Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Technology Certificate

The certificate program is designed to prepare you for the basic job skills needed to service and maintain heating and air conditioning equipment. Students who elect to complete the certificate option learn the theory of operation and how to service, repair and design gas furnaces, central air conditioners, heat pumps, rooftop air conditioning systems, boilers, and commercial systems air conditioners. This knowledge is reinforced by working on actual equipment in the laboratory. Completion of this program will allow the student to seek employment as a maintenance and service technician in the heating/air conditioning trade.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 6230; State CIP Code 47.0201)

First Semester

HVAC 105HVAC Fundamentals4
HVAC 110Electrical Fundamentals4
HVAC 136Heating System Fundamentals3
HVAC 164EPA 608 Refrigerant Management1
HVAC 167Sheet Metal Layout and Fabrication3
INDT 155Workplace Skills1
Total Hours16

Second Semester

INDT 125Industrial Safety/OSHA 303
HVAC 142Load Calculations*3
HVAC 201Cooling Systems *3
HVAC 236Advanced Heating Applications*3
HVAC 250HVAC Installation and Start-up Procedures*3
HVAC 280HVAC Internship*1-3
Note: Only 1 credit hour internship for certificate program.
Total Hours16-18

Total Program Hours: 32

Courses

HVAC 105   HVAC Fundamentals (4 Hours)

This is a beginning course in heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology that is appropriate for HVAC students. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the basic components of an air-conditioning system. Topics will include heat laws, refrigerants, oils and refrigeration cycles. In the lab, students will design, assemble and operate a working refrigeration system. Competencies will include brazing, wiring, evacuating and charging a system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 110   Electrical Fundamentals (4 Hours)

This course is in electrical theory and is required for HVAC but is appropriate for all interested students. Common electrical components found in the HVAC industry are used to develop these skills. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify electrical components and their relationships to the various repair and troubleshooting techniques. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 125   Energy Alternatives (2 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify diverse methods of alternate energy production. Some of the technologies that will be discussed are wind energy, photoelectric energy, nuclear energy, hydroelectric energy, biomass and alternate fuel vehicles. Students will understand the advantages of using various alternate energy technologies, the effects or by-products of each and the problems that might be encountered. Some student research will be included in the context of the course. Emphasis will be on the most promising or effective alternate energy technologies available. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HVAC 136   Heating System Fundamentals (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify all the components and accessories in residential heating systems. Emphasis will be on the electrical diagrams and mechanical principles. Practical instruction in service diagnostic procedures for efficient operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of these systems make up the lab portion of the course. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 142   Load Calculations (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HVAC 105 or HVAC 121

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform the load calculations for residential and commercial HVAC applications. The students will be using the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual J and Manual N. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 164   EPA 608 Refrigerant Management (1 Hour)

The student should have a complete understanding and knowledge of the characteristics of several different types of refrigerants and the correct usage. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to pass the examination set forth by a third-party testing facility. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

HVAC 165   410-A Refrigerant Management (1 Hour)

Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to understand nuances of new refrigerants on the market. The student should have a complete understanding and knowledge of the characteristics of R-410-A. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to pass the examination set forth by a third-party testing facility. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

HVAC 167   Sheet Metal Layout and Fabrication (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the components, equipment and operation for sheet metal layout and fabrication. Practice problems are included at the end of each unit in order to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the methods attained by sheet metal layout. Shop facilities are available. The patterns will be fabricated and joined into a line of fittings. This gives the most complete test of pattern accuracy and also provides the experience needed by a competent layout person. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 201   Cooling Systems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify all the components and accessories and their relationship to the functions of residential and commercial air conditioning and heat pump systems. Topics covered will include air conditioner condensing units, metering devices, evaporation coils and refrigerants. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 231   HVAC Rooftop Units (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123)

Topics will include electrical controls and economizers of various rooftop units, roof curbs, installation, service, diagnosis, evacuation and charging of typical light commercial rooftop units. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 236   Advanced Heating Applications (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123) AND (HVAC 136 or HVAC 127)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify all the components and accessories of furnaces, heat pumps or boiler systems that are used either in residential or commercial spaces. The student should also be able to demonstrate familiarity with aspects of fuel gas piping, gas appliance venting, water heater installations, combustion air requirements and proper piping techniques. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 242   Duct Design and Equipment Selection (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HVAC 105 or HVAC 121

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to determine proper sizing of residential HVAC equipment and duct work to meet the requirements for high-quality climate control systems. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 250   HVAC Installation and Start-up Procedures (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: (HVAC 201 or HVAC 221) AND (HVAC 236 or HVAC 223)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures to install new systems and retrofit systems. Topics include initial start-up, maintenance of furnaces and air conditioners, electrical requirements, permits and inspections, combustion air, sheet metal and applying mechanical standards. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 275   HVAC Code Review (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: . (HVAC 142 or HVAC 124) AND (HVAC 201 or HVAC 221)

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 136 or HVAC 127

This course is for the use and interpretation of the current International Mechanical Code (IMC). Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to interpret and apply the Code to HVAC applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HVAC 277   HVAC Control Systems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: . HVAC 201 or HVAC 221

Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 236 or HVAC 223

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the components and theory in electronic, pneumatic and direct digital control systems. Classroom topics will center on components, wiring diagrams, calibration and sequences of operation, system components, theory of operation, wiring diagrams and installation methods. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HVAC 280   HVAC Internship (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: Department approval

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. The internship will provide the students with an on-the-job experience under the supervision of industry professionals. The work will be developed in cooperation with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals in the HVAC field. Minimum 15 hrs. per week on-the-job training.

HVAC 105

  • Title: HVAC Fundamentals
  • Number: HVAC 105
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology that is appropriate for HVAC students. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the basic components of an air-conditioning system. Topics will include heat laws, refrigerants, oils and refrigeration cycles. In the lab, students will design, assemble and operate a working refrigeration system. Competencies will include brazing, wiring, evacuating and charging a system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Identify the career and apprentice opportunities in the HVAC field.
  2. Explain the regulatory codes and the drawings.
  3. Assemble copper tubing by brazing, soldering, flare, and compression fittings.
  4. Identify heat transfer in relationship to the refrigeration cycle.
  5. Identify the pressure and temperature relationship to the refrigeration cycle.
  6. Identify commonly used refrigerants in the HVAC field.
  7. Introduce the four major components and accessories in the refrigeration cycle.
  8. Identify controls devices used in the HVAC field.
  9. Construct an HVAC system.
  10. Explain the refrigeration management using the three R’s.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Career Opportunities

A.Identify career and apprentice opportunities in the HVAC trade.

