Hotel & Lodging Management, A.A.S.

The hospitality management program at JCCC is a comprehensive study of the food service and public lodging industries. The program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Educational Institute Accrediting Commission.

The JCCC hotel and lodging management program prepares the graduate to enter hotel and lodging management, usually as a trainee or department supervisor. Courses in supervisory management, hotel accounting, hotel sales and marketing, and advanced hospitality management provide a comprehensive management background. In addition the students learn basic skills through courses in housekeeping, front office management, basic and intermediate food preparation, and beverage control.

Individuals considering this field should enjoy a very active environment and a lot of contact with people.

Note: Metropolitan Community College students should seek specific counsel from the JCCC program personnel for the appropriate course plan and numbers.

Metropolitan Community College students should refer to Cooperative Program Information.

(Major Code 2510; State CIP Code 52.0904)

Associate of Applied Science

First Semester

HMGT 121Perspectives of Hospitality Management3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
PSYC 121Applied Psychology3
or PSYC 130 Introduction to Psychology
HMGT 120Food Service Sanitation1
HPER 200First Aid and CPR2
HMGT 132Seminar in Housekeeping Operations3
Total Hours15

Second Semester

MATH 120Business Mathematics*3
HMGT 265Front Office Management3
HMGT 128Supervisory Management3
HMGT 235Seminar: Risk Management and Loss Prevention3
HMGT 123Professional Cooking I*3
Total Hours15

Summer

Humanities Elective ^3
HMGT 275Seminar in Hospitality Management: Internship*3
Total Hours6
^

Humanities Requirement

Third Semester

SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
or SPD 121 Public Speaking
or SPD 125 Personal Communication
HMGT 130Hospitality Law3
HMGT 203Hotel Sales and Marketing*3
HMGT 273Hospitality Cost Accounting*3
HMGT 279Beverage Control3
Total Hours15

Fourth Semester

Hospitality Program Elective (see below)6
HMGT 207Hospitality Human Resource Management*3
HMGT 228Advanced Hospitality Management*3
HMGT 268Hospitality Managerial Accounting*3
Total Hours15

Hospitality Program Electives

HMGT 126Food Management*4
HMGT 150Seminar: Food Service Sales and Marketing3
HMEC 151Nutrition and Meal Planning3
HMGT 165Food Industry Compliance Safety3
HMGT 167Local Food Production3
HMGT 221Design and Facilities Management*3
HMGT 223Fundamentals of Baking3
HMGT 245Travel for Credit*3
HMGT 256Casino Management3
HMGT 271Seminar in Hospitality Management: Purchasing3
HMGT 277Seminar in Hospitality Management: Menu Design Planning*3

Total Program Hours: 66

Courses

HMGT 120   Food Service Sanitation (1 Hour)

This course covers the basic principles of providing and serving safe food. It also provides the student with safe food-handling procedures necessary to manage a sanitary and safe food service operation in compliance with the National Food code and the National Restaurant Association. The successful completion of the Serv Safe Sanitation exam will result in a national sanitation certification. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

HMGT 121   Perspectives of Hospitality Management (3 Hours)

This introductory course is designed to provide students with current information on topics relevant to career exploration, employment and operational specifics of the various segments of the hospitality industry. The course includes exploration of the tourism, lodging, food and beverage and related industries, along with the operational characteristics unique to each and the critical concepts of service management. The identification of current events and trends will be included along with the evaluation of impact on the hospitality industry. This course also identifies and explores career opportunities and includes the professional profiles and job search materials directly related to the hospitality industry. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 123   Professional Cooking I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: HMGT 120

This is the first of two courses in professional cooking methods for students enrolled in hospitality management programs. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate skills in basic cooking methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate common food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 126   Food Management* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HGMT 230 and HMGT 277 and admission to the hospitality management program

This course offers an overview of restaurant management practices used in the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on demonstrating the components of menu planning and the styles of food service used for various occasions -- buffet service and French, Russian and American service. The student will participate in the operation of the campus restaurant, including food preparation, service, sales promotion, purchasing and costing. 9 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 128   Supervisory Management (3 Hours)

This course contains the basic supervisory management skills, management styles, motivation with emphasis on human relations, delegation, training, evaluation and communication. In addition, the hiring and firing functions within FLSA guidelines will be covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 130   Hospitality Law (3 Hours)

This course offers an overview of product and dram shop liability as well as of the various areas of federal and state legislation that regulate the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on familiarizing the hospitality manager with ways to avoid costly and time-consuming lawsuits. A manager's or owner's legal rights and responsibilities also will be discussed. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to recognize potential legal problems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 132   Seminar in Housekeeping Operations (3 Hours)

This course presents a systematic approach to managing housekeeping operations in the hospitality industry. The course will also include related health department and OSHA regulations. While enrolled in this class, a student must work a minimum of 15 hours a week in a lodging operation. The work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. This course is typically offered in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 150   Seminar: Food Service Sales and Marketing (3 Hours)

This course includes detailed information in distinguishing the difference between marketing, sales, promotion, advertising and merchandising. In addition, development and quantifying the cost of a marketing plan by analyzing markets and developing a primary target market will be discussed. This course is a seminar course, and students are required to be employed 15 hours per week in a job related to the hospitality industry. 3 hrs. lecture, 15 hrs. internship/wk.

HMGT 150H   HON: Seminar:Food Service Sales and Marketing (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HMGT 165   Food Industry Compliance & Safety (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and explain the basic legal compliance issues regarding food safety and the post-harvest handling of local food products. This course focuses on the legal compliance issues of market farming as well as the food safe handling principles necessary for an individual involved in market farming. It will provide students with practical methods of application involved with food safety and post-harvest marketing. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 167   Local Food Production (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and explain the basic cooking methods, recipe conversion and professional food preparation and handling of local food products. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate common food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. It will provide students with practical methods of application involved with safe handling and production of post-harvest local food products. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 203   Hotel Sales and Marketing* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 121 and admission to the hospitality management program

This course will focus on practical sales and marketing techniques for the hotel industry. It will cover a marketing plan and advertising campaign for a hotel, including identifying target markets, prospecting for sales leads and using sales techniques. This course is typically offered in the fall semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 207   Hospitality Human Resource Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 128

This course will examine hospitality human resources management from the global perspective as the rise of multinational hospitality corporations and a multicultural society place new requirements on managers with human resource responsibilities. Special emphasis will be placed on both the "soft skills" involved in counseling, interpersonal relations and different management theories, as well as the "hard skills" involved in the legislative aspects of managing people. This course will concentrate on how to manage managers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 220   American Regional Cuisine* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 230

This course introduces the student to regional American cooking from nine regional culinary traditions and two specialty traditions within American cuisine. Students will study the cuisine of New England; the Mid-Atlantic states; the Deep South; Florida and the Caribbean; Cajun and Creole; the Central Plains and Rocky Mountain states; Tex-Mex and the American Southwest; California and Hawaii; the Pacific Northwest, as well as vegetarian cuisine and kosher dietary laws. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate skills in cooking and presenting classic American dishes in their traditional forms within a restaurant setting. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 221   Design and Facilities Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HMGT 271

This course includes detailed information about food service design that covers layout, design and equipment specifications. In addition, facilities operations will be discussed regarding electrical, water and transportation systems; refrigeration; waste disposal; energy management; and HVAC. Preventive maintenance will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 223   Fundamentals of Baking (3 Hours)

This course covers bakeshop production as it relates to the basic principles of ingredients, measurements, mixing, proofing, baking and final presentation. In addition, the student will be able to identify the various types of baking equipment used in the preparation of bakeshop products. The class includes lecture and participation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 226   Garde Manger* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 230

This course is designed for the student to learn cold food production and charcuterie. The course will allow the student to develop fundamental principles of the cold kitchen and modernize traditional methods of salad preparation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 228   Advanced Hospitality Management* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval

This course includes detailed information about various components of menu planning, food service, supervision, design and beverage control. In addition, an understanding of the external factors affecting the hotel-restaurant industry will be discussed. Skills necessary to secure a position in management within the hospitality industry will be emphasized, and case studies and computer simulation (HOTS) will be used for critical thinking analysis. Business plans will be developed as part of the course project. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 230   Professional Cooking II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 120 and HMGT 123

This is the second of two courses in professional cooking methods for students enrolled in hospitality management programs. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate advanced level skills in cooking methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate advanced food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. This course consists of lecture, demonstration and participation in food preparation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 230H   HON: Professional Cooking II (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HMGT 231   Advanced Food Preparation* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 230 and department approval

This course is designed to develop a student's advanced culinary skills in preparation of international cuisine commonly served in today's operations in Latin America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, the Far East and the Pacific area. 4.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 235   Seminar: Risk Management and Loss Prevention (3 Hours)

This course explains the issues surrounding the need for individualized security programs, examines a wide variety of security and safety equipment and procedures, discusses guest protection and internal security for asset protection. It explores risk management and loss prevention issues and outlines OSHA regulations that apply to lodging properties. While enrolled in this class, a student must work a minimum of 15 hours a week in a lodging operation. The work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 2 hrs lecture, 15 hrs. work/wk.

HMGT 238   Advanced Garde Manger* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 226

This course is designed for the student to learn advanced cold food production and charcuterie as well as Modern Cuisine techniques. This course will allow the student to develop advanced principles of the cold kitchen and modern cooking techniques and equipment. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 240   Advanced Baking* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HMGT 223

This course covers the principles needed to enter the baking and pastry industry. The course provides knowledge of specialty ingredients and techniques needed to make tortes, finished desserts and a wedding cake. The student will be instructed in the making of these items through lecture and will prepare a variety of such items in lab. 4.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 245   Travel for Credit* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 121 and department approval

This travel-for-credit course consists of visits to restaurants, hotels, markets and food and beverage producers in an established region.

HMGT 248   Confectionery Arts (3 Hours)

This course covers the design and production of artistic centerpieces made from confections. It provides knowledge of and basic skills in making decorative dining table centerpieces using food products such as cooled and pulled sugar syrup, isomalt, pastillage, marzipan and chocolate. The student will be instructed in the preparation of these ingredients and will construct center and showpieces after viewing demonstrations. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 250   Introduction to Catering (3 Hours)

This course includes detailed information about the different types of catered events within the hospitality industry. Topics covered include the importance of marketing, contract writing, food production, room arrangements and required personnel relative to specific catered events. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 256   Casino Management (3 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the unique conditions and management challenges associated with a casino property. An overview of game operation and rules will serve as a foundation. Management controls will be emphasized including how to compute statistical data to assist management in operations. The course is not intended to be a training exercise. Casino marketing and ways to develop effective player rating systems will be analyzed. The history of the casino industry and regulatory environment will also be examined. The course is not intended to be a training exercise for those interested in learning to deal games. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 265   Front Office Management (3 Hours)

This course provides a full understanding of the flow of business from the front office, beginning with the reservations process to checkout and settlement. It also includes the night audit and statistical analysis of rates and revenue management. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 268   Hospitality Managerial Accounting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MATH 120 and HMGT 121 and HMGT 273

This course introduces the student to basic managerial accounting. This includes accounting concepts, processing data and the flow of financial information within a hospitality operation. The course provides a working knowledge of an income statement, balance sheet, statement of owner's equity and cash flows. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 270   Meat and Fish Identification and Fabrication* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 226 and HMGT 286

This course is designed for the student to learn about meat and fish identification, and fabrication of beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry, fish and seafood. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HMGT 271   Seminar in Hospitality Management: Purchasing (3 Hours)

This course offers an overview of purchasing techniques and specification writing for commodities used in the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on decision-making skills in the areas of quality, quantity, specifications and general value analysis. Two hours in class and a minimum of 15 hours a week are required in a supervised work situation in an approved area of the hospitality industry. Work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course.

HMGT 273   Hospitality Cost Accounting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MATH 120 or higher and HMGT 121

This course includes detailed information on how to prepare operation statements for a food service operator, including inventory and control systems. Areas of concentration will be food cost controls, labor cost controls, purchasing controls and profit production. The practice set will be used to reinforce control systems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 275   Seminar in Hospitality Management: Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the hospitality management program

This course provides industry experience for students in cooperating businesses, agencies and organizations. While enrolled in this course, a student must work a minimum of 320 hours in an approved position in the hospitality industry. By arrangement.

HMGT 277   Seminar in Hospitality Management: Menu Planning* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 123

This course provides the basic knowledge of menu design and planning. Students will learn the components of menu design and planning for each concept category. The course will cover the topics of menu layout, selection and development, price structures and the theory of menu design. A minimum of 15 hours a week is required in a supervised work situation in an approved area of the hospitality industry. Work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 279   Beverage Control (3 Hours)

This course covers the history of wines and their use and storage procedures. The students should gain an understanding of beverage control and how it is used in all types of operations. The course will also cover in-depth study of spirits, internal control systems and local/state alcoholic beverage control laws. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HMGT 281   Culinary Arts Practicum I* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the American Culinary Federation Chef Apprenticeship training program and hospitality management department approval

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation.

HMGT 282   Culinary Arts Practicum II* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 281

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum I.

HMGT 285   Culinary Arts Practicum III* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 282

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum II.

HMGT 286   Culinary Arts Practicum IV* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 285

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum III.

HMGT 287   Culinary Arts Practicum V* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 286

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum IV.

HMGT 288   Culinary Arts Practicum VI* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: HMGT 287 and hospitality management department approval

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum V.

HMGT 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of culinary arts, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

HMGT 120

  • Title: Food Service Sanitation
  • Number: HMGT 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This course covers the basic principles of providing and serving safe food. It also provides the student with safe food-handling procedures necessary to manage a sanitary and safe food service operation in compliance with the National Food code and the National Restaurant Association. The successful completion of the Serv Safe Sanitation exam will result in a national sanitation certification. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify various pieces of food service equipment used in the hospitality kitchens and related sanitation requirements.
  2. Identify and discuss the sanitation challenges facing the foodservice operation.
  3. Identify and discuss food safety hazards and control factors.
  4. Describe and demonstrte proper personal hygiene standards.
  5. Describe the hazard analysis critical control point food safety system.
  6. Describe purchasing and receiving standards and procedures.
  7. Discuss food storage standards and procedures.
  8. Identify proper food preparation, holding, cooling and service procedures.
  9. Discuss sanitary facility and equipment maintenance.
  10. Identify cleaning and sanitatization procedures for the commercial operation.
  11. Describe an integrated pest management system.
  12. Describe the roles of federal, state and local regulatory agencies.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Food Service Equipment 
   A. Identify common large equipment used in commercial kitchens.   
   B. Identify common smallware equipment used in the preparation of food
in commercial foodservice operations.
   C. Discuss proper material selection for food preparation areas.
   D. Identify proper cleaning and sanitation of commercial equipment,
small wages, food contact and non-food contact surfaces.
   E. Discuss temperature and sanitation guidelines for food storage
areas.

II. Providing Safe Food
   A. Recognize the challenges to food safety in your operation.
   B. Discuss the main types of contamination.
   C. Identify the foods most likely to be contaminated.
   D. Recognize how food becomes contaminated.
   E. Identify at-risk populations.
   F. Identify the barriers to compromised food safety.

III. Food Safety Hazards 
   A. Identify biological, chemical and physical hazards.
   B. Describe how bacteria reproduce, grow and impact food safety.
   C. Discuss the factors needed for bacterial growth, symptoms of food
born illness, common causes, common disease carrying vehicles and control
factors.
   D. Discuss the impact of viruses, parasites, molds & yeasts on food
safety.
   E. Identify chemical and physical hazards to food.
   F. Identify safe food handling practices to prevent, reduce and
eliminate the contamination of food.

IV. The Safe Food Handler 
   A. Describe the correlation between personal hygiene and food borne
illness.
   B. Discuss basic standards for personal hygiene.
   C. Demonstrate proper hand washing procedures.
   D. Demonstrate proper service procedures.

V. Introducing the HACCP System 
   A. Describe the main principles of a HACCP System.
   B. Assess food safety hazards.
   C. Identify critical control points.
   D. Establish procedures and standards for critical control points.
   E. Describe how to manage a HACCP System.
   F. Discuss how to train employees to follow HACCP procedures.

VI. Purchasing and Receiving Safe Food
   A. Describe purchasing and receiving standards and procedures.
   B. Describe the criteria for assessing suppliers sanitation practices.
   C. Discuss appropriate receiving facilities and equipment.

VII. Storing Food Safely
   A. Develop storage standards and procedures.
   B. Specify storage equipment and facilities.
   C. Develop different usage factors for storage areas based on
temperature standards for each food group.
   D. Describe hot to store food safely.
   E. Discuss the First-In/First-Out product rotation system.

VIII. Keeping Food Safe During Preparation and Service
   A. Describe methods for thawing.
   B. Describe proper preparation methods.
   C. Describe various methods of cooking.
   D. Describe holding techniques.
   E. Develop serving standards for each food type.
   F. Describe cooling techniques for cooked foods.
   G. Discuss reheating procedures.

IX. Sanitation Facilities and Equipment
   A. Describe a well designed restaurant.
   B. Select proper equipment.
   C. Arrange for careful handling of garbage and solid waste.
    
X. Cleaning and Sanitizing
   A. Supervise cleaning and sanitizing throughout your operation.
   B. Ensure safe machine and manual ware washing.
   C. Provide safe storage for clean/sanitized items.
   D. Train employees to safely handle cleaning supplies including
hazardous materials.
   E. Organize, implement and monitor a cleaning program.

XI. Developing an Integrated Pest Management Program 
   A. Set up an integrated pest management program.
   B. Implement methods to keep pests out of the building and off the
grounds.
   C. Select methods for detecting pests.
   D. Coordinate the program with a pest control operator.

XII. Regulatory Agencies and Inspections
   A. Describe the roles of federal, state and local regulatory agencies.
   B. Prepare for various types of inspections.
   C. Develop a positive working relationship with a sanitarian during an
inspection.
   D. Establish a procedure for recording and utilizing inspection
finding.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

                              Approximately
In-Class Exercises                 20%
Unit Exams                         40%
Sanitation Certification Exam      40%
Total                             100%

Grade Criteria:
       A = 90 - 100%
       B = 80 - 89%
       C = 70 - 79%
       D = 60 - 69%
       F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 121

  • Title: Perspectives of Hospitality Management
  • Number: HMGT 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This introductory course is designed to provide students with current information on topics relevant to career exploration, employment and operational specifics of the various segments of the hospitality industry. The course includes exploration of the tourism, lodging, food and beverage and related industries, along with the operational characteristics unique to each and the critical concepts of service management. The identification of current events and trends will be included along with the evaluation of impact on the hospitality industry. This course also identifies and explores career opportunities and includes the professional profiles and job search materials directly related to the hospitality industry. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the various career opportunities existing within individual segments of the hospitality industry.
  2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the development of the hospitality industry.
  3. Identify the various operational factors distinguishing the various types of operations.
  4. Define the problems and opportunities the hospitality industry provides on a day to day operational basis.
  5. Define terms related to the hospitality industry and identify relative functions.
  6. Describe the unique differences between the operations of a corporate entity and an independently owned hospitality business.
  7. Describe the career advantages/disadvantages of each segment.
  8. Identify poor sanitation practices and implement good sanitation procedures in a food service operation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Hospitality Industry
   A. The scope of the hospitality industry
      1. Describe the hospitality industry as an age-old industry.
      2. Discuss the relationship to the hospitality and tourism network.
   B. Service-the mission and product of hospitality
      1. Define the nature of the product.
      2. Discuss issues arising from product delivery.
      3. State the principals of achieving guest satisfaction.
   C. Pursuing opportunities in hospitality
      1. Discuss opportunities abound.
      2. Identify required skills and abilities.
      3. Explain the meeting requirements.

II. Travel and Tourism
   A. The relationship of hospitality to travel and tourism
      1. Discuss the interdependence in the network.
      2. Relate historical ties between hospitality, travel and tourism.
      3. Explain choosing destinations today.
   B. Marketing and promoting hospitality and tourism
      1. Create a destination development plan.
      2. Describe government’s role in destination development.
      3. Identify organizations that promote hospitality and tourism.
      4. Explain the importance of destination’s image.
      5. Illustrate the distribution through travel intermediaries.
   C. The effects of hospitality, travel and tourism
      1. Compare economic gains and costs.
      2. Describe the sociocultural impact.
      3. Explain the tourism and environmental impact.

