Fire Services Administration Certificate

The certificate in Fire Service Administration is offered as a step in the process of receiving an Associate in Arts degree in Fire Services Administration. Those firefighters who have attained state certification as a firefighter will be able to continue their education by completing the certificate requirements.

All six courses that lead to the certificate provide knowledge that can be utilized immediately by the firefighter and provide their fire department with an employee that has significant education in areas that will be of immediate use to the organization.

When ready and available, the student will be able to complete their AA degree in a timely fashion.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

Prerequisite

Prior to admission into any FIRE degree course, the student must possess an International Fire Service Accreditation Congress certification as a firefighter or be an active member in a fire-related occupation.

(Major Code 6650; State CIP Code 43.0203)

First Semester

FIRE 162Firefighting Tactics*3
FIRE 220Fire Management*3
FIRE 222Fire Science Law*3
Total Hours9

Second Semester

FIRE 136Fire and Emergency Management*3
FIRE 152Codes/Detection and Suppression Systems*3
FIRE 201Leadership in the Fire Service*3
Total Hours9

Total Program Hours: 18

Courses

FIRE 120   Fire Academy* (12 Hours)

Prerequisites: HPER 240 and department approval

This course provides cognitive, psychomotor and affective instruction for those students seeking certification as a fire fighter in the state of Kansas. The class covers hazardous materials (first responder; operations level), fire department communications, fire ground operations, rescue operations and prevention, preparedness and maintenance, and physical agility (CPAT). Upon successful completion of the cognitive examinations and all psychomotor skills evaluations, students will be allowed to sit for the Kansas Fire Fighter I and II state certification examinations, which are administrated by the University of Kansas, Fire and Rescue Training Institute. 15 hrs. integreated lecture/lab/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall and spring semesters only.

FIRE 136   Fire and Emergency Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Managing resources is a part of every incident. The ability to manage these resources is crucial in safely and effectively mitigating the incident. Organizations must have a system in place prior to the incident, which will facilitate the management of resources. Federal legislation mandates organizations, which respond to hazardous materials incidents, use an incident management system. This course provides information about incident management systems, as well as pursues issues wherein it needs to be utilized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

FIRE 152   Codes/Detection and Suppression Systems* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

This course will provide a basis for students to become familiar with and utilize fire codes that are in use today. It will also provide students with basic knowledge of detection and suppression systems that are an ever increasing part of fire control today. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

FIRE 162   Firefighting Tactics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Strategy and tactics are essential competencies required to mitigate fires. This course is designed to prepare a fire officer to be able to provide tactics at a structure fire, fully utilizing available resources in a safe and efficient manner. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

FIRE 201   Leadership in the Fire Service* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

This is a course that will delve into leadership as defined and utilized in the fire service setting. It will review many types of leaders and the qualities that make them leaders. It will also provide students insight into the type of leaders they may see in the fire service as well as provide them with role models for their use as future fire service leaders. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

FIRE 220   Fire Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

This course will involve the student in learning proper methods of supervision and the duties of a fire department first line manager. It will encompass supervisory techniques as well as various management theories. This course will assist the student in the application of techniques and the practical use of management theories in the role as a fire service manager. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

FIRE 222   Fire Science Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

The law as it pertains to the fire service will be explained, along with tort law and business law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

FIRE 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

FIRE 120

  • Title: Fire Academy*
  • Number: FIRE 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 12
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HPER 240 and department approval

Description:

This course provides cognitive, psychomotor and affective instruction for those students seeking certification as a fire fighter in the state of Kansas. The class covers hazardous materials (first responder; operations level), fire department communications, fire ground operations, rescue operations and prevention, preparedness and maintenance, and physical agility (CPAT). Upon successful completion of the cognitive examinations and all psychomotor skills evaluations, students will be allowed to sit for the Kansas Fire Fighter I and II state certification examinations, which are administrated by the University of Kansas, Fire and Rescue Training Institute. 15 hrs. integreated lecture/lab/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall and spring semesters only.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify how to initiate the response to a reported emergency.
  2. Identify how to transmit and receive messages via the fire department radio.
  3. Demonstrate how to use self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during emergency operations.
  4. Demonstrate how to respond on apparatus to an emergency scene.
  5. Demonstrate how to force entry into a structure.
  6. Demonstrate how to set up ground ladders.
  7. Describe how to clean and check ladders, ventilation equipment, SCBA, ropes, salvage equipment, and hand tools.
  8. Demonstrate how to attack an interior structure fire.
  9. Demonstrate how to extricate a victim entrapped in a motor vehicle.
  10. Explain how to assist rescue operation teams.
  11. Explain how to connect a fire department pumper to a water supply.
  12. Identify those situations where hazardous materials/WMD are present.
  13. Identify the fire, explosion, and health hazard information using the current edition of the DOT Emergency Response Guidebook
  14. Explain how to survey the incident to identify the containers and materials involved to determine whether hazardous materials/WMD have been released.
  15. Identify each tank car by type.
  16. Identify the markings indicating container size, product contained, and/or site identification numbers.
  17. Given examples of hazardous materials incidents, identify the name(s) of the hazardous material(s).
  18. Identify and list the surrounding conditions that should be noted when a hazardous materials/WMD incident is surveyed.
  19. Explain how to estimate the potential harm within the endangered area at each incident.
  20. Explain how to determine whether available personal protective equipment is applicable to performing assigned tasks.
  21. Identify when emergency decontamination is needed.
  22. Demonstrate the ability to don, work in, and doff the equipment provided to support mission-specific tasks.
  23. Demonstrate the ability to set up and implement mass decontamination operations for ambulatory and nonambulatory victims.
  24. Explain how to select a technical decontamination procedure that will minimize the hazard and spread of contamination.
  25. Identify procedures for determining whether the items have been fully decontaminated.
  26. Describe the potential criminal violation and identify the law enforcement agency having investigative jurisdiction for hazardous materials/WMD incidents.
  27. Identify the options for each response objective.
  28. Describe detection or monitoring equipment suitable for detecting or monitoring solid, liquid, or gaseous hazardous materials/WMD.
  29. Demonstrate the field test and operation of each device and interpret the readings.
  30. Describe the feasibility of conducting victim rescue and recovery operations at an incident involving a hazardous material/WMD.
  31. Identify and describe the unique tasks and operations encountered at illicit laboratory scenes. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Fire Protection
   A. Identify how to initiate the response to a reported emergency.
   B. Identify how to transmit and receive messages via the fire
department radio.
   C. Demonstrate how to use self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
during emergency operations.
   D. Demonstrate how to respond on apparatus to an emergency scene.

II. Fire Ground Operations
   A. Demonstrate how to force entry into a structure.
   B. Demonstrate how to set up ground ladders.
   C. Describe how to clean and check ladders, ventilation equipment,
SCBA, ropes, salvage equipment, and hand tools.
   D. Demonstrate how to attack an interior structure fire.

III. Special Operations
   A. Demonstrate how to extricate a victim entrapped in a motor vehicle.
   B. Explain how to assist rescue operation teams.
   C. Explain how to connect a fire department pumper to a water supply.

IV. Hazardous Materials Awareness
   A. Identify those situations where hazardous materials/WMD are
present.
   B. Identify the fire, explosion, and health hazard information using
the current edition of the DOT Emergency Response Guidebook
   C. Explain how to survey the incident to identify the containers and
materials involved to determine whether hazardous materials/WMD have been
released.
   D. Identify each tank car by type.
   E. Identify the markings indicating container size, product contained,
and/or site identification numbers.
   F. Given examples of hazardous materials incidents,  identify the
name(s) of the hazardous material(s).
   G. Identify and list the surrounding conditions that should be noted
when a hazardous materials/WMD incident is surveyed.
   H. Explain how to estimate the potential harm within the endangered
area at each incident.

