Interactive Media, A.A.S.

The interactive media program provides instruction in the design and development process for different types of interactive media, acquiring and managing assets, the history and theory of communication forms, authoring for interactive media, screen design, interface design, and project management. This program is designed to build a common foundation of experience while allowing the student to select courses from the interactive media electives list as well as general electives that best serve his or her individual needs. Depending on individual choices and talents, students who complete the interactive media program should be prepared for employment in a variety of positions in the interactive media field.

(Major Code 2410; State CIP Code 09.0702)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

Prerequisite for Required Courses

Note: Prior to beginning the program, the student must take the following prerequisite, or have taken the equivalent transfer course, or have passed the waiver test (where applicable), or have obtained a waiver from the program administrator.

CDTP 135Desktop Photo Manipulation I: Photoshop1

Fall Semester

Elective3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
CIM 130Interactive Media Concepts*2
CIM 140Interactive Media Assets*4
CIM 133Screen Design*4
Total Hours16

Spring Semester

ENGL 140Writing for Interactive Media*3
CIM 156*4
CIM 200Interactive Communication Form*3
CIM 135Digital Imaging and Video*3
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours16
^

Humanities Elective

Fall Semester

Interactive Media Elective (see below)3
CIM 254Interactive Authoring II*4
CIM 230*4
CIM 250Interface Design*4
MATH 120Business Mathematics* (or higher)3
Total Hours18

Spring Semester

Interactive Media Elective (see below)3
CIM 270Interactive Media Project*4
CIM 273Career Preparation*4
Social Science and/or Economic Elective ^3
Health and/or Physical Education ^^1
Total Hours15
^

Social Science and/or Economic Elective

^^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

Interactive Media Elective List

ANI 123Concept Art for Animation3
ANI 145Introduction to 3D Animation*3
BUS 141Principles of Management3
CIM 235Advanced Digital Video*3
CIS 162Database Programming*4
ENGL 150Digital Narratives*3
ENTR 120Introduction to Entrepreneurship2
ENTR 180Opportunity Analysis2
ENTR 142Fast Trac Business Plan3
MUS 156MIDI Music Composition3
SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
SPD 121Public Speaking3
SPD 125Personal Communication3

Total Program Hours: 65

Courses

CIM 130   Interactive Media Concepts* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ENGL 121

This survey course introduces students to the interactive media field. Topics to be covered include the definition of interactive media, the basic stages of interactive media creation and project management fundamentals. Current and future trends in interactive media will also be covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

CIM 133   Screen Design* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CDTP 135

This course will cover fundamental visual principles and the creation of graphic elements, as well as the layout of those visual elements, for the computer screen. Visual perception, composition, color and typographic principles will be covered as applicable to presentation graphics, Web graphics, CD-ROM and kiosk graphics. Cross-platform issues will be addressed. This course is intended to provide nondesigners with fundamental visual literacy. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

CIM 135   Digital Imaging and Video* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: CDTP 135 Recommended: PHOT 121

This course provides an introduction to electronically mediated photography, including digital video. The course covers basic concepts of photographic communication and design. The course covers basic techniques of electronic photography, including operation of input devices, two-dimensional and time-based computer imaging and digital video production software programs and output devices. Recommended prior courses are Fundamentals of Photography and Introduction to Photoshop. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

CIM 140   Interactive Media Assets* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CDTP 135 AND prerequisite or corequisite CIM 130

This course teaches the creation, acquisition and management of assets for use in the development of interactive media. Assets to be covered include digital text, graphics, audio and video. Related topics include issues concerning intellectual property and interactive media professional practices. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

CIM 156   Interactive Authoring I* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 130

Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 140

This course focuses on the user experience aspects of Web design, HTML and interactive authoring. The course covers concepts about the way the World Wide Web works and introduces students to new technologies that are destined to have an important effect on the Web's future. Students examine specifications for each project and carefully analyze individual sites. This course provides a comprehensive experience in the design and development of websites primarily utilizing HTML and CSS. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

CIM 200   Interactive Communication Form* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 130

This course will focus on concepts and forms of human communication historically, currently and in the future of our culture. Immediated and mediated forms of communication, such as lecture, telephony, television, print and computer interaction, will be explored. Particular attention will be given to how communication forms affect content. Emphasis will be on the integration of communication forms as demonstrated by interactive media applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

CIM 230   Interactive Media Development* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 156 AND prerequisite or corequisite CIM 254

Corequisites: CIM 250

The course will provide a conceptual as well as a hands-on exploration of the development process for interactive media. Information design, interaction design and presentation design will be equally emphasized. Students produce a series of projects starting with the use of text and graphics and building toward more complex projects employing animation and video. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

CIM 235   Advanced Digital Video* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 135

This course provides advanced instruction in the production and applications of digital video. The course covers advanced concepts and techniques in video design and production, from the initial preproduction scripts and storyboards through actual shooting to nonlinear editing, mastering and output. The emphasis is on in-depth, advanced, practical experience in producing professional-level video products for a variety of applications, including education, corporate, documentary and entertainment. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

CIM 250   Interface Design* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 156

Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 254 AND corequisite: CIM 230

This course will specifically focus on the issues and complexity of interface design for interactive media applications. Students are provided an in-depth study of the use of the building blocks of interface design: backgrounds, windows and panels, buttons and controls, text, images, sound, video and animation. Through readings, critiques, exercises and discussions, students will explore what makes the interface of an interactive media application successful. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

CIM 254   Interactive Authoring II* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 156

This course will build on the knowledge and skills gained in the Interactive Authoring I course. Students will write a technical proposal, produce a flowchart and create a storyboard for each project before actually authoring the project. This course provides in-depth experience with the design and development of websites and interactive authoring for delivery by other platforms, primarily utilizing industry-standard proprietary multimedia authoring applications and their associated scripting methods. Project management will also be explored. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

CIM 270   Interactive Media Project* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 230 and CIM 250 and CIM 254

This project-oriented course requires students to actively participate in a group interactive media project. The project requires each student to analyze the problem and write a project proposal. Students work as a team to design, produce and gather assets for the project. The team is responsible for building a prototype and developing the final project as well as testing and evaluating the final project prior to delivery. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the spring semester.