III. Global Issues and Hospitality
   A. Economic climate
      1. Discuss measuring the economy.
      2. Describe a global economy.
      3. Compare guest responses to economic fluctuations.
   B. Demographics and socioeconomic trends
      1. Define the demographics.
      2. Relate demographic research and life style to trends.
   C. Psychological motives
      1. Discuss basic and secondary human motives.
      2. Describe the push/pull theory.
      3. Relate Maslow's hierarchy of needs.
      4. Explain the psycho centric/allocentric tourists.
      5. Illustrate the psychographic data and hospitality promotion.
   D. Technological innovations
      1. Discuss effects of the industrial age.
      2. Summarize the effects of the computer age.
   E. Political forces
      1. Discuss effects of political events.
      2. Describe government regulations and hospitality.

IV. Leisure Activities and Hospitality
   A. Managing of leisure segments of the hospitality industry
      1. Explain the purpose of leisure segments.
      2. Describe the advent of hospitality professionals in the leisure
segment.
   B. Novel lodging facilities
      1. Compare bed and breakfast with a chateaux operation.
      2. Describe paradors and other unique operations.
   C. Clubs
      1. Define club ownership and the various types of organizations.
      2. Describe club membership.
      3. List the types of clubs.
      4. Compare service at clubs with public operations.
   D. Recreational facilities
      1. Describe various types of theme parks.
      2. Compare resorts to commercial hotel operations.
      3. Describe casino operations.
      4. Discuss various types of cruises.
      5. Explain the entertainment operations.
   E Health and fitness facilities
      1. Define spas and the typical guest they attract.
      2. Discuss fitness clubs and centers.

V. Focus on the Future
   A. Demographics beyond the 1990’s
      1. Attracting a changing work force.
      2. Describe the nature of the future consumer.
      3. Compile a plan to meet the changing needs of the industry.
   B. Technological advancement
      1. Discuss interactive systems.
      2. Illustrate software advancement.
      3. Define property management systems.
      4. Describe telecommunications and other systems.
   C. The global economy
      1. Define the areas of growth.
      2. Project the trends.
      3. Predict the future of the industry.
   D. Ethics in hospitality
      1. Develop guidelines for an ethical work force.
      2. Explain how to make difficult decisions.
      3. Describe ethical issues for the future.

VI. Dynamics of the Lodging Industry
   A. Evolution of lodging facilities
      1. Illustrate the influence of transportation technology.
      2. Describe the influence of economic fluctuations.
   B. Classifying lodging properties
      1. Illustrate through descriptive labels, the different
classifications of properties.
      2. Compare by levels of service.
      3. Relate by market price levels.
   C. Types of lodging ownership
      1. Compare independent ownership with chain ownership.
   D. Marketing
      1. Discuss the market segmentation.
      2. Develop a marketing plan.
      3. Describe the elements of marketing methods.
      4. Define the evolution process.

VII. Hotel Development
   A. An overview of the process
      1. Develop a conceptualization plan.
      2. Describe a feasibility analysis.
      3. Point out the level of commitment.
      4. Outline the design and construction stages.
      5. Describe the opening plan.
   B. Choosing the right location
      1. Describe airport properties and their unique business cycles.
      2. Compare  downtown properties with suburban properties.
      3. Identify highway motels.
      4. Discuss resorts and attractions.
   C. Assessing the concepts feasibility 
      1. Comparing market areas.
      2. Evaluating competition.
      3. Selecting sites.
      4. Evaluating demand.
      5. Develops facilities and services plan.
      6. Prepares the financial estimate.
   D. Financial commitment to a new hotel
      1. Finding investors.
      2. Determining costs.
      3. Controlling costs.
   E. Design of the new hotel
      1. Developing a basic lodging design.
      2. Describe the accessibility factor.
      3. Define ambiance and its impact on customers.

VIII. Hotel Management and Operations
   A. Basic management structure
      1. Illustrate administrative departments and service departments.
   B. Human resources management
      1. Describe personnel needs.
      2. Discuss human resources legislation.
      3. Define immigration issues.
      4. Explain the impact of unions on an operation.
   C. Producing an efficient and profitable operation
      1. Implementing the uniform system of accounts for hotels.
      2. Developing the break even analysis.
      3. Establishing room rates.
   D. Referral and rating systems
      1. Describe referral associations.
      2. Explain reservation systems.
      3. Discuss rating systems.

IX. Specialized Segments of the Hospitality Industry
   A. Meetings, conventions and expositions
      1. Discuss how meetings, conventions and expositions differ from one
another.
      2. Describe how meetings, conventions and expositions differ from
other hospitality areas.
      3. Explain why its a major and growing source of hospitality
revenue.
      4. Illustrate the primary reasons for growth.
      5. Discuss other influences.
   B. Hospitality functions and long term residential health care
      1. Explain the development of long term health care.

X. Serving Safe Food
   A. The challenge to food safety
      1. Providing safe food.
      2. Identifying food safety hazards.
      3. Describing the safe food handler.
   B. Developing a food safety system
      1. Introducing the HACCP system.
      2. Adapting HACCP principals.
   C. The flow of food
      1. Purchasing and receiving safe food.
      2. Storing food safely.
      3. Keeping food safe during preparation .
   D. Maintaining facilities and equipment
      1. Sanitary facilities and equipment
      2. Cleaning and sanitizing processes.
      3. Developing a pest management system.
      4. Describe regulatory agencies and inspections.
  
XI. Contemporary Foodservice Concepts
   A. The relationship between market, concept and menu
      1. Comparing market segments.
      2. Developing the concept.
      3. Designing the theme.
      4. Deciding on the form of service.
      5. Establishing the quality of service.
      6. Developing a menu for the concept.
   B. Contemporary commercial food service concepts
      1. Describe fine dining.
      2. Describe theme restaurants.
      3. Describe casual dinner houses.
      4. Identifies Various ethnic restaurants.
      5. Describe family restaurants.
      6. Discuss cafeteria and/buffet operations.
      7. Compare quick service operations with theme operations.
      8. Describe neighborhood/third places.
      9. Discuss catering and describe the operational differences from
other concepts.
   C. Restaurant ownership
      1. Describe independents.
      2. Compare chain operations.
      3. Discuss franchises.
      4. Compare multi unit foodservice firms with individual units.
   D. Commercial restaurants within other businesses
      1. Identify hotel/motel foodservice potential.
      2. Compare food courts with single unit operations.
      3. Discuss retail operations.
      4. Explain the impact of convenience stores.
   E. Contemporary institutional foodservice
      1. The blurring of boundaries between institutional and commercial
foodservice.
      2. Changing expectations of institutional members and constituents.
      3. Segmenting the institutional foodservice industry.
      4. Running the operation.

XII. Culinary Arts and Foodservice Operations
   A. Historical overview of cooking and culinary arts
   B. Elements of American and European fine dining
      1. Describe the major figures in French culinary tradition.
      2. Illustrate the kitchen brigade system.
      3. Identifies the dining room organization.
      4. Discuss today’s dining room.
      5. Planning career progression, education and training.
   C. Menu planning
      1. Outlining the concept.
      2. Defining customers wants and expectations.
      3. Organizing staff and equipment.
      4.  Developing a margin of profitability.
      5. Discuss benefits of a limited menu.
      6. Implement menu engineering.
   D. The Production cycle
      1. Following standard recipe file.
      2. Forecasting sales.
      3. Purchasing according to sales.
      4. Receiving in an organized manner.
      5. Storing and issuing all food items.
      6. Developing a pre-preparation process.
      7. Define final preparation.
      8. Developing service.
      9. Implementing clean-up and ware washing.
   E. Social issues
      1. Defining equal access.
      2. Describing food safety.
      3. Developing a healthy environment.
      4. Describing food labeling laws and their impact on commerce.

XIII. Beverage Management
   A. Trends in beverage consumption
      1. Describe non-alcoholic beverages.
      2. Discuss alcoholic beverages.
      3. Compare beverages and taxes.
   B. Wines
      1. Naming wines.
      2. Developing wine-making standards.
      3. Describe red wines.
      4. Describe white wines.
      5. Compare the types of wine.
      6. Discuss the wine producing regions.
      7. Compare the relationship of wine to food.
   C. Liquors
      1. Describe the types of distilled liquors.
      2. Selecting bartenders.
   D. Malt beverages
      1. Describe beer making.
      2. Discuss the brewery.
      3. Compare micro breweries.
      4. Explain imported beer market.
      5. Compare trends in beer sales.
   E. Risk management and liquor liability
      1. Describe liquor liability and legislation.
      2. Determine risk management techniques for your operation.

XIV. Building For Success
   A. Some basic business skills
      1. Developing communications.
      2. Working with computers.
      3. Acquiring the needed skills and knowledge.
   B. Steps to a career in hospitality
      1. Comparing self-evaluation skills.
      2. Developing career objectives.
      3. Discovering your opportunities.
   C. Getting the job
      1. Composing letters and resumes.
      2. Developing interview techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three exam scores at 50 points each    150 points
Comprehensive final at 200 points      200 points
1 Project                              100 points
Sanitation exam                        100 points
Tour and/or Speakers                    25 points
Chapter Exercises                       50 points
     Total                             625 points

Quizzes, if necessary, will be added to total points possible.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Admission to the Hospitality Program 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 123

  • Title: Professional Cooking I*
  • Number: HMGT 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: HMGT 120

Description:

This is the first of two courses in professional cooking methods for students enrolled in hospitality management programs. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate skills in basic cooking methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate common food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Operate many commercial pieces of equipment.
  2. Demonstrate the fundamentals of making stocks, soups and sauces.
  3. Demonstrate all of the presented cooking methods of meats, fish and vegetables.
  4. Identify the various market forms of meat, poultry and fish and their uses and storage of such items.
  5. Identify the basic elements of salads and sandwiches preparation and cooking including presentations.
  6. Demonstrate the fundamentals of breakfast cookery and be proficient at making omelettes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Equipment Use
  A. Identify various hand tools used in the professional kitchen and
describe the safe use of each item.
  B. Identify utensils, pots and pans and describe safe practices for
using range tops, convection ovens, griddles, deep fryers and dish washing
machines.

II. The Recipe
   A. Describe the importance of a standardized recipe in the professional
kitchen
   B. Describe the procedures for writing a standardized recipe.
   C. Describe the difference between “AP” and “EP”..
   D. Identify all units of U.S. fluid and weight measure and convert
recipes using these units of measure

III. Flavoring Foods
   A. Identify and describe common herbs and spices used in a professional
kitchen.
   B.  Identify and describe common oils and vinegars used in a
professional kitchen
                                             
IV. Cooking Methods
   A. Discuss the effect heat has on food, as well as the methods of heat
transfer.
   B. Describe dry heat cooking methods including roasting and baking,
broiling and grilling, griddling, sautéing, frying and deep frying
   C. Describe moist heat cooking methods including poaching, simmering,
boiling and steaming.

  
V. Stocks
   A.  Describe and define stock and its importance in the professional
kitchen.
   B.  Define “Mise en Place.”
   C.  Define mirepoix.
   D.  Identify and describe a sachet. 
   E.  Describe the difference between brown stock and white stock.
   F.  Identify and describe the dimensions for fine brunoise, brunoise,
small dice, medium dice, large dice, fine julienne, julienne and
battonet.
 

VI. Sauces
   A.  Identify and describe the five leading sauces and their importance
in the professional kitchen.
   B.  Define roux.
   C.  Describe the three types of cooked roux.
   D.  Define “emulsion”.


VII. Soups
   A.  Describe clear soups.
   B.  Describe thick soups.
   C.  Describe Specialty and National soups.
   D.  Identify appropriate garnishes for each type of soup.

VIII. Breakfast Cookery
   A.  Identify and describe USDA grades of eggs.
   B.  Identify and describe various sizes of eggs.
   C.  Identify and describe various methods used to prepare eggs.
   D.  Describe various breakfast meats, cereals and battered products
prepared in a professional kitchen.
   E.  Describe the steps in coffee making.
   F.  Describe hot tea service.
.

IX. Salads
   A. Identify various types of salads and their appropriate dressings   
   B. Identify the four parts of a salad.

X. Sandwiches
   A. Describe the variety of breads, spreads and fillings used in a
professional kitchen.
   B.  Identify the three parts of a sandwich.

XI. Meat and Poultry Fabrication
   A.  Identify and describe the composition of muscle tissue.
   B.  Identify and describe USDA inspection stamps.
   C.  Identify and describe the USDA grades of beef and poultry. 
   D.  Identify and describe connective tissue and its affect on finished
products.
   E.  Identify the eight primal cuts of beef.
   F.  Identify and describe the six classes of poultry and the species
within each class.
   G.  Distinguish between the light and dark meat of a chicken.
   H.  Describe the differences between cooking light and dark meat of a
chicken.

XII. Seafood Fabrication
   A.  List and describe round fish used in a professional kitchen.
   B.  List and describe flat fish used in a professional kitchen.
   C.  List and describe the various crustaceans used in a professional
kitchen.
   D.  List and describe the various mollusks used in a professional
kitchen.


XIII. Roasting
   A.  Define roasting.
   B.  Select food items appropriate for roasting.
   C.  Describe the benefits of slow roasting meats.
   D.  Describe the three factors that effect the roasting times of
meats.
   E.  Define and describe carry over cooking.  
   F.  Explain the importance of resting meats after roasting.
   G.  Select appropriate starches and vegetables suitable for roasting.

XIV. Frying
   A.  Define deep frying.
   B.  Select food items appropriate for frying.
   C.  Discuss the qualities of properly fried foods.
   D.  List the steps of a Standard Breading Station.
   E.  List the ingredients and describe the process of making batters.
   F.  Describe the qualities and proper care of frying oils.

XV. Sauté 
   A.  Define sauté.
   B.  Select food items appropriate for sauté.
   C.  Identify the proper cookware needed to sauté food items.
   D.  List the three rules of “Sauté.”
   E.  Describe the types of fats used to sauté in a professional
kitchen.
   F.  Describe the qualities of food that have been properly sautéed.

XVI. Baking
   A.  Identify and describe the twelve steps of yeast bread production.
   B.  Identify and describe quick bread production methods.
   C.  Describe the process of baking casseroles and custards.
   D.  Describe the process of making a pastry crust.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exams               750 points
Final Exam                  250 points
9 Classes/Labs              270 points
9 Class/Lab Participation   160 points
      Total                1430 points

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to wear closed-toe shoes, white chef’s jacket and white chef’s hat. Shorts will not be permitted in class. Equipment operations and sanitation procedures will be conducted on an individual student basis. NOTE: Additional Lab Work Required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 126

  • Title: Food Management*
  • Number: HMGT 126
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 9
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 9

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HGMT 230 and HMGT 277 and admission to the hospitality management program

Description:

This course offers an overview of restaurant management practices used in the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on demonstrating the components of menu planning and the styles of food service used for various occasions -- buffet service and French, Russian and American service. The student will participate in the operation of the campus restaurant, including food preparation, service, sales promotion, purchasing and costing. 9 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain and demonstrate the planning necessary for an effective, profitable menu.
  2. Describe the styles of table service, the varieties of food service operations and roles of professional staff for each.
  3. Explain and analyze food service trends and the specific ways to accommodate them.
  4. Describe the contemporary business practices necessary for a profitable efficient restaurant, including management and accounting principles.
  5. Describe the basics of alcoholic beverage service and the special demands of that service.
  6. Describe the elements of merchandising and public relations commonly employed by restaurants, including the merchandising program, the market survey, the advertising media strategy, public relations and the budget.
  7. List and describe the sanitation safety and fire protection for protecting employees and patrons.
  8. Discuss the laws and regulations a restaurant must follow for wages, employment practices, safety, taxes, insurance and pensions.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the laboratory setting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Planning the Menu
   A. List the needs and desires of patrons and methods for identifying
them
   B. Describe the process for incorporating new menu items consistent
with market trends
   C. Describe the elements and layout of the menu front
   D. List the elements of a good menu card

II. Styles of Food Service
   A. Trace the stages or process of quality table service
   B. List and describe the major types of table service, including
American, French, Russian and buffet
   C. Describe the roles and responsibilities of servers
   D. Describe the roles and responsibilities of other service staff
   E. Describe the typical dishes and essential utensils for each of the
many types of table service
   F. Compare and contrast self-service and buffet service operations
   G. Describe the varieties and demands of in-house food service,
including coffee breaks, receptions, luncheons, meetings and facility
cafeterias
   H. Describe the special requirements of institutional food service,
including educational, health care, and retirement organizations
   I. List the three types of catering and describe the special equipment,
laws, permits and site planning required of each
 
III. Food Preparation and Cooking
   A. Briefly describe the historical roots of each food service style
   B. Trace the history of food preference and preparation
   C. Describe the principal cooking methods including reference to
technologies employed

IV. The Dynamics of the Food Service Industry
   A. Describe the trends for eating out, their reasons, and their impact
   B. List and explain the reasons for restaurant closings
   C. Describe the potential for future change and growth of the industry

V. Effective Management
   A. Explain management as a formal discipline
   B. Describe the principles of planning for and organizing a business 
   C. Describe the contribution of modern tools for management, including
information technology, collaborative/participatory management,
techniques, strategic planning and training

VI. Accounting Principles 
   A. List the various categories of food costs
   B. Describe the major strategies for controlling food costs
   C. List the various categories of labor costs
   D. Describe the major strategies for controlling labor costs
   E. Differentiate between fixed and variable costs

VII. Alcoholic Beverages
   A. List and describe the four principal uses of wines and liquors
   B. Describe the criteria for selecting wine varietels and vintages and
liquors, including appropriateness, price and quality
   C. Demonstrate appropriate presentations and table side service of
wines and liquors
   D. Describe the proper storage and security of alcoholic beverages

VIII. Merchandising and Public Relations
   A.  Define merchandising
   B. Describe the planning necessary for the merchandising program,
including the market survey
   C. Describe the different types of advertising media, their individual
benefits, and their effect on the merchandising budget
   D. Define public relations to include in-house activity community
service, and media information

IX. Sanitation, Safety, and Fire Protection
   A. List the main source of sanitation problems and describe proper
procedures for avoiding them
   B. Describe the safe kitchen layout for equipment and storage
   C. List the main sources of safety hazards and describe the proper
procedures for avoiding them
   D. List the main sources for fire hazards and describe the proper
procedures for avoiding them
   E. Describe the role of employee cooperation, training and management
in maintaining a safe and sanitary work place

X. Laws and Regulation
   A. Describe the state and federal minimum wage laws as they pertain to
hourly, tipped, and salaried employees
   B. Describe the Fair and Equal Opportunity Employment practices
necessary and harassment
   C. Describe the basic elements and coverage of the Occupational Safety
and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA)
   D. Discuss specific challenges restaurants face in accommodating OSHA
regulation
   E. Describe the income and Social Security taxes with held from the
wages of hourly, tipped and salaried employees
   F. Describe the Medicare, hospital and medical insurance required for
full-time employees and optional for part-time employees
   G. Explain the pension options for the self-employed
   H. Describe the employment security taxes paid by a restaurant and the
resulting employee benefits

XI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three examinations                   300 pts  (48% of grade)
*Lab work of 12 labs of 10 pts each  120 pts  (20% of grade)
Manager week with total pts of 100   100 pts  (16% of grade)
Final Examination                    100 pts  (16% of grade)
       Total                         620 points (100% total)
 
(Percentage may change depending on the number of students in class which
determines the weekly labs.)

These points may not be made up.  A missed lab will cause a 5 point
deduction.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the laboratory and will be a factor in determining grades.  In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The student, if working in the kitchen, must come to lab class with a white chef coat, white chef hat, dark pants, and shoes must be closed toe and heel. If working in the dining room, the student must wear black shoes, black pants/skirt and white shirt/blouse. Student needs to have good personal hygienic practices. Lab hours will vary with the position assigned on a weekly basis. Food production positions will start early in the morning. Wait staff positions will start at mid-morning. Exact starting times will be assigned in class. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 128

  • Title: Supervisory Management
  • Number: HMGT 128
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course contains the basic supervisory management skills, management styles, motivation with emphasis on human relations, delegation, training, evaluation and communication. In addition, the hiring and firing functions within FLSA guidelines will be covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify a potential problem area in the management of people.
  2. Describe management’s goals and employees’ goals and how to bring them into close harmony which in turn will maximize productivity.
  3. Demonstrate the skill of delegating authority.
  4. Analyze and explain the process of identifying individual’s motivators.
  5. Separate the factors satisfying an employee and those factors which are motivating.
  6. Describe measurements used in performing appraisal systems.
  7. Identify appraisal errors.
  8. Identify hiring and firing functions while staying within the FLSA guidelines.
  9. Discuss various management styles and identify situation or person types best managed by each style. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Supervisor as Manager
   A. Define the supervisor’s role.
   B. Describe and list the obligations and responsibilities of a
supervisor.
   C. Discuss the functions of management.
   D. Explain the theories of people management.
   E. Discuss the managerial skills needed to succeed.

