Landscape Technician Certificate

The 31-credit-hour certificate program is designed to prepare students for a career in landscape design and maintenance. Upon completion of this certificate, students will possess the competencies to be successful at entry-level or higher positions in landscape design and maintenance and other related occupations.

A full-time student can complete this certificate in a fall-spring sequence year.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/professional responsibilities.

(Landscape Technician -Major Code 6190; State CIP Code 01.0605 and Business Plan -Major Code 4810; State CIP Code 52.0710)

First Semester

HORT 201Introduction to Horticultural Science4
HORT 214Woody Plants I, Deciduous3
HORT 140Turfgrass I3
HORT 220Herbaceous Plants3
HORT 235Landscape Maintenance and Techniques3
Total Hours16

Second Semester

Landscape Elective (see list below)3
HORT 215Woody Plants II, Evergreens3
HORT 225Plant Problems*3
HORT 135Landscape Design3
HORT 265Landscape Construction3
Total Hours15

Landscape Electives

HORT 150Fruits, Vegetables and Herb Crops2
HORT 205Plant Propagation*3
HORT 260Horticulture Soils3
HORT 240Turfgrass II*3
HORT 270Horticulture Internship*3
BUS 121Introduction to Business3
BUS 145Small Business Management3


Total Program Hours: 31-38

Additional Certificate

Business Plan Certificate

This certificate is designed for students who are interested in opening their own service business providing administrative assistance to businesses. Coursework focuses on fundamental knowledge necessary to own and operate an entrepreneurial venture, evaluating the feasibility of the business idea, and concludes with writing a business plan to start, grow and sustain a business venture. The business plan certificate is recommended for students to add to their Horticultural Sciences certificate.
 

Courses

HORT 115   Home Horticulture (2 Hours)

This course provides basic knowledge for the design and management of home lawns, flower and vegetable gardens, and landscape trees and shrubs. Students will learn basic plant anatomy and physiology concepts; how to recognize some common plant deficiency symptoms; the use of fertilizers and pesticides; identification of some common trees, shrubs and garden plants; and the major considerations of good landscape design. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 135   Landscape Design (3 Hours)

The course is designed to familiarize students with aspects of landscape design. Students will analyze the site and preferences of the client and complete a landscape design following basic design principles. Students will learn presentation graphics, hand lettering techniques, and how to make a hand drawing to scale. Note: Plant material courses (HORT 214, HORT 215, HORT 220) could be helpful for this course but are not required. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 140   Turfgrass I (3 Hours)

The basics of turfgrass identification, selection, use and care will be covered. The emphasis will be on efficient management of soil and turf on large or small grounds. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate their ability to properly identify the major categories of turfgrass; establish and maintain turfgrass; identify turfgrass pests; and develop a pest control fertilizer program. Irrigation systems, their maintenance and repair will also be discussed. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 150   Fruits, Vegetables and Herb Crops (2 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize garden center employees with the plant materials and production of crops many homeowners use and grow. This course will help the employee answer many homeowner questions about production, varieties and potential crop problems. Home hobbyists may also wish to enroll in this course. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 160   Garden Center Operations (3 Hours)

This course is designed for garden center employees and provides background on the elements necessary for success in a competitive retail environment. The business organization is emphasized, including environmental monitoring, selling, inventory issues, merchandising, advertising, cost effectiveness, labor/team relationships and customer service. In addition, safety and legal issues are examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HORT 165   Arboriculture (3 Hours)

This course will prepare the student to work with trees in Zones 5-6. In lecture and lab settings students will learn and demonstrate how to properly plant, prune and maintain trees, identify hazard trees and proper pruning and tree removal techniques. Emphasis will be placed on ANSI and OSHA safety requirements. At the end of this course the student will be prepared to take the test for arboriculture certification in Kansas. 2 hrs. lecture 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 201   Introduction to Horticultural Science (4 Hours)

This is an introduction to the principles and practices of horticultural plant systems. Plant structure and function will be discussed, along with the effects of environmental factors on plant growth. General cultural practices will be described, including pest control, mineral nutrition and plant propagation. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 201H   HON: Introduction to Horticulture Sciences (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HORT 205   Plant Propagation (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HORT 201 or department approval

This course provides basic knowledge of the art and science of sexual and asexual methods of propagating plants. Students study the processes of seed development, seed dormancy, germination, root initiation and grafting. Students will learn basic seed sowing, cutting and grafting skills. The students will be able to demonstrate the selection of appropriate propagation methods and choose the proper environmental conditions necessary to achieve successful propagation of seeds or cuttings. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 214   Woody Plants I, Deciduous (3 Hours)

The class places emphasis on identification, ornamental characters, site requirements, and use of woody ornamental deciduous trees and shrubs with special emphasis on the cultivated varieties in climatic zones 5 and 6. Plant uses and seasonal effects and influences that affect plant choices will be also be taught. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper, and garden center employee in identifying plant materials used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 215   Woody Plants II, Evergreens (3 Hours)

This course places emphasis on identification, ornamental characteristics, site requirements and use of evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs with special emphasis on the cultivated varieties in climatic zones 5 and 6. Plant uses and seasonal effects and influences that affect plant choices will be taught. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper and garden center employee in identifying plant materials used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 220   Herbaceous Plants (3 Hours)

This course will focus on the identification, ornamental characters, culture, propagation, and use of herbaceous perennials, bulbs, ground covers, vines and annuals. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper, and garden center employee in identifying and selecting herbaceous plant materials with additional emphasis on uses and maintenance of these plants when used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 225   Plant Problems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HORT 214 and HORT 220 or department approval

This course is a broad-spectrum overview of plant insects, diseases and nutrition. Students will look at plants to identify the common characteristics found when diagnosing plant problems. Identification, treatment and treatment alternatives will be considered to help customers make diagnostic decisions for the use of chemicals and integrated pest management techniques (IPM). 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 235   Landscape Maintenance and Techniques (3 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the principles and techniques involved in landscape maintenance including pruning techniques, fertilization, irrigation, spray schedules and weed control. Installation and maintenance of annual and perennial plant material is examined. In addition, the student will learn to design preventive strategies and identify and examine disease and insect damage. The students will learn how to maintain good customer relations. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 240   Turfgrass II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HORT 140

This course is a continuation of turfgrass I (HORT 140). Topics include green construction, top dressing, sprayer calibration, management programs (e.g., setting up a lawn care program) and the influence environment has on turfgrass growth. 2 hrs. lecture 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 245   Commercial Crop Production (3 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize Market Farmers with the plant materials and production of crops grown in the Market Farming industry. This course will help answer questions about varieties of plants to grow, establishment, growth, harvesting and post-harvesting of crop, varieties of plants to grow. Students will become familiar with different marketing options and good record keeping. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HORT 255   Pest Control Management (3 Hours)

This course will explore the general concepts of turf, ornamental, commercial crop and vegetable garden maintenance and pest control in the local area. The student will become familiar with federal and state regulations pertaining to horticulture chemical application. Upon completion of this course, the student should be prepared to take the Kansas or Missouri licensing examination to become a certified applicator of restricted horticultural pesticides and herbicides. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HORT 260   Horticulture Soils (3 Hours)

This course covers soil components as well as the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils that affect plant growth. Emphasis will be placed on horticultural substrates and urban soils and their applications. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

HORT 265   Landscape Construction (3 Hours)

This course will cover the theories, principles and practices used in the interpretation and implementation of landscape construction. It will include site planning and preparation, safety principles, tool use and identification, landscape and construction materials, job bid development and project management. Construction projects in the class will vary by semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $100.

HORT 270   Horticulture Internship (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval

Student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the Horticultural industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a job experience in the area of their horticultural focus and career goals. 20 hrs field study.

HORT 272   Sustainable Agriculture Fall Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the fall and early winter seasons. This includes production and marketing of summer crops, planning, and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field, and marketing these fall crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 274   Sustainable Agriculture Spring Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the winter and early spring seasons. This includes production and marketing of winter crops and planning and production of spring and summer crops in high tunnels and open field and marketing these spring crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs practicum/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 276   Sustainable Agriculture Summer Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the summer season. This includes planning, production and marketing of spring and summer crops and planning and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $50.

HORT 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

HORT 115

  • Title: Home Horticulture
  • Number: HORT 115
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides basic knowledge for the design and management of home lawns, flower and vegetable gardens, and landscape trees and shrubs. Students will learn basic plant anatomy and physiology concepts; how to recognize some common plant deficiency symptoms; the use of fertilizers and pesticides; identification of some common trees, shrubs and garden plants; and the major considerations of good landscape design. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the major parts of a higher plant and discuss their functions.
  2. Discuss the importance of soil condition and fertility, including the proper use of fertilizers.
  3. Discuss the importance of water, light and temperature to plants and how they affect plant growth.
  4. Describe factors regulating plant growth and health.
  5. Prune an herbaceous and woody plant to induce branching and reduce height.
  6. Prepare a stem-tip cutting for rooting.
  7. Identify the economic and sequential considerations when developing a landscape plan.
  8. Recognize and discuss the value of 10 important landscape trees and 10 common landscape shrubs.
  9. Recognize and discuss the value of 20 common garden flowering and vegetable plants.
  10. Design and evaluate a home landscape plan. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Value of Plants
   A. Describe the economic value of plants for homes and neighborhoods.
   B. Explain the environmental value of plants, including water and soil
conservation, sound control and air quality.
   C. Explain the aesthetic value of plants for homes and neighborhoods,
including their psychological benefits.

II. Plant Biology and Physiology
   A. Structure and growth: basic physiological processes
      1. Discuss the importance and process of photosynthesis.
      2. Relate the importance and process of respiration.
      3. Identify photoperiodism and discuss how it can be manipulated.
      4. Identify plant tropisms: plant responses to external stimuli.
   B. Structure and growth: The vegetative phase
      1. Ascertain the life cycle of a higher plant.
      2. Identify the components of a plant cell and discuss their
functions.
      3. Identify the components of a leaf and discuss their functions.
      4. Identify the components of a stem and discuss their functions.
      5. Identify the components of a root and discuss its functions.
   C. Structure and growth: The reproductive phase
      1. Identify a flower and discuss its components and functions.
      2. Identify a fruit and discuss its function.
      3. Identify a seed and describe its components and functions.

III. Plant Culture and Maintenance
   A. Soil and soil fertility
      1. Describe the functions of soil.
      2. Ascertain the basis of plant nutrition.
      3. Discuss the importance of soil pH.
      4. Identify the macro- and micro- plant nutrients and express the
meaning of the three numbers found on a fertilizer container.
      5. Determine the use of fertilizers in the garden.
   B. Water and irrigation
      1. Explain the moisture cycle.
      2. List the roles of water in plant growth.
      3. Discuss irrigation systems for the garden and landscape.
   C. Climate, temperature and light
      1. Describe the effects of climate on plant growth.
      2. Articulate the effect of temperature on plant growth.
      3. Articulate the effect of light on plant growth.
   D. Regulating plant growth
      1. Determine proper plant spacing.
      2. Demonstrate various pruning techniques.
      3. Discuss the use of growth regulating chemicals.
   E. Garden pests
      1. Explore plant pesticide regulations.
      2. List and identify common garden weeds and discuss their control.
      3. List and identify common plant disease problems and discuss their
control.
      4. List and identify common insect pests and discuss their control.

IV. Horticultural Elements of Landscape Design
   A. Trees and shrubs
      1. Recognize 20 common trees and shrubs from the Midwest.
      2. Discuss their general cultural requirements.
   B. Annuals and perennials
      1. Recognize 40 common garden plants from the Midwest.
      2. Discuss their general cultural requirements.
   C. The lawn
      1. List the steps in establishing a lawn.
      2. Discuss the steps in lawn maintenance.