V. Hazardous Materials Operations
   A. Explain how to determine whether available personal protective
equipment is applicable to performing assigned tasks.
   B. Identify when emergency decontamination is needed.
   C. Demonstrate the ability to don, work in, and doff the equipment
provided to support mission-specific tasks.
   D. Demonstrate the ability to set up and implement mass decontamination
operations for ambulatory and nonambulatory victims.
   E. Explain how to select a technical decontamination procedure that
will minimize the hazard and spread of contamination.
   F. Identify procedures for determining whether the items have been
fully decontaminated.

VI. Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Operations
   A. Describe the potential criminal violation and identify the law
enforcement agency having investigative jurisdiction for hazardous
materials/WMD incidents.
   B. Identify the options for each response objective.
   C. Describe detection or monitoring equipment suitable for detecting or
monitoring solid, liquid, or gaseous hazardous materials/WMD.
   D. Demonstrate the field test and operation of each device and
interpret the readings.
   E. Describe the feasibility of conducting victim rescue and recovery
operations at an incident involving a hazardous material/WMD.
   F. Identify and describe the unique tasks and operations encountered at
illicit laboratory scenes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Eight Unit Exams                 100 pts. each
2. Two Comprehensive Exams          100 pts. each
3. Twenty Quizzes                    20 pts. each
4. Practical Skills Evaluation         Pass/Fail

92 – 100 = A
85 – 91 = B
77 – 84 = C
70 – 76 = D
69 or less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. FIRE 120 is a selective entry course. Students must pass XNF 3001 Fire Service Entrance Examination (FSEE) with a 70% and sit for an interview. Students are selected based on a combined score including the FSEE and interview. FIRE 120 is the prerequisite for all other FIRE courses. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 136

  • Title: Fire and Emergency Management*
  • Number: FIRE 136
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

Managing resources is a part of every incident. The ability to manage these resources is crucial in safely and effectively mitigating the incident. Organizations must have a system in place prior to the incident, which will facilitate the management of resources. Federal legislation mandates organizations, which respond to hazardous materials incidents, use an incident management system. This course provides information about incident management systems, as well as pursues issues wherein it needs to be utilized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and describe how an incident management system will be utilized during all sizes and types of emergencies.
  2. Describe supervisory levels of the command structure that can be utilized in each situation depending on the nature of the incident.
  3. Determine which levels and modules are to be implemented to control an incident.
  4. Describe the history and evolution of emergency operations planning.
  5. Detail the various parts of an emergency operation plan for a small city.
  6. Apply an emergency operations plan to an incident.
  7. Assess the operations of an emergency operations plan during a simulation.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Incident Management System (IMS)
   A. Describe the why and how of the beginning of the IMS.
   B. Define the various intersecting parts of IMS.
   C. Utilize the IMS during scenarios.
   D. Describe and define the levels within the IMS and utilize them
correctly in scenarios.

II. Unified Management System (UMS)
   A. Provide appropriate opportunities wherein UMS would be required.
   B. Explain how and when IMS would change into UMS.
   C. Describe the various roles and levels within a potential UMS
incident.

III. Evolution of Emergency Management
   A. Delineate the beginning of Federal level intervention in Disasters.
   B. Provide a timeline for disasters that affected the evolution of
local to federal level disaster response.
   C. Discuss how geography plays a significant role in disasters.

IV. Role of Planning in Disaster Management
   A. Detail the beginning of pre disaster planning at various stages in
the 1900's.
   B. Provide insight into today's changing landscape in disaster
planning.

V. A Typical Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)
   A. Describe and provide specifics as to the typical process for
producing an EOP.
   B. Identify the "players" in providing an EOP.