II. The Supervisor as a Leader Should:
   A. Develop you and your people.
   B. Define the nature of leadership.
   C. Discuss how to choose a leadership style.

III. Building Work Place Diversity Will Require:
   A. Defining diversity.
   B. Developing cross-cultural interaction.
   C. Managing diversity issues.

IV. Communicating Effectively, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Define good communications and their importance.
   B. Identify obstacles to good communications.
   C. Develop good listening skills.
   D. Discuss skills needed to direct people at work.
   E. Develop business writing skills.
  
V. Creating a Positive Work Climate, a Supervisor
   A. Develop employee expectations and needs.
   B. Enhance motivation techniques.
   C. Incorporate theories of motivation.
   D. Apply theory to reality including the limiting factors.
   E. Explain how to build a positive work climate.
   F. Analyze the job.
   G. Analyze the supervisor’s role in creating a positive work
climate.

VI. Developing Job Expectations, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Describe how to analyze a job.
   B. Describe how to write a job description.
   C. Discuss what a good performance standard system can do.
   D. Develop a performance standard system.
   E. Discuss implementing a performance standard system.

VII. Recruiting and Selecting Applicants, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Analyze the labor market.
   B. Determine labor needs.
   C. Investigate the legal aspects of recruiting and selection.
   D. Describe a recruiting process.
   E. Discuss selecting the right person.

VIII. Employee Training and Development, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Evaluate the importance of training.
   B. Discuss who will train.
   C. Determine how employees learn best.
   D. Develop a training program.
   E. Discuss retention methods.
   F. Plan and organize an employee orientation.
   G. Discuss overcoming obstacles of learning.

IX. Evaluating Performance, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Develop coaching skills.
   B. Define the essentials of performance evaluations.
   C. Discuss the evaluation process.
   D. Utilize the appraisal interview.
   E. Describe the follow-up process.
   F. Define the legal aspects of performance evaluations.

X. Disciplining and the Marginal Employee, a Supervisor Should:
   A. Define the essentials of discipline.
   B. Discuss approaches to discipline.
   C. Determine when to administer discipline.
   D. Discuss the termination process.
   E. Define special disciplinary concerns.
   F. Discuss the supervisor’s key role in the disciplinary process.
 
XI. Planning, Organizing, and Controlling, a Supervisor should:
   A. Discuss the nature of planning.
   B. Define and list the types of plans and planning.
   C. Develop a planning for change process.
   D. Define how to plan your own time.
   E. Discuss organizing for success.
   F. Define controlling in the three step process.

XII. Decision Making and Problem Solving, a Supervisor should:
   A. Discuss the decision-making process.
   B. Describe how to make good decisions.
   C. Define problem solving processes.
   D. Develop building decision making skills.

XIII. Delegating, a Supervisor should:
   A. Discuss what delegation means.
   B. Discuss why people resist delegation.
   C. Describe how to delegate successfully.

XIV. Additional Supervisory Topics, a Supervisor should:
   A. Discuss safety and security issues.
   B. Identify alternatives for dealing with aids and the hospitality
worker.
   C. Discuss the guide to Family and Medical Leave Act.
   D. Analyze the effect unions can have in an operation.
   E. Discuss ethics in the work place.
   F. Describe the supervisor as mentor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three exams @ 100 pts.  42% (300 pts)
Project                 29% (200 pts)
Possibility of additional class participation points 
Comprehensive Final     29% (200 pts)
      Total            100% (700 pts)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 130

  • Title: Hospitality Law
  • Number: HMGT 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course offers an overview of product and dram shop liability as well as of the various areas of federal and state legislation that regulate the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on familiarizing the hospitality manager with ways to avoid costly and time-consuming lawsuits. A manager's or owner's legal rights and responsibilities also will be discussed. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to recognize potential legal problems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define hospitality law.
  2. Locate sources of law.
  3. Explain the legal process and court and legal systems.
  4. Explain civil rights and their applications to hospitality businesses.
  5. Outline the basic concepts of contract law.
  6. Apply contract law to specific hospitality industry situations.
  7. Explain the elements of negligence.
  8. Identify the various legal duties owed to guests.
  9. Discuss legal relationships with guests and other patrons.
  10. Explain the legal concepts applicable to patrons’ property.
  11. Outline specific rights of innkeepers in their dealings with guests and other persons.
  12. Identify various rights of guests and other persons.
  13. Explain the areas of liability created by the sale of food and alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages.
  14. Discuss liability for injuries to patrons.
  15. Outline the rights and liabilities pertaining to travel law.
  16. Discuss the legal rights and duties of employers and employees with regard to civil rights laws, wage and hour laws, discrimination, and disabilities.
  17. Explain the licensing process and business operations, including regulatory compliance and various business activities.
  18. Discuss legal matters related to gambling facilities. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Contemporary Hospitality Law
   A. Trace the development of the law
   B. Define the law
   C. Identify principles of hospitality law
   D. Identify sources of law
   E. Discuss attributes of law
   F. Explain how to read a case
   G. Identify important legal terms

II. Legal Procedures: Journey of a Case Through the Courts
   A. Identify the parties to a legal matter and the elements of legal
proof
   B. Describe the steps taken to file a lawsuit
   C. Explain pretrial procedure
   D. Outline trial procedures
   E. Explain appeal procedures
   F. Explain alternative dispute resolution
   G. Interpret a case citation
 
III. Civil Rights and Hospitality Businesses
   A. Explain the provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
   B. Identify methods used to enforce the act
   C. Identify exempt establishments
   D. Apply the act to private clubs
   E. Explain the Americans with Disabilities Act
   F. Discuss rights of proprietors

IV. Contract Law and the Hospitality Industry
   A. Identify the elements of a contract
   B. Explain trade usage terms
   C. Explain the legal ramifications of breach of contract
   D. Explain various “special” contract situations including room,
catering and convention contracts
   E. Discuss the tort of intentional interference with contractual
relations

V. Principles of Negligence
   A. Negligence
      1. Define the elements of negligence
      2. Explain the duties owed to invitees, licensees, trespassers and
others
   B. Explain negligence doctrines generally favoring the plaintiff,
including:
      1. Res Ipsa Loquitur
      2. Children and the Reasonable Person Test
      3. Attractive Nuisance Doctrine
      4. Negligence Per Se Doctrine
      5. Obligations Beyond Regulation
      6. Strict or Absolute Liability
      7. Strict Products Liability
      8. Respondeat Superior
      9. Duty to Aid a Person in Distress
      10. Developing Duty to Invitees in Danger
   C. Discuss negligence doctrines generally favoring the defendant
      1. Explain Assumption of Risk
      2. Differentiate Contributory Negligence and Comparative Negligence

VI. Negligence and Hospitality Practices - Part I
   A. Identify duties owed guests in rooms
   B. Identify duties owed guests and others in public areas
   C. Explain duty owed in restaurant and dining rooms
 
VII. Negligence and Hospitality Practices - Part 2
   A. Explain duties owed guests outside an establishment
   B. Explain duties owed guests in swimming areas
   C. Identify special duties, including fire injuries, security, and
medical care

VIII. Relationships with Guests and Other Patrons
   A. Identify persons who qualify as a guest
   B. Explain the importance of intent of parties
   C. Explain the effect of guests’ illegal acts
   D. Identify events that terminate the guest/innkeeper relationship
   E. Differentiate the landlord/tenant relationship from the
guest/innkeeper relationship

IX. Protecting Patrons’ Property
   A. Identify risks to property in the hotel
   B. Explain legislative limitations to the absolute liability rule
   C. Explain methods to limit liability for other property
   D. Explain fire liability situations
   E. Describe extension of liability
   F. Explain elements of hotel’s negligence
   G. Identify areas of liability during check-in and check-out
   H. Explain the elements of bailment

X. Rights of Innkeepers
   A. Explain the right to exclude non-guests
   B. Identify times when a guest can be refused lodging
   C. Explain the right to select or change accommodations for a guest
   D. Trace the procedure for evicting a guest
   E. Discuss how to refuse a diner
   F. Explain the statutory protections for the hotelkeeper
   G. Explain how a hotelkeeper or restaurateur can be defrauded
   H. Explain how liability for false arrest can be avoided

XI. Guests’ Rights
   A. Explain basic rights of guests
   B. Identify methods to avoid liability for illegal searches
   C. Describe proper handling of mail and packages
   D. Identify rights concerning rates and fees

XII. Liability and the Sale of Food and Alcohol
   A. Explain the warranty of merchantability, including:
      1. Judging the Merchantability of Food
      2. Objects in Food
      3. Other Grounds for Breach of Warranty of Merchantability
      4. Pork and Trichinosis
      5. Required Proof That Food Is Unwholesome
      6. Restaurant as Insurer of Wholesomeness
      7. Privity of Contract
      8. Strict Products Liability
   B. Identify areas of false food claims, including:                 
      1. Truth-in-Menu Laws
      2. Food Labeling
      3. Kosher Foods
   C. Describe current smoking restrictions
   D. Identify the effect of alcoholic beverages on the hospitality
industry with respect to:
      1. Sales to underage patrons
      2. Sales to people who are visibly intoxicated
      3. Sales to habitual drunkards
      4. Proof of intoxication
      5. Alcohol vendor’s liability under common law
      6. Alcohol vendor’s liability under Dram Shop Act
      7. Alcohol vendor’s liability to the patron
      8. Alcohol vendor’s liability to third parties
      9. Alcohol vendor’s liability to passengers
      10. Two licensees serving one patron
      11. States without Dram Shop Act 
      12. Liquor liability insurance
      13. New demands from convention sponsors
      14. Strategies to avoid liability
      15. Alcohol sales in hotel guest rooms
      16. Miscellaneous regulations on licensees
   E. Identify areas of general liability for injuries to patrons
   F. Explain Safety Concerns Particular to Food Preparation
 
XIII. The Travel Agent and the Airlines-Rights and Liabilities
   A. Explain the make-up of the travel industry
   B. Identify methods for recovering small damages
   C. Identify the various rights of the traveler
   D. Outline special rights of airlines
   E. Identify liabilities of travel agents and charter tour companies
   F. Identify legal matters related to rental cars
 
XIV. Employment               
   A.  Explain the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, including:
      1. Minimum wage
      2. Overtime pay
      3. Time worked
      4. Equal pay for equal work
      5. Comparable worth
      6. Restrictions on child labor
      7. Violations of the FLSA
   B. Identify various concerns related to illegal job discrimination,
including:
      1. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
      2. Filing a complaint
      3. Remedies
      4. Defense of Bona Fide Occupational Qualification
      5. Defense of business necessity
      6. Race
      7. National origin
      8. National origin and language discrimination
      9. Religion
      10. Sex
      11. Gender-differentiated grooming standards
      12. Sexual harassment
      13. Pregnancy
      14. Age  
      15. Retaliatory discharge
      16. Mixed types of discrimination
      17. The Civil Rights Act of 1991
   C. Apply the Americans With Disabilities Act to employment
   D. Explain mandatory verification of employment status
   E. Apply the Family and Medical Leave Act
      
XV. Licensing and Regulation
   A. Explain how the marketplace is regulated through the use of:
      1. Antitrust enforcement
      2. Trademarks and service marks
      3. Copyright
      4. Illegal satellite transmission prohibitions
      5. Music performances restrictions
      6. Franchising
   B. Identify regulation of internal affairs
   C. Explain licensing and zoning requirements

XVI. The Law of Casinos:
   A. Discuss contracts and gambling debts
   B. Identify torts involving casinos
   C. Discuss how sexual harassment occurs at casinos
   D. Discuss types of criminal activities at casinos
   E. Explain how casinos operate on Indian reservations

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four examinations                  80% of grade
A minimum of 2 assignments and 5 in-class quizzes-
                                                20% of grade
                                               100%

Grading Scale:  A = 90+%
                B = 80%
                C = 70%
                D = 60%
                F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Success in this course is very dependent upon a student's attending all class sessions due to the specialized nature of the course. If a session is missed, the student should contact the instructor to discuss the missed session and obtain handout materials. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 132

  • Title: Seminar in Housekeeping Operations
  • Number: HMGT 132
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 17
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 15

Description:

This course presents a systematic approach to managing housekeeping operations in the hospitality industry. The course will also include related health department and OSHA regulations. While enrolled in this class, a student must work a minimum of 15 hours a week in a lodging operation. The work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. This course is typically offered in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of a housekeeping department within a hotel operation.
  2. Explain the responsibilities of planning and organizing in the housekeeping department.
  3. Utilize the proper management tools in planning and controlling inventories and expenses.
  4. Select the proper cleaning procedures and chemicals for different areas of the hotel and different types of hotels.
  5. Select the proper cleaning equipment for different types of surfaces and flooring.
  6. Explain the different safety and security issues facing the housekeeping department, including OSHA standards.
  7. Describe and evaluate the pros and cons of contract vs. in-house cleaning.
  8. Plan and organize an on-premise laundry.
  9. Develop and utilize an operating budget.
  10. Discuss the importance of a good preventative maintenance program.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Hotel industry and the housekeeping department
      1. List different types of hotels
      2. Describe the different departments in a hotel
      3. Analyze how this department interrelates with the housekeeping 
department
   B. Planning and organizing the housekeeping department
      1. Identify housekeeping department’s responsibilities
      2. Organize a housekeeping department
      3. Plan the work of the housekeeping department

II. Management Responsibilities of the Executive Housekeeper
   A. Managing inventories
      1. Determine par levels for recycled inventories
      2. Determine par levels for non-recycled inventories
   B. Controlling expenses
      1. Explain the housekeeping budget process
      2. Plan and use an operating budget
      3. Read and explain an operating budget and income statement
      4. Identify ways to control different expenses
      5. List capital budget items
      6. Evaluate contract vs. in-house cleaning
   C. Safety and security
      1. List and discuss the security and safety concerns of a hotel and
how to address them
      2. Identify and discuss OSHA regulations
   D. Managing an on-premise laundry
      1. Plan an on-premise laundry
      2. Identify the flow of linens through an on-premise laundry
      3. Evaluate different laundry machines and equipment

III. Technical/Reference Guide for Executive Housekeepers
   A. Housekeeping chemical and hazard communication responsibilities
      1. Identify common housekeeping chemicals
      2. Identify and explain housekeeping safety equipment
      3. Describe OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard
   B. Guestroom cleaning
      1. Prepare to clean
      2. Describe the steps in cleaning a guestroom and how it will be
inspected
      3. Describe deep cleaning, turndown service and different special
requests
   C. Public areas and other types of cleaning
      1. List front-of-the-house and other cleaning areas
      2. Describe special project cleaning
   D. Ceiling, wall, furniture and fixtures
      1. Discuss selection of furniture, fixtures and equipment
considerations
      2. List types of ceiling surfaces, wall coverings, furniture and
fixtures
      3. List care considerations for ceiling surfaces, wall coverings,
furniture and fixtures
   E. Beds, linens and uniforms
      1. Describe the considerations when selecting beds, linens and
uniforms
   F. Carpets and floors
      1. Describe and identify carpet construction, problems and
maintenance
      2. Describe and evaluate different carpet and floor equipment
      3. Describe and evaluate different carpet cleaning methods
      4. List the different types of floors
      5. Describe and evaluate general floor maintenance and different
floor cleaning methods

IV. Maintenance Department
   A. Preventative maintenance program
      1. Discuss the importance of a preventative maintenance program
      2. List the steps to develop a program
      3. List the ongoing organizational factors of a program

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Exams           300 pts  (50% of grade)
1 Final Exam      200 pts  (34% of grade)
Job Evaluation     50 pts  ( 8% of grade)
Case Studies       50 pts  ( 8% of grade)
   Total          600 points (100% total)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Be able to go on field trips.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 150

  • Title: Seminar: Food Service Sales and Marketing
  • Number: HMGT 150
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 17
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 15

Description:

This course includes detailed information in distinguishing the difference between marketing, sales, promotion, advertising and merchandising. In addition, development and quantifying the cost of a marketing plan by analyzing markets and developing a primary target market will be discussed. This course is a seminar course, and students are required to be employed 15 hours per week in a job related to the hospitality industry. 3 hrs. lecture, 15 hrs. internship/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define marketing and other terminology.
  2. Identify service quality through customer satisfaction.
  3. Analyze market segmentation through demographics.
  4. Analyze consumer behavior.
  5. Develop a marketing plan to suit the need of the foodservice establishment.
  6. Develop sales strategies.
  7. Develop promotion strategies.
  8. Identify the hospitality product life cycle.
  9. The student should be able to identify the importance of an electronic commerce advertising campaign.
  10. Develop and analyze an advertising and media plan.
  11. Acknowledge the importance of public relations skills.
  12. Develop in-house merchandising strategies.
  13. Develop a personal selling strategy.
  14. Develop a menu pricing strategy with menu design.
  15. Develop a marketing strategy by developing the menu.
  16. Identify legal issues in advertising and marketing. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Hospitality Marketing
   A. Define marketing mix
   B. Identify the marketing environment
   C. Identify the marketing management cycle

II. Hospitality Services Marketing
   A. Identify service quality
   B. Identify customer satisfaction
   C. Identify trends affecting the industry

III. Market Segmentation & Target Marketing
   A. Develop types of segments
   B. Identify segmentation variables
   C. Develop market segmentation decisions
   D. Develop market segmentation strategies

IV. Understanding Consumer Behavior
   A. Identify factors that influence consumer behavior
   B. Develop a customer decision-making model
   C. Develop a consumer problem-solving process

V. The Marketing Plan
   A. Develop a corporate mission
   B. Develop an executive summary
   C. Develop an external analysis
   D. Develop an internal analysis
   E. Develop a market positioning strategy

VI. Sales Strategy
   A. Develop a local strategic marketing strategy
   B. Develop a corporate strategic marketing strategy
   C. Identify strengths, weakness, opportunities and trends (SWOT)
analysis

VII. Promotion and Marketing
   A. Develop the promotion mix
   B. Develop an advertising strategy
   C. Evaluate the results of the marketing plan

VIII. The Hospitality Product
   A. Identify the product life cycle
   B. Identify the concept as a product
   C. Identify the benefits of branding

IX. Distribution & Electronic Commerce
   A. Develop a distribution management strategy
   B. Develop an advertising campaign for electronic commerce

X. Advertising and Media Planning
   A. Develop a print media strategy
   B. Develop a broadcast media strategy
   C. Develop a direct mail strategy
   D. Identify the importance of support media

XI. Merchandising 
   A. Identify and define merchandising
   B. Develop a merchandising plan

XII. Public Relations
   A. Identify the importance of public relations
   B. Develop a public relations plan

XIII. Personal Selling
   A. Identify the personal selling process
   B. Develop a plan to prospect business
   C. Identify personal selling tools
   D. Identify ethical issues in selling
   E. Develop a sales presentation
   F. Identify the importance of closing the sale

XIV. Pricing Strategy and Menu Design
   A. Identify pricing variables
   B. Identify pricing techniques and procedures
   C. Develop a cost pricing strategy
   D. Identify pricing law and ethics

XV. Marketing with Menu Design
   A. Identify menu-planning variables
   B. Identify how to increase sales while developing the printed menu

XVI. Legal Issues
   A. Identify Truth-In-Menu concerns
   B. Identify ethics in advertising

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests                 45.0% of grade
Final Examination     22.5% of grade
Projects/Assignments  22.5% of grade
Coordination Grade    10.0% of grade
 Total               100.0% 
   
Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 - 100
 B = 80 -  89
 C = 70 -  79
 D = 60 -  69
 F = Below 60

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. This course is a seminar course and students are required to be employed a minimum of 15 hours per week in a job related to the hospitality industry.
  2. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 150H

No information found.