B.Identify job outlook and expectations.

II. Regulations and Drawings

A.Describe the types of regulatory codes encountered in the HVAC trade.

B.Identify the types of schedules/drawings used in the HVAC trade.

C.Apply trade math principles.

III. Copper and Plastic Tubing

A.Select the right tubing for a job.

B.Cut and bend copper tubing.

C.Safely join tubing by using flare and compression fittings.

D.Identify types of plastic pipe and state their uses.

E.Cut and join lengths of plastic pipe.

F.Demonstrate soldering and brazing techniques.

IV. Heat Transfer

A.Explain how heat transfer principles occur in a cooling system, demonstrating an understanding of the terms and concepts used in the refrigeration cycle.

B.Apply the Laws of Thermodynamics.

V. Pressure and Temperature Relationship

A.State the basic safety requirements for pressure-testing a system.

B.Calculate the temperature and pressure relationships at key points in the refrigeration cycle.

C.Demonstrate the use of temperature- and pressure-measuring instruments to make readings at key points in the refrigeration cycle.

VI. Refrigerants

A.Identify commonly used refrigerants and demonstrate the proper procedures for handling these refrigerants.

B.Identify different color codes of the refrigerants.

VII. Major Components in the Refrigeration Cycle

A.Identify the major components of a cooling system and explain how each type works.

B.Install one or more of the following HVAC systems and their components: (1) Residential, (2) Commercial, and/or (3) Industrial.

VIII. Controls and Accessories

A.Identify the major accessories available for cooling systems and explain how each works.

B.Identify the control devices used in cooling systems and explain how each works.

IX. HVAC Systems

A.State the precautions that must be taken when installing refrigerant piping.

B.Determine the kinds of hangers and supports are needed for refrigerant piping.

X. Three R’s

A.Demonstrate refrigerant leak detection procedures.

B.Demonstrate refrigerant evacuation procedures.

C.Demonstrate refrigerant recovery procedures.

D.Demonstrate refrigerant charging procedures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 110

  • Title: Electrical Fundamentals
  • Number: HVAC 110
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course is in electrical theory and is required for HVAC but is appropriate for all interested students. Common electrical components found in the HVAC industry are used to develop these skills. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify electrical components and their relationships to the various repair and troubleshooting techniques. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Examine electrical safety and first aid requirements.
  2. Describe and apply Ohm’s Law.
  3. Identify the concepts of distribution of electrical power.
  4. Calculate and measure the characteristics of various electrical components.
  5. Interpret electrical diagrams.
  6. Identify common electrical symbols.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety and First Aid

A. State and demonstrate the safety precautions that must be followed when working on electrical equipment and circuits.

B. Discuss first aid procedures.

II. Ohm’s Law

A. Apply Ohm’s law to calculate the current, voltage, and resistance in a circuit.

B. Apply power formula to calculate how much power is consumed by a circuit.

C. Review math principles pertaining to basic algebraic equations.

III. Electrical distribution

A. State how electrical power is distributed.

B. State how AC and DC electricity are different.

IV. Circuits and Components

A. Describe how voltage, current, resistance and power are related.

B. Describe the difference between series and parallel circuits and calculate loads in each.

C. Construct parallel circuits.

D. Construct series circuits.

E. Construct combination parallel and series circuits.

F. Perform voltage, current and resistance measurements using electrical test equipment.

V. Electrical Diagrams and Symbols

A. Read and interpret common electrical symbols.

B. Identify common diagrams used in HVAC.

VI. Schematic Diagrams and Motors

A. Read and interpret electrical diagrams.

B. Describe the purpose and operation of the various electrical components used in HVAC equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 125

  • Title: Energy Alternatives
  • Number: HVAC 125
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify diverse methods of alternate energy production. Some of the technologies that will be discussed are wind energy, photoelectric energy, nuclear energy, hydroelectric energy, biomass and alternate fuel vehicles. Students will understand the advantages of using various alternate energy technologies, the effects or by-products of each and the problems that might be encountered. Some student research will be included in the context of the course. Emphasis will be on the most promising or effective alternate energy technologies available. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the theory of operation of the many different types of alternate energy components and how they produce energy.
  2. Analyze the positive and negative aspects of the various alternate energy technologies.
  3. Explain the world energy situation.
  4. Acquire specific alternate energy information and how to conduct their own research.
  5. Discuss recommended applications of various alternate energy technologies available and should lead the student to apply this technology in real-life situations. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Energy Supplies and Systems
   A. Define energy.
   B. List the forms of energy.
   C. Explain energy conversion.
   D. List the types of resources.
   E. Explain energy mix.
   F. Forecast energy growth patterns.
   G. List the factors in an energy crisis.

II. Energy Consumption
   A. List the energy sectors within society.
   B. List the energy use percentages within each sector.
   C. Explain current growth patterns and trends.
   D. Describe some specific applications.
   E. Define common energy terminology.

