Game Development, A.A.S.

The game development associate of applied science degree provides students with the focused knowledge and understanding of game design and development useful in qualifying for entry level industry positions as game programmers, tool builders, collision detection developers, engine builders and interface programmers as well as video and online training developers, Q/A (Question/Answer) Testers, customer supporters and simulations developers. Completion of this degree program will greatly enhance students' ability to create code for 2D/3D graphics and real time virtual environments. Additional skills will include an understanding of game ethics, of the proper presentation of "game bibles" and of math and physics required to model a realistic game world.

Note: Metropolitan Community College students should seek specific counsel from the JCCC program personnel for the appropriate course plan and numbers.

Metropolitan Community College students should refer to Cooperative Program Information.

(Major Code 2650; State CIP Code 50.0411)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

First Semester

GAME 104Introduction to Game Development1
ENGL 121Composition I*3
MATH 171College Algebra*3
GAME 102The Business of Games3
GAME 105Beginning Game Creation3
CS 134Programming Fundamentals4
Total Hours17

Second Semester (Game Programming Option)

GAME 121Game Programming I*4
CS 201Concepts of Programming Algorithms using C#*4
GAME 110Flash Gaming4
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^^3
Total Hours16
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

^^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Second Semester (Game Design Option)

GAME 120Game Design I*4
GAME 136Game Prototyping*4
GAME 132Game Level Editing*4
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^^3
Total Hours16
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

^^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Third Semester (Game Programming Option)

GAME 240Agile Game Development*2
GAME 180Artificial Intelligence for Games*3
GAME 221Game Programming II*4
CS 236Object-Oriented Programming Using C#*4
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours16
^

Humanities Elective

Third Semester (Game Design Option)

GAME 240Agile Game Development*2
GAME 180Artificial Intelligence for Games*3
GAME 220Game Design II*4
GAME 134Game World Creation*4
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours16
^

Humanities Elective

Fourth Semester (Game Programming Option)

Game Elective (see list below)3
GAME 250Game Capstone*4
SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
or SPD 121 Public Speaking
or SPD 125 Personal Communication
GAME 255Mobile Game Programming*4
MATH 191Math Physics for Games I*4
or PHYS 191 Math Physics for Games I*
Total Hours18

Fourth Semester (Game Design Option)

Game Elective (see list below)3
GAME 250Game Capstone*4
SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
or SPD 121 Public Speaking
or SPD 125 Personal Communication
ENGL 150Digital Narratives*3
GAME 235Game Quality Assurance*2
GAME 238Serious Game Design3
Total Hours18

Game Electives

GAME 110Flash Gaming4
GAME 120Game Design I*4
GAME 121Game Programming I*4
GAME 132Game Level Editing*4
GAME 134Game World Creation*4
GAME 136Game Prototyping*4
GAME 220Game Design II*4
GAME 221Game Programming II*4
GAME 235Game Quality Assurance*2
GAME 238Serious Game Design3
GAME 255Mobile Game Programming*4
GAME 292Special Topics:*3
ENGL 150Digital Narratives*3
HUM 155Classical Mythology3
HUM 156Contemporary Approaches to World Mythology3

Total Program Hours: 67

Courses

GAME 102   The Business of Games (3 Hours)

In this course, students are introduced to the business and process of game development, from the concept document to publishing. Students will learn the stages of game development within the context of the often complex relationship between developer, publisher and retailer. The course uses a participatory format emphasizing analytical thinking and problem solving, both key skills for persons seeking a career in the game development industry. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

GAME 104   Introduction to Game Development (1 Hour)

This course covers the basics of game design and production. Topics include the fundamentals of managing game development, development of a plan for a game, the game production process, the history and business of games, and the various job roles in the industry. 1hr. lecture/wk.

GAME 105   Beginning Game Creation (3 Hours)

This course is designed to present the skills and to provide the hands-on experience required to create computer games utilizing game development tools that require no programming. Topics will include learning how to build games with a game development environment, the basic ideas of game design and an introduction to building 3D levels. Students should learn how to build a variety of games, include sound effects and simple animation effects in games, use simple analysis tools to evaluate games, build a 3D level, and create an original game as a term project. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 110   Flash Gaming (4 Hours)

This course is designed to present the skills and to provide the hands-on experience required to create computer games utilizing Flash MX 2004. Typical topics to be covered include 2D coordinate systems, basic game physics, game trigonometry, motion techniques, collision detection, collision reaction, conservation of momentum and energy, and tile based worlds. Typical tasks include creation of angle conversion functions; projection functions; controlling speed, velocity, and acceleration; applying Newton's three laws of motion, affecting gravity and friction; and creation of grid management systems. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

GAME 120   Game Design I* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 104 and GAME 105

This course is designed to give people who are interested in creating games the foundations they need to create fun, engaging experiences for players. Students will learn the basics behind creating compelling and entertaining experiences for players. The four key focuses will be on fun, theme, mechanics, and essential experience. During the course students will create a complete game. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 121   Game Programming I* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: (CS 134 or CIS 134) and GAME 104 and GAME 105

Corequisites: CS 201

This course is designed to present skills and provide hands-on experience required to create basic three-dimensional games. Typical topics will include 3D engine evaluation, differences between platforms, core game logic, proper use of external assets, and publishing. Typical tasks will include configuration and installation of 3D engines, creating several games, integration of non-programming assets, and exercises that will highlight important game programming concepts. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GAME 132   Game Level Editing* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 105

This course will cover how to create a prototype level, place interactive elements, and script the general gameplay and flow of the level. Upon successful completion of the course students will have created a fully playable game level. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GAME 134   Game World Creation* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 105

In this course students will study what exactly world, region, and level means to different games. Students will also create a game world, region and level during the semester using current industry tools. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 136   Game Prototyping* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 105

This course will cover the best practices and techniques for rapidly creating prototypes. Students will learn how to focus prototyping efforts on specific game play areas and how to evaluate the success and failure of a prototype. Multiple prototypes will be created during the semester. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GAME 180   Artificial Intelligence for Games* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: CS 134 or CIS 134 and GAME 105