VI. Parts of an EOP
   A. Detail how an EOP would be utilized, with scenario provided.
   B. Describe how the various parts of an EOP would function.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes            15-20%
In Class Projects  10-15%
Unit Tests         20-30%
Final              30-40%

Grading Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-70%
D - 60-69%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 152

  • Title: Codes/Detection and Suppression Systems*
  • Number: FIRE 152
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

This course will provide a basis for students to become familiar with and utilize fire codes that are in use today. It will also provide students with basic knowledge of detection and suppression systems that are an ever increasing part of fire control today. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and discuss the basic history of codes and the code making process.
  2. Utilize and apply codes during review and inspections.
  3. Discuss and describe the principles of fire.
  4. Explain how fire can be extinguished and utilize this knowledge in reviewing extinguishing and detection systems.
  5. Explain water and its effect on fire.
  6. Explain the science behind and the operation of other fixed suppression systems.
  7. Explain the science behind and the operation of major types of detection systems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The History of Codes and Their Use by Various Nations and Empires
   A. Identify various codes employed in historic times.
   B. Provide examples of why they were produced.
   C. Examine and discuss tragedies as part of the codes process.

II. The Utilization and Interpretation of Codes During Review and
Inspections
   A. Utilize and explain a code in actual situations.
   B. Review and explain the use of various chapters in a code.
   C. Explain and utilize a code in specific exiting situations.
   D. Explain and discuss the term "performance" as it relates to codes
and enforcement.

III. Fire Aids in the Placement and Operation of Detection and
Extinguishing Systems
   A. Explain and describe the various interpretations of what fire is,
especially the fire tetrahedron.
   B. Utilize the knowledge of fire in describing various types of fires.

IV. Extinguishing Methods Utilized to Control and Extinguish a Fire
   A. Connect these methods to types of fires.
   B. Connect types of fires to types of extinguishing systems.

V. Basic Fire Extinguishment Using Water
   A. Explain how water extinguishes a fire and why it is still the most
effective extinguishing agent.
   B. Examine, discuss and utilize math in the process of building and
using water as an extinguishing agent.
   C. Explain and determine how various types of water suppression systems
function.

VI. Other Extinguishing Agents and Systems
   A. Examine and discuss water additives as a basis for effective
extinguishing systems.
   B. Explain and discuss utilizing various types of non-water based
extinguishing systems.

VII. Fire Detection Systems
   A. Discuss the earliest types of heat detectors.
   B. Explain the operation of products of combustion detection systems.
   C. Discuss the need for fire detection systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes            15-20%
In Class Projects  10-15%
Unit Tests         20-30%
Final              30-40%

Grading Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 162

  • Title: Firefighting Tactics*
  • Number: FIRE 162
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

Strategy and tactics are essential competencies required to mitigate fires. This course is designed to prepare a fire officer to be able to provide tactics at a structure fire, fully utilizing available resources in a safe and efficient manner. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply fundamental principles of fire tactics to the complexities of fireground conditions.
  2. Formulate procedures for the effective development and application of pre-fire plans.
  3. Effectively cope with definitive fire emergency problems.
  4. Insure that tactics employed attempt to mitigate problems with firefighter safety and survival while still providing the necessary protection to the citizens they serve. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fire Chemistry Terms and Concepts
   A. Define and utilize heat transfer in tactical situations.
   B. Describe principal fire characteristics of materials to enhance
knowledge of tactical situations.
   C. Explain a fire tetrahedron and its relationship to tactics.
   D. Explain the five stages of fire and its impact on tactical issues.
   E. Define flashover and how it can be reduced as a significant issue in
structure fires.
   F. Explain fire spread and how it impacts fire attack.

II. Developing a Fire Department Safety Program
   A. Discuss the 3 basic tenets of fireground safety.
   B. Provide a basic structure for training about firefighter safety.
   C. Discuss the need for record keeping, especially near misses.
   D. State various needs for fitness of firefighters.
   E. Explain how risk management fits into the fire service.