V. Landscape Designs
   A. The ornamental garden
      1. Explore the basic considerations in designing a home landscape.
      2. Identify and discuss common woody plants used in a home
landscape.
      3. Identify and discuss common herbaceous plants used in a home
landscape.
      4. Identify and discuss turf grasses and other ground covers used in
a home landscape.
   B. The vegetable and herb garden
      1. Plan a vegetable garden.
      2. Describe the cultural requirements of 10 common vegetables.
      3. Explain the value of growing herbs.
   C. Indoor and container gardening
      1. Identify the factors affecting plant growth in the indoor
environment.
      2. Describe the process of acclimatization.
      3. Identify 12 common houseplants.
      4. Discuss the care of indoor plants.
      5. Identify the requirements and limitations of the hobby
greenhouse.
   D. The home landscape project
      1. Design a plan for a selected home landscape.
      2. Articulate economic considerations and limitations.
      3. Demonstrate a landscape plan.
      4. Explain its limitations and advantages.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods:

Grading is based on three different areas:

Lab experiments                  40% of grade
Landscaping project              30% of grade
Review of landscaping materials  30% of grade
                                100% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 135

  • Title: Landscape Design
  • Number: HORT 135
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

The course is designed to familiarize students with aspects of landscape design. Students will analyze the site and preferences of the client and complete a landscape design following basic design principles. Students will learn presentation graphics, hand lettering techniques, and how to make a hand drawing to scale. Note: Plant material courses (HORT 214, HORT 215, HORT 220) could be helpful for this course but are not required. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the essential factors affecting a landscape design, including the site condition, the client’s needs, preferences and the projected budget.
  2. Demonstrate effective listening techniques while creating effective relationships with customers to lead to successful sale and/or implementation of the landscape design.
  3. Describe and be able to use the basic elements of a landscape designs for residential and commercial clients.
  4. List the basic elements of a landscape design.
  5. Communicate design ideas through writing, speaking and graphics
  6. Work in teams; participate in decision making, delegation of tasks, dependability and participation in final product (oral, written or graphic presentation). 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe the Essential Factors Affecting a Landscape Design
Including the Site Condition, the Client’s Needs, Preferences and the
Projected Budget
   A. Site Inventory and Analysis
      1. Identify the elements of a base map.
      2. Prepare a scaled base map from field information.
      3. Describe the design and function of a plot plan.
      4. Construct a plot plan for a specific site.
      5. Inventory existing plants and terrain features.
      6. Describe and evaluate sun/shade functions.
      7. Describe and evaluate climatic factors of a site, including
rainfall, wind, sunlight and temperature averages and extremes.
      8. Complete a site analysis for each given location.
   B. Read a landscape design, identifying the shapes and symbols.
   C. Describe the various site soils and substrata and their effect on
the landscape design.
   D. Create a customer profile.
   E. Generate several alternatives to meet the above criteria.

II. Demonstrate Good Customer Serve Practice
   A. Describe good listening skills.
   B. Identify skills used in setting priorities.
   C. Demonstrate good presentation skills to leads to successful sales.
   D. Illustrate final design to customer. 

III. List the Seven Design Principles in All Landscape Drawings
   A. Describe how you would use Unity in creating a theme garden.
   B. Describe the two types of Balance in a landscape design.
   C. Describe how to use Color to direction ones attention to a specific
area of the garden.
   D. Describe how you use Transition to create illusion in the
landscape.
   E. Describe different types of Line in the landscape.
   F. Illustrate the use of Proportion (length, breadth, and depth or
height) in a landscape feature.
   G. Describe the use of Repetition in a well designed landscape.

IV. List the Basic Elements of a Landscape Design
   A. Describe various styles of landscape design, including the Japanese
and English garden style and be able to apply the concepts of the outdoor
room (the use of walls, floor and ceiling).
   B. Describe contemporary trends in landscape design and maintenance of
the design.
   C. Differentiate between the stylistic elements of complexity and
simplicity.
   D. Describe the roles of site condition, garden planting and
construction in the design of a landscape.
   E. Analyze basic problems and potentials in use, practicality and
application of landscape materials.
   F. Use movement and circulation in the design process.

V. Communicate Design Ideas Regarding a Landscape Drawing Through Writing,
Speaking and Graphics.
   A. List and describe the current tools, from the pencil to the
computer, used by the industry to communicate landscape designs.
   B. Be familiar with both an architectural and engineering scale and be
able to employ either so as to communicate a landscape design.
   C. Employ the elements of a landscape design through the use of
appropriate graphic symbols.
   D. Choose and execute the appropriate type of drawing so as to
communicate a landscape design developed by listening to clients, sorting
out priorities and synthesizing that information into the design solution
and thus developing effective customer relationships.
   E. Discuss the use of computer programs and their use in landscape
design.

VI. Work as Individuals and in Teams; Learn to Participate in Decision
Making, Delegation of Tasks, Dependability and Participation in Final
Product (Oral, Written or Graphic  Presentation)
   A. Create and draw an original landscape design.
   B. Identify and compare the graphic conventions employed in traditional
computer-assisted design communication.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading is based on the following:

Exams, Assignments, projects and self/peer and 
 client evaluations  80 to 95%
Attendance            5 to 10%
  Total:                100%

Grades Criteria:
  A = 90% - 100%
  B = 80% -  89%
  C = 70% -  79%
  D = 60% -  69%
  F = below  60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS – Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY – Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated in class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 140

  • Title: Turfgrass I
  • Number: HORT 140
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

The basics of turfgrass identification, selection, use and care will be covered. The emphasis will be on efficient management of soil and turf on large or small grounds. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate their ability to properly identify the major categories of turfgrass; establish and maintain turfgrass; identify turfgrass pests; and develop a pest control fertilizer program. Irrigation systems, their maintenance and repair will also be discussed. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the species of turfgrasses used in this region of the country.
  2. Describe and apply the management practices involved in the establishment and general maintenance of turfgrass.
  3. Identify and use various types of turf equipment and explain the role of each type in turf maintenance.
  4. Identify the various pests that persist in the turf environment.
  5. Select and apply chemical and cultural controls for turf pests in a safe manner.
  6. Identify the basic principles of proper irrigation management and install, maintain and repair specific components. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Turfgrass species used in this region of the country
   A. Identify turfgrass species and describe their growth habits.
   B. Describe environmental limits.
   C. Explain mowing qualities.
   D. Identify basic fertility requirements.

II. Establishment and general maintenance of turfgrass 
   A. Control existing weeds, remove debris, rough grade terrain,
reestablish terrain and renovate terrain.
   B. Create proper drainage.
   C. Modify soil composition if needed.
   D. Grade final surface terraces.
   E. Describe seeding techniques and densities, and practice specific
techniques.
   F. Describe the advantages, disadvantages and techniques of vegetative
planting and practice specific techniques.
   G. Explain the need for mulching, fertilization, irrigation, and pest
control practices.
   H. Describe and practice specific post planting cultural practices.

III. Turf equipment
   A. Identify various types of turf equipment and the role of each type
in turf maintenance, including: mowers, aerators, verti-cutters, seeders,
over-seeders, topdressing equipment, sprayers and others.
   B. Use the identified types of equipment in a safe manner.

IV. Turfgrass pests
   A. Identify specific weed species.
   B. Identify specific diseases.
   C. Identify and describe the life cycle of fungi, time of growth, and
time of occurrence.
   D. Identify turfgrass insects and describe their life cycle(s).
   E. Describe the life cycle of the most common soil pests and describe
the typical damage to the plant.
   F. Describe thatch, explain how it is produced and how to avoid or
remove it.

V. Chemical and cultural controls
   A. Describe the basic elements of pest control.
   B. Select the proper herbicides, fungicides and pesticides used to
control turf pests.
   C. Apply these products using the proper application, calibration and
safety techniques.
   D. Describe pesticide characteristics and be able to contrast pre vs.
post emergence weed control.

VI. Irrigation
   A. Describe the appropriate frequency, timing and rates for irrigating
turfgrasses.
   B. List and describe the different systems available for irrigation and
their advantages.
   C. Describe the design features of specific systems and install,
maintain, and repair specific components.
   D. Discuss the significance of water quality in irrigation
success.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations, Written Assignments and Quizzes 70 to 90% 
Labs and exercises                            10 to 30% 
  Total:                                        100%

Grading Scale:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 –  89%
  C = 70 –  79%
  D = 60 –  69%
  F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer literacy expectations - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY: Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. Chemical hazards and or use of equipment dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals or equipment are used in the laboratory. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated whenever chemicals or equipment are used.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 150

  • Title: Fruits, Vegetables and Herb Crops
  • Number: HORT 150
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize garden center employees with the plant materials and production of crops many homeowners use and grow. This course will help the employee answer many homeowner questions about production, varieties and potential crop problems. Home hobbyists may also wish to enroll in this course. 1 hr. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the fruit tree and small fruit crops indigenous to Kansas and Missouri.
  2. Identify the vegetable types sold at most garden centers in Kansas and Missouri and list recommended varieties.
  3. Identify a minimum of eight herbs, recommend uses and describe sun requirements and spacing.
  4. Recommend planting and harvesting common vegetable crops including asparagus, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, peas, peppers, potatoes, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and vine crops.
  5. Explain and diagnose insect and disease problems of food crops.
  6. Recommend appropriate solutions for insect control and fertilizations on garden food crops.
  7. Demonstrate effective interaction with garden center customers.
  8. Identify and analyze a plant's nutritional requirements. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fruit Trees
   A. Identify the popular fruit trees common to Kansas and Missouri.
   B. Identify recommended varieties of fruit trees for use in landscape
design.
   C. Classify fruit trees according to their size or number of grafts.
      1. Identify grafter parts.
      2. Identify grafted locations and numbers.
   D. Explain the soil requirements for growing fruit trees for
recommended locations.
   E. Explain the yearly cycle of fruit trees and the yearly cultural
practices to develop a fruit tree framework.
   F. Explain how to prune a fruit tree to maximum production,
demonstrating correct pruning techniques.
   G. Identify the common insects and pathogens that attack fruit trees
and recommend safe, effective solutions to these problems.
   H. Recognize when fruit is ready for harvest and explain how to
maintain fruit in storage for a reasonable time.

II. Home Vegetables
   A. Identify common home vegetable types and describe their structure.
   B. Identify the recommended varieties of home vegetables for climatic
zones 5 and 6.
   C. Explain the soil, light and water requirements of home vegetables.
   D. Describe the various nutrient requirements, including fertilizer
required by home vegetables.
   E. Explain the different cultivation cycles – planting/seeding,
growing and harvesting – of home vegetables.
   F. Describe the special cultivation requirements of selected home
vegetables.
   G. Identify the common insects and pathogens that attack home
vegetables and recommend safe, effective solutions to these problems.
   H. Recommend appropriate home vegetable garden layout and design to
meet the client’s needs.

III. Home Vegetables
   A. Identify the popular small fruit plants common to Kansas and
Missouri.
   B. Identify the recommended varieties of small fruits in climatic zones
5 and 6.
   C. Explain the soil, light and water requirements for small fruits.
   D. Describe the nutrient requirements, including fertilizer, required
by small fruits.
   E. Explain the cultivation cycles – planting/seeding, growing and
harvesting – of small fruits.
   F. Identify the common insects and pathogens that attack small fruits
and recommend safe, effective solutions to these problems.
   G. Describe special requirements of small fruits including pruning and
training and trellis design.
  