HMGT 165

  • Title: Food Industry Compliance & Safety
  • Number: HMGT 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and explain the basic legal compliance issues regarding food safety and the post-harvest handling of local food products. This course focuses on the legal compliance issues of market farming as well as the food safe handling principles necessary for an individual involved in market farming. It will provide students with practical methods of application involved with food safety and post-harvest marketing. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives




  1. Discuss various growers’ terminology with regard to market farming.
  2. Describe various industry food safety guidelines.
  3. Identify various risk hazards affecting market farming.
  4. Discuss different management systems to prevent the risk hazards of market farming.
  5. Identify good agriculture practices including HACCP standards.
  6. Explain good agriculture practices in packaging, storage and transportation of market farming products.
  7. Develop an on-farm safety program.
  8. Develop a grower’s self assessment program. 



Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Various Language Associated with Market Farmers 
    A. Describe and review terminology associated with conventional
farming.
    B. Describe and review terminology associated with market farming.
    C. Describe and review terminology associated with organic farming.
 
II. Industry Food Safety Guidelines for Market Farmers
    A. Identify the USDA guidelines governing market farmers.
    B. Identify the USDA guidelines governing food safety and trade
information
    C. Identify the USDA guidelines governing food preparation and
handling.
    D. Identify the USDA guidelines governing food safety and inspection.
    E.  Identify Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) for market farmers.
    F.  Identify U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for
market farmers.
    G. Identify U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines for
food safety and applied nutrition.
     
III. The Role of the Market Farmer Surrounding Various Risks
   A. Identify potential source of on-farm contaminates.
   B. Describe how to minimize risks prior to planting.
   C. Describe how to minimize specific site risks.
   D. Evaluate methods to minimize risks during production.
   E. Evaluate methods to minimize risks at harvest.
   F. Describe how to minimize risks associated with farm personnel.
       
IV. Good Agriculture Practices during Packaging, Storage and
Transportation of Market Farming Products
   A. Describe the guidelines on how to keep the packing house clean and
sanitary.
   B. Identify the guidelines on how to properly cool and cold store
product.              
   C. Identify the proper methods for transporting product from farm to
market.
   D. Describe the basic elements of equipment cleaning and sanitation
during food processing and handling.
         
V.  On-Farm Safety Program
   A. Identify U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines to
minimize microbial food safety hazards for fresh fruits and vegetables.
   B. Identify services available from the Center for Disease Control and
Prevention for market farmers.
   C. Describe the value of a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point
(HACCP) system for market farmers.
   D. Develop an on-farm safety program based on the good agriculture
guidelines.
        
VI. Grower’s Self Assessment Plan
   A. Develop a record keeping system based on good agriculture
guidelines.
   B. Develop a harvest and field sanitation action plan.
   C. Develop a worker hygiene appraisal plan. 
   D. Identify areas of concern with regard to farm biosecurity.
   E. Identify actions necessary for crisis management.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                50% of grade
Projects/Assignments     50% of grade
Total                      100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 167

  • Title: Local Food Production
  • Number: HMGT 167
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze and explain the basic cooking methods, recipe conversion and professional food preparation and handling of local food products. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate common food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. It will provide students with practical methods of application involved with safe handling and production of post-harvest local food products. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate the fundamentals of handling food in a safe and sanitary manner.
  2. Operate many commercial pieces of equipment used in a commercial kitchen.
  3. Describe the process of obtaining local products for retail and wholesale use.
  4. Demonstrate the fundamentals of making stocks, soups and sauces using local products.
  5. Demonstrate all of the presented cooking methods of meats, fruits and vegetables available from the local market.
  6. Identify the various market forms of meats, fruits and vegetables from the local market.
  7. Identify the basic elements of using local meats, fruits and vegetables in salad and sandwich preparation.
  8. Identify how to properly incorporate the use of local products in menus.
  9. Describe changing expectations on menus using local products. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Various Sanitation Guidelines for the Handling of Market Farmer
Products 
    A. Describe and review sanitation guidelines when using local
products. 
    B. Describe and review proper storage and handling of local products.
    C. Describe and explain possible containments associated with local
products.
    D. Identify possible health hazards associated with the use of local
products.  
    E. Describe the basic elements of equipment cleaning and sanitation
during food processing and handling. 

II. The Use of Commercial Tools and Equipment
    A. Describe the main categories of food production equipment.
    B. Describe the commercial cooking and processing equipment.
    C. List various types of small wares used in a commercial kitchen.
    D. Identify various types of measuring devices used in a commercial
kitchen.
    E. List various types of knives and hand tools used in a commercial
kitchen.
    F. Describe the basic elements of equipment cleaning and sanitation
during food processing and handling.

III. The Process by which Market Farm Product is Secured for the Wholesale
and Retail Market
     A. Identify different ways of obtaining local market farm product.
     B. Develop a purchasing system from market farmers.
     C. Develop a delivery system from market farmers.
     D. Identify various accounting requirements when buying from a local
farmer.
     E. Evaluate different ordering systems available when purchasing from
a local farmer.
               
IV. Basic Cooking Principles
     A. Discuss the most commonly used cooking terms.
     B. Discuss the effect heat has on food, as well as the methods of
heat transfer.
     C. Describe the most common methods of cooking including moist heat
and dry heat. 
     D. Define the use of seasonings and flavorings.
     E. Describe the use of local herbs and their use in a commercial
kitchen.         
         
V. Basic Stock Production
     A. Identify local ingredients and their use in basic stock
production.        
     B. Discuss basic stock production procedures.
     C. Discuss various stock recipes and how they may be altered when
using local product.     .
     D. Prepare reductions and glazes using local products.
        
VI. Classical Sauce Productions
     A. Identify the main ingredients used in preparation of the five
classical sauces.
     B. Discuss various types of rouxs.
     C. Explain alternate thickening agents. 
     D. Describe finishing techniques.
     E. Discuss proper methods of sauce production.               

VII. Basic Soup Production
     A. Describe a clear soup, thick soup and a specialty soup.
     B. Identify how market farm products can be incorporated in various
types of soups.
          
VIII.  Salads and Sandwich Production
     A. Identify various types of salads.
     B. Demonstrate how local product may be utilized in different salad
production.
     C. Identify various types of salad dressing using local herbs.
     D. Identify various types of sandwiches.
     E. Demonstrate how local product may be utilized in different
sandwiches.
             
IX. Fruits and Vegetables 
     A. Identify various types of fruit and vegetable forms available from
local farmers.
     B. Demonstrate how local fruits and vegetables can be used in stock,
sauce, soup, salad and sandwich production.

X. Current Trends using Market Farm Products
     A. Identify what current menu trends with regard to local and organic
products.
     B. Demonstrate how menu trends could require the use of local and
organic products.
     C. Describe how to properly write a menu using local and organic
products.          

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                50% of grade
Projects/Assignments     50% of grade
Total                      100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:


Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 203

  • Title: Hotel Sales and Marketing*
  • Number: HMGT 203
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 121 and admission to the hospitality management program

Description:

This course will focus on practical sales and marketing techniques for the hotel industry. It will cover a marketing plan and advertising campaign for a hotel, including identifying target markets, prospecting for sales leads and using sales techniques. This course is typically offered in the fall semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize major trends affecting the hospitality industry.
  2. Describe how sales and marketing fit into the total hotel operation.
  3. Explain the different parts of an organizational chart of the sales office.
  4. Explain the importance of a marketing plan and describe how it is developed.
  5. Identify and demonstrate an understanding of different sales techniques and how to “prospect” for the most appropriate sources of additional business.
  6. Identify and demonstrate an understanding of negotiation and closure techniques.
  7. Discuss the different legal aspects of a sales contract.
  8. Describe the importance and relationships of internal sales in food and beverage, catering, meeting room and guest rooms.
  9. Write and develop an advertising campaign including public relations and publicity projects.
  10. Discuss and identify different market segments and how to attract them.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Hospitality sales and marketing
      1. Discuss hospitality trends.
      2. Distinguish marketing from sales.
      3. Discuss management’s role in marketing and sales .
      4. Discuss the importance of sales.
   B. Parts of a marketing plan
      1. Identify the parts of a marketing plan.
      2. Research and write a marketing plan for a specific hotel.
   C. The sales office
      1. Identify all parts of a sales and marketing department .
      2. Design an organizational chart for different types of hotels.
      3. Discuss the relationships sales office must have with different
departments.

II. Sales Techniques
   A. Personal sales
      1. Identify prospecting techniques.
      2. Prepare and demonstrate a presentation sales call.
      3. Identify ways to increase sales productivity.
      4. Demonstrate a typical sales call from preparing to signing the
contract.
   B. Telephone sales
      1. Demonstrate the basics of telephone communication.
      2. Write a telemarketing script.
      3. Discuss the pros and cons of telephone sales.
   C. Internal marketing and sales
      1. Discuss and demonstrate the difference and the importance of
internal sales and internal marketing.
      2. Identify effective internal merchandising.
      3. Develop special services and in-house promotions.
   D. Restaurant and lounge sales
      1. Describe techniques of developing repeat business.
      2. Write different positioning statement for different types of
restaurants and lounges.
      3. Develop different promotions and merchandising campaigns.
      4. Discuss other food and beverage options for a hotel.
   E. Banquet and meeting rooms
      1. Describe a catering department within a hotel.
      2. Distinguish between outside catering and inside catering in a
hotel.
      3. Discuss the differences between sleeping room sales and meeting
room sales.
      4. List the importance of audio visual in today’s meeting room
market.

III. Advertising, Public Relations and Publicity
   A. Effective advertising
      1. Discuss the reasons to advertise.
      2. List the types of advertising.
      3. Develop an advertising plan.
      4. Analyze what advertising tools (outdoor, displays and collateral
materials) would be most effective for different hotels and campaigns.
      5. Measure the effectiveness of different types of print
advertising.
      6. Research and develop a direct mail campaign.
      7. Measure the effectiveness of the direct mail campaign.
      8. Discuss the pros and cons of different types of broadcast
advertising.
   B. Public relations and publicity
      1. Develop a public relations campaign.
      2. Handle different types of publicity.
      3. Write a press release.

IV. Marketing
   A. Marketing to different market segments.
      1. Describe the different types of business traveler.
      2. Identify the needs of and how to reach the business travelers.
      3. Describe the different types of leisure traveler.
      4. Identify the needs of and how to reach the leisure travelers.
      5. Discuss the special needs and wants of travel agents and meeting
planners and how to meet them.
      6. Identify ways to reach travel agents and meeting planners.
      7. Describe different types of meeting planners and their needs.
      8. List other special market segments and some ways to reach
them.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final Exam                        200 pts ( 29% of grade)
Three tests at 100 points each    300 pts ( 43% of grade)
Case Studies                      100 pts ( 14% of grade)
Project                           100 pts ( 14% of grade)
       Total                      700 pts (100% total)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Be able to go on tours.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 207

  • Title: Hospitality Human Resource Management*
  • Number: HMGT 207
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 128

Description:

This course will examine hospitality human resources management from the global perspective as the rise of multinational hospitality corporations and a multicultural society place new requirements on managers with human resource responsibilities. Special emphasis will be placed on both the "soft skills" involved in counseling, interpersonal relations and different management theories, as well as the "hard skills" involved in the legislative aspects of managing people. This course will concentrate on how to manage managers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define human resource management in a dynamic and changing environment.
  2. Describe and evaluate the employment process.
  3. Evaluate human resources training, development and evaluation processes.
  4. Compare and contrast different discipline, counseling and exiting policies.
  5. Compare, contrast and evaluate different management philosophies.
  6. Explore different compensation options and planning in the Hospitality Industry.
  7. Explain how positive employee relations is meeting the needs of a new workforce.
  8. Identify the challenges and changing needs of human resource management in the future. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Define Human Resource Management in a Dynamic and Changing
Environment
   A. Explore the historic evolution of human resource management
   B. Describe how human resources management supports quality improvement
programs
   C. Describe the planning and organization development of human
resources

II. Describe and Evaluate the Employment Process
   A. Describe the labor market
   B. Evaluate different recruitment possibilities and their legal
implications
   C. Describe and evaluate the different selection, hiring and placement
processes
   D. Lists the different types and categories of employment law
   E. Interprets the impact of employment legislation on the employment
process

III. Evaluate Human Resources Training, Development and Evaluation
Processes
   A. Defend ‘Why train?’ argument
   B. Evaluate different orientation and training structures and programs
   C. Describe different ways to maximizing you training investment
   D. Evaluate developmental programs
   E. Describe the role of performance evaluating in human resources
management
   F. Evaluate different employee retention programs

IV. Compare and Contrast Different Discipline, Counseling and Exiting
Policies
   A. Describe the differences in ‘management rights’ and the
‘rights of the employees’
   B. Explain the problems of workplace violence and sexual harassment and
describe possible solutions
   C. Evaluate different approaches to disciple and corrective actions
   D. Explain the legal ramifications of different approaches

V. Compare, Contrast and Evaluate Different Management Philosophies
   A. Explore at least six different management philosophies
   B. Evaluate different management philosophies and theories in different
employment environments 
 
VI. Explore Different Compensation Options and Planning in the Hospitality
Industry 
   A. Describe different considerations in developing a compensation plan
   B. List and describe different legal issues in compensation
administration  
   C. Explain compensation administration in the hospitality industry
   D. Explain the role of benefits and flexible benefit programs in the
Hospitality Industry
   E. Describe trends and innovative approaches in benefits programs
   F. Explain the special concern of benefit plan design

VII. Explain How Positive Employee Relations Meets the Needs of a New
Workforce
   A. Describe the basic concept of multicultural management
   B. Evaluate the impact of cultural diversity in the workforce
   C. Explain and evaluate ‘Conflict Management and Resolution’ in
different work environments
   D. Explain the importance of stress and coping skills in employee
management
   E. Describe and evaluate an employee assistance program; how to set one
up, its benefits and cost-effectiveness
   F. Explain the importance of managerial problem-solving/decision making
techniques
   G. Explain and evaluate unions and collective bargaining in the
workplace

VIII. Identify the Challenges and Changing Needs of Human Resource
Management in the Future 
   A. Identify trends and challenges in the future for human resource
management
   B. Explain the importance of strategy formulation and planning for
implementation
   C. Explain the purpose of an ongoing needs analysis
   D. Evaluate ‘Human Resources Information Systems’ versus
‘Information Systems’ and the legal ramifications
   E. Describe the increasing importance of human resource
management

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations         50-60% of grade
Projects/Assignments 30-50% of grade
 Total                 100%

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 – 100% 
 B = 80 –  89% 
 C = 70 –  79%  
 D = 60 –  69%   
 F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 220

  • Title: American Regional Cuisine*
  • Number: HMGT 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 230

Description:

This course introduces the student to regional American cooking from nine regional culinary traditions and two specialty traditions within American cuisine. Students will study the cuisine of New England; the Mid-Atlantic states; the Deep South; Florida and the Caribbean; Cajun and Creole; the Central Plains and Rocky Mountain states; Tex-Mex and the American Southwest; California and Hawaii; the Pacific Northwest, as well as vegetarian cuisine and kosher dietary laws. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate skills in cooking and presenting classic American dishes in their traditional forms within a restaurant setting. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Develop an understanding of the diverse selection of high-quality ingredients indigenous to the United States.
  2. Prepare selected recipes from nine regional culinary traditions and two chosen specialty traditions of American cuisine using indigenous ingredients, cooking methods and presentations.
  3. Demonstrate the fundamentals of handling food in a safe and sanitary manner.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to work within a restaurant environment to produce timely appetizers, entrees, vegetables and starches from within the regional American culinary traditions.
  5. Demonstrate skills in plate presentation and buffet presentation of selected classic American dishes.
  6. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. New England
   A. Identify typical New England ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the New England culinary tradition to
include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and starches.

II. Mid-Atlantic States
   A. Identify typical Mid-Atlantic ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Mid-Atlantic culinary tradition to
include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and starches.

III. The Deep South
   A. Identify typical Southern ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Southern culinary tradition to
include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and starches.

IV. Florida and the Caribbean
   A. Identify typical Floridian and Caribbean ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Floridian and Caribbean culinary
tradition to include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and
starches.

V. Cajun and Creole Cuisines
   A. Identify typical Cajun and Creole ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Cajun and Creole culinary
traditions to include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and
starches.

VI. Central Plains and Rocky Mountain States
   A. Identify typical Central Plains and Rocky Mountain ingredients and
dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Central Plains and Rocky Mountain
culinary traditions to include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and
starches.

VII. Tex-Mex and the American Southwest
   A. Identify typical Tex-Mex and Southwestern ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Tex-Mex and Southwestern culinary
traditions to include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and
starches.

VIII. California and Hawaii
   A. Identify typical Californian and Hawaiian ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Californian and Hawaiian culinary
traditions to include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and
starches.

IX. Pacific Northwest
   A. Identify typical Northwestern ingredients and dishes.
   B. Prepare selected dishes from the Northwestern culinary tradition to
include appetizers, entrees, sauces, vegetables and starches.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Practical examination  0% to 20% of grade  A = 94 – 100%
Four examinations     40% to 50% of grade  B = 84 –  93%
Class work            30% to 40% of grade  C = 75 –  83%
Homework and projects 10% to 20% of grade  D = 70 –  74%
    Total:                100%             F = below 70%

Although attendance is essential, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the kitchen and will be
a factor in determining grades.  In addition, collaboration and teamwork
will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students may not attend cooking labs without the proper uniform of black pants, a white chef’s jacket, closed-toe shoes, and a white cloth chef’s hat. Shorts and tights will not be permitted in class.
  2. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 221

  • Title: Design and Facilities Management*
  • Number: HMGT 221
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HMGT 271

Description:

This course includes detailed information about food service design that covers layout, design and equipment specifications. In addition, facilities operations will be discussed regarding electrical, water and transportation systems; refrigeration; waste disposal; energy management; and HVAC. Preventive maintenance will be emphasized. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the distinct different components of various pieces of equipment.
  2. Select equipment to fit operational requirements.
  3. Write specifications for all types of restaurant equipment.
  4. Develop proper product and traffic flow in a kitchen layout.
  5. Revise a poor kitchen layout into a functional operation at a minimum of cost.
  6. Develop a compact and efficient work center.
  7. Coordinate work centers into work sections.
  8. Design and layout a complete restaurant, including kitchen, dining room, and bar. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Equipment Selection
   A. Define the supporting factors regarding equipment, including:
      1. Electricity
      2. Plumbing
      3. Steam
      4. Gas
   B. Explain the principles for equipment selection in general
   C. Define the selection principles for specific equipment, including:
      1. Mechanical equipment
      2. Cooking equipment
      3. Serving equipment
      4. Refrigeration
      5. Auxiliary equipment
   D. Define the principles specification writing
   E. Develop general conditions to bid

II. Layout Planning
   A. Discuss the various types of food facilities
   B. Explain and analyze layout characteristics, including:
      1. Work center development
      2. Work selection development
      3. Product flow
      4. Work flow
   C. Describe the operational aspects that affect plans
   D. Define space allocation for:
      1. Kitchen
      2. Dining room
      3. Bar
      4. Auxiliary functions

III. Discuss Food Facility Planning by Area, including:
   A. Receiving
   B. Storage
      1. Dry storage
      2. Refrigeration storage
      3. Frozen storage
   C. Food processing
      1. Pre-prep area
      2. Hot prep area
      3. Cold prep area
   D. Serving
      1. Cook's line
      2. Wait staff pick up
   E. Sanitation
      1. Ware washing
      2. Pot and pan area
      3. Janitorial services
   F. Dining room
      1. Tables and chairs
      2. Wait stations
      3. Lobby
   G. Bar-lounge
      1. Back bar layout
      2. Bar storage
   H. Auxiliary areas
      1. Offices
      2. Employee lounge
      3. Restrooms

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Exam @ 100 points each   43%   of grade (300 points)
Restaurant Design Project  28.5% of grade (200 points)
Final Exam                 28.5% of grade (200 points)
        Total             100%            (700 points)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 223

  • Title: Fundamentals of Baking
  • Number: HMGT 223
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Description:

This course covers bakeshop production as it relates to the basic principles of ingredients, measurements, mixing, proofing, baking and final presentation. In addition, the student will be able to identify the various types of baking equipment used in the preparation of bakeshop products. The class includes lecture and participation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss and demonstrate the basic principles of bake shop production.
  2. Describe and demonstrate a variety of yeast raised roll preparation techniques.
  3. Describe and demonstrate sweet dough product production.
  4. Explain and demonstrate Danish pastry preparation.
  5. Discuss and demonstrate quick bread preparation.
  6. Explain and demonstrate cake and icing preparation techniques.
  7. Describe and demonstrate cream, custard and pudding preparation techniques.
  8. Describe and prepare a variety of cookie preparation techniques.
  9. Explain and demonstrate pie dough preparation techniques.
  10. Discuss and prepare a variety of pie fillings.
  11. Describe and demonstrate a variety of aerated desserts. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Bakeshop Production:  Basic Principles
   A. Define safety and sanitation principles
   B. Explain the use of baker's scale
   C. Discuss formulas, rolling pin and dough cutter usage
   D. Explain and demonstrate mixing and gluten development
   E. Discuss the use of ingredients

II. Yeast Products (Dinner Roll and French and Rye Bread Production)
   A. Describe scaling procedures
   B. Describe mixing procedures
   C. Describe proofing procedures
   D. Outline the twelve steps in the baking process

III. Basic Sweet Dough Preparation (Yeast Doughnuts and Sweet Rolls)
   A. Describe and perform mixing procedures
   B. Describe and perform scaling procedures
   C. Describe and perform cutting procedures
   D. Describe and perform rolling procedures
   E. Describe and perform proofing procedures
   F. Describe and perform baking procedures
   G. Describe and perform icing procedures

IV. Danish Pastry Preparation
   A. Discuss the variation between Danish dough and basic sweet dough
preparation
   B. Explain rolling procedures
   C. Describe cutting and shaping procedures
   D. Describe proofing procedures
   E. Describe baking procedures
  
V. Quick Breads Production
   A. Discuss the objectives of quick bread preparation from scratch
   B. Describe biscuits, muffins, breads and varieties production
techniques
   C. Prepare and bake a variety of quick breads  

VI. Cakes and Icings
   A. Discuss mixing techniques, including:
      1. Creaming method
      2. Sponge method
      3. Two-Stage method  
   B. Describe icings and toppings
   C. Produce, assemble and decorate a cake

VII. Creams, Custards, Puddings and Sauces
   A. Discuss sweet puddings, creams, custards and chilled desserts 
   B. Prepare mousses and Bavarians
   C. Discuss plating techniques

VIII. Cookies
   A. Describe cookie characteristics
   B. Discuss mixing methods
   C. Explain types and make up methods
   D. Discuss panning, baking and cooling methods
   E. Prepare a variety of cookies

IX. Scratch Pie Dough Preparation
   A. Define ingredients
   B. Explain single crust production
   C. Explain double crust production
   D. Discuss graham cracker and short dough crusts
   E. Describe assembly and baking methods
   F. Prepare appropriate pie doughs

X. Pie Fillings
   A. Discuss starches for fillings
   B. Discuss fruit fillings
   C. Discuss custard or soft fillings
   D. Prepare appropriate fillings and complete both soft and fruit pies

XI. Assorted Aerated Desserts and Pastries
   A. Describe puff paste dough
   B. Describe pate a choux (eclair paste)
   C. Describe meringue
   D. Cook and assemble fresh fruit desserts

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four exams                31% of grade
Participation in 16 class sessions     37%
Notebook                               15%
A minimum of 9 quizzes                 17%
                                      100%


A = 94 - 100%
B = 84 - 93%
C = 75 - 83%
D = 70 - 74%
F = Below 70%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The student must come to class with white coat, cloth WHITE CHEF'S HAT, pants or dress (no sweats or tights) and shoes must be closed toe and heel and the student should have good personal hygienic practices as outlined in Student Food Laboratory Guidelines. No shorts allowed on any production work.
  2. Equipment operational procedures will be conducted on an individual student basis.
  3. NOTE: Additional lab work required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 226

  • Title: Garde Manger*
  • Number: HMGT 226
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 230

Description:

This course is designed for the student to learn cold food production and charcuterie. The course will allow the student to develop fundamental principles of the cold kitchen and modernize traditional methods of salad preparation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare forcemeats for sausage and demonstrate the fundamentals of cooking, slicing and serving these items.
  2. Successfully brine-cure and dry-cure meat and demonstrate basic fundamentals of slicing and serving these items.
  3. Design, prepare and present cocktail hors d’oeuvres.
  4. Identify quality in gourmet purchases of caviar, foie gras and truffles.
  5. Prepare marinades for meat, vegetables and fish.
  6. Process meat, fish, shellfish and vegetables for hams, corned beef products, salami, pates and terrines.
  7. Produce pates, terrines and galantines and demonstrate basic fundamentals of slicing, glazing and displaying these items.
  8. Demonstrate a basic understanding of aspic glazing, ice carving, tallow sculpting and other garde manger skills to enhance cold buffet presentations.
  9. Prepare modern salads, dressings and crackers.
  10. Produce cold sauces, including relishes and chutneys.
  11. Demonstrate production techniques for cocktail sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, canapés and other cold plated appetizers.
  12. Demonstrate a basic understanding of cheese-making processes and produce soft cheese.
  13. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Orientation to Preparing Pate; Salami and Sausage; Hams; Cured Beef
Products; Galantine; and Salads
   A. Describe the elements of a well-constructed cold food display or
plate presentation.
   B. Construct original menu items that are balanced, harmonious and
nutritious.

II. Preparation
   A. Demonstrate basic butchery skills.
   B. Demonstrate meat fabrication in preparation for curing and brining.
   C. Make classic vegetable cuts.
   D. Prepare suitable dough for pate en croute and describe the reasons
for the baking phase.
   E. Prepare salad dressings and crackers.
   F. Measure by both volume and weight the recipe ingredients.
   G. Plan for final presentation.

III. Production
   A. Demonstrate correct cooking techniques, including sautéing,
simmering, smoking and baking.
   B. Use safe food-handling techniques.
   C. Demonstrate proper serving methods.
   D. Produce sauces and condiments appropriate for the prepared items.

IV. Presentation
   A. Apply various plate presentation designs complementing the tastes,
textures, colors of the prepared food items.
   B. Distinguish between ineffective and successful plate presentation
for both plates and platter presentations.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes towards tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four Examinations:     30 to 50% of grade
Practical Examination: 15 to 25% of grade
Class Work:            25 to 40% of grade
Projects and homework: 10 to 25% of grade
  Total:                 100%

Although attendance is essential, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the kitchen and will be
a factor in determining grades.  In addition, collaboration and teamwork
will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to wear closed toe shoes, a white chef's coat and a white chef's hat, long black pants. No sweats or jeans. Excellent personal hygiene is required.
  2. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 228

  • Title: Advanced Hospitality Management*
  • Number: HMGT 228
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

This course includes detailed information about various components of menu planning, food service, supervision, design and beverage control. In addition, an understanding of the external factors affecting the hotel-restaurant industry will be discussed. Skills necessary to secure a position in management within the hospitality industry will be emphasized, and case studies and computer simulation (HOTS) will be used for critical thinking analysis. Business plans will be developed as part of the course project. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the skills necessary to effectively secure a position of management within the hospitality industry.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship of the various disciplines within the curriculum.
  3. Dissect a problem logically into its basic components and reach a reasonable solution to that problem.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of how external factors, i.e. government and society, affect the hotel-restaurant industry.
  5. Identify various trends, both from the consumer and within the industry and how to react to those trends. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Job Search Process
   A. Prepare a resume:
      1. Develop a format
      2. Organize content
   B. Implement established interview techniques
   C. Implement the job search, including:
      1. Identifying goals
      2. Matching available positions with goals
      3. Sourcing of jobs that you feel competent in undertaking
      4. Describing industry trends
      5. Illustrating economic trends and forecasts

II. The Interrelationship of Academic Areas of Study
   A. Summarize food production skills
      1. Implement basic food preparation skills
      2. Develop intermediate food preparation skills
      3. Develop advanced food preparation skills
   B. Describe purchasing techniques, including:
      1. One stop shopping
      2. Bid buying, formal and informal
   C. Incorporate accounting principles into operational reports
   D. Describe supervisory management skills
   E. Illustrate menu planning skills
   F. Describe food management techniques

III. External Factors Affecting the Hotel-Restaurant Industry
   A. Complying with governmental regulatory law
      1. Describe federal statutes and their implementation
      2. Describe state statutes and their implementation
      3. Describe local statutes and their implementation
   B. Define consumer activist groups and describe their impact
   C. Describe demographic trends and their implications for the
hospitality industry
   D. Discuss operational trends

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Classroom Participation & Assigned Papers  50% of grade
Final Exam                                 50% of grade
       Total                              100%

*NOTE:  A student must pass the final exam to pass the course.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 230

  • Title: Professional Cooking II*
  • Number: HMGT 230
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 120 and HMGT 123

Description:

This is the second of two courses in professional cooking methods for students enrolled in hospitality management programs. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate advanced level skills in cooking methods, recipe conversion, and professional food preparation and handling. Additionally, the student should be able to safely operate advanced food service equipment used in commercial kitchens. This course consists of lecture, demonstration and participation in food preparation. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Operate many commercial pieces of equipment.
  2. Demonstrate advanced techniques of making stocks, soups and sauces.
  3. Demonstrate all of the presented cooking methods of meats, fish and vegetables.
  4. Identify the presented market forms of meat, poultry and fish and their uses and storage of such items.
  5. Identify advanced elements of salads and sandwiches preparation and cooking including presentations.
  6. Demonstrate advanced techniques of breakfast cookery and be proficient at making omelettes.
  7. Be proficient at setting up a breakfast buffet. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Equipment Use
   A. Identify the mandolin, ricer, mortar and pestle and pasta machine.
   B. Identify utensils, pots and pans and describe safe practices for
using slicers, grinders, combi-ovens, food processors, stand mixers, alto
shams, and smokers.

II. The Recipe
   A.  Describe the importance of a standardized recipe in the
professional kitchen.
   B.  Describe the procedures for writing a standardized recipe.
   C.  Describe the difference between “AP” and “EP”.
   D.  Identify all units of U.S. fluid and weight measure and convert
recipes using these units of measure.


III.  Flavoring Foods
   A. Identify and describe marinades and rubs used in a professional
kitchen..


IV. Cooking Methods
   A. Describe combined methods of cooking including braising and
stewing.
   B.  Describe dry heat methods of cooking including broiling, pan
broiling grilling and smoking.

V.  Stocks
   A.  Describe and define stock and its importance in the professional
kitchen.
   B.  Define “Mise en Place.”
   C.  Identify and describe fish stock and vegetable stock.
   D.  Identify and describe court bullion and fumet
   E.  Identify and describe the dimensions for oblique cut, tourne,
paysanne and fluting.

VI. Secondary Sauces
   A. Identify and describe the secondary sauces and their importance in
the professional kitchen.

VII. Soups
   A.  Describe clear soups including consommé.
   B.  List the ingredients needed to produce a clearmeat.
   C.  Describe thick soups including bisques and chowders.
   D.  Describe Specialty and National soups.
   E.  Identify appropriate garnishes for each type of soup.

VIII. Breakfast Cookery
   A. Identify and describe the various food items and beverages suitable
for breakfast service.           
   B.  Select food items appropriate for a limited service breakfast
buffet..
   C. List and describe various specialty coffee drinks..
   
IX. Salads and Sandwiches 
   A.  Identify various types of salads and their appropriate dressings.
   B.  Describe the variety of breads, spreads and fillings used to
prepare hot sandwiches in a professional kitchen.
   C.  Identify the four parts of a salad.

X. Meat Fabrication
   A.  Identify and describe the USDA grades of pork, veal, lamb and
duck.
   B.  Identify the primal cuts of pork, veal and lamb.
   C.  Describe the use of duck in the professional kitchen.
   D.  Identify the five parts of a lamb, beef and veal leg.

XI. Seafood Fabrication
   A.  List the types of crabs used in a professional kitchen.
   B.  Identify the parts of a lobster.
   C.  Identify the types of mollusks used in a professional kitchen.
   D.  Describe the different size designations of shrimp.

XII.  Simmering
   A.  Define simmering.
   B.  Identify food items appropriate for simmering.

XIII. Poaching
   A.  Define poaching.
   B.  Identify food items appropriate for poaching.
   C.  Describe shallow poaching.
   D.  Define submersion poaching.
   E.  Define cuisson. 
   F.  List and describe the liquids used for poaching in a professional
kitchen.

XIV.  Steaming
   A.  Define steaming.
   B.  Identify food items appropriate for poaching.
   C.  Describe the benefits steaming.
   D.  Define “en pappilote.”
   E. Describe the process of steaming food items.

XV.   Boiling
   A.  Define Boiling.
   B.  Identify food items appropriate for boiling.
   C.  Describe the process of boiling food items.
   D.  Describe various types of pasta and its appropriate sauce.

XVI.   Braising
   A.  Define braising.
   B. Identify food items appropriate for braising.
   C.  Describe the benefits of braising food items.
   D.  Define the pilaf method of cooking starches.
   E.  Describe the benefits of oven braising.

XVII.  Stewing
   A.  Define stewing.
   B.  Identify food products that are appropriate for stewing and
braising.
   C.  Describe the differences and similarities between stewing and
braising.

XVIII.  Broiling and Pan Broiling
   A.  Define broiling and pan broiling.
   B.  Identify food products that are appropriate for broiling and pan
broiling.
   C.  Describe the differences and similarities between broiling and pan
broiling.

XIV.  Grilling and Smoking
   A.  Define grilling.
   B.  Define smoking.
   C.  Identify food products appropriate for grilling.
   D.  Identify food products appropriate for smoking.
   E.  Describe the differences between cold and hot smoking.
   F.  Describe the proper temperatures used when grilling specific food
items.
   G.  Describe the temperatures used when hot smoking.
   H.  Describe the temperatures used cold smoking.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Although attendance is essential, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the kitchen and will be a
factor in determining grades.  In addition, collaboration and teamwork
will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to wear closed toe shoes, a white chef's coat and a white chef's hat, long pants or jeans (no sweats). Name tags will be supplied and must be worn. Excellent personal hygiene is required. Equipment operations and sanitation procedures will be conducted on an individual student basis.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 230H

No information found.

HMGT 231

  • Title: Advanced Food Preparation*
  • Number: HMGT 231
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 230 and department approval

Description:

This course is designed to develop a student's advanced culinary skills in preparation of international cuisine commonly served in today's operations in Latin America, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, the Far East and the Pacific area. 4.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe advanced theories of food production techniques and their place in today’s modern kitchen.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the tools and ingredients in the professional kitchen.
  3. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the preparation of stocks, sauces and soups.
  4. Describe in depth an understanding of the preparation of meats, poultry, fish and seafood.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the preparation of vegetables, potatoes, grains, legumes, pasta and dumplings.
  6. Identify national dishes from around the world and how they can be incorporated into a menu.
  7. Describe various styles of table service including French, Russian, American, English, butler and buffet services.
  8. Discuss the advantages, as well as disadvantages, of each style of service in a food service operation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Chef as a Professional
   A. Describe the chef’s profession.
   B. Describe the food service professional.
   C. Describe the professional chef.
   D. Discuss food and kitchen safety.
   E. Define nutrition and healthy cooking.
   F. Illustrate equipment identification.
   G. Discuss the raw ingredients.

II. Food Service Production
   A. Discuss cooking in the professional kitchen.
   B. Describe mis en place and its enhancement of productivity.
   C. Develop soups including clear, cream and cold.
   D. Prepare sauces from the basic mother sauces to secondary sauces, as
well as reductions.

III. Cooking in the Professional Kitchen
   A. Describe recipes on dry heat cooking methods.
   B. Describe recipes on moist heat and combination cooking methods.

IV. Table Service
   A. Explain table service and its impact on an operation.
   B. Describe types of table service.
   C. Discuss functions of personnel in dining room.
   D. Explain working relationship between dining room and kitchen
staff.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of 5 examinations           62.5% of grade
Class work of 9 sessions @ 30 pts     28.1% of grade
Pop quizzes, homework assignments
  and practical test (90 pts. total)   9.4% of grade
       Total                         100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The student must come to class with white coat, cloth WHITE CHEF’S HAT, black pants or dress (no sweats or tights) and shoes must be closed toe and heel and the student should have good personal hygienic practices as outlined in Student Food Laboratory Guidelines. No shorts allowed on any production work. Equipment operational procedures will be conducted on an individual student basis. NOTE: Additional lab work required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 235

  • Title: Seminar: Risk Management and Loss Prevention
  • Number: HMGT 235
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 17
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 15

Description:

This course explains the issues surrounding the need for individualized security programs, examines a wide variety of security and safety equipment and procedures, discusses guest protection and internal security for asset protection. It explores risk management and loss prevention issues and outlines OSHA regulations that apply to lodging properties. While enrolled in this class, a student must work a minimum of 15 hours a week in a lodging operation. The work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 2 hrs lecture, 15 hrs. work/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss legal concerns in providing safe and secure accommodations for guests.
  2. Identify preliminary considerations in setting up a security program.
  3. State the various methods of security staffing.
  4. Identify and explain the functions of a wide variety of security equipment.
  5. Identify and explain the purposes of security procedures that deal with guest protection and internal control.
  6. Explain the value of and procedures for accurate report writing and recordkeeping.
  7. Discuss the elements of and need for protecting the accounting functions.
  8. Develop an emergency management program.
  9. Discuss the elements of a risk management program.
  10. Identify many Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations that contain information important to lodging property managers and personnel. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Discuss Legal Concerns in Providing Safe and Secure Accommodations
for Guests

II. Identify Preliminary Considerations in Setting up a Security Program
   A. Discuss the importance of a law enforcement liaison
   B. Discuss the importance of security training for all departments 

III. State the Various Methods of Security Staffing
  
IV. Identify, Explain and Evaluate the Functions of a Wide Variety of
Security Equipment
   A. Explain the importance of physical security systems, surveillance
systems, communication systems, alarm systems, and guestroom security
equipment such as locks
   B. Evaluate which systems and equipment would work best for different
types of hotels

V. Identify and Explain the Purposes of Security Procedures That Deal With
Guest Protection and Internal Control
   A. Discuss security procedures on a department-by-department basis
   B. Discuss the special procedures placed on handling special guests and
events

VI. Explain the Value of and Procedures for Accurate Report Writing and
Recordkeeping
   A. List what reports must be taken and when they are taken
   B. Explain the value of accurate and timely reporting
   C. List the advantages of documentation for the hotel and for yourself

VII. Discuss the Elements of and Need for Protecting the Accounting
Function
   A. Discuss the importance of accounting control and cashiering
procedures 
   B. Discuss the importance of credit policies
   C. Discuss the importance of computer security
   D. Examine the importance of an internal audit program

VIII. Develop an Emergency Management Program
   A. Develop a program deals with bombs and bomb threats, fires,
hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, blackouts, robberies, medical
emergencies and terrorism
   B. Develop a plan to work effectively with the media in the event of an
emergency situation

IX. Discuss the Elements of a Risk Management Program
   A. Discuss appropriate insurance coverage for lodging operations and
claims management
   B. Discuss the importance of an ongoing safety committee

X. Identify Many Occupational Safety and Health Act Regulations That
Contain Information Important to Lodging Property Managers and
Personnel

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          60% of grade
Projects/Assignments  40% of grade
 Total               100%

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 – 100% 
 B = 80 –  89% 
 C = 70 –  79%  
 D = 60 –  69%   
 F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 238

  • Title: Advanced Garde Manger*
  • Number: HMGT 238
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 226

Description:

This course is designed for the student to learn advanced cold food production and charcuterie as well as Modern Cuisine techniques. This course will allow the student to develop advanced principles of the cold kitchen and modern cooking techniques and equipment. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the fundamental aspects of food sculpture and decoration.
  2. Prepare foods utilizing modern cuisine methods and equipment.
  3. Successfully brine-cure and dry-cure meat and demonstrate basic fundamentals of slicing and serving these items.
  4. Design, prepare and present cold entrées, soups and intermezzos.
  5. Prepare marinades and pickles for meat, vegetables and fish.
  6. Process meat, fish, shellfish and vegetables for hams, corned beef products, salami, pates and terrines.
  7. Discuss the fundamentals of the HACCP food safety protocol.
  8. Produce pates, terrines and galantines and demonstrate basic fundamentals of slicing, glazing and displaying these items.
  9. Produce cold sauces, including relishes and chutneys.
  10. Demonstrate production techniques for cocktail sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, canapés and other cold plated appetizers.
  11. Demonstrate a basic understanding of sausage making techniques.
  12. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the kitchen.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Classroom Discussion

A. Describe advanced cold kitchen production techniques.

B. Define HACCP and its principles.

C. Describe the elements of a well-constructed cold food display or plate presentation.

D. Construct original menu items that are balanced, harmonious and nutritious.

II. Food Preparation

A. Demonstrate advanced cold kitchen skills.

B. Demonstrate meat fabrication in preparation for curing and brining.

C. Make a variety of fresh, cured, fermented, smoked and dried sausages.

D. Prepare pickling and marinade mixtures for a variety of meats, fruits and vegetables.

E. Prepare cold entrees, soups and appetizers.

F. Prepare a variety of foods utilizing modern cuisine techniques, ingredients and equipment.

III. Food Production

A. Demonstrate correct food preparation techniques, including brining, curing, smoking and preserving.

B. Use safe food-handling techniques according to HACCP principles.

C. Demonstrate proper serving methods.

D. Produce sauces and condiments appropriate for the prepared items.

E. Produce a variety of forcemeat preparations including pates, terrines and galantines.

IV. Food Presentation

A. Apply various plate presentation designs complementing the tastes, textures and colors of the prepared food items.

B. Distinguish between ineffective and successful plate presentation for both plate and platter presentations.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits

A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow students appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting criticism and praise.