III. Types of Energy
   A. Coal
      1. List several coal characteristics.
      2. List the three types of coal.
      3. List the availability and location of coal resources.
      4. Explain the economic and environmental problems with using coal.
      5. Explain coal gasification and liquefaction.
   B. Petroleum Energy
      1. List the availability and location of supplies of oil.
      2. Define oil exploration.
      3. Describe several methods of oil production.
      4. Describe the following types of oil transportation.
         a. Pipeline
         b. Water transportation
         c. Tank trucks and railroad cars
      5. Explain oil refining.
         a. Describe the characteristics.
         b. List several refining processes.
      6. List several oil products and their chemistry.
      7. Define oil shale.
   C. Natural Gas Resources
      1. Explain the characteristics of these types of gases:
         a. Natural gas
         b. Liquid petroleum gas
      2. Compare the heating value of LPG and natural gas.
      3. Describe the associated technology related to:
         a. Distribution and storage of natural gas
         b. Petrochemical industries
   D. Nuclear Energy
      1. Explain the basic chemistry of nuclear energy.
      2. Explain the nuclear fuel cycle, including:
         a. Mining
         b. Milling
         c. UF6 Production
         d. Enrichment
         e. Fuel fabrication
      3. List the types of reactors.
      4. Discuss nuclear waste in terms of:
         a. Characteristics
         b. Waste fuel
         c. Storage of waste.
         d. Volume of waste
         e. Nuclear waste cycle
   E. Hydroelectricity
      1. List the advantages of hydroelectric power.
      2. Discuss the present and future of large-scale hydroelectric
stations.
      3. Define pumped storage plants.
      4. Explain small-scale hydroelectric generation.
      5. List the environmental problems associated with dams and
reservoirs.
      6. Discuss the comparative regional potential.
   F. Ocean Energy Resources
      1. Explain tidal power.
      2. Define Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC).
      3. Describe wave energy.
      4. Define ocean current power.
      5. Discuss salinity gradient power.
      6. Discuss ocean bioconversion.
   G. Geothermal Energy
      1. List the types and uses of geothermal energy.
      2. Discuss geothermal resources development.
      3. List environmental considerations.
      4. Describe the regional potential of this resource in the United
States.
   H. Biofuels
      1. Define gasohol.
      2. List the uncertainties concerning gasohol.
      3. Define biomass and energy farms.
      4. Explain how to get energy from waste.
      5. Discuss the regional advantages.
   I. Space Base Power
      1. List the sources of energy possible from space including:
         a. Nuclear
         b. Sunlight
         c. Microwave
         d. Artificial moons
         e. Fuel cells
   J. Wind Energy
      1. Describe using wind as a resource.
      2. Identify places where small wind machines would work.
      3. Describe large wind electrical systems.
      4. List the environmental and economic considerations.
      5. Describe regional advantages for wind power.
   K. Direct Solar Energy
      1. Explain solar collection.
      2. Describe solar heating systems.
      3. List the properties needed for solar storage systems.
      4. Describe solar cooling systems.
      5. Explain how solar photovoltaic systems work.

IV. Energy Conversion and Cogeneration
   A. Explain the concept of energy conversion.
   B. Define common energy converter terminology.
   C. List the chemical to thermal to mechanical converters.
   D. Explain the basic electrical principles.
   E. Explain how mechanical to electrical conversion-generators work.
   F. Explain how electrical to mechanical conversion-motors work.

V. Energy Storage
   A. Explain the concept of energy storage.
   B. Discuss battery storage technology.
   C. Discuss hydrogen storage technology.
   D. Discuss alternative storage technology.

VI. Energy Conservation
   A. Explain the objectives of energy conservation.
   B. Define energy conservation in the residential/commercial sector.
   C. Define energy conservation in the industrial sector.
   D. Define energy conservation in the transportation sector.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Periodical Quizzes and Chapter Tests 40%
Final Test                           20%
Report (2 x 20%)                     40%
Total                               100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 136

  • Title: Heating System Fundamentals
  • Number: HVAC 136
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify all the components and accessories in residential heating systems. Emphasis will be on the electrical diagrams and mechanical principles. Practical instruction in service diagnostic procedures for efficient operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of these systems make up the lab portion of the course. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Explain the different design types of furnaces and their efficiencies.
  2. Explain the theory and application regarding carbon monoxide and safety.
  3. List and explain the fundamental components of heating systems.
  4. Demonstrate and define air flow in regards to the heating systems.
  5. Demonstrate and define proper venting applications for heating systems.
  6. Demonstrate proper systems commissioning.
  7. Install gas piping to a furnace.
  8. Conduct troubleshooting analysis of furnaces.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Furnaces

A. Recognize the different fuel types used in various furnaces.

B. Identify different efficiencies of furnaces.

II. Carbon Monoxide

A. Identify carbon monoxide safety violations.

B. List causes related to carbon monoxide poisoning.

III. Heating System Fundamentals

A. List sequence of operation.

B. Measure temperature split.

C. Explain the design and function of heating systems.

D. Introduce airside and hydronic systems including various types of boilers, piping, chilled water and their components.

E. Interpret mechanical drawings, symbols and their application.

IV. Air Flow

A. Assess air flow/water flow.

B. Measurement and control of air temperature, humidity, pressure and velocity.

C. Apply trade math to daily applications.

V. Venting

A. Design and install venting for fossil fuel appliances.

B. Use a computer application to conduct and design flue sizing.

VI. Systems Commissioning

A. Perform start-up procedures.

B. Check gas pressure.

VII. Gas piping

A. Identify the types of ferrous metal pipes.

B. Measure the sizes of ferrous metal pipes.

C. Identify the common malleable iron fittings.

D. Cut, ream and thread ferrous metal pipe.

E. Join lengths of threaded pipe together and install fittings.

F. Describe the main points to consider when installing pipe runs.

G. Describe the methods used to join piping.

VIII. Trouble shooting

A. Inspect and perform standard seasonal maintenance and tune-up.

B. Check and adjust thermostat heat anticipators.

C. Maintenance and repairs of various HVAC systems.

D. Introduce troubleshooting of heating, cooling and heat pumps systems.

E. Introduce troubleshooting of control circuits, electronic controls and accessories.

F. Introduce troubleshooting of air quality and energy conservation equipment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 142

  • Title: Load Calculations*
  • Number: HVAC 142
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HVAC 105 or HVAC 121

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform the load calculations for residential and commercial HVAC applications. The students will be using the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual J and Manual N. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Determine winter and summer infiltration into residential and commercial structures.
  2. Demonstrate and define the usage of the psychrometrics chart and how it applies to comfort cooling, commercial and heat pump applications.
  3. List the factors in determining the rate of heat loss and heat gain in a residential and commercial setting and why they are different.
  4. Complete Manual J and Manual N forms using a computer program from ACCA.
  5. List the factors associated with under-sizing and over-sizing residential and commercial heating and cooling equipment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Seasonal Infiltration

A. Calculate U values for materials and systems.

B. Determine residential and commercial design procedures.

C. Compare different load calculation methods at American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) design conditions.