IV. Herbs
   A. Identify popular herbs common to Kansas and Missouri.
   B. Identify particular varieties of selected herbs, for example, sweet
cinnamon, anise and spicy globe basil.
   C. Explain the soil, light, space and water requirements of popular
herbs.
   D. Explain the cultivation cycles – planting/seeding, growing and
harvesting – of popular herbs.
   E. Describe pruning and deflowering of herbs.
   F. Design a spacing chart for selected herbs to accommodate size and
invasiveness.
   G. Describe methods for processing, preserving and drying herbs.

V. Customer Service
   A. Demonstrate strategies for identifying customer needs and goals.
   B. Demonstrate strategies for identifying customer resources, including
knowledge, skills, plot suitability and personal use of harvest.
   C. Demonstrate strategies for educating the customer regarding the
cultural and plot requirements of the plants and garden.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  Exams and quizzes      80%
  Analysis of nutritional needs of selected plants 
  and in-class exercises 20%
  Total                 100%
 
Grading Scale:
A  =  90% -  100%
B  =  80% -   89%
C  =  70% -   79%
D  =  60% -   69%
F  =  0%  -   59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 160

  • Title: Garden Center Operations
  • Number: HORT 160
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed for garden center employees and provides background on the elements necessary for success in a competitive retail environment. The business organization is emphasized, including environmental monitoring, selling, inventory issues, merchandising, advertising, cost effectiveness, labor/team relationships and customer service. In addition, safety and legal issues are examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify different types of garden center markets.
  2. Explain the need for and purpose of setting business goals.
  3. Demonstrate good telephone skills for order taking and sales.
  4. Take customers’ orders and process to completion.
  5. Explain inventory needs, stock rotation and the process of ordering supplies and inventory.
  6. Put together a merchandise display, exhibiting creativity and proper technique.
  7. Demonstrate merchandising techniques for attracting attention, emphasizing value, educating the customer and moving the audience to action.
  8. Model appropriate interaction and people skills with clients and co-workers.
  9. Explain the value of customer service and describe its consequences.
  10. Evaluate the cost relationship between time, product and labor efficiency.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Develop a substantial competitive advantage through market planning
leading to clear and specific steps needed for reaching designed goals.
   A. Identify the customer base and individual needs.
   B. Discuss the company’s resources and policies.
   C. Explain the importance of adapting to change.
   D. Establish goals.
   E. Predict and forecast future trends in garden center marketing.

II. Demonstrate the accomplished skills necessary in a competitive retail
environment.
   A. Articulate good telephone techniques.
   B. Process orders and establish a follow-up process.
   C. Develop a code of behavior to enhance store image.
   D. Maintain inventory.
   E. Develop and follow policies and guidelines.
   F. Apply price formulas and tagging.
   G. Use technology resources.

III. Demonstrate personal interaction skills to enhance employability of
any horticultural business.
   A. Describe the attributes of the company’s image including quality,
service, reliability and integrity.
   B. Demonstrate the dynamics of customer service including integrity,
customer expectations, innovative customer service techniques, effective
communications skills and importance of showing interest in the customers
needs.
   C. Demonstrate personal qualities that are set as standards including
timeliness, personal hygiene and apparel, language and grammar, attention
to the job, working with others, personal problems, whining and setting
the climate and respect for property.

IV. Demonstrate creative customer service to enhance sales.
   A. Describe and illustrate selling techniques including acknowledgment
- using names, conversational selling, purpose of selling, closing a sale
and the extras.
   B. Articulate the diverse store policies typical of the market (i.e.,
credit, returns and guarantees, personnel requirements/handbook, gift
certificates and deliveries).

V. Demonstrate and evaluate merchandising techniques using different
methods such as promotions, signage, displays, store layout - conveniences
and advertising.

VI. Demonstrate efficiency in solving problems for labor standards such as
time factor, scheduling and developing teamwork and leadership.

VII. For a variety of chemicals, including pesticides, herbicides and
fertilizers, demonstrate the skills necessary to market and deliver them.
   A. Read and interpret Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and label
data.
   B. Follow safety guidelines for preparation, application and
storage.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods: 1) examinations; 2) projects;
and 3) customer interaction exercises.

Exams                            60% 
Projects                         20%
Customer Interaction Exercises   20%
Total                           100%

 Grading Scale:
   A = 90% -  100% 
   B = 80% -   89% 
   C = 70% -   79%
   D = 60% -   69%
   F = 0%  -   59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated in class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 165

  • Title: Arboriculture
  • Number: HORT 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course will prepare the student to work with trees in Zones 5-6. In lecture and lab settings students will learn and demonstrate how to properly plant, prune and maintain trees, identify hazard trees and proper pruning and tree removal techniques. Emphasis will be placed on ANSI and OSHA safety requirements. At the end of this course the student will be prepared to take the test for arboriculture certification in Kansas. 2 hrs. lecture 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the history and future of arboriculture
  2. Explain soil and water management including testing, fertilization and drainage
  3. Describe basic tree biology
  4. Explain tree selection and installation and follow-up care
  5. Identify structural, disease and insect problems in trees
  6. Describe and demonstrate tree maintenance techniques including use of pruning equipment and climbing gear
  7. Identify tree problems and explain treatment methods
  8. Demonstrate the ability to describe and follow all industry safety standards  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History 
   A. Explain the history of arboriculture
   B. Discuss where the industry is today
   C. Explain how new research and problems solving techniques are
changing the industry 
 
II. Soil and Water Management
   A. Describe the physical and chemical properties of soils
   B. Describe soils in urban areas and how they differ from rural areas
   C. Explain the requirements and procedures for soil testing
   D. Analyze soil testing results and recommend soil amendments
   E. Discuss fertilizer types, analysis and techniques
   F. Explain fertilizer leaching and the affects on soil conditions and
tree growth 
   G. Define over fertilization and the effects on soil conditions and
tree growth
   H. Discuss water management
   I. Explain soil drainage and how to modify it

III. Tree Biology
   A. Explain the anatomy and physiology of a tree
   B. Discuss fertilizer requirements
   C. Discuss water requirements
   D. Discuss basic soil requirements

IV. Tree Planting
   A. Discuss the proper soil types and locations for different tree
varieties
   B. Explain the criteria and characteristics for choosing the right tree
for the right site
   C. Explain proper planting hole size
   D. Discuss soil amendments, fertilization and watering of newly planted
trees
   E. Demonstrate proper staking methods and time frame
   F. Describe follow-up care including proper watering, fertilization,
mulching and winterization

V. Tree Maintenance
   A. Describe why, when and where to prune trees
   B. Explain tree responses to pruning
   C. Demonstrate the different techniques for pruning (reduction,
thinning, lions tailing, etc.)
   D. Describe when, where and why cable and bracing are used
   E. Explain the different types of cable and bracing hardware
   F. Explain the limitations of cable and bracing

VI. Tree Problems
   A. Describe the differences between biotic and abiotic disorders
   B. Explain methods to correct abiotic problems
   C. Identify signs and symptoms of common fungal, bacterial, and viral
diseases
   D. Explain the proper treatment methods for tree diseases
   E. Identify common insects and insect problems in Zones 5-6
   F. Explain proper treatment methods for insect problems
   G. Explain the roles of PHC and IPM in insect and disease control

VII.  Climbing Trees
   A. Demonstrate the ability to safely climb trees using climbing gear
   B. Demonstrate the ability to use pruning saws, loppers and other gear
while in the tree canopy
   C. Demonstrate the ability to tie the eight most important rope knots

VIII.  Industry Safety Standards
   A. Explain ANSI and OSHA standard in detail
   B. Demonstrate first aid techniques and explain why CPR certification
is necessary
   C. Explain electrical safety with the 10’ rule and working around
both overhead and underground electric lines
   D. Demonstrate the ability to use and maintain all pruning equipment
safely
   E. Demonstrate the ability to don and use properly all climbing and
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and Quizzes             50% 
Lab Exams and projects        30%
Term Paper and Short Reports  20%
Total    100%

 Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100% 
   B = 80% -  89% 
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY – Students are expected to follow established safety policies and procedures. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 201

  • Title: Introduction to Horticultural Science
  • Number: HORT 201
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This is an introduction to the principles and practices of horticultural plant systems. Plant structure and function will be discussed, along with the effects of environmental factors on plant growth. General cultural practices will be described, including pest control, mineral nutrition and plant propagation. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the functions of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds.
  2. Identify, differentiate and discuss the occurrence of parenchyma, collenchyma and
  3. sclerenchyma cells.
  4. Demonstrate the effects of light intensity and duration and temperature on stem elongation and flower initiation.
  5. Classify plants as annuals, biennials and perennials, as well as herbaceous or woody, deciduous or evergreen, based on their use, growth habit, structure and leaf retention.
  6. Compare and contrast the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.
  7. Differentiate proteins, carbohydrates, fats, enzymes and cofactors, and explain their functions.
  8. List the physical and chemical properties of water and recount its uptake and movement in the phloem and xylem of plants.
  9. List the 17 essential mineral elements of plants and write a short summary of their roles in plant metabolism.
  10. List five important properties of soils that are essential for optimal plant growth.
  11. Perform the making of a stem-tip cutting, a leaf-bud cutting and a leaf-piece cutting.
  12. Perform the correct method of sowing various-sized seeds in a germination medium.
  13. Identify and list the control of six common plant insect pests and five common disease problems.
  14. Present examples of four horticultural cropping systems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Identify the plants of economic and aesthetic value to people.
   B. Classify and differentiate plants based on their physical
characteristics.

II. Horticultural Biology
   A. Identify and classify plant organs.
   B. Compare and contrast the functions of plant organs.
   C. Identify plant cells and their functions.
   D. Compare plant physiological processes.
      1. Photosynthesis
      2. Respiration
      3. Translocation
      4. Transpiration
   E. Identify the physical and chemical properties of water.
      1. Physical states
      2. Cohesion and adhesion
      3. Evaporation and evapotranspiration

III. Horticultural Technology
   A. Identify and perform three methods of asexual plant propagation.
   B. Identify and perform three methods of sexual plant propagation.
   C. Identify and elucidate the common insect pests of plants.
   D. Identify and elucidate the common disease problems of plants.
 
IV. Horticulture Industry
   A. Classify food and ornamental production systems.
   B. Discuss the scope of the horticulture service industries.
   C. Identify trends in research.
   D. Speculate and envision future horticultural goals and problems.

LABORATORY OUTLINE AND COMPETENCIES:

      1. Organize a collection of trade magazine and catalogue examples of
the various fields of horticulture.
      2. Draw and compare the gross morphology of the seed, root, stem,
leaf, flower and fruit of 10 horticulture crops.
      3. Create and identify a seed collection composed of 32 species of
horticultural plants and construct a test to determine seed viability.
      4. Discuss, evaluate and document the results of the seed
germination test.
      5. Prepare a rooting medium and make three different types of
cuttings.  Observe and document the rooting process.
      6. Prepare a medium and sow tomato, petunia and pea seeds.  Observe
and document the germination process.
      7. Observe through a microscope and draw examples of parenchyma,
collenchyma and sclerenchyma cells and the specific tissues in which these
cells are found.
      8. Prepare an experiment comparing stem-tip cuttings with and
without a rooting hormone.  Observe, document and discuss the results.
      9. Prepare an experiment comparing depth of planting of seedling
transplants.  Observe, document and discuss the results.
     10. Prepare an experiment comparing the effect of light intensity on
the growth of plants.  Observe, document and discuss the results.
     11. Prepare an experiment comparing various watering regimes and
their effect on plant growth.  Observe, document and discuss the results.
     12. Prepare a collection of common insect pests and diseases of
horticultural plants.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Examinations            50%
 Laboratory Reports      30%
 Laboratory Technique    20%
  Total                 100%

Grading Scale:
   A = 90% -  100% 
   B = 80% -   89% 
   C = 70% -   79%
   D = 60% -   69%
   F =  0% -   59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 201H

No information found.