CIM 272   Interactive Media Internship* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: department approval required

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the skills learned in the interactive media program. Student interns will be required to complete a minimum of 180 hours of on-the-job training. ANI 272 and CIM 272 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

CIM 273   Career Preparation* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CIM 230 and CIM 250

Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 270

This course will provide interactive media majors instruction in the presentation of his or her work in a digital portfolio format of professional quality. A printed and written resume will be produced. Self-promotion, networking, job searches and interview skills will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. CIM 273 is the same course as ANI 273; do not enroll in both. This course is taught in the spring semester.

CIM 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

CIM 130

  • Title: Interactive Media Concepts*
  • Number: CIM 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ENGL 121

Description:

This survey course introduces students to the interactive media field. Topics to be covered include the definition of interactive media, the basic stages of interactive media creation and project management fundamentals. Current and future trends in interactive media will also be covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify major functions of interactive media.
  2. Identify audience characteristics.
  3. Select appropriate tools for a given project.
  4. Produce a planning document.
  5. Identify organizational structures.
  6. Create navigation systems for various levels of interaction.
  7. Implement usability factors.
  8. Implement functionality factors.
  9. Utilize appropriate graphic considerations.
  10. Demonstrate consistent style attributes.
  11. Organize structural, informational, and functional elements.
  12. Create design documents and prototypes
  13. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

  I. Information Design
     A. Define the product or service.
     B. Determine the purpose and impact on the design.
        1. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes
education/training.
        2. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes entertainment.
        3. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes
presentation/communication.
        4. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes art/performance.
        5. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes sales/marketing.
        6. Analyze and identify if the purpose includes kiosks or
databases.
     C. Define the audience of the project.
        1. Identify target users.
        2. Analyze usage.
        3. Determine an appropriate environment.
        4. Research availability and level of equipment.
     D. Select appropriate tools.
        1. Choose an appropriate authoring tool(s).
        2. Employ an authoring tool(s) for online publishing.
        3. Employ an authoring tool(s) for presentation.
        4. Identify various tools for creating an electronic document.
     E. Create project planning documents.
        1. Determine the amount and type(s) of existing content.
        2. Determine the amount and type(s) of needed content.
        3. Establish a timeline for tasks.              
        4. Establish a budget.
     F. Determine appropriate project organization.
        1. Analyze the use of a single frame/hierarchy.
        2. Analyze using a linear organization.
        3. Analyze using a tree or branching organization.
        4. Analyze using a web or network organization.
        5. Consider the use of a combination structure.
 
 II. Interaction Design
     A. Determine the level of interaction control.
        1. Consider user control of the pace.
        2. Allow one or multiple sequences.
        3. Determine user control of media.
        4. Analyze the use of variables.
        5. Analyze the use of transactions.
        6. Determine the interactivity of objects.
        7. Analyze the use of simulation.
     B. Determine the appropriate environment.
     C. Employ image maps when appropriate.
     D. Employ metaphors when appropriate.
     E. Determine appropriate navigation methods.
        1. Employ different types of access.
        2. Employ different levels of access.
     F. Implement usability factors.
        1. Remove obstacles.
        2. Minimize effort.
        3. Maintain explicit and meaningful options.
        4. Provide flexibility.
        5. Assure forgiveness.
     G. Implement functionality factors.
        1. Define interaction.
        2. Solve organizational problems.
        3. Ensure consistency.
        4. Define screen relationships.
        5. Determine control of the media.

III. Presentation Design
     A. Determine and accommodate graphic considerations.
        1. Establish appropriate resolution.
        2. Define and consider anti-aliasing.
        3. Employ appropriate color palettes.
        4. Define and consider using compression.
     B. Determine the appropriate project style.
        1. Determine the graphic look and feel.
        2. Consider media presentation. 
        3. Determine the best authoring tool(s).
        4. Employ an appropriate interface.
     C. Utilize layout elements.
        1. Consider appropriate structural elements.
        2. Analyze informational elements.
        3. Analyze functional elements.
        4. Employ grid systems when appropriate.
 
 IV. Planning and Timelines
     A. Scope the project.
        1. Write a project proposal.
        2. Produce a project timeline.
        3. Write a project contract.
     B. Create design documents.
        1. Create a flowchart.
        2. Create a storyboard.
        3. Develop a prototype.
     C. Employ the project development process.
        1. Determine need for media production.
        2. Employ appropriate programming.
        3. Debug the scripts.
        4. Test the prototype.
        5. Address all cross platform issues.
     D. Define and address production issues.
     E. Define and address legal issues.
 
V. Attitudes and Work Habits
     A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
     B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending
to detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
     C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation                25% of grade
Research Papers, minimum of two 25% of grade
Prototypes, minimum of three    50% of grade
        Total                  100%
 
Class Participation/Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is
importance, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency
and accuracy in the classroom/lab and will be a factor in determining
grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and
evaluated.
 


Grading Criteria:
   A = 90 - 100%
   B = 80 -  89%
   C = 70 -  79%
   D = 60 -  69%
   F = less than 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need to spend additional time in computer labs in order to complete the prototypes and to access the Internet.
  2. Students may also need to spend time in computer labs to write the research papers.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 133

  • Title: Screen Design*
  • Number: CIM 133
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CDTP 135

Description:

This course will cover fundamental visual principles and the creation of graphic elements, as well as the layout of those visual elements, for the computer screen. Visual perception, composition, color and typographic principles will be covered as applicable to presentation graphics, Web graphics, CD-ROM and kiosk graphics. Cross-platform issues will be addressed. This course is intended to provide nondesigners with fundamental visual literacy. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Develop fundamental visual literacy and an appreciation of the knowledge and skills of a visual designer as applied to the computer screen.
  2. Define and explain the nature of light and color and how computer monitors display color including gamma settings, color depth and resolution issues.
  3. Describe digital color systems, identify visual characteristics of digital color and compare color palettes.
  4. Describe contemporary color theories relating to both the objective and subjective use of color within a given cultural setting and a cross-cultural setting.
  5. Select fonts based on their legibility when viewed on a computer screen.
  6. Identify and employ the use of visual hierarchy.
  7. Relate basic visual elements (type, color, texture, photographs, illustrations, additional graphic elements) to screen composition.
  8. Identify visual systems, such as grid systems, used to organize elements in a given space.
  9. Compare and contrast screen design issues for the Web versus for presentation graphics, CD ROM graphics and kiosk graphics.
  10. Select, prepare and employ graphic elements for a variety of cross-platform applications.
  11. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab including the ability to be an effective member of a team.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles of Visual Perception and Organization
   A. Define visual perception principles.
      1. Visual grouping
      2. Visual separation
      3. Spatial perception
   B. Define visual balance.
      1. Symmetry and asymmetry
      2. Figure and ground
   C. Define basic visual elements
      1. Line
      2. Shape
      3. Texture
      4. Color
      5. Value
   D. Define the three functions of images.
      1. Picture
      2. Symbol
      3. Sign

