurial mindset in its true economic and social context by studying the unlimited opportunities that an entrepreneurial mindset can provide. The student will study the skills, attitudes and behaviors that successful entrepreneurs have historically possessed, as well as the issues, circumstances and obstacles that shaped their time. Additionally, the student will analyze modern-day successful entrepreneurs who faced hardship and adversity by embracing an entrepreneurial mindset. The characteristics of the entrepreneurial mindset will be dissected and applied to the student's own mindset and entrepreneurial potential. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Ascertain the economic, political, social and technological climate that supports and hinders the spirit of entrepreneurship.
  2. Trace the origins of entrepreneurial ideas focusing on the economic, political, social and technological conditions of the time.
  3. Evaluate the impact and benefits of applying the lessons learned in dissecting the entrepreneurial mindset.
  4. Translate the historical applications of implementing the characteristics of an entrepreneurial mindset to current applications.
  5. Consider the potential for current implementation of the characteristics of an entrepreneurial mindset considering modern day issues, opportunities and obstacles.
  6. Discuss the application of the entrepreneurial mindset to problem solving.
  7. Affirm the value of the entrepreneurial mindset and its applications on the future of our society.
  8. Utilize ones' personal perspectives, histories, experiences, and viewpoints to identify similarities and differences to the characteristics of an entrepreneurial mindset.
  9. Compare and contrast the entrepreneurial mindset tools utilized historically and in modern times; identify similarities and differences. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Empowering Entrepreneurs
   A. Examine beliefs and assumptions that empower entrepreneurs.
   B. Analyze circumstances surrounding entrepreneurial successes and
failures.

II. Transforming Entrepreneurial Concepts
   A. Identify requirements of implementing an entrepreneurial concept.
   B. Identify actions necessary to move from implements the concept to
achieving sustainable success.

III. Entrepreneurial Opportunities
   A. Identify opportunities that ignite ambition and foster self-reliance
and resourcefulness, perseverance, and determination.
   B. Analyze circumstances, skills and strategies which yield
entrepreneurial success.

IV. Goal Setting
   A. Review goals set by other entrepreneurs and the impact of goal
setting on entrepreneurial success.
   B. Applying the course content, establish individual goals to develop
personal entrepreneurial skills.

V. Learning Strategies
   A. Identify the impact of knowledge applied to effort.
   B. Analyze the power of self-directed life-long learning.

VI. Creating Sustainable Wealth
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic financial literacy.
   B. Illustrate how entrepreneurs create sustainable wealth regardless of
circumstances.

VII. Building a Sustainable Brand
   A. Recognize the importance of reliability as a key to building a
successful and sustainable brand.
   B. Discuss the impact responsibility plays in building a successful and
sustainable brand.

VII. Networking
   A. Understand the value a community of success by learning how to
connect and collaborate with innovators, entrepreneurs, mentors and
trusted advisors who can assist in transforming entrepreneurial ideas into
sustainable successes.
   B. Discuss strategies for implementing a personal community of
success.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25% Quizzes
40-50% Activities, Discussions and Reflections
30-40% Case Study Analysis

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic computer skills, word processing skills and Internet search skills for the completion of some assignments. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 131

  • Title: Financial Management for Small Business*
  • Number: ENTR 131
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ACCT 111 or ACCT 121

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and evaluate the various sources available for funding a small business; demonstrate an understanding of financial terminology; read, prepare and analyze a financial statement; and write a loan proposal. In addition, the student should be able to explain the importance of working capital and cash management. The student should also be able to identify financing needs, establish credit policies, and prepare sales forecasts. This course is required for a vocational certificate and associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, discuss and prepare the main financial statements (balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement) that are important to an entrepreneur.
  2. Identify sources of financing available to small business and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  3. Explain the importance and methods of cash management.
  4. Make a financial statement analysis utilizing ratio analysis, break-even point and trend analysis.
  5. Evaluate the credit worthiness of a business. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Financial Statements (Balance Sheet, Income Statement and Cash Flow
Statement).
   A. Define financial terminology.
   B. Explain the importance and use of each financial statement.
   C. Prepare three-year proforma Income Statements, Balance Sheets and
Cash Flow Statements.

II. Sources of Financing
   A. Differentiate between debt and equity financing.
   B. Identify sources of debt and equity financing.
   C. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each form of financing.
   D. Identify the various types of business loans.
   E. Interpret the terms and conditions of a loan.

III. Cash Management
   A. Prepare a cash budget including:
      1. Start-up costs.
      2. Revenues.
      3. Expenditures.
   B. List methods of improving cash flow within a business.
   C. Determine the financial needs of a business.
   D. Describe methods of financing cash deficits incorporating internal
cash management techniques and external resources.