III. Eight Orders of Tactical Operations
   A. Discuss each as to basic understanding of role.
   B. Describe basic styles of interior attack.
   C. Delineate the differences between the three methods of attack based
on fire size.

IV. Prioritizing Issues on the Fireground
   A. Discuss the five concepts of size up.
   B. Provide information so as to make fireground prioritizing
effective.

V. Pre-Fire Planning for Initial Fire Attack
   A. Define and discuss the pre-fire plan concept.
   B. Delineate the methods used in pre-fire planning.

VI. The Effects of Post Fire Analysis
   A. Describe and discuss the objectives of doing a post fire analysis.
   B. Define and describe the methods employed in a post fire analysis.
   C. Describe the format employed to provide a post fire analysis.

VII. Basic Structural Fire Tactical Process
   A. Explain basic fire attack in dwellings.
   B. Explain basic fire attack in other structures.

VIII. Issues with Basic Firefighting Skills
   A. Describe proper hose line placement and use.
   B. Explain appropriate information on search techniques.
   C. Explain basic ladder placement.
   D. Discuss how and when to use ventilation.
   E. Illustrate the proper method of fighting a single family residential
fire.
   F. Describe and define various types of hidden space fires and tactics
used to suppress.
   G. Describe construction of high rises and its effect on tactics.
   H. Describe medical process in large victim fire.
   I. Discuss building under construction tactial issues.
   J. Describe other non structure fire problems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes           15-20%
In class Projects 10-15%
Unit Tests        20-30%
Final             30-40%

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89%  = B
70 - 79%  = C
60 - 69%  = D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 201

  • Title: Leadership in the Fire Service*
  • Number: FIRE 201
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

This is a course that will delve into leadership as defined and utilized in the fire service setting. It will review many types of leaders and the qualities that make them leaders. It will also provide students insight into the type of leaders they may see in the fire service as well as provide them with role models for their use as future fire service leaders. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Provide descriptions and needs for the various types of leadership styles discussed.
  2. Review their "style" and equate it to the type of leader they wish to emulate.
  3. Delineate the roles of a leader in the fire service.
  4. Discuss the various types of situations that may confront a leader in the fire service and how they would react.
  5. Interpret Crew Resource Management as it should be used in the Fire Service today. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Leaders
   A. Discuss and define the term leadership.
   B. Describe the terms traits and abilities and provide insight into
their meaning as it pertains to leadership.
   C. Describe the various leadership roles that individuals in the fire
service need to be involved with and delineate how various types of
leadership styles would fit into those leadership roles.
   D. Describe the various types of leaders that are most prevalent today
inside and outside the fire service.
   E. Provide specific personal aspects of leadership and tie them to
types of leaders.
   F. Discuss how changing your leadership style can possibly change your
actions.

II. Leadership In Its Simplest Form
   A. Describe how answers can be found by leaders that pay attention to
their personnel.
   B. Describe the root cause of success.
   C. Describe how leaders can return to the right track when confronted
with mistakes being made.
   D. Discuss the role emotions play in leadership and issues being
confronted.

III. Leading Through Conflict
   A. Describe and discuss the three faces of leaders when faced with
conflict.
   B. Define and discuss the tools needed and used by a mediator.

IV. Leading As If Your Life Depended On It
   A. Discuss the type of leadership that is effective when leading during
extremely dangerous circumstances.
   B. Describe how effective leaders can overcome fear in themselves and
others.
   C. Describe the role of an effective leader when they and their
personnel are faced with tragedy.
   D. Delineate how an effective leader builds effective teams.