II. The Physics of Light and Color
   A. Explain color light theory.
   B. Apply color light theory to how a computer monitor works.
      1. Gamma
      2. Color depth
      3. Resolution

III. Color Systems
   A. Recognize traditional color systems.
      1. Monochromatic
      2. Analogous
      3. Complementary
      4. Primary triad
      5. Secondary triad
   B. Define and employ digital color systems.
      1. HSV
      2. RGB
      3. CMYK
      4. Pantone
      5. CLUB
   C. Define and employ cross platform color solutions.

IV. Typography and Font Issues
   A. Define legibility in type as it relates to screen design.
   B. Define readability principles with type.
      1. Display type versus text type
      2. Type size, line length and leading triad
   C. Employ cross platform font solutions.
      1. Postscript fonts
      2. Truetype fonts
      3. Embedding fonts
      4. Graphic type

V. Creation and Organization of Visual Elements for the Screen
   A. Create appropriate visual elements for the screen.
      1. File formats
      2. File size
      3. File compression
      4. File naming conventions
   B. Appropriately employ the principles of design for the screen.
      1. Visual systems
      2. Visual hierarchy
   C. Compare and contrast approaches to screen design for a variety of
applications.
      1. Web
      2. Presentation
      3. CD-ROM
      4. Kiosk

VI. Communicating with Visual Information
   A. Define where visual communication fits into human communication.
   B. Distinguish between representational and abstract visual
information.
   C. Define the steps of the communication process.
      1. Source
      2. Message
      3. Channel
      4. Receiver
   D. Understand the role of visual elements as media assets.
   E. Understand the role of visual elements in interface design.

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Course work will be evaluated in regular class critiques as well as
through individual student evaluation forms and conferences. Student work
performance will be part of the overall evaluation procedure. Student
grades will be based at least on the following:

 Minimum of five projects 75-85%
 Work performance         15-25%
  Total:                    100%

Grading Scale:
 A = 90 - 100%
 B = 80 -  89%
 C = 70 -  79%
 D = 60 -  69%
 F = 59% and below

Project Grades: All projects submitted for evaluation must adhere to the
project specifications. The grades assigned to each project will be based
on the quality of the solution to the problem to include both formal and
conceptual qualities, the degree of technical skill apparent in the work
and whether or not the work was included in the class critique. The
instructor reserves the right to refuse to evaluate a project which was
not seen in progress.

Late Projects: Late projects will receive a lowered grade. The grade will
be lowered one full letter grade for each day, not class period, the work
is late.

Work Performance Grade: A grade of no less than equal weight to a major
project will be assigned based on the student''s attendance record, level
of participation in class critiques and general productivity level during
studio hours. Late arrivals and/or early departures will negatively impact
the student''s attendance record. When appropriate, students are expected
to be effective and contributing team members. Productive attitudes and
work habits affect morale, efficiency and accuracy in the classroom/lab
and will be a factor in determining grades.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 135

  • Title: Digital Imaging and Video*
  • Number: CIM 135
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CDTP 135 Recommended: PHOT 121

Description:

This course provides an introduction to electronically mediated photography, including digital video. The course covers basic concepts of photographic communication and design. The course covers basic techniques of electronic photography, including operation of input devices, two-dimensional and time-based computer imaging and digital video production software programs and output devices. Recommended prior courses are Fundamentals of Photography and Introduction to Photoshop. 6 hrs. integrated lecture, studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Create, critique and interpret effective photographic design
  2. Identify and describe the physical, perceptual and technological properties of light
  3. Describe basic theory and technology of imaging systems and media
  4. Describe basic theory of computer-based photographic images
  5. Perform computer-based photographic operations and techniques, including video
  6. Operate film and video cameras, VTRs, digital image input and output equipment
  7. Produce effective photographs for specific communication media and audiences

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Communication: Ideas and Technology
   A. Perception and Cognition: Interface with Technology
      1. Define and describe human signs.
      2. Define and describe instrument signals.
   B. Social and Cultural Issues
      1. Describe the legal tenets of Creative / Intellectual Property and
Copyright Law, and apply them to photography and video production.
      2. Identify important issues in Communication Ethics and relate them
to students' own work.
   C. Light
      1. Define and describe the perceptual properties of light.
      2. Define and describe the technical properties of light.
   D. Space
      1. Define and describe the perceptual properties of space.
      2. Define and describe the technical properties of space.

II. Photographic Visualization and Design
   A. Basic Semiotics
      1. Define and explain content.
      2. Define Textuality and Interpretation and explain their role in
the reciprocity between the communicator and the audience.
   B. Image Structure, Design and Photographic Composition
      1. Identify and produce effective spatial image structure.
      2. Identify and produce effective tonal image structure.
      3. Identify and produce effective temporal structure in video
production.

III. Light
   A. Identify and define the following physical properties of light:
Amplitude/Brightness, Frequency-Color and Trichromatism.
   B. Identify and define the following modes of light propagation:
Source, Reflection and Transmission.
   C. Perception of Light
      1. Define the following elements of Color Space: Hue, Saturation,
Brightness.
      2.Identify and apply important standardized Color Spaces.
      3. Identify and manipulate Color Resolution and Contrast.
      4. Identify and manipulate Brightness Resolution, Contrast.
   D. Technology of Light
      1. Define Image Rasters.
      2. Describe the relation of Color Space to imaging software and
display.
      3. Describe and manipulate Color Resolution (Color Depth).