IV. Financial Statement Analysis
   A. Define the most common ratios used to evaluate and manage a
business, including:
      1. Using ratio analysis, assess the financial health of a business.
      2. Determine the break-even point for a business start-up.
      3. Interpret financial trends within a company.

V. Credit Worthiness
   A. Define the 5C’s of credit
   B. Evaluate the credit worthiness of a business using financial ratios
such as:
      1. Debt ratios.
      2. Equity ratios.
      3. Profit ratios.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Tests/Quizzes    30%
   Assignments      40%
   Projects         30%
                   100%

Grading Scale:
   A = 90-100%
   B = 80- 89%
   C = 70- 79%
   D = 60- 69%
   F = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 142

  • Title: Fast Trac Business Plan
  • Number: ENTR 142
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to evaluate a business concept and write a sound business plan. In the process of doing so, students will be able to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a business concept; collect and organize market research data into a marketing plan; and prepare the financial projects for their business concept. In addition, students will be able to identify and evaluate various resources available for funding small businesses. The course is required for the business plan certificate, the vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship and the associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare a well defined concept statement that clearly explains the business and product(s) and/or service(s).
  2. Describe entrepreneurial characteristics and behaviors important to business success.
  3. Develop a personal criteria of what is important in a business venture and evaluate the business concept against this criteria.
  4. Evaluate the business concept against the “ideal” model business characteristics.
  5. Develop a management plan for a business.
  6. Identify the legal requirements for starting and growing a business.
  7. Develop a marketing plan for a business.
  8. Prepare the product or service section of the business plan.
  9. Develop a financial plan for a business.
  10. Identify money sources available to a small business.
  11. Integrate sections of business plan into comprehensive whole.
  12. Identify outside sources for small business assistance and expertise.
  13. Prepare an effective business plan presentation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concept Statement
   A. Explain clearly and succinctly the proposed business and its
products and/or services.
   B. Evaluate the concept statement for clarity and completeness

II. Entrepreneurial Characteristics and Behaviors
   A. List common entrepreneurial characteristics and behaviors.
   B. Identify skills and expertise necessary for business success.
   C. Assess personal strengths and weaknesses.
   D. Identify specific areas in which additional business or technical
skills are needed.

III. Evaluation of Business Concept Against Personal Criteria
   A. Identify personal preferences, interests and talents.
   B. Identify at least three personal and career goals for the next 10
years.
   C. Evaluate the compatibility of personal goals and talents with
business concept.

IV. Evaluate the Business Concept against the “Ideal” or Model
Business Criteria
   A. Review criteria for the “ideal” or model business.
   B. Evaluate business concepts against ideal business.
   C. Develop strategy to address weaknesses in business concept.

V. Management  Plan for Business
   A. Identify positions needed and define responsibilities.
   B. Prepare the organizational chart.
   C. Identify outside resources for business assistance and expertise.

VI. Legal Requirements for a Business
   A. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the various forms of
business ownership and determine which form is best for student types of
business.    
   B. Investigate local restrictions (licensing, zoning, permits) relevant
to business.
   C. Identify the types of legal agreements that are necessary to
securing proprietary rights for a business.

VII. Develop a Marketing Plan
   A. Prepare an industry study.
   B. Prepare a competitive analysis and customer analysis.
   C. Develop a plan for market penetration.

VIII. Develop a Product or Service Plan
   A. Outline how the product will be made and delivered.
   B. Identify sources of materials or suppliers for product or service.

IX. Develop a Financial Plan
   A. Evaluate traditional and non-traditional sources of capital.
   B. Identify, discuss and prepare proforma income statements, balance
sheets and cash flow statements for three years.
   C. Explain the importance of cash management to a business.

X. Prepare a Business Plan
   A. Summarize critical business plan information into an effective
executive summary.
   B. Integrate sections of the plan into an effective whole, adding an
appendix and table of contents.
   C. Explain the benefits of a business plan from the perspective of the
entrepreneur, a lender or an investor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Sections of Plan        30%
   Business Plan           50%
   Assignments/Quiz(s)     20%
                          100%

   Grading Scale:
   A = 90 - 100%   
   B = 80 -  89%
   C = 70 -  79%
   D = 60 -  69%
   F = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 160

  • Title: Legal Issues for Small Business
  • Number: ENTR 160
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the forms of business ownership and the legal and tax implications for each. In addition, the student should be able to explain laws covering issues such as personnel, contracts and protection of intellectual property. The student should also be able to explain the reporting requirements for local, state and federal agencies. This course is required for the associate of applied science degree and the vocational certificate in business. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the essentials of a contract.
  2. Evaluate the legal forms of organization.
  3. Describe the nature of a business owner’s liability.
  4. Explain the duties and responsibilities of an agency relationship.
  5. Describe the legal ways to protect the proprietary aspects of a business.
  6. Identify resources for zoning, licensing and regulatory information.
  7. Explain the law as it relates to human resource management in a small business.
  8. Explain the different types of bankruptcies.
  9. Identify political issues affecting business ownership. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Essential of a Contract
   A. Identify the requirements of an enforceable contract.
   B. Distinguish between the workings of contract law and tort law.
II. Legal Forms of Ownership
   A. Identify the various forms of legal ownership.
   B. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each form of business
ownership.
   C. Discuss the tax implications of the various forms of business
ownership.