HORT 205

  • Title: Plant Propagation*
  • Number: HORT 205
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HORT 201 or department approval

Description:

This course provides basic knowledge of the art and science of sexual and asexual methods of propagating plants. Students study the processes of seed development, seed dormancy, germination, root initiation and grafting. Students will learn basic seed sowing, cutting and grafting skills. The students will be able to demonstrate the selection of appropriate propagation methods and choose the proper environmental conditions necessary to achieve successful propagation of seeds or cuttings. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the types of media, equipment necessary to maintain the proper environment and the structures in which successful plant propagation can occur.
  2. Identify the parts of a seed and explain the process of seed germination.
  3. Discuss methods of seed scarification and stratification.
  4. Select and demonstrate the proper methods of seed germination for a variety of plant species.
  5. Identify and describe the various types of cuttings.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to make stem-tip, leaf-bud and leaf-piece cuttings.
  7. Explain the use of plant grafts and describe the procedure for making a successful graft.
  8. Summarize the benefits of micropropagation and the technique of tissue culture. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

LECTURE 

I. Biology of Propagation
   A. List the environmental factors affecting plant propagation.
   B. List and explain the functions of all major morphological parts of
higher plants.
   C. Describe the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.
 
II. Sexual Propagation
   A. Discuss the development of seeds.
   B. Identify the techniques of seed production and handling.
   C. Articulate the principles of propagation by seed.
   D. List the techniques of seed propagation.

III. Asexual Propagation
   A. Discuss the techniques of propagation by cuttings.
   B. Discuss the biological factors affecting grafting.
   C. Identify the various techniques of grafting.
   D. Identify the process of layering and discuss its natural
modifications.
   E. Describe various industry applied propagation methods.
   F. Demonstrate the various methods of propagating specialized stems and
roots.

IV. Principles of Tissue Culture for Micropropagation
   A. Summarize the techniques of in vitro culture for micropropagation
and biotechnology. 

LAB

   1. Determine the water-holding capacities of various propagation
methods.
   2. Draw and label the morphology of various fruits and seeds.
   3. Create and identify a seed collection.
   4. Construct and conduct a test to determine seed viability.
   5. Describe, evaluate and document the results of the seed germination
test.
   6. Prepare a planting medium and properly sow tomato and potato seeds.
   7. Draw and label the morphological characteristics of the stem, leaf
and root.
   8. Describe propagation methods of specialized plant structures.
   9. Prepare and conduct an experiment comparing stem-tip cuttings with
and without a rooting hormone.
  10. Describe, evaluate and document the results of the stem-tip cuttings
experiment.
  11. Prepare and conduct an experiment comparing various depths of
planting of seedling transplants.
  12. Describe, evaluate and document the results of the depth of planting
experiment.
  13. Prepare and conduct an experiment comparing leaf and root cuttings.
  14. Describe, evaluate and document the results of the leaf and root
cuttings experiment.
  15. Describe propagation methods of grafting and apply those methods of
“pomato” production.
  16. Describe propagation methods of tissue culture.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods:

 Examinations                   50%
 Laboratory Reports             30%
 Laboratory Technique           20%
  Total                        100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 214

  • Title: Woody Plants I, Deciduous
  • Number: HORT 214
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

The class places emphasis on identification, ornamental characters, site requirements, and use of woody ornamental deciduous trees and shrubs with special emphasis on the cultivated varieties in climatic zones 5 and 6. Plant uses and seasonal effects and influences that affect plant choices will be also be taught. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper, and garden center employee in identifying plant materials used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify selected deciduous plants common to garden centers in zones 5 and 6.
  2. Articulate the uses of the selected plant materials, i.e. bloom times, sun requirements, size and color.
  3. Describe the process of helping customers select the appropriate plants for their landscape design.
  4. Describe plant maintenance, pruning, care and how to troubleshoot plant problems.
  5. Explain the general concepts and the role of deciduous trees and shrubs in garden design.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultivation Zones
   A. Discuss the characteristics of the various growing zones.
   B. Describe the specific requirements of deciduous trees and shrubs
successfully cultivated in Zones 5 and 6.
   C. List and identify selected deciduous trees and shrubs common to
garden centers outside zones 5 and 6. 
   D. Describe cultivation requirements for deciduous trees and shrubs
marginally successful in zones 5 and 6.

II. Classifications
   A. Describe the classification systems of deciduous trees and shrubs
addressing the logic of its major headings and the logic of its species
and sub-species arrangement.
   B. List and identify deciduous trees and shrubs according to climatic
zones.

III. Plant Applications
   A. Describe the aesthetic applications of various deciduous trees and
shrubs in a landscape design.
   B. Describe the functional or structural applications of various
deciduous trees and shrubs in a landscape design.

IV. Plant Requirements
   A. Describe the cultivation requirements of various deciduous trees and
shrubs including irrigation/drainage, sunlight, space, nutrients and soil
conditions.
   B. Compare and contrast the maintenance requirements of various
deciduous trees and shrubs, including watering/irrigation, fertilizing,
pruning, pest control and disease control.

V. Customer Service and Sales
   A. Describe the interactions with customers and clients necessary to
determine the customers needs, goals, resources, knowledge
and personal involvement in solving the problem.
   B. Describe a typical inventory that would satisfy a customer’s
needs.
   C. Demonstrate the use of resources to help the customer including
guides and resource booklets, catalogs videos and self-help workshops.

VI. Describe the most commonly recommended varieties of deciduous trees
and shrubs including their application, requirements, characteristics,
relative resistance to disease and pests, cost/purchase, preparation,
maintenance, place in the plant classification system and substitutions.

VII. Catalog deciduous tree and shrub materials according to their
requirements and applications including sunlight, moisture tolerance and
requirements, bloom date and duration, color, size and cost.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1) examinations and 2) labs.

50% of total points will be from exams and quizzes
50% of total points will be from lab exams

 Grading Scale:
A = 90% -  100% 
B = 80% -   89% 
C = 70% -   79%
D = 60% -   69%
F =  0% -   59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. SAFETY - Consumption of food, gum, beverages or use of tobacco products is prohibited.
  2. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 215

  • Title: Woody Plants II, Evergreens
  • Number: HORT 215
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course places emphasis on identification, ornamental characteristics, site requirements and use of evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs with special emphasis on the cultivated varieties in climatic zones 5 and 6. Plant uses and seasonal effects and influences that affect plant choices will be taught. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper and garden center employee in identifying plant materials used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify selected evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs common to garden centers in zones 5 and 6.
  2. Articulate the uses of the selected plant materials, i.e. bloom times, sun requirements, size and color.
  3. Describe plant maintenance, pruning, care and how to troubleshoot plant problems.
  4. Explain the general concepts and the role of evergreen tree and shrubs and flowering shrubs in garden design.
  5. Describe the process of helping customers select the appropriate plants for their landscape design. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultivation Zones
   A. Describe the characteristics of the various growing zones.
   B. Describe the specific requirements for evergreen trees and shrubs
and flowering shrubs successfully cultivated inside zones 5 and 6.
   C. List and identify selected plants common to garden centers in zones
5 and 6.        
   D. Describe cultivation requirements for evergreen trees and shrubs and
flowering shrubs marginally successful in zones 5 and 6.

II. Classifications
   A. Describe the classification systems of evergreen trees and shrubs
and flowering shrubs addressing the logic of its major headings and the
logic of its species and sub-species arrangement.
   B. List and identify evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs
according to climatic zone. 

III. Plant Applications
   A. Describe the aesthetic applications of various evergreen trees and
shrubs and flowering shrubs in a landscape design.
   B. Describe the functional or structural applications of various
evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs in a landscape design.

IV. Plant Requirements
   A. Describe the cultivation requirements of various evergreen trees and
shrubs and flowering shrubs, including irrigation/drainage, sunlight,
space, nutrients, and soil conditions.
   B. Compare and contrast the maintenance requirements of various
evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs, including
watering/irrigation, fertilizing, pruning, pest control and disease
control.
 
V. Customer Service and Sales
   A. Describe the interactions with customers and clients necessary to
determine the customer’s needs, goals, resources, knowledge and personal
involvement in solving the problem.
   B. Describe a typical inventory that would satisfy customer needs.
   C. Demonstrate the use of resources to help the customer including
guides and resource booklets, catalogs, videos and self-help workshops.

VI. Describe the most commonly recommended varieties of evergreen trees
and shrubs and flowering shrubs including their application, requirements,
characteristics, relative resistance to disease and pests, cost/purchase,
preparation, maintenance, place in the plant classification system and
substitutions.

VII. Catalog evergreen trees and shrubs and flowering shrubs materials
according to their requirements and applications including sunlight,
moisture tolerance and requirements, bloom date and duration, color, size
and cost.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1) examinations and 2) labs.

50% of total points will be from exams and quizzes
50% of total points will be from lab exams

Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100% 
B = 80% -  89% 
C = 70% -  79%
D = 60% -  69%
F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. SAFETY - Consumption of food, gum, beverages or use of tobacco products strictly prohibited.
  2. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 220

  • Title: Herbaceous Plants
  • Number: HORT 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course will focus on the identification, ornamental characters, culture, propagation, and use of herbaceous perennials, bulbs, ground covers, vines and annuals. This course will assist the grounds maintenance employee, landscaper, and garden center employee in identifying and selecting herbaceous plant materials with additional emphasis on uses and maintenance of these plants when used in the landscape. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify selected herbaceous plants common to garden centers in zones five and six.
  2. Articulate the characteristics of the selected herbaceous plant materials, i.e., bloom times, sun requirements, size and color.
  3. Describe the process of helping customers select appropriate plants for their landscape design.
  4. Describe plant maintenance, pruning, care and troubleshooting problems of herbaceous plants.
  5. Explain the general concepts and role of herbaceous plants in garden design.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultivation Zones
   A. Describe the characteristics of the various growing zones and the
common types of herbaceous plants successful in those zones.
   B. Describe the specific requirements for herbaceous plants
successfully cultivated in zones five and six.
   C. List and identify selected herbaceous plants commonly sold in garden
centers in zones five and six. 
   D. Describe cultivation requirements for herbaceous plants marginally
successful in zones five and six.

II. Classifications
   A. Describe the classification system for herbaceous plants addressing
the logic of its major headings and the logic of its species and
sub-species arrangement.
   B. List and identify herbaceous plants according to zones of
cultivation including perennials, annuals, bulbs, ground covers and
vines.

III. Plant Applications
   A. Describe the aesthetic applications of herbaceous plants in a
landscape design.
   B. Describe the functional or structural applications of various
herbaceous plants in a landscape design.

IV. Plant Requirements
   A. Describe the cultivation requirements of various herbaceous plants,
i.e., irrigation/drainage, sunlight, space, nutrients and soil
conditions.
   B. Compare and contrast the maintenance requirements of various
herbaceous plants, i.e., watering/irrigation, fertilizing, pruning and
pest and disease control.

V. Customer Service and Sales
   A. Describe the interactions with customers and clients necessary to
determine the customer’s needs and goals, resources, knowledge and
personal involvement in solving problems.
   B. Describe a typical interaction with a customer to determine needs
and solve a problem.
   C. Demonstrate the use of resources to help the customer including
guides and resource booklets, catalogs, videos and self-help workshops.

VI. Describe the most commonly recommended varieties of herbaceous plants
for the home gardener including applications, requirements,
characteristics, relative resistance to disease and pests, cost/purchase
and preparation, maintenance, plant classification system and
substitutions.