D. Determine the outdoor and indoor design temperatures.

E. Calculate Manual J and Manual N for heating and cooling loads.

F. Determine the values for doors and walls.

G. Determine the below grade values for the R and U factors.

H. Calculate the winter air exchange estimate.

I. Use the 97 ½ % and 2 ½% ACCA guidelines for current design temperatures.

J. Determine the transmission gains for opaque surfaces.

K. Calculate the glass transmission and solar gains.

L. Determine the effects of low-e glass, integral blinds, external shade screens and skylights.

M. Analyze the overhangs, internal loads, infiltration loads and duct loss.

N. Calculate summer air changes.

II. Psychrometrics

A. Discuss the history of psychometrics.

B. Discuss dry bulb, wet bulb and relative humidity.

C. Calculate the sensible heat ratio.

D. Explain and identify how to use and apply psychrometric charts.

III. Heat Loss and Heat Gain

A. Determine the factors that are associated with heat loss in a residence and commercial building.

B. Determine the factors that are associated with heat gain in a residence and commercial building.

C. Manual J and Manual N

D. Use the energy conservation standards and codes to determine the correct size of loads.

E. Apply computer applications as useful sales and marketing tools.

F. Calculate the energy consumption and loads requirements.

G. Demonstrate Manual J calculations using a written form.

IV. Equipment sizing

A. List the factors that determine if the equipment is too large for residential or commercial applications.

B. Design the amount of cooling for residential or commercial applications.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Lab

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 164

  • Title: EPA 608 Refrigerant Management
  • Number: HVAC 164
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

The student should have a complete understanding and knowledge of the characteristics of several different types of refrigerants and the correct usage. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to pass the examination set forth by a third-party testing facility. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1.  Identify and explain the concepts regarding the Core, Type I, Type II, and Type III licensure on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) examination.
  2. Describe the Clean Air Act and No Venting Law.
  3. Describe and identify the concepts of reclaim, recovery, and recycle (3R’s).

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Exam Fundamentals

A. Identify cooling equipment components and basic refrigeration theory.

B. Identify EPA regulations.

C. Describe general safety procedures.

D. Describe the application of the EPA regulations regarding the following:

1. Core

2. Type I

3. Type II

4. Type III

II. Clean Air Act

A. Identify the legal handlings of refrigerants.

B. Describe the Clean Air Act and No Venting Law.

C. Explain ozone depletion and its consequences.

D. Identify substitute refrigerants and oils.

III. Reclaim, Recovery and Recycle (3 R’s)

A. List service procedures.

B. Describe refrigerant cylinder safety procedures.

C. Identify equipment service requirements. Recovery procedures and safety procedures for Type I technicians (small appliances), Type II technicians (high pressure systems) and Type III technicians (low pressure systems).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

100% of grade    Tests

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 165

  • Title: 410-A Refrigerant Management
  • Number: HVAC 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to understand nuances of new refrigerants on the market. The student should have a complete understanding and knowledge of the characteristics of R-410-A. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to pass the examination set forth by a third-party testing facility. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Describe the safety requirements of R-410-A and other advanced refrigerants.
  2. Describe the theory of the R-410-A refrigerant.
  3. Identify EPA Clean Air Act, the guidelines, and procedures for R-410-A.
  4. Describe and identify the concepts of reclaim, recovery and recycle (3R’s) with R-410-A.
  5. Explain the R-410-A refrigerant oils and their applications.
  6. Identify procedures where R-410-A is use.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Responsibilities

A. Describe regulations for R-410-A.

B. Use personal protective equipment (PPE) appropriately.

C. Demonstrate safe handling procedures for refrigerant.

D. Describe purpose and use of material safety data sheets (MSDS).

E. Identify appropriate lock out tag out (LOTO) procedures.

II. Basic Refrigeration Theory for R-410A

A.Describe fundamentals of use ofR-410-A

B.Use the pressure and temperature charts for R-410-A.

III. Clean Air Act

A. Use refrigeration color coded refrigerant cylinders.

B. Describe temperature glide.

C. Describe fractionation and its importance to refrigerants.

D. Describe various appropriate service tools.

E. Identify refrigerant recovery techniques.

IV. Reclaim, Recovery and Recycle

A. Describe the concepts involved in recycle, recovery, and reclaim refrigerant protocols.

B. Identify recovery equipment and containers.

V. Substitute Refrigerants and Oils

A. Describe use of polyester oils.

B. Describe use of mineral oils.

VI. R-410-A Applications and Methods

A. Identify sub-cooling and super-heating applications.

B. Describe R-410-A charging methods.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

90% - 95% of grade    Test

5% - 10% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 167

  • Title: Sheet Metal Layout and Fabrication
  • Number: HVAC 167
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the components, equipment and operation for sheet metal layout and fabrication. Practice problems are included at the end of each unit in order to provide the student with an opportunity to apply the methods attained by sheet metal layout. Shop facilities are available. The patterns will be fabricated and joined into a line of fittings. This gives the most complete test of pattern accuracy and also provides the experience needed by a competent layout person. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe HVAC application and materials used in sheet metal work.
  2. Recognize potential safety hazards on the job when using hand tools, power tools and metal cutting and bending machinery.
  3. Solve sheet metal problems involved with measurements of lines, area, volume, weight, and geometric figures.
  4. Identify and describe proper use and maintenance of all sheet metal work.
  5. Demonstrate the use of various kinds of fasteners used in sheet metal work.
  6. Match each of the three common sheet metal layout procedures to their applications.
  7. Demonstrate skill and competence in the construction of seams, edges, notches, locks, and clips.
  8. Identify, layout, fabrication of selected trunk runs and duct run fittings.
  9. Identify applicable standards, codes, and ordinances and demonstrate the ability to adhere to those specifications. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sheet Metal Orientation
   A. Describe terms and definitions.
   B. Match metals to their significance.
   C. Discuss job opportunities for sheet metal workers.

II. Safety
   A. Discuss terms and definitions.
   B. Explain accident causes.
   C. Describe safe working attire.
   D. Describe safe lifting.
   E. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment.
   F. Describe fire safety rules.

III. Basic Math and Measuring
   A. Discuss terms and definitions.
   B. Calculate fraction problems.
   C. Calculate decimal problems.
   D. Calculate percent problems.
   E. Demonstrate architects scale-use in sheet metal.
   F. Calculate area and perimeter.
   G. Calculate circumference and area of a circle.