III. Business Owner’s Liability
   A. Identify areas in which a business may have legal liability
exposure.
   B. Explain methods for addressing the liability aspects of business.
   C. Explain the need for, and process of, finding the right attorney.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities of an Agency Relationship
   A. Explain the nature of an agency relationship.
   B. Identify the risks associated with an agency relationship.

V. Ways to Protect the Proprietary Aspects of a Business
   A. Explain the importance of protecting the proprietary rights of a
business.
   B. Identify how to legally protect the proprietary aspects of a
business.
   C. List the criteria for the patentability of a product.
   D. Explain the patent process.
   E. Describe the process of obtaining trademark and copyright
protection.

VI. Resources for Zoning, Licensing and Regulatory Information
   A. Identify the licensing requirements for a new business.
   B. Investigate the zoning and regulatory requirements for a business.

VII. The Law and Human Resource Management
   A. Identify laws which impact human resource management in small
business.
   B. Describe the role of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
   C. Prepare guidelines to ensure adherence to laws impacting human
resource management.

VIII. Bankruptcy
   A. Explain the different types of bankruptcy.
   B. Describe how state law impacts bankruptcies.

IX. Political Issues Involving Entrepreneurship
   A. Describe recent or pending legislation having significant impact on
small businesses.
   B. Identify political avenues to support small business legislation and
action.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Examinations (2)                60%
   Research Project                30%
   Class Activities/Discussions    10%
                                  100%
   Grading Scale:
   A = 90 - 100%
   B = 80 -  89%
   C = 70 -  79%
   D = 60 -  69%
   F = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 180

  • Title: Opportunity Analysis
  • Number: ENTR 180
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to assess the current economic, social and political climate for small businesses. In addition, the student should be able to explain how demographic, technological and social changes create opportunities for small business ventures. This course is required for the associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify opportunities for small business start-up and/or growth.
  2. Identify and discuss significant changes which impact small business.
  3. Analyze the current environment and make recommendations as to how small business can best maximize beneficial and minimize negative changes.
  4. Conduct an environmental analysis and develop a strategic plan for a specific small business (idea).
  5. Discuss how developments in the local community impact the small business climate. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Opportunities for Small Business Start-up and/or Growth
   A. Keep a written log of opportunities presented within the current
environment.
   B. Accurately evaluate and justify which business opportunities
identified have the greatest possibility of economic success.

II. Significant Changes Which Impact Small Business
   A. Identify and list the types of external information available to
assist small businesses in conducting an environmental analysis.
   B. Identify significant consumer trends affecting business today and in
the near future.

III. Analysis of Current Business Environment and Recommendations for
Small Business
   A. Differentiate between the environmental factors which should be
monitored carefully and those which may be only casually assessed.
   B. Project how positive environmental factors may be capitalized upon
by small businesses.
   C. Identify the unique qualities of small businesses which may enable
them to respond rapidly to business opportunities.
   D. Explain how factors having a negative impact on business may, given
the right environment, be minimized or turned into a business
opportunity.

IV. Environmental Analysis and Strategic Plan for a Specific Small
Business (Idea)
   A. List the four major categories of macro environmental variables.
   B. Conduct an analysis of the macro environment for small business.
   C. Identify which factors in the macro environment have the greatest
impact on small business.
   D. Evaluate how well the proposed business (idea) is supported by
consumer trends.
   E. Conduct a strategic analysis of environmental threats and
opportunities for the proposed business (idea).