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to deconstruct simple program scripts within a game engine illustrating introductory concepts in artificial intelligence (AI) as applied to computer games. The students will define terms and application areas in the field, and describe game representation and implementation techniques used in artificial intelligence for games. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 180H   HON: Artificial Intellig/Games (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GAME 200   Game Design (3 Hours)

Students will refer to the history of video games to describe the progression of development up to the modern forms of games available today. Students will critically analyze video games and identify and understand the thematic, visual, systematic, and geographical elements that contribute to making a fun user experience. Abstract systems will be introduced at the beginning of the course, and students will be invited to give their own examples. Models will be shown early as references for students when investigating specific video game structures later in the course. Students will develop a common lattice of "game design patterns" creating a common vocabulary and database. Creative habits and professional attitudes will be discussed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 220   Game Design II* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 120

In this course students will learn how to use mechanics to create and control feedback systems, emergent gameplay, and establish game balance. This course will also cover how to handle rewards and punishment, how interface design can make or break a game, and how games can be created as sports. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 221   Game Programming II* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 121

Corequisites: CS 236

This course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of 3D game programming techniques. Students will study multi-threading, networking, use of analytic software, shader basics, and user-generated content systems. Students will create a 3D game using all of these techniques. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GAME 235   Game Quality Assurance* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 105

In this course, students are introduced to the concepts and skills involved in testing video games. The course emphasizes the importance of testing and various methods and approaches used in game testing. This course will also cover how to correctly write up and report errors found in games. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 238   Serious Game Design (3 Hours)

In this course, students will examine the various aspects of serious games and how games have outgrown being just a source of entertainment. Students will study educational games, training simulations, and games for change. Students will also complete a basic educational game prototype. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 240   Agile Game Development* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 105

This course will cover the Agile software development methodology using Scrum. The student will learn how Scrum can be applied specifically to the processes used in game development. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

GAME 250   Game Capstone* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 180 and GAME 240 and GAME 220 or GAME 221

This course is designed for students to apply the foundations of game design and game programming to a significant original game. Students will work within a team to analyze a problem, develop and present a proposed game design document, build a demonstrable prototype of the game and develop a significant portion of the finished product. Students should also develop a project schedule and present progress information to the class. Students should also develop job search skills and both written and oral communication skills. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

GAME 255   Mobile Game Programming* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 221

This course is designed for students who want to learn mobile device game programming. The students will learn the various limitations on mobile devices and the options available for programming them. They will create a 2D game for mobile devices. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GAME 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GAME 220 or GAME 221

This course presents specialized topics in game development that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics.

GAME 102

  • Title: The Business of Games
  • Number: GAME 102
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

In this course, students are introduced to the business and process of game development, from the concept document to publishing. Students will learn the stages of game development within the context of the often complex relationship between developer, publisher and retailer. The course uses a participatory format emphasizing analytical thinking and problem solving, both key skills for persons seeking a career in the game development industry. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the stages of game development.
  2. Manage the development process.
  3. Cite effective leadership skills.
  4. Keep a productive team together.
  5. Compare and contrast the relationships between the players on the team.
  6. Development business plans.
  7. Employ strategies for staffing.
  8. Obtain financial support and market a game. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. A Brief Introduction to Game Development
   A. Summarize the history of games.
   B. Identify and describe the most important games and genres for each
decade.
   C. Show the influence that prior games have had on modern game
production.
   D. Describe the game industry as it currently stands.
      1. The process
      2. The team

II. Preproduction
   A. Outline the initial stages of game production.
      1. Working prototype
      2. Budget
      3. Timelines
   B. Describe how the preliminary idea of the game is laid out.
      1. Game narrative
      2. Key gameplay mechanics
   C. Illustrate the process of pitching the game to a publishing company
for financing.
      1. Sales sheet
      2. Design document
      3. Interactive demo
      4. Technical design document
      5. Risk analysis
      6. Project plan
      7. Cost forecasts

III. Production
   A. Define the roles of the key developers who take the game from
conception to finished product.
      1. Director
      2. Producer
      3. Level designers
      4. Programmers
      5. Artists
      6. Audio developers
      7. Writers
   B. Describe the testing process to ensure that the game is bug free
before release.

IV. Postproduction
   A. Cover the life cycle of the game after the main production phase is
over.
   B. Locate other territories in which to release the game.
   C. Plan ahead for sequels and expansions of the successful game.

V. Business and Finance
   A. Describe the marketing and public relation strategies to inform the
public of the game and how good it is.
   B. Define emerging alternative finance models.
      1. Mobile games
      2. Multiplayer online games

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods:

5 Assignments @ 20 points each  50% of grade
2 Examinations @ 50 points each 50% of grade
                               100% of grade

Grade Criteria:
A = 90%
B = 80%  
C = 70%  
D = 60%  
F = less than 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 104

  • Title: Introduction to Game Development
  • Number: GAME 104
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This course covers the basics of game design and production. Topics include the fundamentals of managing game development, development of a plan for a game, the game production process, the history and business of games, and the various job roles in the industry. 1hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the structure of the game industry.
  2. Describe the job roles for members of a game development team.
  3. List and describe the phases of game production.
  4. Outline the game concept.
  5. Explore characters, setting and story.
  6. Explain game requirements.
  7. Describe a game plan.
  8. Examine marketing and public relations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Game Industry 
   A. Examine the roles of the publisher and the developer. 
   B. Review the pitch documentation. 
   C. Discuss pitching a game to a publisher. 
   D. Explore legal agreements. 
   E. Discuss licenses.

II. Roles on the Team 
   A. Explore production roles. 
   B. Explore art roles. 
   C. Explore engineering roles. 
   D. Explore design roles. 
   E. Explore quality assurance roles. 
   F. Discuss team organization.

III. Game Production 
   A. Describe the production cycle. 
   B. Outline the basic tasks in the preproduction phase. 
   C. Outline the basic tasks in the production phase. 
   D. Outline the basic tasks in the testing phase. 
   E. Outline the basic tasks in the postproduction phase.

IV. The Game Concept 
   A. Investigate how to begin the process. 
      1. Explore motivation. 
      2. Define the target audience. 
      3. Review the initial concept. 
      4. Determine the genre.
   B. Define the concept. 
      1. Define a mission statement. 
      2. Determine a game setting. 
      3. Define gameplay mechanics. 
      4. Explore a story synopsis. 
      5. Define a user interface. 
      6. Outline the audio elements.