IV. Hand and Machine Tools
   A. Discuss terms and definitions.
   B. Describe measuring tools.
   C. Lay out and cut with straight snips.
   D. Lay out with dividers and cut with left cutting snips.
   E. Lay out with dividers and cut with right cutting snips.
   F. Fold, bend, hem, set down and make drive clips with a bar folder.
   G. Lay out then cut on a square shear metal sheets to make a cylinder.
   H. Roll flat metal sheets into cylinder with a slip roll.
   I. Fasten seams with a resistance spot welder.
   J. Crimp, bead, edge, and dovetail cylinders on a combination rotary
machine.
   K. Form hems and seams on a hand brake.
   L. Join a cylinder to a flat surface with a dovetail notch.
   M. Lay out, cut and form on a Pittsburg machine and a hand brake, a one
piece rectangular duct.
   N. Turn drives on rectangular duct using a cleat bender.
   O. Determine the diameter and length of tinner rivets for selected
sheet metal thickness.
   P. Lay out, cut and fasten together a simple box with sheet metal
rivets
   Q. Lay out, cut and fasten together a simple box with pop rivets.
   R. Lay out, cut and fasten together two cylinders with mechanical and
non-mechanical fasteners.
   S. Lay out, cut and form a damper for installation in a rectangular
duct.
   T. Install a damper and quadrant in a rectangular duct.
   U. Lay out, cut and install a damper in a round duct..

V. Projects - Layout, cut and fabricate to specifications:
   A. Metal box.
   B. Rectangular duct.
   C. 90/ Square heel and throat elbow.
   D. 90/ Square and round heel elbow.
   E. 90/ elbow with round throat and curved heel.
   F. Two-Way AY@ Branch
   G. Offset with a square throat and heel.
   H. Offset with a curved throat and heel.
   I. O.G. Transition offset.
   J. Transition.
   K. Square to round.
   L. Drop-cheek elbow with round heel and throat.
   M. Transition AY@ branch.

VI. Layout
   A. Cylinder cut on a miter.
   B. Cylinder cut oblique to axis.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

2 Chapter and/or Unit Tests 10%
Lab Assignments             80%
Final Exam                  10%
Total                      100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z 87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) Purchase and wear ANSI Z 87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 201

  • Title: Cooling Systems*
  • Number: HVAC 201
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123)

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify all the components and accessories and their relationship to the functions of residential and commercial air conditioning and heat pump systems. Topics covered will include air conditioner condensing units, metering devices, evaporation coils and refrigerants. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the usage of the psychrometrics charts.
  2. Describe the operation and components of the air conditioning systems.
  3. Demonstrate current installation and service techniques of cooling systems.
  4. Demonstrate and measure air flow in regards to the cooling systems.
  5. Exhibit exemplary customer service skills.
  6. Identify and recognize the different efficiency of air conditioners and heat pumps.
  7. Apply the Manual J, Manual H, and the Manual N to each system.
  8. Troubleshoot air conditioning systems on residential, commercial, or heat pump system units.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Psychrometric Chart

A. Use the psychrometric chart to plot and calculate the following:

1. Total heat

2. Humidity ratio

3. Enthalpy

4. Sensible heat ratio

5. Air conditioning process

B. Use the psychrometric chart to solve the following problems:

1.  Mixed air temperature problems.

2.  Leaking RA (return air) ducts.

3.  Total air flow.

4.  Total A/C load.

C. Define refrigeration as applied to air conditioning.

1. Explain the refrigeration cycle typical for comfort cooling.

2. Explain how the functions of the evaporator affect comfort.

II. Air Conditioning Systems Operations and Components

A. List the components and controls in a typical air conditioning system.

B. Identify the controls for compressors and fans.

C. List the functions and operating characteristics of low-voltage control systems.

D. List the components and controls in a typical air conditioning system.

III. Installation and Service Techniques

A. Explain the purpose of evacuation and dryers.

1. Describe how air and moisture gets into a system.

2. List the triple evacuation procedures.

3. Perform a triple evacuation.

B. Assemble copper tubing by brazing and leaks testing the joints.

C. List the testing methods to determine leaks.

D. Describe the materials used in brazing, advantages and disadvantages.

E. Describe the methods of cleaning joints.

F. Find leaks using the three leak detection methods.

IV. Air Flow in the Cooling Systems

A. Figure percentage of air re-circulation.

B. Interpret fan curves from the manufacturer’s charts.

C. Use the pitot tube to measure and calculate the following.

1. Static pressure.

2. Velocity pressure.

3. Total pressure.

V. Customer Service Skills

A. Describe proper customer service skills.

B. Practice skills with the external customer.

C. Practices skills with the internal customer.

D.Demonstrate proper protocol to deal with problematic customers.

VI. Efficiency of Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

A. List purpose, function and characteristics of the following:

1. Evaporator

2. Compressor

3. Metering device

4. Condenser

5. Heat pump

B. Identify 13 SEER equipment and above.

VII. Apply the Manual J, Manual H, and the Manual N

A. Apply Manual J to sample residential systems.

B. Apply Manual N to sample commercial systems.

C. Apply Manual H to sample heat pump systems.

VIII. Cooling Systems Fault Analysis

A. Analyze electrical faults in cooling systems.

B. Analyze mechanical faults in cooling systems.

C. Attach and use a gage manifold set.

D. Determine appropriate use of the gage manifold set.

E. Interpret low-side gage readings.

F. Interpret high-side gage readings.

G. Interpret Delta-T temperature readings.

H. Diagnose compressor problems.

I. Troubleshoot the circuit electrical protectors – fuses and circuit breakers.

J. Diagnose and replace faulty parts.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 231

  • Title: HVAC Rooftop Units*
  • Number: HVAC 231
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123)

Description:

Topics will include electrical controls and economizers of various rooftop units, roof curbs, installation, service, diagnosis, evacuation and charging of typical light commercial rooftop units. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the sequence of operation from a ladder schematic diagram for several typical rooftop units.
  2. Describe the sequence of operation of gas fired rooftop ignition circuits.
  3. Identify components and describe the operation of an automatic economizer system.
  4. Assemble a concentric duct package installation.
  5. Change out major components of a rooftop unit to include the heat exchanger.
  6. Perform necessary troubleshooting techniques to fix electrical and mechanical problems.
  7. Diagnose and remedy draft proving switch circuit problems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Explain the Basic Principles of Operation of the Following Types of Rooftop Units.