V. Developments in the Local Community and Their Impact on Small Business
   A. Conduct an environmental analysis for small business in the local
community.
   B. Evaluate the  climate” for small business within the local
economy.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Case Studies                                      20%
Opportunity Evaluation                            20%
Macro Environmental Analysis                      20%
Micro Environmental Analysis                      20%
Strategic Plan (SWOT Analysis) and Presentation   20%
                                                 100%
   Grading Scale:   
   A = 90 -100%   
   B = 80 - 89%
   C = 70 - 79%
   D = 60 - 69%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 185

  • Title: Fundamentals of Direct Sales
  • Number: ENTR 185
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will learn the history of the direct sales industry as well as its current status and economic impact. Trends, both historic and current, will be reviewed and analyzed. Students will research a variety of direct sales companies to include their history, leadership, products, and methods of operation. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industry, the role of the direct sales independent contractors working within this industry, and the impact of this industry on today's economy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the history of the direct sales industry.
  2. Research historically significant companies in the direct sales industry.
  3. Research both historic and current trends in the direct sales industry.
  4. Identify the size and scope of the direct sales industry and its relationship to the economy in terms of both revenue and employment.
  5. Research the primary product groups represented by the direct sales industry.
  6. Explain the business organization relationship between the direct sales company and its independent contractors.
  7. Compare and contrast the variety of sales strategies utilized by the direct sales industry.
  8. Identify and analyze the variety of payment strategies common in the direct sales industry.
  9. Research the functional contributions and the relevant significance of the Direct Selling Association (DSA) to the companies they represent, the independent contractors, and the consumer.
  10. Explain the importance of interpersonal skills and the impact of these skills on customer relationship management.
  11. Research the importance of professional business skills and professional selling skills recognizing the impact of these skills have on the independent contractor's business success.
  12. Discuss how the application of ethical business skills can impact the success of the direct sales independent contractor and the company they represent. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Direct Sales Industry
   A. Research the history of the direct sales industry.
   B. Identify the size and scope of the direct sales industry in terms of
both revenue and self employment.
   C. Identify historically significant companies in the direct sales
industry and analyze rationale of their industry significance.
   D. Discuss the economic impact of the direct sales industry.

II. Direct Sales Industry Trends
   A. Discuss historic trends in the direct sales industry.
   B. Identify current trends in the direct sales industry.
   C. Analyze both historic and current trends.

III. Products Sold through Direct Sales
   A. Identify primary product groups represented by the direct sales
industry.
   B. Discuss relevant consumer audiences for these primary product
groups.

IV. Organizational Structure
   A. Research organizational structures of leading direct sales
companies.
   B. Identify the relationship between the direct sales company and its
independent contractors.
   C. Discuss the form of self employment through independent contracting
comparing it to other forms of employment.

V. Sales Strategies
   A. Research the variety of sales strategies utilized by the direct
sales industry, i.e. face-to-face, group, party plans, etc.
   B. Compare and contrast sales formats identifying relevant applications
for each.

VI. Payment Strategies
   A. Research the different payment strategies utilized among direct
sales companies.
   B. Discuss implications to both the direct sales company and the
independent contractor of each payment strategy.

VII. Customer Relationship Management
   A. Identify the importance of both the customer and the independent
contractor of quality customer relationship management strategies.
   B. Compare and contrast the application of customer relationship
management strategies recommended by leading direct sales companies.

VIII. Professional Skills
   A. Identify the professional business skills necessary for an
independent contractor's success.
   B. Identify the professional selling skills necessary for an
independent contractor's success.
   C. Discuss the importance of and applications necessary for both
professional business skills and professional selling skills.

IX. Ethical Practices
   A. Identify business practices addressing the importance of ethics
utilized by leading direct sales companies.
   B. Discuss the importance of ethical practices in the direct sales
industry and the impact ethical business practices have on both the direct
sales independent contract and the direct sales companies they represent.

X. National Representation
   A. Research the functional contributions of the Direct Selling
Association (DSA) to the companies they represent.
   B. Identify the contributions DSA makes to the independent contractors
representing direct sales companies.
   C. Identify the indirect contributions the DSA makes to the consumers
of products and services brought to them by direct sales companies through
independent contractors.
   D. Discuss the commitment to ethical business practices as demonstrated
by the Direct Selling Association.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes = 35% or 280/800 points

Direct Sales Company Studies (group and individual) =
40% or 320/800 points

Project and Activities = 25% or 200/800 points

Criteria for letter grade:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need basic computer skills, word processing skills and Internet search skills for the completion of assignments. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 195

  • Title: Franchising*
  • Number: ENTR 195
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MKT 230

Description:

In this course, the student should be able to research the franchising method of doing business from the perspective of both the franchisor and the franchisee. The student will analyze independent management efforts necessary for a successful franchise business venture as well as understand the interdependent contractual obligations that are legally binding between the franchisor-franchisee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the nature of the franchising method of doing business.
  2. Identify the unique features not typically found in a business run by an independent owner/operator.
  3. Analyze the pros and cons of becoming involved in franchising.
  4. Understand the necessary steps to successfully enter a franchise agreement.
  5. Explain the location, site selection, accounting, financial management, and information systems important to the successful operation of a franchise.
  6. Review the law as it relates to franchising, addressing contractual requirements, torts, franchisor/franchisee rights, trademarks, registration requirements, antitrust, territorial rights, price fixing, and tying agreements.
  7. Identify and analyze qualifications a franchisor seeks in a prospective franchisee.
  8. Explore the multifaceted relationships between franchisees and franchisors, examining these relationships from a business and a legal perspective.
  9. Evaluate methods of developing and handling franchise relationship programs.
  10. Research the current growth in franchising throughout the world.
  11. Review current trends and issues in franchising. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Franchising
   A. Describe the historical development of franchising
   B. Define franchising