B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data.

C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
94-100% = A
84-93% = B
75-83% = C
70-64% = D
Below 70% = F

30-50% of grade:    Four Examinations
15-25% of grade:    Practical Examination
25-40% of grade:    Class Work
10-25% of grade:    Projects and Homework
Total must equal 100% of grade

Although attendance is essential, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the kitchen and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 240

  • Title: Advanced Baking*
  • Number: HMGT 240
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 123 and HMGT 223

Description:

This course covers the principles needed to enter the baking and pastry industry. The course provides knowledge of specialty ingredients and techniques needed to make tortes, finished desserts and a wedding cake. The student will be instructed in the making of these items through lecture and will prepare a variety of such items in lab. 4.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand the procedures and ingredients for preparing specialty yeast products.
  2. Shape different varieties of rolls and breads.
  3. Understand the correct use of fondants, toppings, creams, glazes and fillings.
  4. Prepare and cook the ingredients of a wide variety of specialty breads and desserts.
  5. Assemble and decorate the finished breads or dessert products.
  6. Prepare a variety of chilled desserts.
  7. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the laboratory setting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review of Fundamentals of Baking
   A. List the typical ingredients of baked products
   B. List and describe the various equipment used for producing baked
goods
   C. List the categories of finished baked products and describe their
take in the menu

II. Demonstrate the Essential Skills of Advanced Baking (as they apply to
objectives III-VI)
   A. Select and measure the appropriate ingredients for the baking
formula
   B. Demonstrate the correct procedures for mixing ingredients
   C. Prepare bread doughs and set sponges
   D. Prepare batters, including high-ratio and foaming method
   E. Form or shape the product
   F. Properly bake the bread dough or dessert foundation
   G. Cook fillings and toppings, when necessary, and prepare for
application
   H. Assemble and decorate the finished breads or dessert products

III. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing Specialty Yeast
Products, including:
   A. Special breads and muffins
   B. Bread show pieces

IV. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing Specialty Sweet and
Rich Dough Products, including:
   A. Kugelhopf dough
   B. Baba/Savarin dough
   C. Brioche dough
   D. Croissants, including:
      1. Plain
      2. Filled

V. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing Specialty Cakes and
Tortes, including:
   A. Petit fours glaces, including:
      1. Base
      2. Filling
      3. Icing
      4. Decorating
   B. Swiss rolls, including:
      1. Sponge roll
      2. Fillings
      3. Icing or coating
      4. Decorating
   C. European-style torte, including:
      1. Bottom layers
      2. Middle layers
      3. Flavoring syrups
      4. Fillings
      5. Icing and coatings

VI. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing Specialty Pastries,
including: 
   A. Tarts and tartlets, including:
      1. Crust
      2. Pastry cream filling
      3. Fruit selection and design
      4. Topping
   B. Puff paste products, including:
      1. Bottom crust
      2. Filling
      3. Top crust
   C. Pate a Choux products, including:
      1. Shell making
      2. Filling
      3. Garnish
   D. Strudel and Phyllo dough, including:
      1. Apple strudel 
      2. Baklava
 
VII. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing a Variety of
Specialty Cookies (Petit Fours Sec.), including:
   A. Speculaas
   B. Pfeffernusse
   C. Almond tea cookies
   D. Langues De-Chat
   E. Florentines

VIII. Describe and Demonstrate the Process for Preparing a Variety of
Chilled Desserts, including:
   A. Charlottes:
      1.  Prepare  molds
      2.  Construct base
      3.  Prepare filling
      4.  Properly chill and unmold
      5.  Garnish
   B. Cheese cakes:
      1. Prepare crust
      2. Prepare one of the following fillings:
         a. New York style
         b. French style
         c. Flavorings
      3. Properly bake and cool the product
   C. Frozen products, including:
      1. Churn-frozen desserts
      2. Still-frozen desserts
IX. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the workplace including giving and accepting
criticism and praise
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks and maintaining the work setting.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/team work skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four Exams       (300 points)   42% of grade
Classroom Grades (420 points)   58% of grade
      Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the laboratory and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.
  2. The student must come to class with a white coat on, shoes must be closed toe and heel and the student should have good personal hygienic practices. No shorts allowed on any production work. Equipment operations and sanitation procedures will be conducted on an individual student basis. NOTE: Additional lab work required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 245

  • Title: Travel for Credit*
  • Number: HMGT 245
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 121 and department approval

Description:

This travel-for-credit course consists of visits to restaurants, hotels, markets and food and beverage producers in an established region.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Identify and use vocabulary relating to hospitality.
  2. Identify regional and national cuisines.
  3. Compare hotel/lodging development abroad with that in the U.S.
  4. Identify items in the beverage marketplace.
  5. Organize a field study travel journal.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Use Vocabulary Relating to Hospitality

II. National and Regional Cuisines

A. Explain identifying features of national cuisines.

B. Explain identifying features of regional cuisines.

C. Identify specific goods utilized in export market and available for use in U.S.

III. Hotel/Lodging Development

A. Compare and contrast hospitality in U.S. and foreign markets.

B. Identify retail marketing methods.

C. Describe trends affecting product selection.

IV. Categories in the Beverage Market

A. Compare and contrast various styles in beer marketplace.

B. Compare and contrast various styles in wine marketplace.

C. Compare and contrast various styles in spirits marketplace.

V. Field-Study Travel Journal

A. List daily itinerary.

B. Compile notes from presentations and seminars.

C. Compile brochures and literature.

D. Relate personal opinion about presentations, markets and other site visits.

E. Define and describe current styles and trends in hospitality.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:
35-55% of grade    Class activities and assignments
25-40% of grade    Field-study travel journal
15-25% of grade    Pre-trip project
Total = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

  1. This is a travel-for-credit course and involves fees based on current airline and/or hotel costs. A deposit is required at time of registration with balance of fees paid prior to travel. Additional costs may be incurred by the student during the trip.
  2. The course will necessitate a large amount of walking and standing. Any student with a health problem should contact a physician prior to enrolling.
  3. Students should have current U.S. passport and must obtain a visa as necessary. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 248

  • Title: Confectionery Arts
  • Number: HMGT 248
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Description:

This course covers the design and production of artistic centerpieces made from confections. It provides knowledge of and basic skills in making decorative dining table centerpieces using food products such as cooled and pulled sugar syrup, isomalt, pastillage, marzipan and chocolate. The student will be instructed in the preparation of these ingredients and will construct center and showpieces after viewing demonstrations. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare sugar syrup for sugar casting.
  2. Color and shade finished pieces.
  3. Make decorative flowers, ornamental items and birds from cast, pulled and blown sugar.
  4. Preserve the sugar showpieces.
  5. a. Explain the effects of humidity on the process and the product.
  6. b. Apply specific techniques to preserve showpieces.
  7. Temper couveture and make centerpieces for table display.
  8. Prepare and form pastillage into decorative table and buffet centerpieces.
  9. Prepare rolled fondant for cake enrobing.
  10. Prepare and form marzipan figures. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sugar

   A. Describe and prepare syrup that, when cooled, will stretch, bend and stay malleable while warm.

   B. Color the syrups to the correct shades.

   C. Form sugar into various shapes, by stretching or blowing.

   D. Paint and spray the finished centerpieces.

   E. Preserve the finished pieces.

II. Chocolate and Couveture

   A. Demonstrate the three methods of tempering chocolate.

   B. Cut and form tempered chocolate.

   C. Pipe chocolate to decorate finished artistic pieces.

   D. Make chocolate fillings and truffles.

III. Pastillage

   A. Make pastillage from given ingredients.

   B. Roll pastillage to form a smooth surface.

   C. Cut and build pastillage into structures.

   D. Prepare royal icing for decoration.

IV. Rolled Fondant

   A. Make fondant from given ingredients.

   B. Roll fondant to a smooth and shining consistency.

   C. Enrobe a simple cake with fondant and eliminate creases.

V. Marzipan

   A. Prepare marzipan from set ingredients.

   B. Color and shade marzipan.

   C. Form marzipan into artistic figures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Labs (12) ... 360 pts. =  47% of grade

Tests (3) ... 300 pts. =  39% of grade

Final (1) ... 100 pts. =  13% of grade

       Total             100%

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:

  94%+  = A

  84%+  = B

  75%+  = C

  70%+  =

  Below 70% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to wear closed-toed shoes, a white chef’s coat, and a white chef’s hat, long pants or jeans (no sweats--no short pants).
  2. NOTE: Additional lab work required.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 250

  • Title: Introduction to Catering
  • Number: HMGT 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course includes detailed information about the different types of catered events within the hospitality industry. Topics covered include the importance of marketing, contract writing, food production, room arrangements and required personnel relative to specific catered events. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the various types of catering events and operations.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the catering market and explain a marketing plan (including a budget) specific to a catered function.
  3. Explain the importance of the customer negotiations, communications and requirements as related to a specific catered event. Identify the various types of catered events and specific requirements involved with each type of event.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the food production specifics for various types of catered events.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of various physical room sets in relation to the type of catered event and type of food being served.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the type of labor required at different catered events along with an understanding of scheduling the required personnel.
  7. Explain the importance of the different types of beverage services available during a catered event.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of different types of contracts used throughout the food service industry for catered events.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of the various challenges presented during convention catering. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Different types of Catering Operations
   A. List and describe various types of catering operations, including: 
      1. Hotel banqueting
      2. On premise catering
      3. Off premise catering
      4. Accommodator catering
      5. Convention catering
      6. Miscellaneous, i.e. Kosher catering
   B. Compare and contrast the supervision, profitability, training
requirements, and preparation for each of the preceding catering
operations
   C. Explain the differences and similarities of catering with other
forms of food service

II. Marketing Plans and different types of Budgets.
   A. Describe the business market
   B. Describe the social market
   C. Describe the convention market and how to develop leads
   D. Explain how to create a market plan
   E. Explain how to prepare an event budget

III. Catering Sales
   A. Describe how product knowledge will enhance sales
   B. Discuss sources of business and the impact on sales volume
      1. Business leads
      2. Social leads
      3. Self generated inquiries
      4. Telephone solicitation

IV. Customer Communications
   A. Describe negotiating a contract
   B. Discuss listening skills
   C. Discuss special requirements for a function

V. Types of Catered Events
   A. Describe various types of social events
   B. Describe various types of business events
   C. Describe convention catering

VI. Food Production
   A. Discuss menu planning and its impact on production
   B. Develop menu pricing for various events
   C. Describe food transportation and the importance of timing
   D. Discuss special equipment needed

VII. Catering Labor
   A. Discuss staffing requirements
   B. Describe various sources of workers
   C. Describe how to implement training for all personnel
   D. Discuss compensation plans and options

VIII. Types of Beverage
   A. Describe alcoholic products
   B. Discuss non-alcoholic products
   C. Monitor licensing requirements and dram shop liability
   D. Describe beverage pricing
   E. Describe special beverage equipment used in catering functions

IX. Contracts
   A. Describe and list types of contracts
   B. Explain liability and how to select an insurance provider

X. Additional Client Services
   A. Describe room set-up options
   B. Discuss audiovisual equipment
   C. Discuss entertainment and entertainment contracts
   D. Describe lighting options
   E. Identify convention services available, including:
      1. Transportation
      2. Spouse programs
      3. Support services

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three exams @ 100 pts.           50% (350 pts)
Project 100 pts.                 25% (175 pts)
Possibility of additional Class 
Participation Points 
Comprehensive Final              25% (175 pts)
  Total                         100% (700 pts)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 256

  • Title: Casino Management
  • Number: HMGT 256
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the unique conditions and management challenges associated with a casino property. An overview of game operation and rules will serve as a foundation. Management controls will be emphasized including how to compute statistical data to assist management in operations. The course is not intended to be a training exercise. Casino marketing and ways to develop effective player rating systems will be analyzed. The history of the casino industry and regulatory environment will also be examined. The course is not intended to be a training exercise for those interested in learning to deal games. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the history of the casino industry, lotteries, sports book and race operations.
  2. Identify the importance of the casino regulatory environment.
  3. Develop an understanding of casino management hierarchy structure.
  4. Examine all area’s of casino cash control.
  5. Identify the importance of slot machines and their physical placement within the casino or hotel.
  6. Discuss how table games are played and understand the importance they have on revenue and profits.
  7. Analyze casino accounting and develop auditing procedures.
  8. Analyze and calculate casino statistics including how to determine house advantage.
  9. Describe how to develop an effective player rating system.
  10. Describe the steps in developing a casino marketing program.
  11. Develop an understanding of sports book, race operations and lotteries.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of the Casino Industry
   A. Describe the history of the casino industry.
   B. Analyze the history of lotteries, sports book, race book and the
Casino industry in general.

II. Regulatory Environment of the Casino Industry
   A. Identify Nevada casino regulations.
   B. Identify Atlantic City casino regulations.     
   C. Identify riverboat casino regulations.
   D. Identify Indian casino regulations.                                 
         

III. Gaming Management of the Casino Industry
   A. Identify the management structure and hierarchy of a casino hotel.
   B. Identify the management structure and hierarchy of others types of
casinos.
   C. Describe how to staff a casino operation with personnel.

IV. Cash Management of Casinos
   A. Identify the controls instituted at the cage on the gaming floor.
   B. Describe the way casinos issue credit.
   C. Review how casinos collections occur.

V. Slot Machine Management of Casinos
   A. Identify the difference between slot machines.
   B. Discuss the importance of physical placement of slot machines.
   C. Analyze the importance of slot machine revenue.
   D. Identify cash control procedures of slot machines.

VI. Table Game Management of Casinos
   A. Discuss how table games are played.
   B. Develop an understanding of the importance of table game revenue.
   C. Identify the importance of the physical placement of table games.
   D. Identify cash control procedures of table games.

VII. Accounting in the Casino Industry
   A. Develop casino accounting and auditing procedures.
   B. Identify the importance of key control.

VIII. The Importance and Calculation of Casino Statistics
   A. Identify the importance and calculate casino statistics of each
table game.
   B. Identify the importance and calculate casino statistics for every
slot machine.

IX. Player rating System of Casino’s
   A. Identify the importance of developing a player rating system.
   B. Demonstrate an understanding of actual and theoretical table win.
   C. Identify the importance of average bet and time played by each
player.

X. Casino Industry Marketing
   A. Developing a casino marketing program based on your target market.
   B. Identify the importance of the premium player segment on casino
revenue.
   C. Identify the difference between slot and table game marketing.

XI. Sports Book, Race Operations & Lotteries
   A. Identify the importance of sports book on casino revenue and
profits.
   B. Recognize the importance of race operations on casino revenue and
profits.
   C. Identify the importance of national and state lotteries.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests                              60% of grade
Project/Assignments                15% of grade
Comprehensive Final Examinations   25% of grade
                                  100 %
Grade Criteria:
  A = 89.50 - 100
  B = 79.50 -  89.50
  C = 69.50 –  79.50
  D = 59.50 –  69.50
F = Below 59.50

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 265

  • Title: Front Office Management
  • Number: HMGT 265
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a full understanding of the flow of business from the front office, beginning with the reservations process to checkout and settlement. It also includes the night audit and statistical analysis of rates and revenue management. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Show how the hotel industry is part of the hospitality industry.
  2. List the different ways a hotel is classified and why.
  3. List the reasons people travel and choose a certain hotel.
  4. Describe a hotel’s mission statement and its importance.
  5. Draw a hotel’s and the front office’s organizational chart.
  6. List different hotel front office forms and equipment.
  7. Describe the “guest cycle.”
  8. Demonstrate a typical guest account from check-in to settlement.
  9. Process a night audit and discuss its relevance.
  10. Describe the importance of good guest relations.
  11. Explain the importance of front office security and list the different areas of concern.
  12. Explain the importance of front desk selling.
  13. Explain the importance of maximizing profits in establishing room rates, forecasting room availability, budgeting, and using revenue management techniques.
  14. Explain the concept of revenue management, its techniques and pros and cons.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The World of Hotels
   A. The Lodging Industry
      1. Describe the hospitality industry
      2. List the different ways to classify hotels
      3. List reasons for traveling
   B. Hotel Organization
      1. Evaluate a hotel’s mission statement
      2. Write a hotel’s organizational chart
      3. Write a front office department’s organizational chart
   C. Front Office Operations
      1. Identify different front office systems
      2. Identify different front office forms and equipment
      3. Design an effective front desk

II. The Guest Cycle
   A. Reservations
      1. Discuss reservations’ sales techniques
      2. List types of reservations
      3. Take a room reservation, from inquiry to confirmation
      4. List different reservation reports
      5. Discuss reservation maintenance and different considerations
   B. Registration
      1. Demonstrate the registration process including the key security
issue
      2. Demonstrate different types of front office selling techniques
      3.  Discuss the issues of room and rate assignment and fulfilling
special requests
      4. Discuss option when guests cannot be accommodated
   C. Front Office Responsibilities
      1. Describe the importance of good communication within the front
office and interdepartmentally
      2. Describe and demonstrate good guest service and guest relations
      3. Discuss the importance of front office security
   D. Front Office Accounting
      1. Discuss front office accounting fundamentals
      2. Create and maintain accounts
      3. Track transactions
      4. Discuss the importance and different types of internal controls
      5. Demonstrate the settlement of an account
   E. Check-Out and Settlement
      1. List the functions of check-out and settlement
      2. Describe departure procedures and check-out options
      3. Explain what to do with unpaid balance on accounts and how to
handle collections
      4. Describe what to do with front office records
   F. The Night Audit
      1. List the functions of the night audit
      2. Calculate and verify a night audit
      3. Describe the daily report and explain its significance

III. Front Office Management
   A. Planning and Evaluating Operations
      1. List the management functions
      2. Calculate the formula for establishing room rates
      3. Calculate and evaluate the formulas and ratios for forecasting
room availability
      4. Summarize the procedure for budgeting for operations
      5. Evaluate front office statistics for operating efficiency
   B. Revenue Management
      1. Discuss the concept of revenue management
      2. List and calculate the formulas and ratios that measure yield
      3. List the elements and principles of revenue management
      4. Discuss how to use revenue management and the different pros and
cons

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final Exam               200 pts   (29% of grade) 
Three tests @ 100 points 300 pts   (43% of grade)
Case Studies             100 ptS   (14% of grade)
Project (Night Audit)    100 pts   (14% of grade)
            Total        700 pts  (100% total)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students must have transportation available to tour hotels in the area to assist them in completing their class project. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 268

  • Title: Hospitality Managerial Accounting*
  • Number: HMGT 268
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 120 and HMGT 121 and HMGT 273

Description:

This course introduces the student to basic managerial accounting. This includes accounting concepts, processing data and the flow of financial information within a hospitality operation. The course provides a working knowledge of an income statement, balance sheet, statement of owner's equity and cash flows. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List and explain the purpose of generally accepted accounting principles.
  2. Describe the proprietorship, partnership and corporate forms of business organization and their advantages and disadvantages.
  3. Define and give examples of financial reporting centers.
  4. Describe the purpose of a chart of accounts and its function in an accounting system.
  5. Identify and explain the technical and long forms of the accounting equation.
  6. Identify the five major account classifications.
  7. List the basic rules governing debits and credits in relation to the major account classifications.
  8. Summarize the purposes of and formats for hotel departmental financial statements.
  9. List and explain the basic steps involved in the month-end accounting process, including the completion of the worksheet and the preparation of financial statements.
  10. Compile, read and analyze an income statement, balance sheet and statement of owner’s equity.
  11. Analyze and interpret income statement and balance sheets, including the use of ratios.
  12. List the commonly used ratios for income statements and balance sheets.
  13. Summarize the information reported on the statement of retained earnings, and explain the relationship between this statement and the income statement and balance sheet.
  14. Explain the purpose, preparation, content and format of the statement cash flow. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Accounting Theory and Practice
   A. The function of accounting
      1. Identify the users of accounting information
      2. List and describe the generally accepted accounting principles
   B. Business organization
      1. List the three types of business organizations
      2. Describe the financial information systems for the lodging
operations

II. Financial Statements
   A. The accounting equation
      1. Identify the technical and long form of the equation
      2. List and explain the five major account classifications
      3. Explain the rules of increase and decrease as related to the
major account classifications
      4. Define the terms debit and credit and list the basic rules
governing debits and credits.
   B. Chart of accounts
      1. Explain the purpose of a chart of accounts
      2. Describe the Uniform System of Accounts and its purpose
   C. Monthly and year end procedures
      1. Compile the information to prepare a trial balance worksheet
      2. Calculate an adjusted trial balance
      3. Prepare financial statements
      4. Prepare and analyze the statement of retained earnings
   D. Statement of income and expense
      1. Compile information to prepare an income statement
      2. Prepare an income statement
      3. Read and analyze an income statement
      4. Prepare and analyze common-size and comparative formats
      5. Read a departmental income statement
   E. Balance sheet
      1. Compile information to prepare a balance sheet
      2. Prepare a balance sheet
      3. Read and analyze a balance sheet
      4. Prepare and analyze common-size and comparative formats
   F. Cash flow statement
      1. Read and analyze a cash flow statement

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final Exam                  200 pts  (29% of grade)
Three tests @ 100 points    300 pts  (43% of grade)
Problems and Case Studies   200 pts  (28% of grade)
                   Total    700 pts (100% total)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 270

  • Title: Meat and Fish Identification and Fabrication*
  • Number: HMGT 270
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 226 and HMGT 286

Description:

This course is designed for the student to learn about meat and fish identification, and fabrication of beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry, fish and seafood. 3.5 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Students in this course will learn the subject of meat, fish and seafood and cover this topic in depth. Understanding the information covered in this class will help build a strong culinary foundation and support the principles to be learned in the courses that follow.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify beef, veal, lamb and pork skeletal charts with location, structure and names of bones.
  2. Identify USDA quality and yield grading, and local and state USDA requirements.
  3. Successfully identify domestic and game poultry species.
  4. Fabricate whole poultry into serving-size cuts.
  5. Identify primal cuts from the beef, pork, and lamb chart.
  6. Differentiate food service cuts and meat terminology.
  7. Trim and cut portions from commonly used subprimal pieces.
  8. Process all pork cuts from whole hog carcass.
  9. Distinguish the “head to tail” concept and differentiate between “square cut fabrication” and “seam butchering.”
  10. Identify, categorize and fabricate the most common fish, seafood and mollusks.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basics of Fabrication

A. Identify industry and food service terms, tools and equipment.

B. Study the meat buyers guide and understand meat composition.

C. Identify purchasing specifications incl receiving and storing of meat and seafood.

D. Identify quality levels of meat and seafood.

E. Demonstrate safe sanitation practices, food safety, HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points).

F. Apply principles of mathematics to yield tests on various fabricated meats.

II. Fabrication

A. Fabricate chicken into various industry standard cuts.

B. Differentiate butchery techniques from larger domestic poultry such as turkey, duck, goose and capon.

C. Fabricate the commonly used primal cuts of beef.

D. Fabricate pork shoulder and pork loin into portion cuts.

E. Fabricate lamb cuts from whole carcass.

F. Cut whole flatfish and roundfish into fillets.

III. Identification

A. Identify different species of game birds and understand their use in food service.

B. Identify the primal and subprimal cuts on a beef chart.

C. Identify all usable products and cuts on a pork chart.

D. Identify the most common shellfish and mollusks.

IV. Presentation

A. Demonstrate standard and advanced styles of portion cuts.

B. Fabricate subprimal cuts into advanced individual serving cuts.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
94 - 100% = A
85 - 93.9% = B
75 - 84.9% = C
70 - 74.9% = D
below 70 = F

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:
35-50% of grade:    Three Examinations
15-25% of grade:    Practical Examination
25-40% of grade:    Class Work and projects

Total of evaluation must be 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 271

  • Title: Seminar in Hospitality Management: Purchasing
  • Number: HMGT 271
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 17
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 15

Description:

This course offers an overview of purchasing techniques and specification writing for commodities used in the hospitality industry. Emphasis will be on decision-making skills in the areas of quality, quantity, specifications and general value analysis. Two hours in class and a minimum of 15 hours a week are required in a supervised work situation in an approved area of the hospitality industry. Work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Know and identify the pack sizes and grades of fresh and processed produce.
  2. Identify the characteristics distinguishing the various cuts and grades of beef, lamb, pork and poultry products used frequently in the hospitality industry.
  3. Differentiate among a variety of fresh fin and shellfish species and describe the advantages/disadvantages of the various harvesting methods.
  4. Weigh and determine the full cost of a product to include equipment usage, available storage, staff food preparation skills, waste, customer expectations, etc.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding and implement proper food storage and handling procedures.
  6. List and explain the various industry food regulatory agencies and laws impacting the purchasing and sale of food to the public.
  7. Define all product grades according to USDA specifications.
  8. Describe and model decision making skills in the areas of purchase quality, quantity, specifications and general value analysis.
  9. Define the purchasing trade terminology.
  10. Describe and model ethical and unethical behavior of purveyors and buyers.
  11. Identify the purchasing needs of various hospitality operations and describe the products most appropriate for those operations. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Purchasing 
   A. Describe the three spheres of purchasing
   B. Markets
      1. Describe types of markets
      2. Compare agents and their role in the purchasing process
      3. Illustrate regulations
      4. Describe the various types of purveyors
      5. Describe the issue of ethics
   C. Internal functions
      1. Developing needs, values, specs
      2. Describe making the purchase
      3. Receiving, storing, issuing

II. Groceries
   A. Identify dry goods
   B. Define fats and oils
   C. Describe condiments

III. Beverages
   A. Explain criteria for selecting coffee, tea
   B. Explain criteria for selecting soda fountain drinks, syrups
   C. Explain criteria for selecting juices and mixes

IV. Dairy
   A. Describe the factors involved in selecting milk
   B. Evaluating cheeses
   C.  Describe the factors involved in selecting butter
   D. Compare ice cream
   E. Describe fat contents and quality 

V. Fruits
   A. Describe the criteria for selecting fresh, frozen, canned
   B. Implementing quality standards
   C. Describe consumer expectations
   D. Illustrate the dynamics of market

VI. Vegetables
   A. Describe the criteria for selecting fresh, frozen, canned
   B. Establishing quality standards
   C. Describe consumer expectations
   D. Compare dynamics of market

VII.  Seasonings
   A. Define the criteria for selecting herbs and spices
   B. Compare fresh vs. dried
   C. Describe the oil contents of various seasonings
   D. List and describe the quality standards of seasonings

VIII. Poultry and Eggs
   A. Describe market forms
   B. Establish quality standards
   C. Compare regulations
   D. Define specifications

IX. Fish
   A. Compare fresh vs. frozen
   B. Describe the proper receiving and storing of fish
   C. List and describe quality standards
   D. Discuss the market, including supply, demand and availability

X. Meats
   A. Describe quality standards:
      1. Grades
      2. Aging
      3. Cuts
   B. Identify the cuts of meat
   C. Describe how to buy for value
   D. Develop specifications

XI. Bid Contracts and Specification Forms

XII. Non Food Supplies
   A. Selecting tableware
   B. Purchasing linen
   C. Selecting china
   D. Selecting glassware

XIII. Industry Tours
   A. Selecting a grocery supply house
   B. Selecting a produce supply house

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Test 1               100 pts.  15 % of grade
Test 2               100 pts.  15 % of grade
Test 3               100 pts.  15 % of grade
Final Exam           200 pts.  31 % of grade
Job/Work Evaluation   50 pts.   8 % of grade
Project Assignment    50 pts.   8 % of grade
Assigned Paper        50 pts.   8 % of grade
    Total            650 pts. 100 %

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Student must be employed a minimum of 15 hours per week in a job related to the hospitality industry. Note: Additional Lab Work Required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 273

  • Title: Hospitality Cost Accounting*
  • Number: HMGT 273
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 120 or higher and HMGT 121

Description:

This course includes detailed information on how to prepare operation statements for a food service operator, including inventory and control systems. Areas of concentration will be food cost controls, labor cost controls, purchasing controls and profit production. The practice set will be used to reinforce control systems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Determine cost, volume and profit relationship
  2. Define fixed, variable and semi-variable cost
  3. Demonstrate the use of controls in purchasing, receiving and storage
  4. Identify the importance of issues and transfers
  5. Determine daily and monthly food cost calculations
  6. Analyze financial statements
  7. Complete sales forecasts and demonstrate their use in relationship to production control and budgeting
  8. Develop bar controls
  9. Measure the effectiveness of food and beverage controls
  10. Develop labor cost controls
  11. Develop staffing and scheduling systems
  12. Develop payroll manually and computerized
  13. Identify legal issues and ethics of concern for accounting practices within the foodservice industry 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis
   A. Identify when to use cost-volume-profit analysis
   B. Identify the importance of cost-volume-profit analysis

II. Accounting Terminology
   A. Identify a fixed expense
   B. Identify a variable expenses
   C. Identify a semi-variable expense

III. Purchasing Controls
   A. Identify and develop purchasing controls
   B. Identify the importance of using standardized recipes
   C. Identify the use of the standard cost tools
   D. Develop a purchase specification

IV. Issues & Transfers
   A. Identify the importance of issues as a control device
   B. Identify the importance of transfers as a control device

V. Food Cost Calculations
   A. Determine how to develop a daily food cost percentage
   B. Determine how to develop a monthly food cost percentage
   C. Determine how to take inventory
   D. Determine the importance of using inventory as a control tool

VI. Financial Statements
   A. Develop an understanding of an income statement.
   B. Develop an understanding of a balance sheet.
   C. Identify the differences between an income statement and balance
sheet.

VII. Sales & Revenues
   A. Develop a sales forecast
   B. Develop a yearly budget
   C. Identify the three parts to a budget
   D. Identify the importance of using zero based budgeting

VIII. Bar Controls
   A. Identify the importance of cost controls in a bar
   B. Develop portioning controls for a bar

IX. Food & Beverage Cost Controls
   A. Measure the results of current cost controls
   B. Identify the importance of each control procedure

X. Labor Cost Controls
   A. Identify the difference between fixed and variable labor costs
   B. Develop labor cost controls

XI. Staffing & Scheduling Systems
   A. Identify the difference between staffing & scheduling
   B. Develop a schedule for a restaurant

XII. Payroll
   A. Develop a manual payroll
   B. Develop a computerized payroll

XIII. Ethics in Accounting
   A. Identify ethics in regards to financial reporting  
   B. Identify the legalities of payroll  

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests              60% of grade
Practice Set       15% of grade
Final Examination  25% of grade
    Total         100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100
B = 80 –  89
C = 70 –  79
D = 60 –  69
F = Below 60

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 275

  • Title: Seminar in Hospitality Management: Internship*
  • Number: HMGT 275
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 18
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the hospitality management program

Description:

This course provides industry experience for students in cooperating businesses, agencies and organizations. While enrolled in this course, a student must work a minimum of 320 hours in an approved position in the hospitality industry. By arrangement.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of an actual operation and describe solutions to operational problems.
  2. Explain proper employee scheduling.
  3. Analyze and explain the steps necessary to cost out a menu.
  4. Identify proper purchasing procedures.
  5. Design and develop a project to improve operations.
  6. Analyze and explain the process of solving food cost problems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Planning for the Internship
   A. List goals and objectives to achieve in internship setting.
   B. Identify personal strengths and competency areas needing additional
work.
   C. Develop a plan to acquire additional knowledge and skills relevant
to hospitality management and the work situation.
   D. Identify job opportunities in the local area.
   E. Complete the application and interview process to secure
employment.

II. Identifying Operational Problems and Issues
   A. Describe and list various food cost problems
   B. Discuss labor costs and how sales impact the labor budget
   C. Describe direct expenses
   D. Assess various areas of an operation which could involve theft and
security issues
   E. Discuss breakage and a method of prevention
   F. Describe indicators of low morale

III. Developing Solutions to Operational Problems
   A. Reviewing food cost issues
      1. Identify receiving - storage procedures
      2. Discuss inventory methods
      3. Describe production controls
      4. Describe portion controls
      5. Assess the benefits of guest check controls
      6. Identify cash control procedures    
   B. Developing a labor control plan
      1. Explain productivity
      2. Describe scheduling procedures
      3. Discuss the value of cross training
   C. Implementing direct expense controls
      1. Describe utility expenses and their controls
      2. Discuss laundry control procedures
      3. Describe chemical usage including federal requirements
      4. Discuss control of paper products
   D. Identifying theft and security issues
      1. Discuss locking devises
      2. Explain the control of keys
      3. Discuss the control of leftovers
      4. Describe liquor storage controls
      5. Discuss control of food storage areas
   E. Developing a breakage and loss control program
      1. Identify methods of inventory of china, silver and glassware
      2. Monitor the dishwashing area
      3. Discuss dishwashing techniques
      4. Discuss flooring recommendations
   F. Measuring morale and managing to motivate
      1. Describe and list indicators of low morale
      2. Discuss methods of improving morale
      3. Describe management consistency
      4. Explain the major styles of management

IV. Professional Conduct and Workplace Skills
   A. Exhibit punctuality, initiative, courtesy and loyalty in the
workplace.
   B. Exhibit an ability to get along with others.
   C. Demonstrate adaptability to changes in the work environment.
   D. Follow written and oral instructions.
   E. Manage time and resources effectively.
   F. Follow employee rules, regulations and policies.
   G. Demonstrate effective work ethics appropriate to a business
environment.

V. Evaluating the Internship Experience
   A. List and describe significant consistencies between learned
classroom competencies and work place practices.
   B. List and describe significant differences between learned classroom
competencies and   work place practices.
   C. Summarize the employer evaluation.
   D. Write a self-evaluation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Project Proposal    10% of grade
Project Outline      5% of grade
Project Report      85% of grade
       Total       100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 277

  • Title: Seminar in Hospitality Management: Menu Planning*
  • Number: HMGT 277
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 17
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 123

Description:

This course provides the basic knowledge of menu design and planning. Students will learn the components of menu design and planning for each concept category. The course will cover the topics of menu layout, selection and development, price structures and the theory of menu design. A minimum of 15 hours a week is required in a supervised work situation in an approved area of the hospitality industry. Work experience is concurrent but does not necessarily concentrate on the subject being taught in the course. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the interdependence of a menu and the demographic of its customer base.
  2. Describe how the new and existing operations are totally dependent on the menu.
  3. Create cost cards from standardized recipe to determine the cost of the meal.
  4. Select several of the important markup methods to get the right selling price.
  5. Describe menu analyze and scoring of the menu for profitability.
  6. Describe nutritional issues affecting menu design.
  7. Select the criteria used to determine specific menu listings.
  8. Describe the importance of accuracy for menu listings.
  9. Describe the various menu styles and select the proper layout for menus.
  10. Describe how simplicity impacts a quick service menu.
  11. Describe the importance of variety and balance in family style restaurant menus.
  12. Describe the characteristics of theme and ethnic restaurants and menus.
  13. Describe the banquets that menus are packaged for selling.
  14. Describe the advantages that a buffet offers over a traditional menu.
  15. Describe the difference between the various cafeteria designs.
  16. Describe how profitability is tied to a menu. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Know Your Customer
   A. Describe the difference between demographic surveys and feasibility
studies.
   B. Describe how competition can influence a restaurant’s menu
listings.
   C. Differentiate between the popularity of certain foods among age
groups, ethnic origins, education, occupations and income.
   D. Describe the difference between fads and trends and how to use them
to an advantage.

II. Know Your Restaurant
   A. Recognize what considerations need to be made when changing the menu
in an existing operation.
   B. Describe the importance of product availability, selling price,
equipment availability, station capacities, flow, skill level and theme
when making menu changes.
   C. Describe how the new operation interrelates with and is totally
dependent on the menu.

III. Costs
   A. Develop a cost card from a standardized recipe including a
conversion of invoice casts into recipe cost.
   B. Describe the difference between AP (as purchased) and EP (edible
portion).
   C. Cost out a complete meal.
   D. Calculate the cost of a salad bar or an “all you can eat”
buffet.

IV. Pricing the Menu
   A. Describe the makeup of an income statement including the
interrelationships of controllable and non-controllable cost and their
effect on sales and profits.
   B. Select several of the important markup methods including the factor
method, markup on cost, gross markup, ratio method and the TRA method, as
well as the relationship each has with the other.
   C. Describe the concept of psychological pricing and its importance in
selecting the final menu price.
   D. Select the menu pre-cost method for selling price, cost and amount
of items sold.

V. Menu Analysis
   A. Describe how to analyze a menu for profitability.
   B. Apply menu engineering to menu analysis.
   C. Apply menu scoring methods to menu analysis.

VI. Menu Content
   A. Select the categories that are used on menus and differentiate when
each is used.
   B. Select the criteria that are used to determine specific menu
listings.
   C. Describe the importance of utilizing descriptive terminology to
explain and sell menu listings.

VII. Writing the Menu
   A. Explain the importance of utilizing descriptive terminology to
explain and sell the menu listings.
   B. Explain the importance of accurately describing menu listings.
   C. Explain the 11 sections of the accuracy in menu position paper
adopted by the National Restaurant Association.

VIII. Menu Layout and Printing
   A. Describe the various styles of menu covers and their importance to
the overall ambiance of the restaurant.
   B. Select the proper layout techniques for the headings, subheadings,
listing and descriptive terminology for food and alcoholic beverage
listings.
   C. Describe the basic principles of printing techniques and terminology
needed to communicate with the staff.
   D. Explain the issues related to the desktop publishing of a menu.

IX. Quick Service Menus
   A. Describe how simplicity that impacts a quick service menu.
   B. Explain how speed, holding qualities, packaging and minimum handling
of products are important in menu planning.
   C. Explain the importance of standardization of menu items.
   D. Describe how the menu interrelates to other facets of the quick
service industry such as concessions, delis, drive-thrus and delivery.

X. Family Style Restaurant Menus
   A. Explain the primary structure for family style restaurants regarding
pricing, staffing and complexity of listings.
   B. Describe the importance of variety and balance in family style
menus.
   C. Generate menus that have the familiar listings as well as innovative
and cutting-edge listings.

XI. Theme, Ethnic and Fine Dining Menus
   A. Differentiate the characteristics of theme, ethnic and fine dining
restaurants and their respective menus.
   B. Utilize descriptive terminology to influence the success of a theme,
ethnic or fine dining menu.
   C. Describe the elements of design for the menu cover which are
critical to tying together the theme of the restaurant.

XII. Banquet/Show Menus
   A. Explain the function of the sales department.
   B. Describe how banquets are packaged for selling.
   C. Describe the elements of a function sheet.
   D. Explain how to differentiate between banquet menus and show menus.

XIII. Buffets
   A. Describe the advantages that a buffet offers over a traditional
menu.
   B. Describe how visual appeal takes the place of descriptive
terminology.
   C. Explain the importance of line movement and table placement.
   D. Describe how to set up buffet tables to control costs.
   E. Describe the different types of buffets.