A. Gas heating units

B. Electric heating units

C. Electric cooling units

D. Combination gas/electric all season units

E. Single zone vs multizone

F. Horizontal discharge/down discharge

G. Draw through vs blow through type units

II. Identify the functions and operational characteristics of the following components of gas heating units.

A. Combustion blower motors

B. Ignition controls - sequence of operation

C. Limit controls

D. Combustion air adjusters

E. Safeties

III. Identify the Functions and Operational Characteristics of the Following Components of Electric Heating Units.

A. Electric heat elements

B. Sequencers

C. Limit controls

D. Safeties

IV. Identify the Functions and Operational Characteristics of the Following Components of Electric Cooling Units.

A. Starting relays and capacitors

B. Outdoor fan motors

C. Compressors

D. Limit controls

E. Economizers

F. Safeties

V. Identify the Functions and Operational Characteristics of the Following Components of Economizers.

A. Temperature sensing

B. Enthalpy controls

C. Minimum outside air requirements

D. Damper linkages/adjustments

E. Damper motors

F. Fresh air intakes

VI. List the Installation Cautions and Procedures for Roof-curbs and Adapter Curbs.

A. Install insulation.

B. Install cant strips.

C. Install filler panels.

D. Install nailer strips.

VII. List the Installation Cautions and Procedures for Concentric Duct Package Units.

A. Calculate the sizing required.

B. Describe the register types and air velocity design parameters.

VIII. Identify the Functions and Operational Characteristics of a Typical DDC controlled system.

A. Components

B. Wiring

C. Sensors

D. Communication links

E. Zone controls/dampers

F. Disconnect and reconnect to operating condition all the communication and control wiring for a typical DDC controlled system.

IX. Discuss the Following Design Considerations.

A. Roof support

B. Weight distribution

X. Startup, Checkout and Adjustment of Rooftop Units

A. List general safety procedures.

B. Discuss the startup check sheet provided by the manufacturer.

C. Exercise: Follow a startup procedure provided by the manufacturer.

D. Calculate a performance check.

E. Calculate the net cooling capacity.

F. Exercise: Calculate and measure the air flow in a system.

G. Exercise: Calculate and measure the air flow in a system using the auxiliary heat method.

H. Exercise: Calculate and measure the Air conditioners gross capacity.

XI. Troubleshooting the Mechanical Side of a Rooftop System.

A. List the general refrigeration side problems.

B. Solve air system problems, high and low.

C. Solve specific rooftop refrigeration system problems on an operating rooftop system.

D. Test a heat exchanger for leaks.

E. Exercise: Disassemble and reassemble to operating condition two different rooftop units.

XII. Troubleshooting the Electrical Side of a Rooftop System.

A. List the general electrical side problems.

B. Find and repair faults to the following components in an operating rooftop unit.

1. Combustion blower motors

2. Ignition controls

3. Draft proving check sheets

4. Limit controls

5. Combustion air

6. Electric heat elements

7. Sequencers

8. Safetys

9. Economizers

10. T-stats

11. Miswiring

12. Compressors

13. Starting components

14. Outdoor fan motors

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Textbook assignments will be made one class prior to their due dates: assignments of unreasonable length will not be made. Read assignments in the text before coming to class. Take notes during the lecture of important points. Student participation in class is encouraged.

2. Lab Sessions: Simple and complex problems will be a part of the lab experience. Tools and testing equipment will be studied and used. Lab grades for each lab session will be based on the following criteria:

a. Ability to work independently 15%

b. Answers to lab study questions 15%

c. Ability to work neatly and accurately 15%

d. Ability to work productively 15%

e. Successful completion of project 40%

Lab work will be graded according to progress and skill. Quizzes will be given periodically.

10%    Periodical quizzes

40%    Chapter and/or unit tests

40%    Lab assignments

10%    Final Exam

100%       TOTAL

Quizzes: There will be no makeup of quizzes.

Chapter or Unit Tests: There will be no makeup of these exams unless prior arrangements have been made with the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207).

Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses.

Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must:

  1. provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or
  2. wear cover goggles (if allowable), or
  3. purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 236

  • Title: Advanced Heating Applications*
  • Number: HVAC 236
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (HVAC 105 or HVAC 121) AND (HVAC 110 or HVAC 123) AND (HVAC 136 or HVAC 127)

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify all the components and accessories of furnaces, heat pumps or boiler systems that are used either in residential or commercial spaces. The student should also be able to demonstrate familiarity with aspects of fuel gas piping, gas appliance venting, water heater installations, combustion air requirements and proper piping techniques. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Explain the safety features of working with heating appliances.
  2. Explain the theory of fuel burning appliances.
  3. Discuss and explain the factors that contribute to formation and effects of carbon monoxide (CO).
  4. Determine the venting requirements for heating appliances.
  5. Demonstrate proper sizing of gas lines.
  6. Explain the piping schematic of heating appliances.
  7. Describe the different types of boilers used in residential or commercial applications.
  8. Identify the components of  boiler systems.
  9. Troubleshoot fuel burning appliances.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety

A. List common safety rules and procedures for an HVAC service technician.

B. Describe specific safety concerns when in the field.

II. Theory of Fuel Burning Appliances

A .Explain using natural gas as a fuel.