V. Characters, Setting and Story 
   A. Illustrate story development. 
   B. Relate story to gameplay. 
   C. Explore the game setting in relation to character and story.

VI. Game Requirements 
   A. Define game features. 
   B. Define milestones and deliverables. 
   C. Evaluate possible technology to be used in the game. 
   D. Define the tools and the pipeline. 
   E. Describe the game requirements documentation.

VII. The Game Plan 
   A. Explain dependencies. 
   B. Describe the process of schedule creation. 
   C. Explain the budgeting process. 
   D. Review the game plan outline.

VIII. Marketing and Public Relations 
   A. Summarize software age ratings. 
   B. Explore how to work with marketing. 
   C. Describe how to plan for a demo.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 100%

A 90-100%
B 80-89%
C 70-79%
D 60-69%
F Under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 105

  • Title: Beginning Game Creation
  • Number: GAME 105
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to present the skills and to provide the hands-on experience required to create computer games utilizing game development tools that require no programming. Topics will include learning how to build games with a game development environment, the basic ideas of game design and an introduction to building 3D levels. Students should learn how to build a variety of games, include sound effects and simple animation effects in games, use simple analysis tools to evaluate games, build a 3D level, and create an original game as a term project. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Install and use a game development environment.
  2. Design and implement games with multiple game levels.
  3. Create 2D games and 3D levels with game creation tools.
  4. Employ graphics, sound and animation as appropriate.
  5. Study student game experiences.
  6. Summarize game project development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Game Development Environment 
   A. Construct a simple game. 
   B. Implement more complex actions. 
   C. Implement complex control sequences in the game. 
   D. Analyze and improve the game using principles derived from game design. 
   E. Analyze and improve the implementation of the game by using Object Oriented Programming techniques. 
   F. Add levels to the game.
 
II. Designing a Game 
   A. Describe what makes a "good" game. 
   B. Discuss the role of challenges and goals in a game context. 
   C. Discuss the use of rewards in motivating game play. 
   D. Describe the principal game genres and discuss how they differ. 
   E. Apply game design ideas to a simple game.
 
III. Construct 2D and 3D Game Levels 
   A. Construct a 2D game. 
       1. Describe the features of a “2D” game development environment. 
       2. Create 2D game frameworks. 
       3. Add assets and levels to the game. 
   B. Construct a 3D game. 
       1. Describe the features of a "3D" game development environment. 
       2. Create a single level. 
       3. Add assets and rooms to the level.
 
IV. Employ Graphics, Sound and Animation 
   A. Discuss features of common graphics formats. 
   B. List common graphics programs. 
   C. Discuss sound effects and music. 
   D. List common sound and music programs. 
   E. Discuss and demonstrate various animation techniques.
 
V. Student Game Experience 
   A. Describe how game preferences have changed over time. 
   B. Describe social interactions associated with game play. 
   C. Contrast on-line game experiences with single-player mode experiences. 
   D. Formulate a set of "good practice recommendations" related to video game use.
 
VI. Game Project Development 
   A. Describe a game project in concise terms to convey its scope and concept. 
   B. Develop a detailed specification for the game project: narrative, characters, art work and setting, game play and technology requirements. 
   C. Develop a time-line and play for completing the game, including significant milestones.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests - 50 - 70%
Projects - 10 - 20%
Semester Project - 10 - 30%

Grading criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 110

  • Title: Flash Gaming
  • Number: GAME 110
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is designed to present the skills and to provide the hands-on experience required to create computer games utilizing Flash MX 2004. Typical topics to be covered include 2D coordinate systems, basic game physics, game trigonometry, motion techniques, collision detection, collision reaction, conservation of momentum and energy, and tile based worlds. Typical tasks include creation of angle conversion functions; projection functions; controlling speed, velocity, and acceleration; applying Newton's three laws of motion, affecting gravity and friction; and creation of grid management systems. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and use a 2D coordinate system.
  2. Convert degrees to radians.
  3. Convert radians to degrees.
  4. Determine distances via the Pythagorean theorem.
  5. Compute Sine, Cosine, and Tangent values using the Math.object.
  6. Compute Inverse Sine, Cosine, and Tangent values using the Math.object.
  7. Calculate speed, velocity and acceleration of objects in 2D space.
  8. Create real motion using Newton’s three laws of motion.
  9. Create friction in a game character.
  10. Create functions to determine different types of collision detection.
  11. Create functions to handle collision reactions.
  12. Apply conservation of motion laws to game characters.
  13. Create and use tile based worlds.
  14. Create and use Isometric worlds.
  15. Create high score lists.
  16. Control game characters with Artificial Intelligence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Game Math
   A. Flash coordinate system
      1. Place objects on Cartesian coordinates
      2. Define angles
   B. Pythagorean Theorem
   C. Trigonometry
      1. Define and use Sine, Cosine, and Tangent
      2. Create projection in objects
   D. Vectors

II. Basic Physics
   A. Create and control speed
   B. Change velocity
   C. Accelerate and decelerate objects
   D. Newton’s three laws of motion
      1. Demonstrate Newton’s First law
      2. Demonstrate Newton’s Second law
      3. Demonstrate Newton’s Third law
   E. Gravity
      1. Create real gravity
      2. Create good enough gravity
   F. Friction
      1. Apply real friction
      2. Apply good enough friction

III. Collision Detection Using HitTest()
   A. Detect collisions between Movie clip-movie clip
   B. Detect collisions between Movie clip-point
   C. Detect collisions between Shape-point

IV. Collision Detection Using Math
   A. Detect collisions between Point-circle and Circle-circle 
   B. Detect collisions between Line-line and Circle-line
   C. Detect collisions between Point-rectangle and Rectangle-rectangle