VII. Catalog herbaceous plant materials according to their requirements
and applications including sunlight, moisture tolerance and requirements,
bloom date and duration, color, size and cost.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and Quizzes 50% 
Lab Exams         50%
Total            100%

 Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100% 
   B = 80% -  89% 
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 225

  • Title: Plant Problems*
  • Number: HORT 225
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HORT 214 and HORT 220 or department approval

Description:

This course is a broad-spectrum overview of plant insects, diseases and nutrition. Students will look at plants to identify the common characteristics found when diagnosing plant problems. Identification, treatment and treatment alternatives will be considered to help customers make diagnostic decisions for the use of chemicals and integrated pest management techniques (IPM). 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Seek out accurate information on identifying and solving plant problems.
  2. Ask appropriate questions of the customer acquiring the needed information to make a reasonable diagnosis.
  3. Recognize the difference between insect and animal damage, disease damage, nutritional deficiencies and environmental or mechanical damage.
  4. Recommend possible solutions to common problems.
  5. Identify common insect pests and describe their life cycles.
  6. Classify symptoms related to disease and differentiate whether symptoms are due to fungi, bacteria or viruses.
  7. Include nutritional elements and the related plant function to apply diagnosis and solutions to a plant problem.
  8. Apply water quality to the diagnosis and solution of a plant problem.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Plant Physiology
   A. Recognize the basic plant parts and name them.
   B. Explain the plant functions and how they relate to growth.
 
II. Plant Diseases
   A. Define plant pathogens and describe how they affect the plant, i.e.,
characteristics of fungi, bacteria and viruses.
   B. Identify common plant diseases, their symptoms and associated
pathogens, i.e., spot diseases, anthracnose, blotch, blight, scorch,
cankers, wilt, damping off, rot, stunts, gummosis, oedema, rust, smuts,
mildews, galls, witches broom, mosaic and chlorosis.

III. Insects
   A. Identify the parts of an insect.
   B. Identify insects that will damage plants.

IV. Insects and Pests
   A. Describe the life cycles of common insects and pests, including
ants, termites, aphids, plant bugs, mealybugs, beetles, leafhoppers,
whitefly, borers, cutworms, mites, sowbugs, nemas, earthworms, slugs and
snails.
   B. Describe control methods for various insects and pests.

V. Vertebrate Animal Pests
   A. Identify the vertebrate animal pests that damage plants and describe
their behavior including rabbits, gophers, skunks, possum, moles, deer,
squirrels, birds and geese.
   B. Describe control methods for various vertebrate animal pests.

VI. Describe and demonstrate pest prevention using cultural practices such
as sanitation, pest resistance, cultural resistance, poisons and chemical
compatibilities. 

VII. Describe other means of pest control that are environmentally safe
and optional using integrated pest management, i.e., monitoring, insect
growth regulators, biological controls, organic methods and chemical
methods.

VIII. Appropriate Use of Equipment 
   A. Demonstrate safety procedures.
   B. Describe regulations and licensing.
   C. Demonstrate orientation and teaching of customers on how to use and
handle application equipment, pesticides and fertilizers according to the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Material Safety
Data Sheets (MSDS).

IX. Demonstrate how to diagnose plant problems with the customer
addressing what to observe in plant specimens, what to ask the customer
and how to evaluate the customer’s understanding of the problem and the
customer’s available resources.
 
X. Plant Nutrition, Its Sources and Needs

   A. List the major and minor elements and how they affect the plant.
      1. Explain nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as to their function
in the plant, availability in the soil, soil condition and deficiency
symptoms.
      2. Explain minor elements regarding function in the plant,
availability and source and deficiency symptoms.
   B. Discuss water quality as it relates to plant growth and nutrient
availability, i.e., pH - effects, changing pH and effects on nutrition.
   C. Recommend fertilizers for specific deficiencies.
      1. Differentiate between organic and inorganic fertilizers.
      2. Explain the type and make up of available fertilizers and their
uses, i.e., dry, liquid and slow release.
      3. Articulate and interpret the formulations of common fertilizers.
      4. Write out a nutritional program for a flower bed based on the
expected results and specific plant types.
      5. Describe the uses of the following soil amendments for specific
situations:  lime, gypsum, organic matter, calcium, sulfur, iron and
mycorrhizal fungi.

XI. Demonstrate Productive Interactions with Customers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and Quizzes              50% 
Identification                 40%
Customer Interaction Exercises 10%
Total                         100%

 Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100% 
B = 80% -  89% 
C = 70% -  79%
D = 60% -  69%
F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: a) Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY a) Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. b) Chemical hazards and use of equipment dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals or equipment are used in the laboratory. Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated in class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 235

  • Title: Landscape Maintenance and Techniques
  • Number: HORT 235
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the principles and techniques involved in landscape maintenance including pruning techniques, fertilization, irrigation, spray schedules and weed control. Installation and maintenance of annual and perennial plant material is examined. In addition, the student will learn to design preventive strategies and identify and examine disease and insect damage. The students will learn how to maintain good customer relations. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the basic plant material requirements for growth and health.
  2. Identify and explain the soil types found in this area, including how they are influenced by various factors.
  3. Correctly interpret Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), chemical and fertilizer labels.
  4. Describe the environmental requirements for a healthy landscape.
  5. Identify important annual and perennial plant materials used in the landscape and explain their care.
  6. Correctly and safely prune plant materials.
  7. Troubleshoot problems in the landscape, evaluate the situation and develop possible solutions.
  8. Demonstrate proper safety techniques.
  9. Demonstrate effective customer relations and relate the course concepts to a customer.
  10. Evaluate various irrigation methods. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Plant Requirements for Growth and Health 
   A. Discuss the sun exposure and stress symptoms of the plant.
   B. Discuss how the plant uses and loses water in its life process.
   C. Discuss the nutrient requirements of the plant.
   D. Discuss the effect of atmosphere, pollutants, and wind on plant
growth.
   E. Discuss the growth and requirements of turf and aquatic plants.

II. Soil Types
   A. Identify soil types in this area based on their characteristics.
   B. Explain the different aspects of soil (i.e. texture, topography,
amendments, soil tests and their interpretations and the effect of organic
matter on soil).

III. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
   A. Interpret MSDS sheets and labels for chemicals used for weed
control. 
   B. Interpret MSDS sheets and labels for chemicals used to control
insects, diseases and other pests.
   C. Interpret MSDS sheets and labels for fertilizers used on turf,
ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, herbaceous perennials and annuals.

IV. Environmental Requirements for Healthy Landscape
   A. Recommend general fertilizers, using the following variables:
different composition, different formulations, spray schedules and
application rates.
   B. Discuss the need for weed control in the landscape:
      1. List the different types of weeds
      2. Identify commonly found weeds
      3. List the chemical controls
      4. Discuss the benefits of mulch.  
   C. Discuss common landscape diseases
      1. Discuss the chemical controls for diseases based on their
classification and the timing for their control
       . Discuss the use of IPM (integrated pest management)

V. Important Annual and Perennial Plant Material
   A. Identify and describe important annual and perennial plants, their
uses, care and maintenance.
   B. Create a calendar for installation and replanting to establish a
continuous display of color in the annual and perennial herbaceous beds.
   C. Establish a nutritional program, weed control, fall and spring
maintenance program for the annual and perennial herbaceous plant
materials. 
   D. Correctly install and maintain annual and perennial herbaceous plant
materials.

VI. Pruning
   A. Discuss the timing of pruning for deciduous trees and shrubs,
flowering shrubs, evergreen trees and shrubs and herbaceous plant
materials.
   B. Identify pruning tools and power equipment and demonstrate their
safe use.
   C. Correctly prune ornamental woody plant materials and herbaceous
materials

VII. Troubleshoot Problems and Develop Solutions
   A. Listen to client’s concerns.
   B. Evaluate current situation including problem areas and areas that
work.
   C. Prioritize and synthesize collected information into possible
solution(s).

VIII. Safety
   A. Demonstrate the safe use of equipment, chemicals, and other
products.
   B. Demonstrate proper lifting techniques.
   C. Identify appropriate clothing and explain the use of noise
protection while using equipment.

IX. Customer Relations
   A. Demonstrate good listening skills.
   B. Identify skills used to set priorities and synthesize that
information into a possible maintenance solution.
   C. Create effective relationships with customers that lead to a
successful sale and/or implementation of a landscape maintenance
contract.

X. Irrigation
   A. Describe the appropriate frequency, timing and rates for
irrigation.
   B. List and evaluate the different systems available and describe their
advantages.
   C. Describe the design features for specific systems including: pumps,
valves, controls and pipes.
   D. Install, maintain, and troubleshoot specific components.
   E. Discuss the significance of water quality in irrigation
success.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations, Written Assignments and Quizzes 70 to 90% of grade
In-class exercises                            up to 30% of grade
  Total                                            100%

Grading Scale:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 –  89%
  C = 70 –  79%
  D = 60 –  69%
  F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer literacy expectations - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY: 1) Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. 2) Chemical hazards and or use of equipment dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals or equipment are used in the laboratory. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated whenever chemicals or equipment are used.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 240

  • Title: Turfgrass II*
  • Number: HORT 240
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HORT 140

Description:

This course is a continuation of turfgrass I (HORT 140). Topics include green construction, top dressing, sprayer calibration, management programs (e.g., setting up a lawn care program) and the influence environment has on turfgrass growth. 2 hrs. lecture 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the various careers associated with the turfgrass industry.
  2. Analyze the growth and development process of turfgrass through its plant anatomy, growth phases and climatic effects.
  3. Identify and evaluate the varieties of turfgrass species.
  4. Assess the components of the turfgrass growth environment.
  5. Demonstrate and explain the primary and secondary practices used to care for turfgrass.
  6. Identify insect pests, weeds and diseases which threaten the growth of turfgrass and describe the various methods used for control.
  7. Demonstrate the proper and safe use of turfgrass equipment.
  8. Outline and explain the steps and procedures to propagate turfgrass.
  9. Create a “cultural system” for the growth of a turfgrass site. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Describe the various careers in turfgrass industry.
      1. Ground superintendent
      2. Manufacturing/sales representative
      3. Professional-service contractor
      4. Technical writer
      5. Scientist/educator
   B. Assess the quality of turfgrass.
      1. Visual quality
      2. Functional quality

II. Growth and Development of Turfgrass
   A. Draw and label grass plant components in a diagram.
   B. Describe germination and seedling development of the grass seed.
   C. Diagram plant leaf form.
   D. Identify three types of stems common to turfgrass.
   E. Explain the process of tillering.
   F. Discuss the two types of turfgrass root systems: primary and
secondary.
   G. Describe the flowering position of the grass shoot: inflorescence.
   H. Compare seasonal growth variation of turfgrass: the biomodal
pattern.
   I. Analyze bioenergetics and metabolism processes and their impact on
plant growth.

III.  Varieties of Turfgrass Species
   A. Relate the six climatic groups and the impact on the type of grass
in its group.
   B. Identify each turfgrass by its Latin name and common name.
   C. Evaluate the turfgrass leaf blade anatomy and morphology.
   D. State the criteria for selecting a turfgrass species based on soil,
temperature ranges, maintenance and utility.
   E. Identify turfgrass seed by variety and in different seed mixes

IV. Turfgrass Environment
   A. Assess the atmospheric effects on the plant such as light,
temperature, moisture and wind.
   B. Explain the effect the edaphic environment has on the plant. 
   C. Explain the effect the biotech environment has on the plant.