B. Explain using LP gas as a fuel.

C. Discuss the pilot burner and its safety controls.

D. Describe the operation of combination gas valves.

E. Describe the operation of heat exchangers.

F. Describe the operation of furnace blowers and controls.

G. Describe the operation of temperature limit switches.

H. Discuss when electronic ignition systems are used.

I. List the sequence of operation for various heating systems.

J. Compile a furnace tune-up check sheet.

III. Carbon Monoxide

A. Discuss dispersion patterns.

B. Discuss diagnosis of CO poisoning.

C. Discuss prevention of CO production.

D. Discuss health effects of CO.

E. Perform first response procedures for CO poisoning.

F. Discuss when medical referral is necessary.

G. List codes applicable to CO.

H. Describe how various CO detectors work.

IV. Venting

A. Describe the theory of operation of the venting system.

B. Describe draft diverters.

C. Describe stack effect.

D. Describe condensation in vent stacks and how to prevent it.

E. Determine size of vent for a single appliance.

F. Determine size combined vents.

G. Calculate location of top of flue stack in relation to various roof pitches and heights.

H. Install various venting systems to code, with special consideration given to the following factors:

I. Code requirements, single wall versus double wall

J. Support of vent piping

V. Fuel Burning Equipment

A. Discuss aspects of fuel burning equipment terminology.

B. Describe operation of fan assisted appliances.

C. List the applications, precautions, and sizing for the following materials.

1. Single wall galvanized metal

2. Double wall galvanized metal

3. Masonry chimney

D. Discuss the sizing methods required by the following codes and regulatory bodies.

1. International Plumbing Code

2. National Fuel Gas Code

3. G.A.M.A. (Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association)

VI. Piping Schematics

A. Identify various piping schematics that are used with HVAC equipment.

B. Identify various piping schematics that are used with boilers.

VII. Boiler Applications

A. Discuss the history of boilers.

B. Explain the differences between a steam and water boiler.

C .Identify the various components of a water boiler system.

D. Identify the various components of a steam boiler system.

E. Compare steam boilers by their applications:

1. Utility/marine

2. Process

3. Comfort (space heating)

4. Steam to water converters

F. Recognize the different types of steam boilers:

1. Water tube

2 .Fire tube

3. Horizontal Return tube

4. Vertical

5. Scotch marine

6. Locomotive

G. Explain the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) code designations.

H. Describe the differences between cast iron sectional and package boilers.

VIII. Boiler Components

A. Recognize and describe the use of the various valves and fittings.

B. Discuss in detail, the pressure relief valve for both a steam and water boiler application.

C. Describe the construction and operation of a pressure relief valve.

D. Explain the code requirements for the installation and adjustment of relief valves.

IX. Appliance Troubleshooting

A. List the basic steps of the troubleshooting approach.

B. Use test equipment.

C. Diagnose electrical faults.

D. Troubleshoot various problems on different furnaces.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 242

  • Title: Duct Design and Equipment Selection*
  • Number: HVAC 242
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HVAC 105 or HVAC 121

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to determine proper sizing of residential HVAC equipment and duct work to meet the requirements for high-quality climate control systems. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Examine the characteristics of different types of HVAC equipment.
  2. Examine the characteristics of different styles of duct work.
  3. Calculate and design a heating and cooling system using current equipment data.
  4. Calculate and design a heating and cooling duct system using the Manual D.
  5. Calculate air flow by using appropriate methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Equipment Selection

A. Select cooling equipment based upon the design.

B. Calculate the sensible and latent load.

C. Choose equipment based upon the performance data.

D. Select heat pumps based upon design temperatures.

E. Choose a furnace and “A” coil based upon the data.

F. Analyze current manufacturer’s performance data.

II. Characteristics of Duct Work

A. Design duct work systems.

B. Choose residential duct design components.

C. Use the duct slide chart.

D. Use the friction chart.

E. Determine the fitting losses based upon the Manual D.

F. Calculate the branch take-off fittings.

G. Determine the room air distribution.

H. Calculate the area for return grilles.

III. Calculate and Design an HVAC System

A. Design a system using the Manual J and the Manual N for comfort cooling.

B. Design a system using the Manual J and the Manual N for comfort heating.

C. Select air conditioning and furnace equipment based upon the correct size derived from the Manual J and Manual N.

D. Determine the amount of cooling BTU on the basis of design temperatures, summer air change estimates, humidity, transmission gains and solar heat gains in accordance to the Manual J and Manual N.

IV. Calculate and Design an HVAC Duct System

A. Use the Manual D to determine the correct size of duct work.

B. Determine if your allowances are with the total equivalent length (TEL) ratio.

V. Analyze Systems Efficiency

A. Measure air velocities throughout the supply and return duct system.

B. Analyze equipment selection and duct

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests

20% - 40% of grade    Lab

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 250

  • Title: HVAC Installation and Start-up Procedures*
  • Number: HVAC 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: (HVAC 201 or HVAC 221) AND (HVAC 236 or HVAC 223)

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures to install new systems and retrofit systems. Topics include initial start-up, maintenance of furnaces and air conditioners, electrical requirements, permits and inspections, combustion air, sheet metal and applying mechanical standards. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Determine the electrical requirements for an installation.
  2. Calculate flue sizes for an installation.
  3. Apply various sheet metal shapes and sizes to retrofit new furnaces.
  4. Discuss permits and inspections.
  5. Recognize and prevent carbon monoxide safety violations. 
  6. Apply proper safety mechanical standards.
  7. Calculate gas requirements of various sized appliances.
  8. Install refrigerant piping for air conditioners and heat pumps.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electrical Wiring

A. Install low voltage wiring to an HVAC system.

B. Install a new double pole breaker.

C. Install an electrical disconnect.

D. Install seal-tight from an outside electrical disconnect to a condensing unit.

E. Install a 120 volt circuit to a furnace complete with a proper ground.

F. Install a 240 volt circuit to an air conditioner with a proper ground.

II. Vent Piping

A. Identify the various materials used in vent piping systems.

B. Identify current venting tables and size vent connectors and vents.

C. List the proper clearances and support hanger requirements for vent piping systems.

D. Install single wall vent connectors from multiple appliances to a chimney.

E. Install Type “B” double wall vent pipe from gas appliance to exterior cap.

F. Install PVC exhaust and intake piping for a condensing furnace with proper pitch.

III. Sheet Metal and Ductwork

A. Identify proper sheet metal gauge size.

B. Measure and properly complete the sheet metal fabrication order form.

C. Install a high sidewall supply air stack.

D. Install return air panning and headers.

E. Demonstrate how to seal a duct system.

F. Calculate a duct to proper length, form edges for drives and assemble duct on the job site.

G. Use fasteners to connect ductwork to mechanical equipment.

IV. Permits and Job Commissioning

A. Complete a job installation and commissioning.

B. Create a Quality Report.

C. Explain how to obtain a permit for a job.

D. Describe the importance of a commissioning  inspection.

V. Carbon Monoxide

A. Explain how carbon monoxide is generated and dispersed.

B. Diagnose carbon monoxide presence and conduct a precautionary test.

C. Identify health effects of carbon monoxide.

VI. Safety Procedures

A. Demonstrate how to use a torch set.

B. Demonstrate how to use fire protection around combustible materials.

C. Describe the use of a fire extinguisher.

D. Demonstrate tying off an extension ladder.

VII. Gas Piping

A. Identify the various gas piping materials.

B. Identify the various gas piping tools.

C. Measure and calculate a piping system.

D. Check gas pressure with a manometer.

E. Clock a gas meter to determine a gas appliance firing rate.

F. Demonstrate cutting and threading gas pipe.

G. Demonstrate proper hangers and spacing requirements for horizontal and vertical gas piping systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests 