V. Collision Reactions
   A. Detect Object-wall reactions
   B. Detect Circle-line reactions

VI. Conservation of Momentum and Energy
   A. Use conservation laws to animate efficiently

VII. Conservation Laws
   A. Apply rectangle-rectangle reactions
   B. Apply circle-circle reactions

VIII. Tile Based Worlds
   A. Create a view
   B. Build a world with seamless tiles
   C. Change scale
   D. Creation and management
      1. Create the grid
      2. Store the view information to a file
   E. Selective processing
      1. Identify the tile
      2. Get the position within the tile
   F. Tile independent objects
      1. Create objects
      2. Manage objects
      3. Destroy objects
      4. Alter the world

IX. Isometric Worlds
   A. Define orientation of Isometric world
   B. Place an object in an Isometric world
   C. Use Z-sorting to organize the objects in the world

X. Use the HighScoreList Class

XI. Artificial Intelligence
   A. Identify different types of AI
   B. Create pathfinding algorithms

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          50% of grade
Projects/Assignments  50% of grade
  Total              100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%   
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 –  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. While it is not a pre-requisite requirement for the student to have taken Trigonometry, trig functions will be used during the course of the class. Therefore, a basic understanding of Trigonometry would be helpful.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 120

  • Title: Game Design I*
  • Number: GAME 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 104 and GAME 105

Description:

This course is designed to give people who are interested in creating games the foundations they need to create fun, engaging experiences for players. Students will learn the basics behind creating compelling and entertaining experiences for players. The four key focuses will be on fun, theme, mechanics, and essential experience. During the course students will create a complete game. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the history of games.
  2. Describe the difference between different genres of games.
  3. Describe the different game platforms.
  4. Identify why the core experience of a game is critical.
  5. Discuss the integration of theme into game design.
  6. Explore how to implement mechanics.
  7. Create a game.
  8. Create a game design document. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Games Overview 
   A. Identify the major genres of games. 
   B. Compare and contrast modern digital game platforms. 
   C. Review the types of non-digital games. 
   D. Identify the major audiences games are targeted towards.
 
II. Games History 
   A. Discuss the history of digital games. 
   B. Identify how table-top games have impacted video games. 
   C. Outline the development of key genres in video games.
 
III. Core Experience of a Game 
   A. Define the core experience of a game. 
   B. Describe how to identify the core experience of a game. 
   C. Discuss how games with similar core experiences can play very differently. 
   D. Review a modern game and identify the core experience and how the elements of that game reinforce the core experience. 
   E. Describe target audiences.
 
IV. Theme in Games 
   A. Discuss how theme can be integrated into a game’s design. 
   B. Discuss how graphics and aesthetics can be used to reinforce theme.
 
V. Game Mechanics 
   A. Discuss the difference between mechanics and rules. 
   B. Compare skill based mechanics to luck based mechanics. 
   C. Review probability and random numbers. 
   D. Discuss how to prototype mechanics.
 
VI. Design Documents 
   A. Discuss the importance of design documents. 
   B. Review design documents from existing games. 
   C. Identify the tools used to create and maintain design documents. 
   D. Demonstrate the ability to create a design document.
 
VII. Game Creation 
   A. Discuss brainstorming techniques. 
   B. Create a game based on a given theme. 
   C. Demonstrate the game in-class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: 0-10%
Exercises: 0-15% 
Projects: 40-60% 
Exams: 10-40%
 
Grade Scale: 
A: 100 - 90 
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 121

  • Title: Game Programming I*
  • Number: GAME 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (CS 134 or CIS 134) and GAME 104 and GAME 105
Corequisites: CS 201

Description:

This course is designed to present skills and provide hands-on experience required to create basic three-dimensional games. Typical topics will include 3D engine evaluation, differences between platforms, core game logic, proper use of external assets, and publishing. Typical tasks will include configuration and installation of 3D engines, creating several games, integration of non-programming assets, and exercises that will highlight important game programming concepts. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe game programming environments.
  2. Describe game programming basics.
  3. Develop basic asset creation skills.
  4. Discuss the integration of external assets.
  5. Create a complete 3D game.
  6. Publish a 3D game. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Game Programming Environment 
   A. Configure the Interactive Development Environment (IDE). 
   B. Identify engine requirements. 
   C. Identify target platforms. 
   D. Download, install and configure a game engine.
 
II. Game Programming Basics 
   A. Describe the main game loop. 
   B. Demonstrate how to create placeholder assets. 
   C. Discuss the proper use of Vector and Matrix operations. 
   D. Examine methods of placeholder art creation.
 
III. Basic Game Development 
   A. Demonstrate the ability to create basic game play based on a design document. 
   B. Demonstrate basic debugger and profiler usage. 
   C. Describe basic 3D physics techniques. 
   D. Describe basic artificial intelligence techniques.
 
IV. External Assets Integration 
   A. Identify proper methods for crediting other peoples work. 
   B. Describe the process of replacing placeholder assets with final assets.
 
V. Game Creation 
   A. Demonstrate proper User Interface (UI) techniques. 
   B. Create a game with a proper UI system. 
   C. Integrate 2D, 3D, and sound assets not created by the student. 
   D. Demonstrate proper crediting techniques.
 
VI. Game Publication 
   A. Compare and contrast the different methods of publishing a game. 
   B. Demonstrate the ability to publish a game to a web site.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance : 0-10% Exercises : 5-25% Projects : 20-55% Exams : 10-40% 

Grade Scale 
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 132

  • Title: Game Level Editing*
  • Number: GAME 132
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 105

Description:

This course will cover how to create a prototype level, place interactive elements, and script the general gameplay and flow of the level. Upon successful completion of the course students will have created a fully playable game level. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe level editing.
  2. Describe level flow.
  3. Describe whiteboxing.
  4. Explain how to create interactive elements.
  5. Explain how to create scripted sequences.
  6. Demonstrate creation of a game level. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Level Editing 
   A. Define level editing. 
   B. Identify the role of level editing in game creation. 
   C. Compare and contrast to level design.
 
II. Level Flow 
   A. Identify different methods of controlling where players can go. 
   B. Discuss the importance of defining a level's purpose.
 
III. Whiteboxing 
   A. Discuss the importance of rapid iteration. 
   B. Describe the technique of whiteboxing. 
   C. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of whiteboxing. 
   D. Create a level using whiteboxing.
 