V. Primary Practices Used to Care for Turfgrass
   A. Demonstrate and describe techniques for mowing
   B. Demonstrate and describe techniques for fertilization
   C. Demonstrate and describe techniques for irrigation

VI. Secondary Practices Used to Care for Turfgrass
   A. Describe techniques for cultivation
   B. Describe techniques for rolling
   C. Describe techniques for top dressing
   D. Describe techniques for molting
   E. Explain the use of wetting agents
   F. Explain the use of colorants
   G. Explain the use of growth regulators 
   H. Explain the use of soil amendments

VII. Equipment Use
   A. Demonstrate in a class laboratory session the use of:
      1. Mowers
      2. Aerators
      3. Sprayers
      4. Trimming tools
      5. Seeders
   B. State and apply safety regulations and practices when using
turfgrass equipment
   C.Compare and contrast types of safety equipment required for safe use
of turfgrass equipment 

VIII.  Pest Identification
   A. Identify insect pests 
   B. Identify weed pests
   C. Identify disease problems
   D. Create a turfgrass and weed collection

IX. Pesticides and Methods Used to Manage Pests
   A. Describe methods of weed control
   B. Describe methods of disease control
   C. Describe methods of nematode control
   D. Describe methods of insect control
   E. Describe methods of large-animal control

X. Steps and Procedures to Propagate Turfgrass
   A. Evaluate preparation of the site
   B. Select turfgrass
   C. Explain planting procedure
   D. Outline post-planting procedures
   E. Describe renovation of deteriorated turfgrass
   F. Discuss use of temporary winter turfgrass

XI. Concept of the “Cultural System” 
   A. Appraise the culture intensity required.
   B. Deduce the growth factors required.
   C. Evaluate the levels of supply available.
   D. Identify the limiting factors.
   E. Asses the cultural intensity selection

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Examinations           50%
Quizzes                  25%
Turf project - written   25%
  Total                 100%

Grade Schedule
90 – 100% A
80 – 89% B
70 – 79% C
60 – 69% D
below 60% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 245

  • Title: Commercial Crop Production
  • Number: HORT 245
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize Market Farmers with the plant materials and production of crops grown in the Market Farming industry. This course will help answer questions about varieties of plants to grow, establishment, growth, harvesting and post-harvesting of crop, varieties of plants to grow. Students will become familiar with different marketing options and good record keeping. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Explain the concepts of sustainable agriculture.
  2. Differentiate between commercial agriculture and organic production.
  3. Explain the concept of sustainability with respect to fresh market fruit, vegetable and herb production and how it relates to conventional agriculture and organic production.
  4. Differentiate between soil management and fertilization.
  5. Describe methods of weed management in vegetables, small fruits and herbs.
  6. Identify the various methods of water management, including irrigation, raised beds, drainage, and mulching.
  7. Compare and contrast methods of insect and disease control in commercial crops.
  8. Compare various methods used to extend the growing season.
  9. Explain the proper stage(s) to harvest, various harvesting techniques, handling methods, market preparation activities, packaging methods, and storage options used in sustainable fresh market production.
  10. Recommend methods and requirements used in crop establishment and plant growth of commonly grown vegetables, herbs and small fruits.
  11. Conduct a market analysis and develop a marketing plan for your operation.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concepts of Sustainability 
   A. Explain the concepts of environmental stewardship and
sustainability
   B. Describe the relationship between profitability and sustainability
of farms and local farm communities
   C. Discuss crop and livestock diversification
   D. Differentiate between conventional agriculture and organic
production
   E. Discuss the connections between sustainable agriculture and human
health 
   F. Contrast the concepts of biotechnology and genetic engineering with
the concept of sustainability
   G. Explain the importance of conservation of resources

II. Development of Fresh Market, Commercial Agriculture and Organic Crop
Production
   A. List important considerations in developing a market plan for an
organic or sustainable fresh market farm
   B. Identify the goals, assets, and skills you bring in planning your
farm
   C. Describe the factors you should consider in finding the place on
which to develop your operation
   D. List the equipment you will need starting up
   E. Illustrate the importance of planning and record keeping

III. Soil Management and Fertilization
   A. Define topography and drainage
   B. Describe methods of soil preparation
   C. Explain organic matter and how to maintain organic matter
   D. Describe "on-farm" composting
   E. Identify techniques of vermiculture
   F. Illustrate crop rotation
   G. Explain the use of cover crops and green manure and animal manures
   H. Identify methods of conservation tillage
   I. Explain soil testing, soil pH and the effects of liming
   J. Differentiate between primary, secondary and micronutrients
   K. Analyze fertilizer formulae and ratios
   L. Identify application methods for fertilization
   M. Define soil productivity

IV. Weed Management
   A. Identify the types of weeds common to growing zones 5 and 6
   B. Classify different types of weeds
   C. Explain competition between weeds and cultivated crops
   D. Describe weed control methods

V. Methods of Water Management
   A. Explain water requirements for different crops
   B. Recognize critical periods of water use
   C. Explain soil moisture
   D. Determine the frequency of irrigation and amount of water needed
   E. Describe different methods of irrigation
   F. Discuss sources of water and water quality
   G. Identify mulching principles and materials

VI. Controlling Insects and Diseases
   A. Discuss the importance of insect and disease control
   B. Identify various insect and plant disease control methods, including
organic methods and Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
   C. Recognize the benefit of bees and other pollinators of plants
   D. Describe methods for the control of plant diseases and plant disease
agents
   E. Explain the importance of proper timing in the control and
prevention of plant diseases
   F. Interpret pesticide labels
   G. Determine the effects of combining insecticides and fungicides
   H. Discuss safe handling and application of insecticides and
fungicides

VII. Extension of the Crop Growing Season
   A. Define seed priming
   B. Diagram types of raised beds
   C. Describe different methods of greenhouse production
   D. Differentiate between row covers, high tunnels and cold frames
   E. Explain micro-climate plant selection
   F. Identify emergency frost protection measures
   G. Develop a crop planting plan using hardier plant varieties

VIII. Harvesting, Handling, Market Preparation, Packaging and Storage
Techniques Used in Sustainable Fresh Market Production
   A. Determine appropriate post-harvest handling techniques
   B. Identify the different types of fruit and vegetable classifications
   C. Describe the factors that cause deterioration of crop products
   D. Differentiate between hand harvesting and mechanical harvesting
techniques
   E. Describe preparations for fresh fruit harvesting
   F. Determine the appropriate time of season for harvesting
   G. Describe the use of temperature control as a method of protecting
harvested crops
   H. Explain processes used in cooling vegetables
   I. Describe the various modes for safe transit and management of fresh
produce
   J. Analyze the quality of vegetables by shelf-life, proper packaging
and grade standards

IX. Establishment and Requirements of Commonly Grown Vegetables, Herbs and
Small Fruits
   A. Discuss the origin, history, classification, industry and production
of commonly grown vegetables, herbs and small fruits
   B. Describe the development and growth cycle of the plants
   C. Describe the criteria to be considered in planting and crop
establishment
   D. Identify climatic and different cultural practices in growing
vegetables, herbs and small fruits
   E. Identify plant cultivars

X. Market Analysis and Marketing Plans for a Successful Operation
   A. Determine and analyze your niche as a Market Farmer
   B. Identify the various marketing options available to a Market Farmer
   C. Based on a market analysis, develop a marketing plan for your
operation

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                50% of grade
Projects/Assignments     50% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. TRANSPORTATION - Students must provide transportation to and from field trips.
  2. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  3. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class.
  4. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 255

  • Title: Pest Control Management
  • Number: HORT 255
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will explore the general concepts of turf, ornamental, commercial crop and vegetable garden maintenance and pest control in the local area. The student will become familiar with federal and state regulations pertaining to horticulture chemical application. Upon completion of this course, the student should be prepared to take the Kansas or Missouri licensing examination to become a certified applicator of restricted horticultural pesticides and herbicides. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe area grasses, including plant parts and growth cycle.
  2. Describe establishment, care, and maintenance of lawns.
  3. Describe lawn problems and pests.
  4. Decide on the amounts and types of pesticides to apply.
  5. Demonstrate chemical application equipment.
  6. Describe ornamental pests and appropriate controls.
  7. Know and apply appropriate federal, state and local regulations.
  8. Demonstrate correct procedures for chemical spills or poisonings.
  9. Describe the certification process in Kansas and Missouri. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Area and Regional Lawn Grasses
   A. Grass plant
      1. Describe the parts of the grass plant.
      2. Explain the function of each plant part.
   B. Seed
      1. Describe the development of the grass seed.
      2. Explain the germination process.
   C. Growth Cycle
      1. Describe elements of the growth cycle.
      2. Explain the sequence of development, including root, crown and
leaf.
   D. Area grasses
      1. List the area grasses.
      2. Identify samples of area grasses.
      3. Describe the growth and maintenance requirements of area
grasses.

II. Establishing a Lawn
   A. Describe the environmental conditions that affect lawn cutting
including light, moisture, wind, turf components and soils.
   B. Discuss which environmental conditions are most significant for
Midwest lawns.
   C. Explain why Kansas/Missouri is a difficult area for lawns.

III. Care and Maintenance of Lawn
   A. Describe the effects on lawns of the following: mowing,
fertilization, irrigation, and aeration.
   B. Describe the annual schedule for each maintenance activity.

IV. General Lawn Problems and Pests
   A. Define types of pests and problems, describing the damage caused by
them.
   B. Describe the types of controls for each pest.

V. Pesticides
   A. List the types of pesticides and describe specific examples of
each.
   B. Describe the typical formulation of each pesticide.
   C. Discuss the significance of labeling, including ingredients, rates
and warnings.
   D. Describe the environment controls for pesticides including:
      1. Federal and state laws
      2. Regulations for handling, storage and application

VI. Application Equipment
   A. Describe the types and uses of the following application equipment:
      1. Sprays/nozzles
      2. Dusters
      3. Granular applicators
   B. Calibrate each application device.
   C. Describe and demonstrate each element of a safe application:
      1. Protective equipment
      2. Cleanup 
      3. Handling chemicals
      4. First aid
      5. Drift control
      6. Protecting other people
   D. Demonstrate correct application procedures.

VII. Ornamental Pest Control
   A. Describe the common insect pests, their indications and their
control.
   B. Describe the common vertebrate pests, their indications and their
control.
   C. Describe the diseases common to ornamental plants, their indications
and their control.

VIII. Turf Threats
   A. Weeds
      1. Describe the life cycles of various weeds common to the area.
      2. Classify weed families.
      3. Identify examples of specific weeds.
      4. Describe and apply appropriate weed controls.
   B. Insects
      1. Describe the body parts of an insect.
      2. Describe the various families of insects and explain their
differences.
      3. Identify specific examples of insects and their damage.
      4. Describe and demonstrate the appropriate controls for various
insect infestations.

IX. Federal, State and Local Regulations
   A. Describe the regulations, their enforcement and penalties.
   B. Describe and demonstrate each of the following topics: 
      1. Applications
      2. Storage
      3. Transportation
      4. Disposal

X. Safety
   A. Describe the state and federal safety regulations for pest and
disease control, including:
      1. OSHA regulations
      2. DOT regulations
      3. Other federal, state and local regulations
   B. Describe and demonstrate correct procedures for handling a chemical
spill, including: 
      1. Confinement
      2. Notification of proper agencies
      3. Cleanup of the chemical spill
      4. Proper disposal of chemical containers
   C. Describe and demonstrate the correct procedures for dealing with a
poisoning, including:
      1. Diagnosis
      2. First aid
      3. Professional medical intervention

XI. Certification
   A. Describe the application and completion procedures to become a
certified applicator of pesticides in either Kansas or Missouri.
   B. Describe the standards and requirements necessary for
certification.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Weekly Exams: 40%-60%
Final Exam:   40%-60%
 
A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% -  89%
C = 70% -  79%
D = 60% -  69%
F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students must provide transportation to and from field trips.
  2. Students will deal with potentially dangerous chemicals and must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  3. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 260

  • Title: Horticulture Soils
  • Number: HORT 260
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course covers soil components as well as the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils that affect plant growth. Emphasis will be placed on horticultural substrates and urban soils and their applications. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the term soil, identify its constituents and describe its formation.
  2. Identify the various layers of a soil horizon
  3. Classify a soil using soil texture and calculate bulk density.
  4. Read a soil survey and determine the soil classifications.
  5. Explain the aspects and effects of soil water.
  6. Identify various soil organisms and describe their relationship to a healthy soil or the problems they cause.
  7. Describe the role organic matter plays in a soil structure.
  8. Test for soil pH and identify methods for changing the soil pH factor.
  9. Explain how cation exchange capacity is determined and measured.
  10. Describe components, sources, and application of fertilizers.
  11. Identify the materials used to create organic-based growing media and the special circumstances related to its use.
  12. Describe the properties, concerns and applications of substrates and urban soils and how they affect plants. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction – What is Soil
   A. Explore the topics covered in the course.
   B. Discuss the functions of soils, soil constituents, and history of
the use and study of soils.
   C. List the goals and purpose for studying soils.