V. Crew Resource Management (CRM) and Leadership
   A. Describe and define the five parts of CRM.
   B. Describe how effective leaders can and should overcome errors, by
utilizing CRM.
   C. Define and utilize the term situational awareness and its critical
importance to a leader.
   D. Describe effective decision making skills during critical times
faced by a leader.
   E. Discuss the importance of, and proper method of effective
communication, both for a leader and for their personnel.
   F. Describe and define teamwork and followership.
   G. Describe the barriers to effective leadership and management.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes     15-20%
Paper       15-20%
Unit Tests  20-30%
Final       30-40%

Grading Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-80%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 220

  • Title: Fire Management*
  • Number: FIRE 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

This course will involve the student in learning proper methods of supervision and the duties of a fire department first line manager. It will encompass supervisory techniques as well as various management theories. This course will assist the student in the application of techniques and the practical use of management theories in the role as a fire service manager. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss various types of governments that fire departments work under and how that may impact the service.
  2. Discuss and provide insight into operating skills required to manage a fire department, which includes but not limited to budgeting, scheduling, organizing, and personnel.
  3. Explain and utilize various management theories and principles in situations that occur at the company level. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Change in Fire Service Management
   A. Delineate substantive changes in fire management and how they came
about.
      1. Name and discuss the three levels of fire service management.
      2. Discuss the role of each level of management.
      3. Discuss the process of change in fire service management
throughout its history.
      4. Explain the development of the fire service in the United States
until 1900.
      5. Discuss the change of management in the fire service since 1900.
   B. Explain some basic impacts on the fire service.
      1. Discuss at least 2 external fire prevention organizations.
      2. Delineate the role of the company officer in fire prevention.
      3. Differentiate between strategy and tactics.
      4. Describe at least two tactical goals for fireground use.
      5. Describe the role of the fire service in emergency management.
      6. Discuss three ways of budgeting.

II. Organizational Design
   A. Discuss and utilize provisions needed in an organizational
structure.
      1. Discuss the factors in the design of an organization.
      2. Explain the provisions needed in an organizational structure.
      3. Describe the two methods that organizations can be organized.
   B. Describe how fire service culture can be changed.
      1. Describe how organizational culture affects managing and
supervising within them.
      2. Describe how culture can be influenced and changed.

III. Basic Organizational Principles of Management
   A. Discuss and utilize the 9 Principles of Management in various
settings.
      1. Describe the similarity of all organizational principles of
management.
      2. Discuss those differences in organizational principles of the
fire service.
      3. Discuss the need to properly apply these principles when
managing.
      4. Discuss how the environment (internal and external) shapes
management principles and their use.
   B. Describe how these principles can affect work flow and personnel.
      1. Describe the pitfalls of conflicting orders.
      2. Discuss the three basic principles of choosing the correct span
of control.
      3. Define the term empowerment.

IV. Fire Service Management Environment and Management Theories
   A. Discuss and review four management theories.
      1. State the contribution of Adam Smith to management theory.
      2. State Fredrick Taylor's Time Studies and their relationship to
management theory.
      3. Explain the term the management cycle.
      4. List the 5 management functions according to Fayol.
      5. Explain P.O.L.E.
      6. Explain the dissatisfaction of people under previous management
theories.
      7. Describe the results of the Hawthorne experiment.
      8. Explain the "management style" theory of management.
      9. Explain the "linking element" behavioral management theory.
   B. Explain how these theories can effect fire service operations.
      1. State 2 similarities between organizations to utilize management
theories.
      2. Describe how management theories are applied.
      3. Describe the "Management Environment" in the fire service as it
pertains to management theories.
      4. Discuss the term "Standards for Fire Protection."
      5. List and describe the 4 areas of management responsibility that
any mid-manager must control.