IV. Interactive Elements 
   A. Discuss the importance of interactive elements in a game. 
   B. Identify common interactive elements players expect to see. 
   C. Create several interactive elements to place in a level.
 
V. Scripted Sequences 
   A. Discuss the importance of scripted sequences. 
   B. Identify common techniques for controlling interactive sequences. 
   C. Design a scripted sequence. 
   D. Implement a scripted sequence in a game.
 
VI. Game Level Creation 
   A. Identify the purpose of the level. 
   B. Implement the whitebox of the level. 
   C. Design and implement the interactive elements. 
   D. Design and implement a scripted sequence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

0-10% Attendance
0-15% Exercises
40-70% Projects
20-40% Exams


Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 134

  • Title: Game World Creation*
  • Number: GAME 134
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 105

Description:

In this course students will study what exactly world, region, and level means to different games. Students will also create a game world, region and level during the semester using current industry tools. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss game worlds.
  2. Describe the basics of game worlds.
  3. Explore game worlds.
  4. Explore game regions.
  5. Explore game levels.
  6. Discuss the process of game world creation.
  7. Create a game world collaboratively. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Game Worlds 
   A. Identify the importance of game worlds. 
   B. Discuss existing game worlds. 
   C. Evaluate an existing game world on how complete it feels.
 
II. Game World Basics 
   A. Define story light and story heavy. 
   B. Compare and contrast story light and story heavy worlds. 
   C. Discuss the various forms a game world can take.
 
III. Game Worlds 
   A. Identify the term game world. 
   B. Discuss existing worlds using this term. 
   C. Create a game world.
 
IV. Game Regions 
   A. Identify the term game region. 
   B. Discuss existing worlds using this term. 
   C. Discuss different methods of changing game regions in game. 
   D. Create a game region.
 
V. Game Levels 
   A. Identify the term game level. 
   B. Discuss existing worlds using this term. 
   C. Discuss different methods of changing game levels in game. 
   D. Create a game level. 

VI. Collaborative World Creation 
   A. Design a game world in collaboration with other students. 
   B. Design at least two game regions in the game world. 
   C. Design at least two game levels in the game region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects: 40-60%
Attendance: 0-10%
Exercises: 10-20%
Exams: 10-40%

Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 136

  • Title: Game Prototyping*
  • Number: GAME 136
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 105

Description:

This course will cover the best practices and techniques for rapidly creating prototypes. Students will learn how to focus prototyping efforts on specific game play areas and how to evaluate the success and failure of a prototype. Multiple prototypes will be created during the semester. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe prototyping and compare it to regular production.
  2. Discuss best practices for rapid prototyping.
  3. Discuss the peer review process.
  4. Create prototypes.
  5. Review prototypes.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Prototyping vs. Production 
   A. Compare and contrast the difference between prototype development and production. 
   B. Identify the need for prototyping. 
   C. Identify the different kinds of prototyping.
 
II. Best Practices 
   A. Identify the best practices for prototyping. 
   B. Discuss how best practices can be applied to different types of prototyping.
 
III. Peer Review Process 
   A. Identify how to conduct a peer review. 
   B. Discuss how to critique other's work in a professional manner.
 
IV. Rapid Prototype Creation 
   A. Identify a game mechanic to prototype. 
   B. Create a prototype of the mechanic.
 
V. Prototype Review 
   A. Discuss the prototypes created by the class. 
   B. Identify the implementations that worked well and those that did not. 
   C. Identify the next mechanic to iterate.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Prototype Game Projects: 50%-80%
Attendance: 5% - 20%
Written Assignments: 20%-30%


Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 180

  • Title: Artificial Intelligence for Games*
  • Number: GAME 180
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CS 134 or CIS 134 and GAME 105

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to deconstruct simple program scripts within a game engine illustrating introductory concepts in artificial intelligence (AI) as applied to computer games. The students will define terms and application areas in the field, and describe game representation and implementation techniques used in artificial intelligence for games. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Study the nature of AI.
  2. Compare various techniques for movement and decision making.
  3. Describe and compare techniques for implementing learning behavior.
  4. Recognize AI based on natural systems.
  5. Explain simple scripting systems.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Nature of Artificial Intelligence
   A. Describe established game AI.
   B. Forecast possible futures for game AI.

II. Movement and Decision Making
   A. Chasing and evading.
      1. Discuss basic chasing and evading.
      2. Explore Line-of-sight methods.
         a. Evaluate continuous environments.
         b. Analyze tiled environments.
      3. Explore intercepting.
   B. Pattern movement.
      1. Summarize the standard algorithm.
      2. Explore pattern movement.
         a. Explain continuous environments.
         b. Analyze tiled environments.
         c. Evaluate physically simulated environments.
   C. Flocking.
      1. Summarize classic flocking.
      2. Analyze obstacle avoidance.
      3. Define follow the leader behavior.
   D. Basic pathfinding and waypoints.
      1. Discuss pathfinding.
         a. Define the basic method.
         b. Evaluate breadcrumb pathfinding.
         c. Analyze path following.
         d. Explain wall tracing.
      2. Summarize waypoint navigation.
   E. A* Pathfinding.
      1. Summarize the components of A*.
         a. Define the search area.
         b. Examine how to start the search.
         c. Create a scoring system.
         d. Analyze how to deal with dead ends.
         e. Define a terrain cost.
      2. Examine influence mapping.
   F. Finite State Machines (FSM).
      1. Define the basic FSM model.
      2. Design an FSM.
      3. Analyze an insect example.
   G. Fuzzy Logic.
      1. Define fuzzy logic basics.
      2. Describe how to use fuzzy logic in games.
      3. Examine a fuzzy logic example.
   H. Rule-based AI.
      1. Describe rule-based basics.
      2. Examine a rule-based example.
   I. Basic probability.
      1. Define probability.
      2. Describe how to use probability in games.

III. Learning Techniques
   A. Bayesian techniques.
      1. Define a Bayesian Network.
      2. Examine various examples.
   B. Neural Networks.
      1. Analyze neural network techniques.
      2. Dissect a neural network.
      3. Train a neural network.
   C. Genetic Algorithms.
      1. Examine the evolutionary process.
      2. Examine evolving plant life.
      3. Describe how to use genetics in game development.