II. Recognizing Franchising Opportunities
   A. Identify advantages and disadvantages of franchising to the
franchisor and the franchisee
   B. Describe typical elements included in a franchising agreement

III. Developing a Franchisor Business Plan
   A. Define a franchise business plan
   B. Identify the elements of a franchisee recruitment package
   C. Analyze the essential elements of a franchisee operations package

IV. Franchisor Management, Organization and Administrative Policies
   A. Describe franchisor management practices and their importance to the
franchisor and franchisee
   B. Investigate leadership principles important to franchising
   C. Analyze the functions of franchisor management in a franchise
system

V. Marketing and Selling the Franchise Opportunity
   A. Identify the uniqueness of selling in a franchise organization
   B. Analyze franchise sales packages

VI. Managing the Operations Process of a Franchise
   A. Learn why a franchisor has a promotional and an operations process
   B. Describe the components of a promotional package
   C. Describe the development of the operations process
   D. Understand the purpose of the franchisor’s brochure and what
information is included in the brochure
   E. Discuss the importance of informational manuals for franchisee
trainees and for prospective franchisees

VII. Evaluating Location and Site Selection
   A. Describe the importance of site selection to the success or failure
of the business
   B. Discuss the franchisor’s approach to allocating franchises within
a geographic area and for selecting specific sites within those areas
   C. Recognize the importance of market share in site selection

VIII. Financial Management and Planning Tools
   A. Develop an understanding of the financial responsibilities within a
franchised business
   B. Identify the capital requirements confronting franchised businesses
   C. Describe financial ratios useful in analyzing the financial
condition of a franchise operation

IX. Information Systems in Franchising
   A. Describe typical information systems used by various franchises
   B. Address the importance of information systems to various franchise
businesses

X. Franchise Legal Documents
   A. Describe trademarks, copyrights and patents and how to protect them
   B. Discuss intellectual property and its importance to business
   C. Analyze the basics of antitrust laws and the role they play in
franchising

XI. Investigating Franchise Opportunities as a Franchisee
   A. Describe the process of investigating and comparing franchise
operations
   B. Evaluate yourself as a prospective franchisee
   C. Describe the contents and importance of the disclosure document

XII. Financing, Marketing and Managing  a Franchised Business
   A. List the financing requirements of a franchisee
   B. Describe the marketing responsibilities of a franchisee
   C. Identify the essentials of the management process in a franchised
business

XIII. The Franchise Relationship between Franchisor and Franchisee
   A. Analyze the importance of communication, awareness, rapport, and
expertise in a franchising relationship
   B. Describe the principal areas of concern to franchisees in the
franchising program

XIV. Franchisor Support Services
   A. Identify services typically provided by a franchisor to a
franchisee
   B. Describe the importance of an effective communication system to the
franchisor-franchisee relationship
   C. Determine the value of franchisee training and what it generally
entails
   D. Identify the contents of a training manual/program necessary for the
development of the franchisee

XV. The Future of Franchising
   A. Research the current growth in franchising throughout the world
   B. Review current trends and issues in franchising

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams                                 30-35%   
Small Group In-Class Case Evaluations 15-20%
Case Studies                          20-25%
Franchise Reviews                     25-30%
  Total:                                100%  

Grading Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%
  B = 80 –  89%
  C = 70 –  79%
  D = 60 –  69%
  F = 59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 210

  • Title: Entrepreneurship Internship I*
  • Number: ENTR 210
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: department approval

Description:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. A minimum of 240 hours of on-the-job training is required. This course is required for an associate of science degree in business entrepreneurship. Either ENTR 210 or BUSE 210, Entrepreneurship Internship I, or ENTR 215 or BUSE 215, Entrepreneurship Internship II, is required for a vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete all essential activities for planning the internship.
  2. Complete all tasks necessary to initiate the internship, including coordinating with facilitator and supervisor.
  3. Describe pertinent information learned about the company providing the internship.
  4. Apply the knowledge and skills acquired in entrepreneurship courses to the work situation.
  5. Document the details of the internship experience, including tasks, issues, knowledge gained, and problems solved.
  6. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.
  7. Evaluate the internship experience, applying classroom learned competencies and workplace practices in an action paper and writing a comprehensive self-evaluation.
  8. Describe the challenges facing small businesses.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Planning for the Internship
   A. List goals and objectives to achieve in the internship setting.
   B. Identify possible internship opportunities and initiate the job
procurement process.
   C. Complete the application and interview process.