IV.Technology of Imaging
   A. Imaging System Model
      1. Identify Input, Stimulus, Event.
      2. Identify and define Media.
      3. Identify and define Reception and Sense Perception.
   B. Signal Systems
      1. Define the following modalities of Analog Signals: Energy, Wave,
Phase.
      2. Define the following modalities of Digital Signals: Energy,
Binary State, Bit/Byte, Pixel.
      3. Define Signal Conversion: Analog-to-Digital, Digital-to-Analog.
      4. Define Signal Characteristics: Dynamic Range, Signal/Noise Ratio,
Saturation, Bandwidth, Memory.
      5. Define Signal Luminance, Chrominance and Synchronization.
   C. Media
      1. Identify and describe Input Devices: Optics, Cameras, Scanners.
      2. Identify and describe Output Devices: CRT Monitors, Recorders.
      3. Identify and describe Storage Devices: Film, Magnetic Disk and
Tape, Optical Disk

V. Still Photography and Image Production
   A. Image Architecture
      1. Identify and describe Display Coordinate Systems (Rasters).
      2. Identify and describe File Coordinate Systems: Vector, Bitmap,
File Formats.
      3. Describe and manipulate the Operation Environment: Foreground,
Background, Layers, Channels, Masks, Paths.
   B. Image Processing Operations
      1. Produce color corrections.
      2. Produce image selection with Selection Tools, Channels, Masks,
Copy, Cut, Paste.
      3. Demonstrate image adjustment: Size, Resolution, Orientation.
      4. Demonstrate overall manipulation with Filters.
      5. Demonstrate local manipulation with Gradients, Paint,
Dodge-Burn.

VI. Time-Based Photography and Image Production
   A. Animation
      1. Identify and distinguish digital animation Metaphors: Objects,
Frames, Cels, Channels,Sprites.
      2. Create animation objects.
      3. Coordinate spatial and temporal elements in an animation.
      4. Transfer digital animations to multimedia and video.
   B. Video
      1. Identify elements in video standards: NTSC, PAL, Digital,
Synchronization.
      2. Operate video cameras and editing tape decks.
      3. Identify and use video production media: Magnetic Tape, Magnetic
Disk, Optical Disk
      4. Describe essential features of Digital Video: A/D Conversion, D/A
Conversion, Sampling, Codecs
      5. Practice and produce video editing: Source Video, Storyboards,
Insert/Assemble Editing,
Transitions, Audio Tracks, Titles, F/X, Non-linear Editing.
      6. Produce video output: Still-Frame Capture, Random-Access Assets,
Linear/Tape.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Two or more written examinations At least 2O% of grade
Two or more projects At least             25% of grade
Final Project At least                    25% of grade
                                         100%

The written examinations evaluate students' ability to recall and relate
of the facts and concepts of
imaging theory and the operations of technical equipment.

The projects evaluate students' ability to conceive and express
photographic ideas using course content
theory and technology.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 140

  • Title: Interactive Media Assets*
  • Number: CIM 140
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CDTP 135 AND prerequisite or corequisite CIM 130

Description:

This course teaches the creation, acquisition and management of assets for use in the development of interactive media. Assets to be covered include digital text, graphics, audio and video. Related topics include issues concerning intellectual property and interactive media professional practices. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Create and edit text
  2. Create, edit and alter digital graphic images
  3. Scan images from various types of analog original sources
  4. Create, manipulate and output digital audio files
  5. Create, manipulate and output digital video files
  6. List and identify interactive media asset file formats
  7. Convert interactive media assets from one file format to another
  8. Identify and use standard types of clip media
  9. Identify copyright/licensing issues related to clip media/original interactive media
  10. Identify and use management techniques for archiving and retrieving interactive media
  11. Identify cross platform considerations
  12. Demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits

Content Outline and Competencies:

  I. Interactive Media Assets
     A. Acquire and use text assets.
        1. Distinguish between content and symbols.
        2. Describe and apply basic typography.
        3. Explain hypertext.
        4. Create original text and incorporate in screen layouts.
        5. Describe text file formats and file conversions.
     B. Acquire and use graphic image assets.
        1. Define bitmap and vector image characteristics and applications.
        2. Create and edit bitmap and vector images.
        3. Scan flat art, prints, negatives and slides.
        4. Import and manipulate digital photographs.
        5. Use clip art.
        6. Discuss graphic file formats and file conversions.
     C. Acquire and use digital audio assets.
        1. Capture audio content from original sources and recorders.
        2. Import previously digitized audio content.
        3. Edit audio content and output files for delivery.
     D. Acquire and use digital video.
        1. Capture video content from camcorders or video decks.
        2. Import previously digitized video content.
        3. Edit video content and output files for delivery.
        
 II. Interactive Media Asset Management
     A. List and explain asset management techniques.
     B. Explain storage considerations.
     C. Describe cross-platform considerations.

III. Intellectual Property Laws and Practices
     A. List credible sources for copyright laws.
     B. Explain why following intellectual property law is important.
     C. Define fair use for different types of interactive media assets.
 
 IV. Attitudes and Work Habits
     A. Identify and develop positive attitudes towards tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
     B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending
to detail, completing tasks, and maintaining the work setting and
recording data.
     C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations      30% - 40%
A minimum of four projects      60% - 70%
        Total                   100%
 
 Grade Criteria:
    A = 90 - 100%
    B = 80 -  89%
    C = 70 -  79%
    D = 60 -  69%
    F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 156

  • Title: Interactive Authoring I*
  • Number: CIM 156
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 130
Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 140

Description:

This course focuses on the user experience aspects of Web design, HTML and interactive authoring. The course covers concepts about the way the World Wide Web works and introduces students to new technologies that are destined to have an important effect on the Web's future. Students examine specifications for each project and carefully analyze individual sites. This course provides a comprehensive experience in the design and development of websites primarily utilizing HTML and CSS. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify and exhibit positive team attitudes and work skills.
  2. Critically analyze clients’ needs and produce Web sites that accomplish the clients’ communication objectives.
  3. Use proprietary Web authoring applications and associated scripting methods to manage all aspects of a Web site project from concept to prototype.
  4. Identify web design principles.
  5. Design and build HTML documents for a variety of browsers and platforms.
  6. Articulate web server basics.
  7. Format HTML documents using a variety of HTML editors.
  8. Format and test HTML documents writing in markup language and associated scripts.
  9. Optimize and add images and other page elements to HTML documents.
  10. Create and integrate frames, tables and forms in an HTML document.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Site Project        
     A. Conduct client and product analysis to ascertain the Web site’s
objectives 
and purposes.
     B. Produce effective and rigorous design documents to initiate and
guide the Web site’s design and development.
     C. Use the proprietary Web authoring interface, markup language and
scripts to create sophisticated and engaging Web sites. 
     D. Explain and demonstrate specific capabilities and limitations of
the Web authoring application’s tools and methods and the markup
language and scripts for constructing the Web site and its components and
functions. 
                