II. Soil Constituents
   A. Discuss the definition and uses of soil.
   B. Classify different types of rocks as basic soil elements.
   C. Identify the four soil constituents.
   D. Compare the physical and chemical weathering processes of rocks.

III. Soil Forming Factors
   A. Describe the soil forming processes that act on soil to form soil
horizons.
   B. Describe and illustrate the five soil forming factors of climate,
organisms, topography, time and parent material.
   C. Relate the climate in the Kansas City area to its impact on the
weathering of rocks and minerals in the soil.
   D. Discuss the impact of organisms on the mixing of the soil.
   E. Relate Kansas City area’s topography to soil formation in
different parts of the area.

IV. Soil Horizons
   A. Differentiate between soil structure and soil texture.
   B. Identify types of soil structure.
   C. Describe how soil color attributes provide information on soil
characteristics.
   D. Identify the various layers of a soil horizon and label the
different soil horizons using morphological clues (color, texture,
structure, etc.).

V. Classifying Soils Using Soil Taxonomy
   A. Identify the eight epipedons (surface soil) and their
characteristics that help determine the soil category.
   B. Identify the subsoil characteristic, or horizon to determine the
soil category.
   C. Describe the twelve orders and their locations on the earth.

VI. Soil Survey
   A. Define the three main elements in a soil survey.
   B. Explain the uses of different map scales and the scale order used
for soil surveys.
   C. Recite the historical significance of soil surveying.
   D. Explain how soil maps are made and their potential uses.
   E. Describe the two major systems of legal land descriptions.
   F. Describe how tracts of land are classified in area.
   G. Identify the eight land capability classes in terms of cropland soil
suitability.
   H. Read a soil survey and determine the soil classifications.

VII. Soil Texture
   A. Classify soil texture components by different particle sizes.
   B. Determine soil texture by particle size. 
   C. Illustrate the mechanical analysis of soil texture by using
“Stokes Law”.
   D. Describe the use of the textural triangle in determining soil
texture.
   E. Describe the use of the feel method in determining soil texture.
   F. Identify the uses of soil texture profiles.

VIII. Soil Bulk Density
   A. Calculate bulk density of soil by using the clod method, the
cylinder method, and the core method.
   B. Calculate soil erosion based on the bulk density.
   C. Identify the terms used to describe soil consistence.
   D. Explain the significance of soil compaction or pore space.
   E. Define the C.O.L.E. measurement of the shrink-swell potential.
   F. Explain the significance of soil porosity and how it can be
changed.

IX. Soil Water
   A. Explain how adhesion and cohesion of water molecules affect the
capillary action of water in soils.
   B. Describe the gravitational potential of the total water potential.
   C. Label soil water classifications according to how “tightly” the
water is being held in the soil.
   D. Determine what conditions are appropriate for drainage (too much
water) or irrigation (not enough water).
   E. Identify four types of irrigation and their uses.
   F. Identify the four soil moisture regimes.

X. Soil Organisms and the Nitrogen and Carbon Cycles
   A. Discuss how earthworms are like “miniature topsoil factories”.
   B. Explain how roots in the soil play an important role in the activity
of microorganisms.
   C. Discuss the negative influence nematodes have on plant roots.
   D. Explain the positive and negative roles of fungi in relation to
organic materials and to other living organisms.
   E. Explain the functions bacteria play in the soil and groundwater.
   F. Explain the role soil bacteria play in providing nitrogen for plant
growth.
   G. Identify various soil organisms.
   H. Diagram the nitrogen & carbon cycle and explain each of four steps
in the nitrogen cycle.

XI. Soil Organic Matter and Erosion 
   A. Diagram and explain the ideal growth conditions for organic matter
decomposition.
   B. Explain the importance of the carbon to nitrogen ratio for compost
microbe’s climate.
   C. Describe the influence of precipitation and temperature on organic
matter production.
   D. Describe the role organic matter plays in a soil structure.
   E. Identify the causes and processes of soil erosion.
   F. Measure soil erosion using the universal soil loss equation (USLE).

XII. Soil pH
   A. Define the elements in the soil pH scale.
   B. Identify the sources of different pH factors in the soil.
   C. Identify methods for determining soil pH.
   D. Test for soil pH.
   E. Describe the causes for the high pH in calcareous, saline and sodic
soils, and solutions for remedies to these soils.
   F. Explain how nutrients can affect the soil pH factor and can be used
to solve micronutrient deficiencies.
   G. Identify the methods, materials, and application procedures for
changing the soil pH factor.

XIII. Cation Exchange and Clay Materials
   A. Describe the methods of expressing the CEC (Cation Exchange
Capacity) and weight of common cation elements.
   B. State the formula for determining the CEC. 
   C. Identify methods for measuring CEC.
   D. Identify the composition and properties of clay.

XIV. Fertilizers
   A. Identify information required for display on commercial fertilizers
(including the guaranteed chemical analysis).
   B. Explain the process of adding nitrogen to soils and its relationship
to the nitrogen cycle.
   C. Identify the four forms of nitrogen fertilizer materials.
   D. Explain the importance of phosphorus to plants and types of
phosphorus fertilizers. 
   E. Describe situations where phosphorus is a pollutant.
   F. Explain the importance of potassium to plants and sources of
potassium fertilizer.
   G. Identify and describe five methods of fertilizer application.
   H. Identify methods for determining nutrient deficiency.

XV. Organic-Based Growing Media
   A. Identify the different materials used to create organic-based
growing media or ‘potting soil.’ 
   B. Explain the special circumstances related to the use of this type of
media.
   C. Discuss the unique dynamic between container side slope, volume of
media, temperature penetration into the root zone, aeration requirements
and movement of moisture through sides of container soils.

XVI. Horticultural Substrates and Urban Soils 
   A. Explain the principles that govern substrates and urban soils.
   B. Describe the substrates properties, concerns and specific
applications.
   C. Identify an urban soils properties, concerns, amelioration, and
specific applications.
   D. Explain composting principles, properties, techniques, parameters
and specific uses.
   E. Describe how urban soils or disturbances to a native soil affect
plants.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading is based on these areas of knowledge:

Examinations, Written Assignments
  and Quizzes      70 - 90% of grade
In-class exercises 10 - 30% of grade
  Total:             100%

Grading Scale:
  A = 90% - 100% 
  B = 80% -  89% 
  C = 70% -  79%
  D = 60% -  69%
  F = Below  60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS – Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY – Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards. Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated in class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 265

  • Title: Landscape Construction
  • Number: HORT 265
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course will cover the theories, principles and practices used in the interpretation and implementation of landscape construction. It will include site planning and preparation, safety principles, tool use and identification, landscape and construction materials, job bid development and project management. Construction projects in the class will vary by semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $100.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the process of landscape construction, landscape plan interpretation and plan installation principles and practices.
  2. Practice tool and equipment safety.
  3. Prepare a site before construction begins.
  4. Design and construct a landscape construction project.
  5. Describe materials, tools, equipment and procedures for building landscape feature(s).
  6. Outline and apply the procedure for bid development, project management, and determining landscape construction costs. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Landscape Construction Process
   A. Outline the basic steps in the construction process. 
   B. Define general legal requirements and terminology. 
   C. Interpret landscape construction plans and drawings.

II. Approved Safety Practices
   A. Describe and follow the procedure for safe operation of landscape
construction hand and power tools and equipment. 
   B. Explain and use factors to prevent accidents and personal injury
while using or operating landscape construction tools and equipment. 
   C. Describe the proper procedure to follow while working around
utilities.

III. Site Preparation Process
   A. Identify the steps to take in preservation of existing site
elements. 
   B. Indicate the procedure for removal of unwanted site elements. 
   C. Explain the procedure for grading a site, constructing site drainage
and erosion control. 
   D. Describe the procedures for protection of site utilities, existing
plant material and other features to be saved during construction.
   E. Prepare a site before construction begins.

IV. Landscape Construction Project - Design and Construction
   A. Design a simple construction project. 
   B. Choose the tools and materials required to complete the project. 
   C. Determine the cost of the project. 
   D. Use the correct procedures to complete the project. 
   E. Evaluate the completed projects.

V. Materials and Tools 
   A. Describe the use, tools, and equipment for the following materials:
      1. Landscape pavers for sidewalks, patios, retaining walls and
stairs and driveways. 
      2. Concrete for stepping stones, sidewalks, and driveways. 
      3. Stone for paths, patios and fences. 
      4. Wood for landscape structures, edging, stairs and retaining
walls. 
      5. Other materials as time allows. 
   B. Evaluate the different methods of construction using these
materials.

VI. Bid Development and Costs
   A. Prepare and present a landscape construction bid. 
   B. Discuss the challenges of managing a landscape construction
project.
   C. Identify the proper procedure for efficient project management. 
   D. Recognize and build on proper teamwork skills.
   E. Accurately complete quantity take offs and create cost estimates
from construction drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations, Written Assignments 
  and Quizzes.      70 to 90% of grade
In-class exercises  10 to 30% of grade
  Total:              100%

Grading Scale:
 A = 90 - 100%
 B = 80 –  89%
 C = 70 –  79%
 D = 60 –  69%
 F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer literacy expectations - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY: Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. Chemical hazards and/or use of equipment dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals or equipment are used in the laboratory. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated whenever chemicals or equipment are used. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 270

  • Title: Horticulture Internship*
  • Number: HORT 270
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 20
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 20

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

Student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the Horticultural industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a job experience in the area of their horticultural focus and career goals. 20 hrs field study.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete all tasks needed to initiate the internship, including planning, coordinating and learning about the company
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills appropriate to the objectives of the internship
  3. Demonstrate effective personal working skills and professional conduct
  4. Document the internship, including tasks performed, knowledge gained, and problems encountered
  5. Evaluate the internship experience, including assessing the employer and a comparison with classroom learning 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Initiation of the Internship
   A. List goals and objectives to achieve in the internship setting
   B. Develop a job description and determine specific objectives for the
internship with the facilitator
   C. Discuss in a meeting with the facilitator and job supervisor the job
description, objectives, and process for the internship’
   D. Fill out a job application and resume targeted to a job in the
student’s field

II. Company Profile
   A. Provide an accurate description of the company and its goals
   B. Provide an accurate description of the services the company
provides
   C. Provide an accurate description of the policies and procedures the
company has in place to deal with customers, job related issues, and
employee concerns

III. Knowledge and Skills in the Workplace
   A. Fulfill the requirements of the job description
   B. Perform tasks to meet the objectives as outlined in the internship
   C. Demonstrate knowledge related to the specific objectives of the
internship

IV. Internship
   A. Meet with the job supervisor at regular intervals to discuss work
related tasks
   B. Meet with internship facilitator at regular intervals to develop and
evaluate objectives for the learning experience
   C. Write individualized learning objectives for job related tasks
   D. Maintain a journal of time spent on the job and all tasks performed
including meetings with job supervisor
   E. Document any new experiences or learning that is the result of
working for this company
   F. Identify potential problems at the job site; develop a plan to
correct the problem and present it diplomatically