II. Initiating the Internship
   A. Determine specific objectives for the internship with the
facilitator.
   B. Discuss in a meeting with the facilitator and the job supervisor the
job description, objectives, and process for the internship.
   C. Complete the orientation to the company, its policies, and the work
assignment.

III. Learning About the Company
   A. Provide an accurate description of the company’s products and/or
services.
   B. Describe the company’s organization and management style.
   C. Describe the company’s market niche and/or customer base.

IV. Apply Knowledge and Skills Acquired in Entrepreneurship Courses
   A. Interpret the financial position and strength of a business based on
financial reports.
   B. Demonstrate an understanding of the marketing and management
functions.
   C. Demonstrate an understanding of decision making and problem solving
in a small business setting.

V. Documenting the Internship
   A. Maintain records detailing job-related tasks at the work site
(journal, activity log, etc.).
   B. Maintain records of human resources issues during the internship,
including hours worked and interactions with supervisors or other
management.
   C. Document classroom knowledge (theory, concepts, facts, strategies,
skills) used to complete job-related tasks.
   D. Document problems experienced and solutions applied.

VI. Demonstrating Professional Conduct and Workplace Skills
   A. Exhibit punctuality, initiative, courtesy, and loyalty in the
workplace.
   B. Exhibit an ability to get along with others.
   C. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   D. Demonstrate adaptability to changes in the work environment.
   E. Follow written and oral instructions.
   F. Manage time and resources effectively.
   G. Follow employee rules, regulations, and policies.
   H. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting, and recording
data.
   I. Demonstrate effective work ethics.
   J. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus, and responding to
supervision.

VII. Evaluating the Internship Experience
   A. Describe and assess degree of consistency between learned classroom
competencies and workplace practices.
   B. Write a comprehensive self-evaluation.
   C. Write a comprehensive strategic action paper on company in which
interned.

VIII. Describing the Challenges Facing Small Business
   A. Identify the most critical challenges to the business in which
interned.
   B. Explain ways to address critical challenges facing the company.
   C. List opportunities for small business growth.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Student Goals and Objectives      up to 10%
Wage and Earnings Record                 5%
Employer’s Evaluation                40-60%
Self Evaluation                         10%
Strategic Action Paper               20-40%
                                       100%

Students must complete a minimum of 240 hours of work.  Students will
receive no credit for course if a fewer number of hours are worked.

   Grading Scale:
   A = 90 - 100%   
   B = 80 -  89%
   C = 70 -  79%
   D = 60 -  69%
   F  = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 215

  • Title: Entrepreneurship Internship II*
  • Number: ENTR 215
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENTR 210 and department approval

Description:

Upon the successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. A minimum of 240 hours of on-the-job training is required. This course is required for an associate of applied science degree in business entrepreneurship. Either BUSE 210 or ENTR 210, Entrepreneurship Internship I, or BUSE 215 or ENTR 215, Entrepreneurship Internship II is required for a vocational certificate in business entrepreneurship.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete all essential activities for planning the internship.
  2. Complete all tasks necessary to initiate the internship, including coordinating with facilitator and supervisor.
  3. Describe pertinent information learned about the company providing the internship.
  4. Apply the knowledge and skills acquired in entrepreneurship courses to the work situation.
  5. Document the details of the internship experience, including tasks, issues, knowledge gained, and problems solved.
  6. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.
  7. Evaluate the internship experience, applying classroom learned competencies and workplace practices in an action paper and writing a comprehensive self-evaluation.
  8. Describe the challenges facing small businesses. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Planning for the Internship
   A. List goals and objectives to achieve in the internship setting.
   B. Identify possible internship opportunities and initiate the job
procurement process.
   C. Complete the application and interview process.

II. Initiating the Internship
   A. Determine specific objectives for the internship with the
facilitator.
   B. Discuss in a meeting with the facilitator and the job supervisor the
job description, objectives, and process for the internship.
   C. Complete the orientation to the company, its policies, and the work
assignment.

III. Learning About the Company
   A. Provide an accurate description of the company’s products and/or
services.
   B. Describe the company’s organization and management style.
   C. Describe the company’s market niche and/or customer base.

IV. Apply Knowledge and Skills Acquired in Entrepreneurship Courses
   A. Interpret the financial position and strength of a business based on
financial reports.
   B. Demonstrate an understanding of the marketing and management
functions.
   C. Demonstrate an understanding of decision making and problem solving
in a small business setting.