 II. Web Design Principles
     A. Design for a variety of browsers and platforms.
     B. Employ effective interface design principles.
     C.  Apply sophisticated page layout principles, graphic and
typographical design.
     D. Effectively and coherently integrate various media forms in the
Web site.

III. HTML Overview
     A. Plan document structure.        
     B. Use HTML editing tools.
     C. Understand, analyze and create HTML tags to create page and site
structures and functions, correspond with search engines, manage page
components, and link to other pages and media.
     D. Employ CSS, DHTML, Java and proprietary client-side applets to
enhance Web site and page functionality.
     E. Employ server-side includes to enhance content management and
delivery.

 IV. Web Server Basics
     A. Explain server basics.
     B. Explore basics of network operating systems.
     C. Develop file naming conventions.
     D. Explain file types.
     E. Upload documents to a server.

  V. Proprietary Web Authoring Interface
     A. Manage the workspace.
     B. Set project preferences and properties.
     C. Explore the Web authoring interface’s windows, panels and
tools.
     D. Explain and demonstrate capabilities and limitations of the Web
authoring application’s tools and methods for constructing the Web site
and its components and functions. 
     E. Explain and demonstrate the Web authoring application’s WYSIWYG
functions and the markup language’s scripts for controlling the Web
site’s components and functions.

 VI. Attitudes and Work Habits
     A. Identify and develop positive attitudes towards tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.   
     B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attention
to detail, completing tasks, and maintaining the work setting and
recording data.
     C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of 2 exams or exercises   20%
A minimum of 4 projects             80%
                Total              100

Grade Criteria: A = 90% - 100% B = 80% - 89% C = 70% - 79% D = 60% - 69% F – under 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 200

  • Title: Interactive Communication Form*
  • Number: CIM 200
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 130

Description:

This course will focus on concepts and forms of human communication historically, currently and in the future of our culture. Immediated and mediated forms of communication, such as lecture, telephony, television, print and computer interaction, will be explored. Particular attention will be given to how communication forms affect content. Emphasis will be on the integration of communication forms as demonstrated by interactive media applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe various forms of human communication from a historical perspective
  2. Discuss human communication forms in context of our current society as well as future culture
  3. Explain immediate forms of communication
  4. Describe mediated forms of communication
  5. Distinguish between form and content
  6. Judge a variety of communication vehicles
  7. Interpret and discuss audience factors which effect communication
  8. Identify the difference between verbal and visual communication list when each is appropriate
  9. Distinguish between multimedia and interactive media
  10. Incorporate system variables, functions, and expressions
  11. Analyze the integration of media in an application in terms of effective communication
  12. Examine the user interface of an application in terms of effective communication
  13. Discuss the impact of new media on current and future communication issues

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Course Overview
   A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction
   B. Review the course objectives and competencies
   C. Discuss the prerequisites
   D. Perform a walk through of interactive applications

II. Discuss Human Communication
   A. Explain the definition
   B. Explore historical perspective
   C. Characterize current society
   D. Investigate future culture
   E. Clarify legal issues

III. Work With Communication Forms
   A. Explore immediate forms
      1. Private immediate forms
         a. contact
         b. conversation
         c. small group
      2. Public immediate forms
         a. lecture
         b. ritual
         c. live performance
   B. Investigate mediated forms 
      1. Extension mediated forms
         a. telegraphy
         b. telephony
         c. radio
         d. television
      2. Storage mediated forms
         a. print
         b. plastic arts
         c. audio record
         d. movie/video
   C. Explain responsive systems/computers
      1. Hearing
      2. Hearing and seeing
      3. Hearing, seeing, and doing

IV. Characterize the Influence of Communication Form on Content
   A. Discuss form versus content
   B. Correlate communicator (sender) versus audience (receiver)
      1. Communication vehicles
      2. Audience factors
         a. demographics
         b. interferences
         c. feedback loop
      3. Communicator factors
         a. credibility
         b. attaining desired outcomes
   C. Critique verbal communication versus visual communication
   D. Form judgments on multimedia versus interactive media

V. Perform Interactive Media Analysis
   A. Point out the integration of media
      1. Text
      2. Image
      3. Graphics
      4. Animation
      5. Audio
      6. Video
   B. Review the user/audience interface
      1. Use of metaphors
      2. Structure of content
         a. single frame
         b. linear
         c. branching
         d. network
      3. Navigation
         a. intuitiveness
         b. consistency

VI. Explore the Impact of New Media
   A. E-mail
   B. Intranet
   C. Internet
   D. CD-ROM
   E. Kiosk
   F. Other

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes towards tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise
   B. Identify and develop productive works habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, and maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation and exercises 25%
A minimum of two exams            25%
Two research papers or projects   50%
 Total                           100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F = 59% and below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students may need to spend additional time in computer labs in order to further utilize sample applications.
  2. Students may also need to spend time in computer labs to accomplish the research project option.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 230

  • Title: Interactive Media Development*
  • Number: CIM 230
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 156 AND prerequisite or corequisite CIM 254
Corequisites: CIM 250

Description:

The course will provide a conceptual as well as a hands-on exploration of the development process for interactive media. Information design, interaction design and presentation design will be equally emphasized. Students produce a series of projects starting with the use of text and graphics and building toward more complex projects employing animation and video. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify major functions of interactive media
  2. Identify audience characteristics
  3. Select appropriate tools for a given project
  4. Produce a planning document
  5. Identify organizational structures
  6. Create navigation systems for various levels of interaction
  7. Implement usability factors
  8. Implement functionality factors
  9. Utilize appropriate graphic considerations
  10. Demonstrate consistent style attributes
  11. Organize structural, informational, and functional elements
  12. Produce a flowchart
  13. Create a storyboard
  14. Develop a prototype
  15. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Information Design
   A. Define the product or service
   B. Determine the purpose and impact on the design:
      1. Education/training
      2. Entertainment
      3. Presentation/communication
      4. Art/performance
      5. Sales/marketing
      6. Kiosks/databases
   C. Define the audience of the project:
      1. Target users
      2. Usage
      3. Environment
      4. Equipment
   D. Select appropriate tools:
      1. Authoring
         a. cards and stacks
         b. time based
         c. object oriented
      2. Online publishing
      3. Presentation
      4. Electronic document
   E. Create project planning documents:
      1. Content
         a. existing
         b. needed
      2. Tasks
      3. Budget
   F. Determine appropriate project organization:
      1. Single frame/hierarchy
      2. Linear
      3. Tree/branching
      4. Web/network
      5. Combination