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory 

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports 

10% - 20% of grade    Participation 

100%                            TOTAL 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 275

  • Title: HVAC Code Review*
  • Number: HVAC 275
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: . (HVAC 142 or HVAC 124) AND (HVAC 201 or HVAC 221)
Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 136 or HVAC 127

Description:

This course is for the use and interpretation of the current International Mechanical Code (IMC). Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to interpret and apply the Code to HVAC applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Explain how the IMC code book addresses the regulatory codes for HVAC applications.
  2. Explain the contextual arrangement and usage of the IMC book.
  3. Describe and examine the relationship between the IMC and the Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC).
  4. Describe the application process for becoming a licensed journeyman or master mechanic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. IMC Use

A. Demonstrate application of the code book.

B. Identify the subgroups in the code book.

II. IMC Administration

A. Explain the role of the administration of the code.

B. Understand the terms associated with the code.

III. Other Code Books

A. Understand the regulations concerning the various code books.

B. Differentiate current code requirements from past code regulations.

C. Identify how to find important information concerning the code.

D. Summarize the code use in various cities, counties and state.

IV. License Requirements

A. Determine testing requirements for a candidate in various jurisdictions.

B. Identify the responsibility of the test taker.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

60% - 80% of grade    Tests

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports

10% - 20% of grade    Participation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 277

  • Title: HVAC Control Systems*
  • Number: HVAC 277
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: . HVAC 201 or HVAC 221
Prerequisites or corequisites: HVAC 236 or HVAC 223

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the components and theory in electronic, pneumatic and direct digital control systems. Classroom topics will center on components, wiring diagrams, calibration and sequences of operation, system components, theory of operation, wiring diagrams and installation methods. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Describe the function of HVAC controls.
  2. Explain the system diagrams of various HVAC controls.
  3. Explain and demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of various HVAC controls.
  4. Demonstrate the proper installation, wiring and programming of a building control system.
  5. Define the common terms associated with controls.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Controls

A. Describe which control system type is normally used in a two (2) position control.

B. Explain which control method is best used for multi-zone applications.

II. System Diagrams

A. Compare and contrast digital versus analog controls.

B. Identify examples of common controls systems.

C. List the advantages of pneumatic and electronic controls.

D. Create a flow chart which shows the sequence of operation from the sensor to the final control device for pneumatic, electronic and DDC control operation.

E. Control Principles

1. Define electronic and pneumatic control sensors.

2. Define thermostat controllers and multipurpose controllers.

3. Discuss throttling range and proportional band in an electronic controller.

4. Describe various final control elements.

III. Advantages of DDC and Microprocessors

A. Describe the proper maintenance and service of the pneumatic air supply system.

B. Identify pressure relief devices and their respective pressure settings.

C. Discuss devices used in moisture and oil removal.

D. Explain the process of remote access for building control.

E. Describe the different types of modems available for control communication.

F. Explain the different baud rates available for DDC communication.

G. Describe the differences between serial and parallel communication connections.

H. Discuss sensors/transmitters.

1. Explain the differences between bimetal and resistive sensors and transmitters.

2. Discuss the accuracy of traditional sensors compared to electronic and pneumatic sensors.

3. Describe the operation of pressure and humidity sensors and transmitters.

4. Explain the differences between positive and negative temperature coefficient sensors.

IV. Installation

A. Explain how to recognize a three phase service.

B. System Installation

1. Describe proper wiring techniques for electronic controls.

2. Describe proper air line connections for pneumatic controls and sensors.

3. Explain proper installation of a DDC communication bus.

4. Discuss the differences between wiring electronic controls and standard controls.

5. Demonstrate installation wiring of a controller, sensor and final control element.

V. Common Terminology

A. Define the following HVAC controls:

1. Hardware

2. Software

3. Integrated circuits

4. ROM (read only memory)

5. RAM (random access memory)

6. EEPROM (electronically erasable programmable read only memory)

7. Serial and parallel ports

8. Communication protocol

B. Discuss the relationships between ROM, RAM and EEPROM memory.

C. Explain the basic function of a DDC controller as compared to a standard controller.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20% - 40% of grade    Tests 

20% - 40% of grade    Laboratory 

10% - 20% of grade    Quizzes and Reports 

10% - 20% of grade     Participation 

100%        TOTAL 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HVAC 280

  • Title: HVAC Internship*
  • Number: HVAC 280
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. The internship will provide the students with an on-the-job experience under the supervision of industry professionals. The work will be developed in cooperation with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals in the HVAC field. Minimum 15 hrs. per week on-the-job training.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

  1. Describe the internship work environment.
  2. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training position.
  3. Keep accurate records of hours worked, job activities, and salary earned.
  4. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment and work.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to work with supervisor, customers and fellow employees.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Work Environment in the HVAC Field

A. Obtain a position with a HVAC employer.

B. List all objectives and situations that arise from the internship position.

C. Describe daily activities during the internship.

II. Secure an Approved Training Position

A. Write a letter of inquiry.

B. Write a resume.

C. Complete a job application.

D. Describe a job interview.

III. Maintain Accurate Records of Job Activities

A. Record all significant activities.

B. Create a detailed list of employer expectations regarding the position.

IV. Professionalism in the workplace

A. Define labor relations.

B. Explain human relations.

C. Examine job performance.

V. Demonstrate the ability to work with others.

A. Describe how to work with supervisors.

B. Describe how to work with other employees.

C. Describe how to work with customers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

60 – 80%    Work assignments

10 – 20%    Employer Evaluations

10 – 20%    Student Self-evaluation

100%    Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.