V. Documenting the Internship
   A. Maintain records detailing job-related tasks at the work site
(journal, activity log, etc.).
   B. Maintain records of human resources issues during the internship,
including hours worked and interactions with supervisors or other
management.
   C. Document classroom knowledge (theory, concepts, facts, strategies,
skills) used to complete job-related tasks.
   D. Document problems experienced and solutions applied.

VI. Demonstrating Professional Conduct and Workplace Skills
   A. Exhibit punctuality, initiative, courtesy, and loyalty in the
workplace.
   B. Exhibit an ability to get along with others.
   C. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   D. Demonstrate adaptability to changes in the work environment.
   E. Follow written and oral instructions.
   F. Manage time and resources effectively.
   G. Follow employee rules, regulations, and policies.
   H. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting, and recording
data.
   I. Demonstrate effective work ethics.
   J. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus, and responding to
supervision.

VII. Evaluating the Internship Experience
   A. Describe and assess degree of consistency between learned classroom
competencies and workplace practices.
   B. Write a comprehensive self-evaluation.
   C. Write a comprehensive strategic action paper on company in which
interned.

VIII. Describing the Challenges Facing Small Business
   A. Identify the most critical challenges to the business in which
interned.
   B. Explain ways to address critical challenges facing the company.
   C. List opportunities for small business growth.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Student Goals and Objectives      up to 10%
Wage and Earnings Record                 5%
Employer’s Evaluation                40-60%
Self Evaluation                         10%
Strategic Action Paper               20-40%
                                       100%

Students must complete a minimum of 240 hours of work.  Students will
receive no credit for course if fewer number of hours are worked.

   Grading Scale:
   A = 90 -100%   
   B = 80 - 89%
   C = 70 - 79%
   D = 60 - 69%
   F = 59% or less

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 220

  • Title: Entrepreneurial Marketing*
  • Number: ENTR 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MKT 230

Description:

In this course, the student will gain insights essential for marketing an entrepreneurial venture utilizing innovative and financially responsible marketing strategies. The student will analyze marketing philosophies implemented by key successful entrepreneurs. Additionally, the student will prepare a marketing plan to launch the entrepreneurial venture and a marketing plan to implement during the first two years of business operation. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and explain the driving philosophies relevant to entrepreneurial marketing.
  2. Analyze marketing philosophies implemented by key successful entrepreneurs.
  3. Identify and justify guiding entrepreneurial marketing philosophies that apply to new business ventures.
  4. Recognize the importance of marketing an entrepreneurial venture.
  5. Develop entrepreneurial marketing objectives that demonstrate respect for the mission of the entrepreneurial business venture as well as demonstrate a thorough comprehension of available financial resources and relevant responsibilities.
  6. List and explain the steps involved in developing a marketing plan to include audience, messages, media mix, budget, and evaluation.
  7. Illustrate the development of an entrepreneurial marketing plan to include direct mail, publications, advertising, public relations and/or the Web.
  8. Prepare a marketing plan to launch an entrepreneurial venture.
  9. Develop a marketing plan to implement during the first two years of operation for an entrepreneurial venture. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Analyzing the Target Audience
   A. Understand that consumer behavior is key to effective promotion
   B. Define the target audience
   C. Identify values, motivations and attitudes of the target audience

II. Targeted Marketing Research
   A. Define target marketing 
   B. Understand that research is key to successful target marketing
   C. Identify specific market segments using demographics, cohort
analysis, psychographics and geo-demographics
   D. Identify motivators and attitudes influencing target audiences
   E. Analyze the audience for the entrepreneurial business describing
them demographically and in terms of cohort, values, motivators and
attitudes
   F. Recognize the importance of continual and constant research
regarding the target market throughout the lifespan of the entrepreneurial
venture

III. Planning the Marketing Message
   A. Determine the market definition
   B. Develop the value proposition
   C. Create the executive summary
   D. Define the features and benefits of the entrepreneurial venture

IV. Creating Your Marketing Plan
   A. Define the problem/opportunity
   B. Identify the objectives to be accomplished
   C. Identify the customers who will be targeted
   D. Develop a strategy and action plan
   E. Determine a budget
   F. Develop a calendar/timetable
   G. Create a culture that supports the marketing plan

V. Choosing Advertising Media
   A. Review the pros and cons for media choices including newspapers,
magazines, radio, television, direct mail, publications and the Internet
   B. Review the production requirements of each media choice
   C. Identify the appropriate media mix for the entrepreneurial business

VI. Application of Entrepreneurial Marketing Philosophies by Successful
Entrepreneurs
   A. Review marketing efforts of successful entrepreneurs
   B. Analyze appropriate application of findings to the entrepreneurial
business