XIV. Cafeteria and Cycle Menus
   A. Explain how to use various time frames for cycle menus.
   B. Explain how cycle menus fit into different types of food service.
   C. Describe the difference between the two categories of cafeterias.
   D. Explain the principles of writing cafeteria menus.
   E. Describe the concepts for food arrangement in a cafeteria line.

XV. The Menu as a Management Tool
   A. Illustrate how profitability is tied to a menu
   B. Explain how product mix can define an operation’s problem areas.
   C. Describe how a menu interrelates with each department in a food
service.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Test/Evaluation          42% of grade  400 points
Projects/Presentation    21% of grade  200 points
Class Participation      11% of grade  100 points
Job Evaluation            5% of grade   50 points
Final Exam               21% of grade  200 points
    Total               100%           950 points

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A minimum of 15 hours a week is required in a supervised work situation in an area of the hospitality industry. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 279

  • Title: Beverage Control
  • Number: HMGT 279
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the history of wines and their use and storage procedures. The students should gain an understanding of beverage control and how it is used in all types of operations. The course will also cover in-depth study of spirits, internal control systems and local/state alcoholic beverage control laws. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the different types of beverage operations and how they perform in the market.
  2. Describe the planning process for establishing a beverage business.
  3. Describe and give examples of the different types of beverages including the tasting of wine, beer, and spirits.
  4. Explain the importance of proper controls, accounting systems and management functions in operations and be able to implement corrective procedures as needed.
  5. Evaluate the marketing and operational features of beverage operations.
  6. Explain the profit and loss of beverage operations including tracking the sales through electric cash register systems and other beverage control equipment.
  7. Identify all aspects of beverage management necessary to seek employment in the hotel and restaurant field. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Industry, Past and Present
   A. Describe the libations of past cultures
   B. Trace the development of the tavern as a precursor to the modern
bar
   C. Describe the today’s beverage service industry, including catering
options, restaurant operations, and stand alone bars and bar/grills

II. The Bar
   A. Identify the clientele that fit the market niche
   B. List the atmosphere and decor factors affecting a bar’s design
   C. Describe the elements and importance of layout to a bar’s
efficiency and productivity
   D. Describe the physical and aesthetic design of the bar itself
   E. Describe the necessary factors for successfully working with
designers

III. The Bar Equipment
   A. List and describe the essential under-bar and back-bar equipment,
including sinks, coolers, ice machines, electrical, water and phone
utilities, and storage and display for liquors
   B. Explain how to determine the appropriate bar stools and small
equipment
   C. List and use the appropriate factors for selecting glassware
   D. List the various types of cash registers and the applications of
each
 
IV. The Bar Staff
   A. Determine the need for staff positions
   B. Explain how to assess staff needs
   C. Describe the factors for selecting the right people
   D. Explain how to manage personnel for success
   E. Explain employee compensation and benefits
   F. Describe payroll taxes, benefits and how they impact an operation

V. The Beverages: Spirits
   A. Describe the types of alcoholic beverages
   B. Identify the various whiskeys available in the United States
   C. Describe vodka, gin, and aquavit by style and by popular brand
   D. Discuss rum and its various applications in a food service
operation
   E. Describe tequila and the major brands available in the United
States
   F. Discuss brandies and their marketing
   G. Describe the categories of liqueurs and cordials and their
marketing
 
   H. Discuss bitters and various uses of the product

VI. The Beverages: Wines
   A. Discuss table wines and their role in hospitality operations
   B. Describe sparkling wines, their storage, presentation and safety
issues
   C. Describe fortified wines
   D. Explain how wines are made
   E. Explain the significance of wine names and labeling requirements
   F. Discuss the maturity, life span and vintage of various wines
   G. Demonstrate the serving of wines
   H. Explain the factors involved in developing an operation’s wine
list
   I. Discuss wine tasting and the standard procedures involved
   J. Describe imported wine

VII. The Beverages:  Beer
   A. Discuss the various beer types, including micro-brews
   B. Describe how beer is made
   C. Describe storing and caring for beer
   D. Explain the serving of beer

VIII. Setting Up The Bar
   A. Explain sanitation procedures
   B. List and describe standard liquor supplies
   C. List and describe various mixes
   D. List and describe various garnishes
   E. Describe condiments
   F. Explain how the quality of ice impacts an operation
   G. Describe accessories used in service of drinks
   H. Monitor opening the cash register as well as closing out
   I. Discuss mise en place
   J. Describe professional behavior behind the bar (bar psychology)
   K. Explain how to close a bar

IX. Mixology One
   A. Discuss mixed drinks in general
   B. Describe the high ball family
   C. Describe fruit juice drinks
   D. Describe liquor on ice
   E. Discuss two-liquor drinks on ice
   F. Explain collinses, rickeys, coolers, spritzers
   G. Discuss old fashioned drinks
   H. Describe pousse-cafe's
   I. Describe coffee drinks

X. Mixology Two
   A. Describe the martini/Manhattan family, its drink variations and
their preparation
   B. Describe sours/sweet sour cocktails and their preparation
   C. Discuss tropical drinks and their preparation
   D. Discuss cream drinks
   E. Describe other dairy drinks
   F. Describe ice cream drinks
   G. Discuss frozen drinks
   H. Explain filling drink orders
   I. Describe how to develop drink menus
   J. Contrast the unlimited and the limited drink menus
   K. Describe how to develop speciality drinks

XI. Purchasing, Receiving and Storage
   A. Describe the planning and purchasing procedures
   B. Discuss ordering, including the role of vendors
   C. List the procedure for receiving liquor and supplies
   D. Discuss storage for security and for conserving liquor and wines
   E. Describe issuing
   F. Describe inventory control procedures
 
XII. Planning for Profit
   A. Describe budget for profit
   B. Describe pricing for profit
   C. Discuss establishing product controls
   D. Discuss implementing beverage controls
   E. Discuss implementing cash controls

XIII. Tracking the Business
   A. Trace accounting functions and their impact on operations
   B. Describe financial information available to a unit manager
   C. Explain how an accounting system can maximize profits

XIV. Marketing
   A. Develop patron and product goals for the operation
   B. Discuss analyzing the market
   C. Explain how to attract customers
   D. Describe sales promotion through paid advertising
   E. Describe on-premise merchandising 
   F. Describe pricing as a merchandising tool

XV. Regulations
   A. Explain the opening procedures
   B. Discuss licensing and registration requirements
   C. Describe local regulations
   D. Explain the limitations on products, operation hours and clientele
   E. Describe purchasing regulations
   F. Discuss records and inspections
   G. Discuss final words of wisdom

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four exams    68% of grade
Project       23% of grade
Quizzes        9% of grade
      Total  100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Additional lab work required.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 281

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum I*
  • Number: HMGT 281
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the American Culinary Federation Chef Apprenticeship training program and hospitality management department approval

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Garde-Manger skills.
  7. Describe continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job.  The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours.  The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.

The individual competencies are in the American Culinary Federation
Apprenticeship Log Book.

I. WORK PROCESSES

   STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN       REQUIRED HOURS 
      1. Steward                       320 hours =   8 weeks
      2. Breakfast Cook                480 hours =  12 weeks
      3. Vegetable Cook                960 hours =  24 weeks
      4. Butcher                       160 hours =   4 weeks
      5. Broiler Cook                  800 hours =  20 weeks
      6. Soup and Sauce Cook           640 hours =  16 weeks
      7. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger  960 hours =  24 weeks
      8. Saute Cook                    960 hours =  24 weeks
      9. Baker and Pastry Cook         320 hours =   8 weeks
      10. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
      TOTAL HOURS                     6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will complete the first twenty-five pages of the Apprentice
Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef as well as the
apprenticeship chairman.  Also twenty-five entries should have been made
in the Apprentice Weekly Training Ledger.
   B. A 300 word essay in your own handwriting should be on file in the
program office covering the subject "Why I Want to Become a Chef."
   C. The individual training areas will vary in sequence due to the
differences in operations.  A student must complete 1,000 hours of
on-the-job training under an American Culinary Federation Chef member.
   D. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.
   E. Students must be working in an approved training site to receive a
grade for each practicum.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

(PRACTICUMS I-V)
On the job performance               50% of grade
*Log Book and Weekly Training        25% of grade
Ledger Entries Jr. Chef Activities   25% of grade
        Total                       100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Log Book and Weekly Training Ledger to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 282

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum II*
  • Number: HMGT 282
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 281

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum I.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Grade-Manger skills.
  7. Describe continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables.
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job.  The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours.  The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.

I. WORK PROCESSES

   STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN             REQUIRED HOURS
      1. Steward                       320 hours =   8 weeks
      2. Breakfast Cook                480 hours =  12 weeks
      3. Vegetable Cook                960 hours =  24 weeks
      4. Butcher                       160 hours =   4 weeks
      5. Broiler Cook                  800 hours =  20 weeks
      6. Soup and Sauce Cook           640 hours =  16 weeks
      7. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger  960 hours =  24 weeks
      8. Saute Cook                    960 hours =  24 weeks
      9. Baker and Pastry Cook         320 hours =   8 weeks
      10. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
   TOTAL HOURS                        6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will have completed pages twenty-six through fifty of the
Apprentice Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef as
well as the apprenticeship chairman.  Students must filet out a whole fish
and have it noted in the Log Book.  Also twenty-five entries should have
been made in the Apprentice Weekly Training Ledger.
   B. Students enrolled in Culinary Practicum II will work a minimum of
sixteen hours at the Annual Culinary Benefit, eight hours in preparation
as well as eight hours the day of the event.  You will be introduced
before hundreds of guests so bring a clean uniform, apron, and hat.
   C. Students enrolled in Practicum II will assist each semester in the
kitchen the day of the Apprentice Graduation Test luncheon.  Dress will be
chef's whites and chef's hat.
   D. The individual areas will vary in sequence due to the differences in
operations.  As each area of a competency is completed, the supervising
chef will sign off in the Apprentice Log Book.  A student must complete
1,000 hours of on-the-job training under an American Culinary Federation
Chef member.
   E. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  (PRACTICUM I-V)
On-the-job performance               50% of grade
*Log Book and Weekly Training        25% of grade
Ledger Entries Jr. Chef Activities   25% of grade
           Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Log Books and Weekly Training Ledger to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 285

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum III*
  • Number: HMGT 285
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 282

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum II.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Grade-Manger skills.
  7. Describe continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables.
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job.  The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours.  The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.

I. WORK PROCESSES

   STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN             REQUIRED HOURS
      1. Steward                       320 hours =   8 weeks
      2. Breakfast Cook                480 hours =  12 weeks
      3. Vegetable Cook                960 hours =  24 weeks
      4. Butcher                       160 hours =   4 weeks
      5. Broiler Cook                  800 hours =  20 weeks
      6. Soup and Sauce Cook           640 hours =  16 weeks
      7. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger  960 hours =  24 weeks
      8. Saute Cook                    960 hours =  24 weeks
      9. Baker and Pastry Cook         320 hours =   8 weeks
      10. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
   TOTAL HOURS                        6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will have completed pages fifty-one through seventy-five of
the Apprentice Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef
as well as the apprenticeship chairman.  Students must bone out a whole
chicken this semester and have it noted on a page in the Log Book.  Also
twenty-five entries should have been made in the Apprentice Weekly
Training Ledger.
   B. Students enrolled in Culinary Practicum III will work a minimum of
sixteen hours at the Annual Culinary Benefit, eight hours in preparation
as well as eight hours the day of the event.  You will be introduced
before hundreds of guests so bring a clean uniform, apron, and hat.
   C. Students enrolled in Practicum III will assist each semester in the
dining room the day of the Apprentice Graduation Test luncheon.  Dress
will be black slacks/skirt, black shoes and white shirt/blouse.
   D. The individual areas will vary in sequence due to the differences in
operations.  As each area of a competency is completed, the supervising
chef will sign off in the Apprentice Log Book.  A student must complete
1,000 hours of on-the-job training under an American Culinary Federation
Chef member.
   E. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  (PRACTICUM I-V)
On-the-job performance                50% of grade
*Log Book and Weekly Training         25% of grade
Ledger Entries Jr. Chef Activities    25% of grade
           Total                     100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Log Books and Weekly Training Ledger to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 286

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum IV*
  • Number: HMGT 286
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 285

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum III.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Garde-Manger skills.
  7. Describe continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables.
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job.  The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours.  The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.

I.  WORK PROCESSES

      STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN      REQUIRED HOURS
   A. Steward                      320 hours =   8 weeks
   B. Breakfast Cook               480 hours =  12 weeks
   C. Vegetable Cook               960 hours =  24 weeks
   D. Butcher                      160 hours =   4 weeks
   E. Broiler Cook                 800 hours =  20 weeks
   F. Soup and Sauce Cook          640 hours =  16 weeks
   G. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger 960 hours =  24 weeks
   H. Saute Cook                   960 hours =  24 weeks
   I. Baker and Pastry Cook        320 hours =   8 weeks
   J. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
      TOTAL HOURS                 6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will have completed pages 76 through 100 of the Apprentice
Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef as well as the
apprenticeship chairman.  Students must bone out a leg of lamb, veal, or
beef and have it noted on a page in the Log Book. Also 25 entries should
have been made in the Apprenticeship Weekly Training Ledger.
   B. Students enrolled in Culinary Practicum IV will work a minimum of
sixteen hours at the Annual Culinary Benefit, eight hours in preparation
as well as eight hours the day of the event. You will be introduced before
hundreds so bring a clean uniform, apron, and hat.
   C. Students enrolled in Practicum IV will assist each semester in the
dining room the day of the Apprentice Graduation Test luncheon. Dress will
be black slacks/skirt, black shoes and white shirt/blouse.
   D. The individual areas will vary in sequence due to the differences in
operations. As each area of a competency is completed, the supervising chef
will sign off in the Apprentice Log Book. A student must complete 1000 of
on-the-job training under an American Culinary Federation Chef.
   E. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

(PRACTICUMS I-V)
On-the-job performance                       50% of grade
*Log Book and Weekly Training Ledger Entries 25% of grade
Jr. Chef Activities                          25% of grade
                                            100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Log Books and Weekly Training Ledger to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum.

Student Responsibilities:


Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 287

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum V*
  • Number: HMGT 287
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 286

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum IV.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Garde-Manger skills.
  7. Describe continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables.
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job. The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours. The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.

I. WORK PROCESSES

      STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN      REQUIRED HOURS
   A. Steward                      320 hours =   8 weeks
   B. Breakfast Cook               480 hours =  12 weeks
   C. Vegetable Cook               960 hours =  24 weeks
   D. Butcher                      160 hours =   4 weeks
   E. Broiler Cook                 800 hours =  20 weeks
   F. Soup and Sauce Cook          640 hours =  16 weeks
   G. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger 960 hours =  24 weeks
   H. Saute Cook                   960 hours =  24 weeks
   I. Baker and Pastry Cook        320 hours =   8 weeks
   J. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
      TOTAL HOURS                 6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will have completed pages 101 through 125 of the Apprentice
Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef as well as the
apprenticeship chairman.  Students must trim and prepare a whole
tenderloin for production, this must be noted on a page in the Log Book
and signed by the supervising chef. Also 25 entries should have been made
in the Apprentice Weekly Training Ledger.
   B. Students enrolled in Culinary Practicum V will work a minimum of 16
hours at the Annual Culinary Benefit, eight hours in preparation as well
as eight hours the day of the event. You will be introduced before
hundreds of guests so bring a clean uniform, apron, and hat.
   C. Students enrolled in Practicum V will assist each semester in the
dining room the day of the Apprentice Graduation Test luncheon. Dress will
be black slacks/skirt, black shoes and white shirt/blouse.
   D. The individual areas will vary in sequence due to the differences in
operations.  As each area of a competency is completed, the supervising
chef will sign off in the Apprentice Log Book.
   E. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.
   F. Students must complete the JCCC Intent to Graduate form by April 1
for fall graduates and November 1 for spring graduates.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

(PRACTICUMS I-V) 
On-the-job performance                       50% of grade
*Log Book and Weekly Training Ledger Entries 25% of grade
Jr. Chef Activities                          25% of grade
                                            100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Log Books and Weekly Training Ledger to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 288

  • Title: Culinary Arts Practicum VI*
  • Number: HMGT 288
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: HMGT 287 and hospitality management department approval

Description:

A qualified chef who is a member of the American Culinary Federation will supervise this on-the-job apprentice training. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply food preparation and presentation techniques and gain experience in all phases of food service operation. This course is a continuation of Culinary Arts Practicum V.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of menu planning.
  2. Explain cost control.
  3. Prepare all mother sauces.
  4. Demonstrate skills in roasting, sauteing, frying, grilling, and poaching.
  5. Detect aromatic fragrances.
  6. Demonstrate basic Garde-Manger skills.
  7. Describe and explain continental food preparation.
  8. Describe the basic kitchen organization.
  9. Prepare seafood items.
  10. Prepare vegetables.
  11. Operate each work station in a commercial kitchen. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The student will receive instruction in the following areas on the
job.  The total apprenticeship will consist of 6,000 hours.  The first 500
hours in the apprenticeship program is probationary.  The individual
competencies are in the American Culinary Federation Apprenticeship Log
Book.

I. WORK PROCESSES

      STATIONS OF THE KITCHEN      REQUIRED HOURS
   A. Steward                      320 hours =   8 weeks
   B. Breakfast Cook               480 hours =  12 weeks
   C. Vegetable Cook               960 hours =  24 weeks
   D. Butcher                      160 hours =   4 weeks
   E. Broiler Cook                 800 hours =  20 weeks
   F. Soup and Sauce Cook          640 hours =  16 weeks
   G. Pantry Cook and Garde Manger 960 hours =  24 weeks
   H. Saute Cook                   960 hours =  24 weeks
   I. Baker and Pastry Cook        320 hours =   8 weeks
   J. Lead Cook                    400 hours =  10 weeks
      TOTAL HOURS                 6000 hours = 150 weeks

II.
   A. Students will have completed pages 126 through 150 of the Apprentice
Log Book and have each page signed by the supervising chef as well as the
apprenticeship chairman prior to the apprentice graduation test week or
have approval by the apprenticeship chairman if testing is earlier in the
semester.  The Log Book, Training Ledger and competency sheets must be
completed during this Practicum.
   B. Students enrolled in Culinary Practicum VI will work a minimum of 16
hours at the Annual Culinary Benefit, eight hours in preparation as well as
eight hours the day of the event. You will be introduced before hundreds of
guests so bring a clean uniform, apron, and hat.
   C. Your Graduation Test will consist of the following:
      1. Submission of completed Training Log Book.
      2. Completion of practical exam of ability to bone and identify
parts and cuts of meat, fish and poultry.
      3. After receiving approval on the completed Training Log, you will
meet with the chef apprenticeship chairman to discuss the menu you have
drawn. Also, at this time, purchasing, production, and service of the
luncheon will be discussed.
      4. You must sign up for the apprentice graduation test within two
weeks after the start of the semester. Sign up at the Hospitality Program
office. STUDENTS MUST BE READY TO GRADUATE THE SEMESTER THEY ENROLL IN
PRACTICUM VI.
      5. Apprentice students must complete the graduation test
successfully to pass the course.
      6. Must pass ACF national written exam.
      7. Students must complete graduation papers from the American
Culinary Federation Educational Institute. 
      8. Students must be paid up Jr. members of the American Culinary
Federation.
 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

(PRACTICUM VI)
On-the-job performance                    30% of grade
Jr. Chef Activities                       10% of grade
Graduation Test and Final Log Book Review 60% of grade
                                         100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A student must submit their Training Log Book to the instructor twice a semester in order to receive a passing grade in the Practicum. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

HMGT 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: HMGT 292
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of culinary arts, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

1. Prepare complex readings and research in the designated topic.

2. Define key terms, and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic.

3. Utilize research and/or analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study.

4. Formulate a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the special topic.

5. Develop a personal point of view about the special topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research and other means.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course content outline and competencies will vary, depending on the special topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course content outline and competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Hospitality faculty prior to its being offered. The Culinary Arts Faculty, the Hospitality Department Chair and the Business Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered, and approve the course content. The Hospitality Department will also determine when and if the course may be taught.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a two-year sequence.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.