IV. Natural System Inspired AI
   A. Examine simulated annealing.
   B. Examine Neural Networks.
   C. Examine Genetic Algorithms.

V. Scripted AI and Scripting Engines
   A. Examine scripting techniques.
   B. Develop opponent attributes.
   C. Analyze basic script parsing.
   D. Develop opponent behaviors.
   E. Create scripted events.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

4 Examinations         80-90 % of grade
1 Class Paper           10-20% of grade
                              100 %
Grade Criteria:
A =     90% - 100%
B =     80% - 89%       
C =     70% - 79%       
D =     60% - 69%       
F =     Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 180H

No information found.

GAME 200

  • Title: Game Design
  • Number: GAME 200
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will refer to the history of video games to describe the progression of development up to the modern forms of games available today. Students will critically analyze video games and identify and understand the thematic, visual, systematic, and geographical elements that contribute to making a fun user experience. Abstract systems will be introduced at the beginning of the course, and students will be invited to give their own examples. Models will be shown early as references for students when investigating specific video game structures later in the course. Students will develop a common lattice of "game design patterns" creating a common vocabulary and database. Creative habits and professional attitudes will be discussed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the history of video games.
  2. Describe a variety of user experiences in game play.
  3. Explore and develop player motivation strategies.
  4. Describe types of games.
  5. Explore the design of the player avatar.
  6. Examine the relationship between stories and games.
  7. Explore the geography of a game environment.
  8. Explain the abstract systems “behind” the game.
  9. Survey and discuss the “foreground” structures of the game.
  10. Describe how external structure impacts the game.
  11. Demonstrate familiarity with the creative process.
  12. Contribute to a database of game design patterns.
  13. Cultivate professional, respectful personal habits in team development.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The History of Video Games
   A. Study the incremental development history
   B. Review a significant legal dispute
   C. Identify relationships between modern games and their early
counterparts

II. Understanding the Concept of Play
   A. Deliberate on the psychology of play from historical ideas to modern
thinking
   B. Explain the “Theory of Learning” and its relevance to play
   C. Explore the psychology of “optimal” experience
   D. Reflect on, and observe children’s playground games
   E. Experience the learning of circus skills and their relationships to
play theory and video games

III. Player Motivation
   A. Discover how and why people play video games
   B. Develop techniques to motivate players

IV. Abstract Systems of Games
   A. Describe game economies
   B. Explore game theory
   C. Illustrate cybernetic systems
   D. Explain resource management
   E. Investigate complexity issues

V. Types of Games
   A. Investigate genre specific issues
   B. Distinguish between a toy and a game
   C. Describe first person shooters
   D. Explain management simulations
   E. Experience third person action adventures
   F. Play vehicle simulations
   G. Solve abstract puzzles

VI. Design of the Player Avatar
   A. Survey popular characters
   B. Describe the avatar as a simulation
   C. Explain artistic issues
   D. Explore character traits
   E. Describe the relationship between avatar and camera

VII. Geography of a Game Environment
   A. Examine pre-existing game environments
   B. Assess 2D and 3D games
   C. Distinguish between the screen, the camera and the world
   D. Explore technical limitations
   E. Describe gameplay goals

VIII. Foreground Structures
   A. Explore spirals, folds, jumps, platforms, climbing and exposure
   B. Investigate fly-through and vista
   C. Observe flow, valves and pits
   D. Demonstrate how journals and maps enhance the play
   E. Determine placement of items within the world

IX. External Structure and its Impact on the Game
   A. Decide how to end the game
   B. Explore the possibilities regarding death and lives
   C. Illustrate rounds, waves and levels
   D. Determine when and how to save and restore the game

X. The Relationship Between Stories and Games
   A. Distinguish between story structure and game structure
   B. Development characters including the internal life of characters
   C. Investigate game pacing
   D. Describe the role of backstory

XI. Video Games as a User Experience
   A. Describe how games fulfill fantasy
   B. Explain how they provide distraction
   C. Explore how games give affirmation
   D. Demonstrate how they help the user obtain control

XII. Develop Game Design Patterns
   A. Study software patterns
   B. Explore game design patterns
   C. Contribute to a common database

XIII. How to be a Good Game Designer
   A. Develop creative habits inside and outside the development process
   B. Investigate a creative process
   C. Practice teamwork
   D. Study something else to bring knowledge and experience to game
design

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Two written tests @ 33%                       66 % of grade
Final student created project or presentation 34 % of grade
  Total                                      100 %

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100 %  
  B = 80 -  89 %  
  C = 70 -  79 %  
  D = 60 -  69 %  
  F =  0 -  59 %  

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students should be avid video game players. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 220

  • Title: Game Design II*
  • Number: GAME 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 120

Description:

In this course students will learn how to use mechanics to create and control feedback systems, emergent gameplay, and establish game balance. This course will also cover how to handle rewards and punishment, how interface design can make or break a game, and how games can be created as sports. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe feedback systems.
  2. Describe emergent game play.
  3. Discuss game balance.
  4. Identify reward and punishment impact on certain player behaviors.
  5. Discuss interface design.
  6. Discuss games as a sport.
  7. Create a game. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Feedback Systems 
   A. Identify the different types of feedback systems. 
   B. Discuss how mechanics can be used to control feedback systems. 
   C. Discuss how feedback systems can be used to control the difficulty of a game. 
   D. Review current games and identify feedback systems.
 
II. Emergent Game Play 
   A. Describe emergent game play. 
   B. Review existing games and discuss emergent game play in them. 
   C. Discuss how mechanics can be used to create and control emergent game play. 
   D. Discuss the benefits and drawbacks to emergent game play.
 
III. Game Balance 
   A. Discuss the importance of having a well-balanced game. 
   B. Identify how feedback systems can impact game balance. 
   C. Identify how emergent game play can impact game balance. 
   D. Discuss how feedback systems can be used to control the difficultly of a game.
 
IV. Rewards and Punishments 
   A. Discuss what it means to reward a player. 
   B. Identify the major types of rewards. 
   C. Discuss what it means to punish a player. 
   D. Identify the major types of punishments.
 
V. Interface Design 
   A. Review best practices for interface design. 
   B. Discuss how target platform can impact interface design.
 