II. Interaction Design
   A. Determine the level of interaction control:
      1. Pace
      2. Sequence
      3. Media
      4. Variables
      5. Transactions
      6. Objects
      7. Simulation
   B. Determine the appropriate orientation
   C. Employ image maps when appropriate
   D. Employ metaphors when appropriate
   E. Determine appropriate navigation methods:
      1. Employ different types of access:
         a. menus
         b. lists
         c. timelines
         d. icons
         e. buttons
         f. maps
      2. Employ different levels of access:
         a. for a new topic
         b. within a topic
   F. Implement usability factors:
      1. Remove obstacles
      2. Minimize effort
      3. Maintain explicit and meaningful options
      4. Provide flexibility
      5. Assure forgiveness
   G. Implement functionality factors:
      1. Define interaction
      2. Solve organizational problems
      3. Ensure consistency
      4. Define screen relationships
      5. Control the media:
         a. text
         b. sound
         c. video
         
III. Presentation Design
   A. Determine and accommodate graphic considerations:
      1. Resolution
      2. Anti-aliasing
      3. Color palettes
      4. Compression
   B. Determine the appropriate project style:
      1. Graphic
      2. Media
      3. Authoring
      4. Interface
   C. Utilize layout elements:
      1. Structural
      2. Informational
      3. Functional
      4. Grid systems

IV. Planning and timelines:
   A. Scoping the project:
      1. Project proposal
      2. Project timeline
      3. Project contract
   B. Create design documents:
      1. Flowchart
      2. Storyboard
      3. Prototype
   C. Employ the project development process:
      1. Media production
      2. Programming
      3. Debugging
      4. Testing
      5. Cross platform issues
   D. Define and address production issues
   E. Define and address legal issues

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation              25% of grade
Research Papers, minimum of two  25% of grade
Prototypes, minimum of three     50% of grade
                                100%

Class Participation/Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is
importance, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency
and accuracy in the classroom/lab and will be a factor in determining
grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and
evaluated.

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F = 59% and below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need to spend additional time in computer labs in order to complete the prototypes and to access the Internet.
  2. Students may also need to spend time in computer labs to write the research papers.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 235

  • Title: Advanced Digital Video*
  • Number: CIM 235
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 135

Description:

This course provides advanced instruction in the production and applications of digital video. The course covers advanced concepts and techniques in video design and production, from the initial preproduction scripts and storyboards through actual shooting to nonlinear editing, mastering and output. The emphasis is on in-depth, advanced, practical experience in producing professional-level video products for a variety of applications, including education, corporate, documentary and entertainment. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Create, critique and interpret effective photographic design
  2. Identify and describe the physical, perceptual and technological properties of light
  3. Describe basic theory and technology of imaging systems and media
  4. Describe basic theory of computer-based photographic images
  5. Perform computer-based photographic operations and techniques, including video
  6. Operate film and video cameras, VTRs, digital image input and output equipment
  7. Produce effective photographs for specific communication media and audiences

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Uses of Digital Video
   A. Entertainment: feature movies, short subjects, games and multimedia
   B. Education: computer-based training, video-based courses, multimedia
"infotainment 
   C. Corporate: Identity, Public Relations, intracorporation
communications
   D. Documentary:  Forensic, social, historical   

II. Dissemination of Digital Video
   A. Broadcast, cable, satellite
   B. Stand-alone products: videotape, digital video disk, CD-ROM
   C. Narrowcast:  Internet, Intranet

III. The Technical Medium of Digital Video
   A. Industry standards: NTSC analog, NTSC-DV, PAL, Secam
   B. Video signal formats: RGB, component, s-video, composite, DV
   C. Color spaces and rasters, dynamic range, white balance and color
temperature
   D. Signal synchronization: Time codes and their implementation
   E. Video camera technology: optics, beam splitter, CCDs, signal
processors, tape transport, video signal gain, white balance, microphones
audio input levels, signal output
   F. Video Tape Recording/Playing Decks: formats, video and audio signal
controls, tape transport,  signal imput and output
   G. Analog-to-Digital conversion:  sampling, compression, file formats  
   

IV. The Aesthetic Medium of Digital Video
   A. Video semiotics:  paradigms of continuity and complexity, metaphors,
symbols, textuality, the producer's representation of experience and the
audience's experience of representation        
   B. Temporal design: story and experiential arcs and cycles, punctuation
of experience, pace and tempo, synchronization of visual and aural
experience
   C. Spatial design: aspect ratios, composition, video and title frames,
blocking out scenes and shots, types of shots, depth of field, lens angle,
point of view 
   D. Tonal and chromatic design: Lighting, light and mood or ambience,
designing with video palettes and color spaces
                           
V. Digital Video Preproduction
   A. Research: Project concept or story, facts, locations, personnel
   B. Scripts: shooting, acting, voice-over
   C. Storyboards:  translating script into shots
   D. Budgets and Schedules:  Time, equipment, personnel, facilities,
funding    
   E. Legal/ethical considerations

VI. Digital Video Production
   A. Direction: photography, performance of talent, lighting and sound
   B. Shooting:  working from scripts and storyboards, working without
scripts   (documentary, fine art, etc.)
   C. Creating or finding shooting sets or locations
   D. Lighting in the studio and on location
   E. Acquiring sound: On-camera talent, voice-over, "wild," added
ambient, music, f/x
   F. Organization and documentation: schedules, slates, shooting and
audio recording logs
   
VII. Digital Video Postproduction
   A. Editing paradigms: narrative and visual continuity, complexity,
stream of consciousness
   B. Cataloging media: labeling reels, shot logs, edit decision lists,
sound and image bins or libraries
   C. Editing video content: capturing, acquiring and trimming clips,
insert and assemble editing, transitions
   D. Creating additional visual content: titles, graphics, f/x
   E. Editing audio content: capturing, acquiring and trimming sound and
music clips, synchronizing to video

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Two or more written examinations    At least 20% of grade
Two or more projects                At least 25% of grade
Final Project                       At least 25% of grade
                                   100%

The written examinations are designed to evaluate students' understanding
of video theory and technical equipment and operations.