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Group and Individual Entrepreneurial 
  Profile Evaluations                    35-40%    
Business Venture Launch Marketing Plan   15-20%
Business Venture Two Year Marketing Plan 25-30%
Quizzes                                  15-20%
  Total:                                   100%

Grading Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%
  B = 80 –  89%
  C = 70 –  79%
  D = 60 –  69%
  F = 59 or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ENTR 225

  • Title: Family Business
  • Number: ENTR 225
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will gain the knowledge and skills needed for the successful management and leadership of a family enterprise by exploring a diverse set of family firms, examining the interrelationships among the owners, the family, and the management team. The student will analyze the management and family practices that ensure success while recognizing the advantages and challenges facing family enterprises. Emphasis is placed on positioning the family enterprise for sustained growth and continuity through generations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Assess the concept of family business and its theoretical roots.
  2. Analyze the impact of family business on local, regional, national and global economies.
  3. Explain the unique assets and vulnerabilities of family enterprises.
  4. Explain the CEO’s key role as an architect of the company’s continued success via its succession and continuity plans.
  5. Analyze strategies that CEO’s can initiate to help the next generation govern the firm and perpetuate its legacy.
  6. Review transition strategies and their impact on succession and continuity.
  7. Analyze the role that many CEO spouses play as co-architects of the company’s succession and continuity process and as chief trust officers of the family.
  8. Assess the key role next-generation members play in endowing the family business with a new vision for the company in their generation.
  9. Identify the developmental needs and challenges of the next-generation leaders.
  10. Discuss the responsibilities involved in leading not just the business but also shareholders and the extended family.
  11. Identify the characteristics of successors who become successful CEO’s, successful sibling team members, and/or successful leaders of family businesses in the cousin consortium stage.
  12. Discuss the role that disagreement on strategy between the incumbent CEO generation and the next generation plays in rejuvenating the company while preserving what has made it successful so far.
  13. Analyze the effect of estate taxes on ownership transfer across generations of family business owners.
  14. Explain the importance of strategic planning and timely communication to the continuity of family business.
  15. Address the reluctance to plan strategically resulting from the desire to avoid conflict in the family.
  16. Explain an approach to building a unique business model or strategic profile for each family business.
  17. Recognize the critical role that non-family managers play in family-owned and family-controlled corporations.
  18. Compare the perceptions about the family business held by family members and non-family managers.
  19. Identify the challenges of motivating and retaining non-family management.
  20. Describe the unique governance needs of the family business that result from the overlap between management, family, and ownership.
  21. Review the requirements and practices of effective boards.
  22. Explain the relationship between the role of the board, the family council, and top management in providing effective governance for family business continuity.
  23. Address the issues of family culture, family communication, family conflict, and family unity and explore their interaction effects on the family business.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Defining Family Businesses
   A. Identify what constitutes a family business
   B. Identify the explain the historical strengths and weaknesses of
family businesses 
   C. Analyze competitive challenges faced by family businesses
   D. Assess the economic impact of family businesses locally, regionally,
nationally and globally

II. Leadership of Family Businesses
   A. Explain the role of the CEO of a family business
   B. Identify strategies to assist the next generation in governing and
perpetuating the legacy of the family business
   C. Analyze strategies to transition a family business from generation
to generation
   D. Recognize the unique roles of the CEO spouse

III. The Role of the Next Generation
   A. Identify the developmental needs and challenges of the next
generation leaders
   B. Explore the potential composition of next generation family members
to include siblings and cousins
   C. Analyze the challenge of respecting the past and focusing on the
future of the family business under the leadership of the next generation

IV. Estate and Ownership Transfer Planning
   A. Identify the essential elements of an estate plan
   B. Define corporate structures and classes of stock
   C. Analyze challenges in estate and ownership transfer planning

V. Strategic Growth Planning for a Family Business
   A. Identify strategies for developing and promoting growth of a family
business
   B. Analyze the critical role of non-family managers
   C. Explore career opportunities for non-family managers
   D. Research motivational and retention strategies for non-family
managers
   E. Identify strategies to extend the family culture to non-family
managers

VI. Family Business Governance
   A. Define the composition and role of boards of directors and/or boards
of advisors
   B. Define the Board’s role in setting company strategy
   C. Describe the Board’s role in succession and continuity planning
   D. Describe the composition and role of the Family Council
   E. Analyze the boundaries between the Board and the Family Council

VII. The Future of Family Businesses 
   A. Discuss the potential for family businesses to compete and thrive
   B. Analyze the challenges and opportunities for the future of family
businesses
   C. Recognize the leadership imperatives for family business
continuity

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                   30% of grade
Case Studies/reaction reports  30% 
Research project/s             40%

Grade Criteria:

 A =  90-100%
 B =  80-89%
 C =  70-79%
 D =  60-69%
 F =  59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.