VI. Games as Sports 
   A. Compare chess as a game to chess as a sport. 
   B. Discuss e-sports. 
   C. Identify the requirements of a sport. 
   D. Compare and contrast the differences between games designed solely for fun and those designed to be a sport.
 
VII. Game Creation 
   A. Create a game that is well balanced. 
   B. Identify the feedback systems in the game. 
   C. Identify possible emergent game play in the game. 
   D. Identify the major types of rewards and punishments used. 
   E. Discuss if the game would be suitable as a sport.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: 0-10%
Exercises: 0-15%
Projects: 40-60%
Exams: 10-40%

Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 221

  • Title: Game Programming II*
  • Number: GAME 221
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 121
Corequisites: CS 236

Description:

This course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of 3D game programming techniques. Students will study multi-threading, networking, use of analytic software, shader basics, and user-generated content systems. Students will create a 3D game using all of these techniques. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Develop a networked 3D game.
  2. Describe how to use programming threads in games.
  3. Create a basic shader.
  4. Implement a user-generated content system.
  5. Implement analytics software.
  6. Create a game. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Networking 
   A. Compare and contrast different communication protocols. 
   B. Identify which protocols are appropriate for different game types. 
   C. Describe common techniques for dealing with latency. 
   D. Describe common techniques for dealing with malicious users.
 
II. Threading 
   A. Describe how threading works. 
   B. Identify the common problems present in threading. 
   C. Create a program to demonstrate threading techniques.
 
III. Shaders 
   A. Describe the core concept of shaders. 
   B. Examine basic shaders. 
   C. Compare and contrast full screen shaders vs per-object shaders. 
   D. Create a per-object shader.
 
IV. User-Generated Content (UGC) 
   A. Identify the benefits of UGC systems. 
   B. Identify the drawbacks of UGC systems. 
   C. Compare and contrast different methods of delivering UGC.
 
V. Analytics 
   A. Define analytics. 
   B. Describe how analytics can improve resource usage and user experience. 
   C. Compare and contrast existing analytics systems. 
   D. Describe how to integrate analytics into game code. 
   E. Demonstrate how to read and interpret data gathered from analytics.
 
VI. Game Creation 
   A. Create a technical specification from a design document. 
   B. Identify the systems that can be threaded. 
   C. Identify what shaders will be needed. 
   D. Design a basic UGC system. 
   E. Integrate analytics into the game.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: 0-15%
Projects: 40-65%
Exams: 20-40%

Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 235

  • Title: Game Quality Assurance*
  • Number: GAME 235
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 105

Description:

In this course, students are introduced to the concepts and skills involved in testing video games. The course emphasizes the importance of testing and various methods and approaches used in game testing. This course will also cover how to correctly write up and report errors found in games. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define quality assurance (QA).
  2. Identify common legal issues.
  3. Describe the different kinds of game errors and categorize into levels of severity.
  4. Find different types of errors.
  5. Write clear and concise bug reports. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to QA 
   A. Explore what QA means to the game industry. 
   B. Discuss the difference between playing games and QA. 
   C. Discuss the importance of QA to the industry.

II. QA Legal Issues 
   A. Describe the meaning of a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). 
   B. Discuss why NDAs are important to the industry. 
   C. Review examples of NDA violations. 
   D. Discuss quality of life issues. 
   E. Discuss general legal rights for hourly and salaried workers.

III. Types of Errors 
   A. Discuss the different types of errors in a game. 
   B. Describe the severity level of errors. 
   C. Demonstrate the ability to categorize example errors.

IV. Visual Errors and Logic Errors 
   A. Discuss in depth the types of visual errors that may occur. 
   B. Discuss in depth the types of logic errors that may occur. 
   C. Demonstrate the ability to identify visual and logic errors in a demo game.

V. Error Documentation 
   A. Recognize the importance of clearly written error reports. 
   B. Identify software that can be used to write errors. 
   C. Discuss industry best practices for writing errors. 
   D. Use current software for reporting errors.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance 0 -10%
Exercises 20 - 40%
Exams 50 - 60%

Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 238

  • Title: Serious Game Design
  • Number: GAME 238
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Description:

In this course, students will examine the various aspects of serious games and how games have outgrown being just a source of entertainment. Students will study educational games, training simulations, and games for change. Students will also complete a basic educational game prototype. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the serious games industry.
  2. Analyze education games.
  3. Analyze training simulations.
  4. Analyze health care games.
  5. Compare and contrast the needs of education, training, and health games.
  6. Create an educational game prototype. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Serious Game Industry 
   A. Describe the industry in general. 
   B. Identify the main types of serious games. 
   C. Identify the main industries interested in serious games.
 
II. Education Games 
   A. Describe education games. 
   B. Identify the unique needs of education games. 
   C. Discuss best practices for education games.
 
III. Training Simulations 
   A. Describe training simulations. 
   B. Identify the unique needs of training simulations. 
   C. Compare and contrast the difference between private sector simulation needs and government sector simulation needs. 
   D. Discuss best practices for training simulations.

IV. Health Care 
   A. Describe health care games. 
   B. Identify the different types of health care games. 
   C. Identify the unique needs of health care games. 
   D. Discuss best practices for health care games.
 
V. Comparison of Games 
   A. Compare and contrast the requirements for education, training, and health care games. 
   B. Examine games in each category.
 
VI. Prototype 
   A. Describe the requirements for an education game. 
   B. Identify the target audience. 
   C. Create a prototype education game.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams: 20-40%
Essays: 30-50%
Prototype Game: 30-50%
Attendance: 0 - 10%

Grade Scale:
A: 100 - 90
B: 89 - 80
C: 79 - 70
D: 69 - 60
F: 59 - 0

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 240

  • Title: Agile Game Development*
  • Number: GAME 240
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 105

Description:

This course will cover the Agile software development methodology using Scrum. The student will learn how Scrum can be applied specifically to the processes used in game development. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the crisis facing game development.
  2. Describe Agile development.
  3. Outline the Scrum process.
  4. Articulate Agile planning.
  5. Explain Agile game development.
  6. Outline the Agile disciplines.
  7. Explain how to implement Agile development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Game Development Crisis 
   A. Examine the history of game development. 
   B. Study the problem of less innovation. 
   C. Study the problem of less value. 
   D. Study the problem of deteriorating work environment.