V. Four Areas of Management Responsibility in the Fire Service
   A. Provide observations how the four areas may impact various fire
department operations.
      1. Provide discussion on 3 of the activities a typical fire
prevention organization is involved.
      2. Describe the three analyses that the IC needs to have information
on.
      3. State the importance of drills in good command.
      4. Describe at least two strategic goals for fireground use.
      5. Explain the need to update fire department resources with changes
in society.
      6. Explain the total time concept for emergency response.
      7. Discuss the two major types of budgets.
      8. Discuss the three general areas of responsibility in personnel
management.
      9. Describe the five functions of personnel management.
     10. Explain the fire department's role in personnel management.
     11. Discuss the basic laws governing labor relations.
     12. Describe the public sector in labor relations bargaining.
     13. Describe the term "needs assessment" in relation to the fire
service and how to conduct one.
     14. Describe influences on planning.
     15. Provide a definition for the three levels of planning.
     16. Define the term gap analysis.
   B. Explain and provide backing for a specific theory that appeals to
the student.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes           15-20%
In class Projects 10-15%
Unit Tests        20-30%
Final             30-40%

Grading scale: 
90 - 100 = A
80 - 89  = B
70 - 79  = C
60 - 69  = D
59 or less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 222

  • Title: Fire Science Law*
  • Number: FIRE 222
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: FIRE 110 or FIRE 120

Description:

The law as it pertains to the fire service will be explained, along with tort law and business law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

The fire department is a business and the law always affects business. The fire service also deals with criminal investigation and an understanding of criminal law is important.

  1. To provide an understanding of the court and legal system.
  2. To provide information about criminal law, as it relates to fire investigation.
  3. To provide an understanding of business law, as it relates to fire protection.
  4. To provide the student with an understanding of torts. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to American Law
   A. Describe the Concepts of Law.
   B. Identify major historical issues that affect law.
   C. Provide context for laws within the Constitution of the United
States.
   D. Describe the Judicial and court System in America.
II. The Process of Civil Law
   A. Describe a basic civil suit.
   B. Describe the differences between civil and criminal acts.
III. The Description of Criminal Law
   A. Provide examples of criminal law and the fire service.
   B. Provide the appropriate definition of crime.
   C. Describe the basic elements of a crime.
IV. A Study of the Law of Torts
   A. Define the Law of Torts.
   B. Describe elements of a Tort.
   C. Define negligence.
   D. Describe defenses Against Negligence
   
V. A Study of the Rescue Doctrine
   A. Provide clarity to the concept of the Rescue Doctrine.
   B. Describe circumstances for its use.
VI. Employer and Employee Relationships and the Law
   A. Provide insight into today's Workman's Compensation Laws.
   B. Describe various Employee's Rights.
   C. Elucidate various aspects of union agreements and state and federal
law.
VII. Federal Labor Laws
   A. Examine and describe FLSA.
   B. Define and describe Sexual harassment.
   C. Define and describe Discrimination.
   D. Provide context for a study of the Fire Service and OSHA.
VIII. Fire Issues and The Supreme Court.
   A. Provide examples of fire issues and the Supreme Court.
   B. Identify potential issues in the fire service that could become a
Supreme Court Issue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Participation in activities in the classroom. 
  2. Completion of all assigned work by the identified date. 3
  3. Attend a civil and criminal trial; submit a one page summary describing each trial. 
  4. Go to a local law library and research a law issue; submit a paper that describes your findings. 
  5. Class attendance requirements follow the policies established by JCCC. 

COURSE EVALUATION:

The student will be evaluated on the results of scores accumulated on four (4) tests, 2 trial reports, 1 report paper, and 6 quizzes.

GRADING SCALE: The student's grade will be determined according to the following:

Category #1 (2 Trial Reports) 15%
Trial Reports - 50% ea. (or 7.5% of overall grade)
Category #2 (1 Paper) 15% Paper - 100% (or 15% of overall grade)
Category #3 (4 Tests) 60% Tests - 25% ea. (or 15% of overall grade)
Category #4 (6 Quizzes) 10%
Quizzes - 16.6% ea. (or 1.66% of overall grade) Total 100%

Grading will be according to the following percent scale:

90 - 100 = A
80 - 89 = B
70 - 79 = C
60 - 69 = D
59 or less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course meets one (1) day per week.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

FIRE 291

No information found.