The projects are designed to evaluate students' ability to conceive and
express sophisticated videographic ideas, and produce advanced-level video
productions for a variety of purposes.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 250

  • Title: Interface Design*
  • Number: CIM 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 156
Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 254 AND corequisite: CIM 230

Description:

This course will specifically focus on the issues and complexity of interface design for interactive media applications. Students are provided an in-depth study of the use of the building blocks of interface design: backgrounds, windows and panels, buttons and controls, text, images, sound, video and animation. Through readings, critiques, exercises and discussions, students will explore what makes the interface of an interactive media application successful. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Implement the principles of interface design.
  2. Create a variety of navigation systems.
  3. Map navigation strategy onto information organization.
  4. Control all interface elements.
  5. Select the appropriate tools and authoring for a project.
  6. Identify form and function issues.
  7. Create a functioning prototype.
  8. Employ user testing.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. User Interface Design
   A. Employ human factors.
      1. Consider time to learn.
      2. Consider speed of performance.
      3. Consider rate of errors by users.
      4. Consider retention over time.
      5. Consider subjective satisfaction.
   B. Identify the audience.
      1. Research age.
      2. Research gender.
      3. Research physical abilities.
      4. Research education level.
      5. Research cultural or ethnic background.
      6. Research motivation of audience.
      7. Research the goals of the user.
   C. Identify user profile.
      1. Determine if a novice or first time user.
      2. Determine if a knowledgeable intermittent user.
      3. Determine if an expert frequent user.
   D. Determine the environment.
      1. Consider use of a metaphor.
      2. Design an appropriate presentation style.
      3. Consider use of icons versus text.
   E. Employ an action model of human-computer interaction.
      1. Form the goal.
      2. Form the intention.
      3. Specify the action.
      4. Execute the action.
      5. Perceive the system state.
      6. Interpret the system state.
      7. Evaluate the outcome.

II. Principles of Interface Design
   A. Define, consider and utilize the principles of interface design.
      1. Define, consider and utilize metaphors.
      2. Define, consider and utilize direct manipulation.
      3. Define, consider and utilize see and point.
      4. Define, consider and utilize consistency.
      5. Define, consider and utilize user control.
      6. Define, consider and utilize feedback and dialog.
      7. Define, consider and utilize forgiveness.
      8. Define, consider and utilize perceived stability.
      9. Define, consider and utilize aesthetic integrity.
     10. Define, consider and utilize functionality.
   B. Employ user testing.
      1. Test overall user reaction.
      2. Test screen design.
      3. Test terminology and system information.
      4. Test learning outcomes.
      5. Test system capabilities.
      6. Test the use of technical manuals and on-line help.
      7. Test the use of on-line tutorials.
      8. Test all media.
      9. Test software installation.

III. Navigation Issues
   A. Determine and apply navigation strategies.
      1. Consider maximum number of steps.
      2. Consider orientation.
      3. Consider reversing any action.
      4. Consider different navigational structures.
   B. Employ user testing.
      1. Test overall user reaction.
      2. Test for clear navigation options.
      3. Test shortcuts provided for frequent users.

IV. Information Organization
   A. Determine and apply information organization methods.
      1. Consider alphabetical organization.
      2. Consider organization based on time.
      3. Consider organization based on location.
      4. Consider organization by category.
      5. Consider organization by continuum or magnitude.
   B. Employ user testing.
      1. Test overall user reaction.
      2. Confirm the context is a relevant environment  for the content.
      3. Confirm the context is a relevant environment for the designated
audience.

V. Interface Elements
   A. Implement appropriate interface elements.
      1. Implement backgrounds.
      2. Implement windows and panels.
      3. Implement buttons and controls.
      4. Employ text.
      5. Employ images.
      6. Implement audio interface.
      7. Implement animation interface.
      8. Implement video interface.
   B. Employer user testing.
      1. Test overall user reaction.
      2. Test for consistent interface.
      3. Test for informative feedback.
      4. Test for easy reversal of actions.
      5. Test user as initiator of actions.
      6. Test user control of the media.
      
VI. Tools and Engines
   A. Consider a custom engine versus existing software applications.
   B. Research and select appropriate authoring tools.
      1. Consider ease of use.
      2. Consider interface tools.
      3. Consider transitions.
      4. Consider navigation.
      5. Consider search engines.
      6. Consider media support.
      7. Consider cross platform issues.
      8. Consider playback.
      9. Consider development tools.
     10. Consider efficiency.
     11. Consider authoring languages.

VII. Form and Function
   A. Define and consider form and function issues for a given project.
      1. Define and consider functionality.
      2. Define and consider consistency.
      3. Define and consider hierarchy.
      4. Define and consider transparency.
      5. Define and consider anticipation.
   B. Employ user testing.
      1. Consider user system experience.
      2. Consider past experiences of user.
      3. Test overall reactions to the system.

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 25% of grade Class participation
 25% of grade Research papers, minimum of two
 50% of grade Prototypes, minimum of three
100%

Class Participation/Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is
important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency
and accuracy in the classroom/lab and will be a factor in determining
grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and
evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need to spend additional time in computer labs in order to complete the prototypes and to access the Internet.
  2. Students may also need to spend time in computer labs to write the research papers.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 254

  • Title: Interactive Authoring II*
  • Number: CIM 254
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 156

Description:

This course will build on the knowledge and skills gained in the Interactive Authoring I course. Students will write a technical proposal, produce a flowchart and create a storyboard for each project before actually authoring the project. This course provides in-depth experience with the design and development of websites and interactive authoring for delivery by other platforms, primarily utilizing industry-standard proprietary multimedia authoring applications and their associated scripting methods. Project management will also be explored. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and exhibit positive team attitudes and work skills.
  2. Use proprietary multimedia authoring applications and associated scripting methods to manage all aspects of an interactive media project from concept to publishing.
  3. Use the tools within industry-standard authoring applications and scripting language to create multimedia products with advanced interactivity and functionality.
  4. Import a variety of media files into authoring applications, integrate them with objects and thereby modify the characteristics of the media in the interactive product's context.
  5. Adjust and control the properties of objects' instances.
  6. Use proprietary multimedia authoring applications and associated scripting methods to test interactive products.
  7. Optimize, export and disseminate interactive products.
  8. Critically analyze clients' needs and produce interactive products that accomplish the clients' communication objectives.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Proprietary Multimedia Authoring Interface
   A. Manage the workspace.
   B. Set project preferences and properties.
   C. Explore the interface's windows, panels and tools.