II. Agile Development 
   A. Describe why projects are hard. 
   B. Explain why Agile should be used for game development. 
   C. Describe what an Agile project looks like.

III. The Scrum Process 
   A. Examine the history of Scrum. 
   B. List the parts of Scrum. 
   C. List the Scrum roles. 
   D. Investigate Sprints. 
       1. Review Sprint planning. 
       2. Describe how to track progress. 
       3. Outline the steps of the Sprint Review.
   E. Investigate user stories. 
       1. Explain user stories. 
       2. Review user roles.

IV. Agile Planning 
   A. Characterize the product backlog. 
   B. Estimate story size. 
   C. Examine release planning.

V. Agile Game Development 
   A. Examine video game project planning. 
       1. Summarize the minimum required feature sets. 
       2. List the development stages. 
       3. Explain managing stages with releases.
   B. Examine team formation. 
       1. Summarize the Scrum approach to teams. 
       2. Review game teams and collaboration. 
       3. Examine how to scale and distribute Scrum.

VI. Agile Disciplines 
   A. Examine Agile technology. 
   B. Examine Agile art and audio. 
   C. Examine Agile design. 
   D. Examine Agile quality assurance and production.

VII. Agile Development 
   A. Examine the myths and challenges of Scrum. 
   B. Study how to work with a publisher. 
   C. Summarize how to launch Scrum.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 60- 80%
Quizzes 20 - 40%

Grade Scale:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 250

  • Title: Game Capstone*
  • Number: GAME 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 180 and GAME 240 and GAME 220 or GAME 221

Description:

This course is designed for students to apply the foundations of game design and game programming to a significant original game. Students will work within a team to analyze a problem, develop and present a proposed game design document, build a demonstrable prototype of the game and develop a significant portion of the finished product. Students should also develop a project schedule and present progress information to the class. Students should also develop job search skills and both written and oral communication skills. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Conduct a Needs Analysis and Feasibility Study for a game development project.
  2. Plan a game development project using game industry business management techniques.
  3. Create a working prototype to demonstrate a portion of the game.
  4. Perform the core tasks required for new game development.
  5. Prepare for the job market.
  6. Employ effective communications skills.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Needs Analysis and Feasibility Study
   A. Interview potential users.
   B. Investigate game engine alternatives.
   C. Write a Project Proposal and Presentation.

II. Business Management Techniques
   A. Plan the elements: tasks, resources, dependencies, milestones.
   B. Assign team roles: animator, storyteller, programmer and producer.
   C. Implement scheduling techniques.
   D. Update the schedule and report progress.

III. Game Concept Prototype
   A. Demonstrate the game engine. 
   B. Script the game prototype.
   C. Present the game prototype. 

IV. New Game Development
   A. Design the game.
   B. Delegate tasks to team members.
   C. Design the levels.
   D. Conduct progress walkthroughs.
   E. Implement the game.
   F. Plan for beta testers and support.

V. Job Market Preparation
   A. Research local firms.
   B. Prepare resume and on-line portfolio.
   C. Write cover letters and follow-ups.
   D. Employ job search techniques.
   E. Practice interviewing techniques.

VI. Communications Skills
   A. Practice written Communications.
   B. Use verbal Communications.
   C. Demonstrate listening Skills.
   D. Use visual aids.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50% of grade - Completion of one semester project and Job Search assignment  
50-70% of grade - Completion of two examinations 
100% - Total 

Grade Criteria:
   A = 90%
   B = 80%     
   C = 70%     
   D = 60%     
   F = less than 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Be an avid player of games. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 255

  • Title: Mobile Game Programming*
  • Number: GAME 255
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 221

Description:

This course is designed for students who want to learn mobile device game programming. The students will learn the various limitations on mobile devices and the options available for programming them. They will create a 2D game for mobile devices. 5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the unique environment in which mobile game programming exists.
  2. Create game levels using tiles.
  3. Setup mobile development environment.
  4. Design and document a mobile game.
  5. Identify the major mobile platforms.
  6. Create a game that will run on a mobile device. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Environment
   A. Explain the limitations of mobile devices.
   B. Configure ways of dealing with varying screen sizes/resolutions.
   C. Describe the various aspects of time and how they impact the game design.
      1. Battery life.
      2. Time available for playing.
      3. Download speeds and connectivity charges.

II. Mobile Integrated Development Environment
   A. Set up a development environment.
   B. Describe the basics of Object Oriented Programming.
   C. Explain problems strings pose in mobile game development.      

III. Mobile Platform Basics
   A. Describe the major platforms available.
   B. Compare and contrast the mobile platforms.
   C. Describe the Application Programming Interfaces and libraries available.

IV. Tile-based Graphics 
   A. Select the proper tools.
   B. Discuss Intellectual Property Laws.
   C. Install a graphics editor.
   D. Create tile maps.
   E. Load tile maps into the game.

V. Optimization Techniques
   A. Practice “write first, then optimize” protocol.
   B. Demonstrate the skills to cope with strings and memory leaks.
   C. Profile the code to improve performance.
   D. Control file overhead.
   E. Explain how obfuscation can optimize code.

VI. Full Game Creation
   A. Evaluate target audience.
   B. Evaluate target hardware.
   C. Create the Game Design Document.
   D. Code and test the game.
   E. Distribute the product.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects:          25%-60%
Exercises:              15%-25%
Attendance:             0%-10%
Exams:                  10%-30%

Grade Criteria:
   A = 90%
   B = 80%     
   C = 70%     
   D = 60%     
   F = less than 60% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Be an avid player of games.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GAME 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: GAME 292
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GAME 220 or GAME 221

Description:

This course presents specialized topics in game development that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use appropriate terminology related to the special topic.
  2. Solve problems by using content related to the special topic.
  3. Demonstrate conceptual understanding of the special topic.
  4. Use software and hardware related to the special topic. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

Will vary within the guidelines of the educational affairs committee.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Will vary within the guidelines of the educational affairs committee.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Varies

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.