V. Professional Workplace Skills
   A. Report to work on time and work 20 hours per week
   B. Dress and speak in a manner appropriate to the company and job
performed
   C. Demonstrate good customer skills including phone, email, and
customer service
   D. Describe the importance of adaptability in the workplace
   E. Follow all employee rules and regulations, policies and procedures
   F. Discuss the importance of honesty, loyalty and discretion

VI. Internship Evaluation
   A. Describe and evaluate significant consistencies and/or
inconsistencies between classroom competencies and work place experiences
   B. Describe and assess the company and the internship experience with
an emphasis on the value of future internships with this company
   C. Assess and summarize the employer evaluation
   D. Write a final report
   E. Discuss the final report with the job supervisor and internship
facilitator

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Pre-internship goals and objectives         5%
Final report and journal evaluation         60%
Final employer evaluation                   35%
Total                                                     100%

 Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100% 
   B = 80% -  89% 
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 272

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Fall Practicum
  • Number: HORT 272
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the fall and early winter seasons. This includes production and marketing of summer crops, planning, and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field, and marketing these fall crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.
  2. Develop a production plan for selected vegetables, flower, fruit and herb crops for the fall/winter season including determining seed and supply needs and sources.
  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques, including fertility, water, pest, disease and weed management, and plasticulture techniques.
  4. Employ safe measures to harvest, handle, and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers.
  5. List a range of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management, including rotations, cover crops, fertilizers and amendments.
  6. Demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment and tools required for tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.
  7. Demonstrate the use of irrigation systems, including drip and sprinkler systems.
  8. Demonstrate safe spraying applications of fertilizers and pesticides.
  9. Maintain detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification, and safety.
  10. Practice farm safety techniques, including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.
  11. Compile additional information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities, and plan future market farming activities.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Options for Market Farming
   A. Describe models of market farms in and around the metro area (and
beyond).
   B. Describe types of market outlets and their requirements.
   C. Describe the concepts of sustainability, organic and conventional
production.

II. Safety
   A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common
occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper
lifting, etc.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements
and tools according to OSHA safety standards.
   C. Outline and demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on
EPA worker protection standard training.
   D. Outline and illustrate good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production Planning
   A. Identify markets and crops or crop mixes for fall/winter season
   B. Determine area requirements, and production methods (organic,
conventional).
   C. Recognize seed sources and supplies for crop production.

IV. Crop Production (Integrated Crop Management)
   A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using
appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.
   B. Grow crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules using
appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.
   C. Manage existing crops from the summer season, including a range of
vegetable, small fruit, and flowers.
   D. Water and fertilize as needed.
   E. Observe and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control using
appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures.
   F. Control weeds using appropriate cultural practices.

V. Harvest and Postharvest Handling
   A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.
   B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards
required by markets.
   C. Use and describe practices for maximum maintenance of postharvest
quality.
   D. Employ and discuss best management practices for food safety during
harvest and postharvest handling.

VI. Marketing through Various Outlets
   A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and
wholesalers.
   B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
commercial operations.
   C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via
the Internet.

VII. Soil and Crop Fertility Management
   A. Plant fall cover crops.
   B. Interpret soil fertility tests and make recommendations.
   C. List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their
appropriate use.
   D. Analyze and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage Equipment and Filed Preparation
   A. Describe various tillage options and demonstrate some appropriate to
high tunnel and field production.
   B. Discuss weed control and cultivation options.
   C. Demonstrate appropriate weed control options for high tunnel and
field production.

IX. Irrigation and Spraying Systems
   A. Demonstrate irrigation principles and practices related to the use
of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.
   B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation.
        
X. Season Extension and Protected Crop Production
   A. Use and describe season extension options.
   B. Outline and use crop protection measures.

XI. Record Keeping (organic certification, farm planning, safety)
   A. Describe procedures and maintain records for organic certification.
   B. Employ procedures to maintain records to allow tracking of farm
profits.
   C. Discuss procedures and maintain records for EPA compliance on
pesticide application.
   D. Describe and keep records for good handling practices on crops for
sale.

XII. Accessing Additional Information and Resources for Market Farmers
   A. Use disease and pest diagnostic, and soil analytical services from
extension or qualified alternatives.
   B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and
other sources.
   C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects/Assignments               40%
Log                             30%
Attendance                      30% (attendance below 70% will results in failure)
Total                          100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.
  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.
  3. Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  4. Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class.
  5. Students will deal with potentially dangerous chemicals according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  6. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 274

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Spring Practicum
  • Number: HORT 274
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the winter and early spring seasons. This includes production and marketing of winter crops and planning and production of spring and summer crops in high tunnels and open field and marketing these spring crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs practicum/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.
  2. Design a crop plan for selected vegetable, flower, fruit and herb crops for the spring/summer season including determining seed and supply needs and sources.
  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques, including fertility, water, pest, disease and weed management, and plasticulture techniques.
  4. Employ safe methods to harvest, handle, and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers.
  5. List a range of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management, including rotations, cover crops, fertilizers and amendments.
  6. Demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment and tools required to conduct tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.
  7. Demonstrate the appropriate methods of irrigation, including drip and sprinkler systems.
  8. Demonstrate proper methods to safely apply fertilizers and pesticides.
  9. Keep detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification, and safety.
  10. Practice farm safety including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.
  11. Compile additional information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities, and plan future market farming activities.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Options for market farming
   A. Illustrate models of market farms in and around the metro area (and
beyond).
   B. Identify and discuss types of market outlets and their
requirements.
   C. Employ the concepts of sustainability, organic and conventional
production.

II. Safety
   A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common
occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper
lifting, etc.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements
and tools according to OSHA safety standards.
   C. Demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on EPA worker
protection standard training.
   D. Demonstrate good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production planning
   A. Identify market and crop or crop mix for spring/summer season.
   B. Determine area requirements, and production methods (organic,
conventional).
   C. Source seeds and supplies for crop production.

IV. Crop Production (Integrated crop management)
   A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using
appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.
   B. Establish crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules
using appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.
   C. Manage existing crops from the winter season including a range of
vegetable, small fruit, and flowers.
   D. Water and fertilize as needed.
   E. Recognize and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control
using appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures. 
   F. Control weeds using appropriate cultural practices.

V. Harvest and Postharvest handling
   A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.
   B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards
required by markets.
   C. Employ good practices for maximum maintenance of postharvest
quality.
   D. Identify and use best management practices for food safety during
harvest and postharvest handling.
        
VI. Marketing through various outlets
   A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and
wholesalers.
   B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
commercial operations.
   C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via
the Internet.

VII. Soil and crop fertility management
   A. Plant spring cover crops.
   B. Interpret soil fertility tests and recommendations.
   C. List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their
appropriate use.
   D. Analyze and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage equipment and field preparation
   A. Discuss various tillage options and use appropriate options in high
tunnel and field production.
   B. Outline weed control and cultivation options.
   C. Demonstrate appropriate option in high tunnel and field production.
  
IX. Irrigation and spraying systems
   A. Demonstrate irrigation principles and practices related to the use
of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.
   B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation as
required.

X. Season extension and protected crop production
   A. Identify and use season extension options including mulches, row
covers, low tunnels, cold frames, high tunnels and greenhouses.
   B. Discuss and use crop protection measures including row covers, high
tunnels, shade cloth and wind breaks.
  
XI. Record keeping (organic certification, farm planning, safety)
   A. Discuss procedures and keep records for organic certification.
   B. Describe production procedures and maintain records to allow
tracking of farm profits.
   C. Discuss procedures and keep records for EPA compliance on pesticide
application.
   D. Discuss and keep records for good handling practices on crops for
sale. 

XII. Accessing additional information and resources for market farmers
   A. Use disease and pest diagnostic and soil analytical services from
extension or qualified alternatives.
   B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and
other sources.
   C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects/Assignments               40%
Log                             30%
Attendance                      30% (attendance below 70% will result in failure)
Total:                          100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 – 89%
C = 70 – 79%
D = 60 – 69%
F =  0 – 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.
  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.
  3. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  4. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class.
  5. Students will deal with potentially dangerous chemicals and must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  6. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 276

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Summer Practicum
  • Number: HORT 276
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the summer season. This includes planning, production and marketing of spring and summer crops and planning and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Supplies: $50.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.
  2. Provide a detailed production plan for a broad range of vegetable, flower, fruit and herb crops for year-round production.
  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques.
  4. Employ appropriate methods to harvest, handle, and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers
  5. Compile a comprehensive list of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management.
  6. Expertly use equipment and tools required to conduct tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.
  7. Demonstrate the use of good irrigation practices.
  8. Demonstrate the safe use sprayers for application of pesticides and fertilizers
  9. Maintain detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification, and safety.
  10. Practice farm safety techniques, including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.
  11. Compile information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities, and plan future market farming activities. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Options for Market Farming
   A. Describe models of market farms in and around the metro area (and
beyond).
   B. Identify and describe types of market outlets and their
requirements.
   C. Describe the concepts of sustainability, and organic and
conventional production.

II. Safety
   A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common
occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper
lifting, etc.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements
and tools according to OSHA safety standards.
   C. Demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on EPA worker
protection standard training.
   D. Demonstrate and employ good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production Planning
   A. Identify market and crop or crop mix for late summer and fall
seasons.
   B. Determine area requirements, and production methods (organic,
conventional).
   C. Determine seed sources and supplies for crop production.
        
IV. Crop Production (Integrated Crop Management)
   A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using
appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.
   B. Grow crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules using
appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.
   C. Manage existing crops from the spring season including a range of
vegetable, small fruit and flowers
   D. Water and fertilize as needed.
   E. Recognize and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control
using appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures.
        
V. Harvest and Postharvest Handling
   A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.
   B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards
required by markets.
   C. Discuss and use conditions for maximum maintenance of postharvest
quality.
   D. Describe the use best management practices for food safety during
harvest and postharvest handling.

VI. Marketing through Various Outlets
   A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and
wholesalers.
   B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to
commercial operations.
   C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via
the Internet.

VII. Soil and Crop Fertility Management
   A. Plant summercover crops.
   B. Interpret soil fertility tests and recommendations.
   C. List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their
appropriate use.
   D. Measure and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage Equipment and Filed Preparation
   A. Discuss various tillage options and use some appropriate to high
tunnel and field production.
   B. Discuss weed control and cultivation options.
   C. Identify appropriate weed and cultivation options in high tunnel and
field production.

IX. Irrigation and Spraying Systems
   A. Discuss and use irrigation principles and practices related to the
use of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.
   B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation as
required.
        
X. Season Extension and Protected Crop Production
   A. Discussion and use season extension options including mulches, row
covers, low tunnels, cold frames, high tunnels and greenhouses.
   B. Discuss and use crop protection measures including row covers, high
tunnels, shade cloth and wind breaks.

XI. Record Keeping (organic certification, farm planning, safety)
   A. Discuss procedures and record keeping for organic certification.
   B. Discuss procedures and keep records for EPA compliance on pesticide
application.
   C. Discuss keep records for good handling practices on crops for sale.

XII. Accessing Additional Information and Resources for Market Farmers
   A. Use disease and pest diagnostic services and soil analyses from
extension services or qualified alternatives.
   B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and
other sources.
   C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects/Assignments               40%
Attendance                      30% (attendance below 70% will results in failure)
Log                             30%
Total                          100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.
  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.
  3. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  4. SAFETY - Consumption of food, beverages or use of tobacco products is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated during class.
  5. Students will deal with potentially dangerous chemicals and must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.
  6. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HORT 291

No information found.