II. Project Planning
   A. Use the authoring interface and scripts to create interactive and
engaging multimedia projects.
   B. Explain and demonstrate capabilities and limitations of the
authoring application's tools and methods for constructing the product and
its components and functions.
   C. Explain and demonstrate the authoring application's scripts for
controlling the product's components and functions.

III. Media Assets Incorporation
   A. Evaluate and select appropriate media formats based on the product's
content requirements, delivery mode and target audience.
   B. Compare and contrast bitmap and vector graphic files.
   C. Import vector files.
   D. Import bitmap files.
   E. Import sound files.
   F. Import video files.
   G. Create and use image masks.
   H. Create and use metafile parameters and cues to manage media
integration and performance.

IV. Project Building
   A. Organize the product's content and components and create the
product's development structure.
   B. Optimize the product's media and playback performance.
   C. Test the product's functionality and performance.
   D. Export and disseminate user-ready versions of the product.

V. Attitude and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes towards tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attention to
detail, completing tasks, and maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two exams or exercises 20%
Two to four projects                80%
Total                              100

Grade Criteria:

A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F – under  60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 270

  • Title: Interactive Media Project*
  • Number: CIM 270
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 230 and CIM 250 and CIM 254

Description:

This project-oriented course requires students to actively participate in a group interactive media project. The project requires each student to analyze the problem and write a project proposal. Students work as a team to design, produce and gather assets for the project. The team is responsible for building a prototype and developing the final project as well as testing and evaluating the final project prior to delivery. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. This course is taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Distinguish among different types of interactive media solutions.
  2. Work as a team member.
  3. Integrate media with content.
  4. Identify copyright and legal issues.
  5. Build a working prototype.
  6. Develop a project production schedule.
  7. Implement production for media and programming.
  8. Produce the documentation for a project.
  9. Appropriately test a project prior to distribution.
  10. Produce a fully functional interactive media project.
  11. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interactive Media Solutions
   A. Distinguish between different types of projects.
      1. Define a communications project.
      2. Define an electronic publishing project.
      3. Define an interactive learning project.
      4. Define a visualization project.
      5. Define an information management project.
      6. Define an interactive entertainment project.
   B. Choose the most appropriate solution for a given problem.

II. Concept and Plan
   A. Identify and define the audience and the client.
   B. Contribute to the project team.
      1. Consider being the content expert.
      2. Consider being the writer, editor, researcher.
      3. Consider being the graphics professional.
      4. Consider being the audio and/or video specialist.
      5. Consider being the information designer.
      6. Consider being the interface designer.
      7. Consider being the programmer.
   C. Utilize existing content and/or develop new content for a project.
   D. Identify copyright issues and other legal issues.
   E. Write a design and development document.
   F. Produce a flowchart for the project.
   G. Plan media integration.

III. Design and Prototype
   A. Brainstorm the project concept.
   B. Employ information design.
   C. Employ interface design.
   D. Create storyboards.
   E. Develop prototypes.
   F. Utilize programming.
   G. Employ user testing.

IV. Production
   A. Develop a production schedule.
   B. Assign production personnel.
      1. Identify the role of writers/editors.
      2. Identify the role of graphic professionals.
      3. Identify the role of audio/music professionals.
      4. Identify the role of animation professionals.
      5. Identify the role of video professionals.
   C. Identify production resources.
      1. Determine necessary equipment.
      2. Utilize appropriate file formats.
      3. Utilize appropriate naming conventions.
   D. Produce the necessary media.
      1. Write and design text.
      2. Create and employ graphics.
      3. Research and create or optimize images.
      4. Create and employ sound files.
      5. Create and employ animation files.
      6. Create and employ video files.
   E. Employ programming production.
   F. Employ production integration.
   G. Write production documentation.

V. Final Interactive Media Project Testing
   A. Employ alpha testing.
   B. Employ beta testing.
   C. Employ functional testing.
      1. Employ unit testing.
      2. Employ integration testing.
      3. Employ media testing.
      4. Employ stress testing.
      5. Employ configuration testing.
      6. Employ environmental testing.

VI. Distribution and Maintenance
   A. Determine appropriate distribution methods.
   B. Identify future maintenance issues or concerns.
   C. Produce project documentation.

VII. Attitude and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing taks, maintaining the work setting and recording data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 25% of grade Class Participation
 75% of grade Project
100% Total

Class Participation/Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is
important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency
and accuracy in the classroom/lab and will be a factor in determining
grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and
evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will need to spend additional time in computer labs in order to complete the project.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 272

  • Title: Interactive Media Internship*
  • Number: CIM 272
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 12
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 12

Requirements:

Prerequisites: department approval required

Description:

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the skills learned in the interactive media program. Student interns will be required to complete a minimum of 180 hours of on-the-job training. ANI 272 and CIM 272 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate his/her ability to secure an appropriate internship position based on his/her interactive media career goals, employer needs and his/her interviewing techniques.
  2. Apply conceptual and technical creative skills acquired as a student in the Interactive Media Certificate program at the place of employment.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to work effectively as a member of a development team.
  4. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.
  5. Demonstrate acceptable performance on the job through the midterm and final evaluations by both the intern's sponsor and the course instructor.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Internship Search Techniques
   A. Make phone calls to appropriate potential employers
   B. Go on personal interviews with potential employers
   C. Evaluate the internship interviews and offers
   D. Make follow-up calls to potential employers

II. Formal Internship Agreement and Related Issues
   A. Negotiate hours and salary
   B. Submit the signed cooperative training agreement

III. Establishing Evaluation Criteria
   A. Be responsible to the sponsor for a mid-term and final evaluation
   B. Be responsible to the instructor for a mid-term and final
evaluation

IV. Review of Internship Activities
   A. Application of conceptual and technical creative skills
   B. Be present for a site visit(s) as deemed necessary by the
instructor
   C. Discuss the mid-term and final evaluations with the sponsor
   D. Discuss the mid-term and final evaluations with the instructor

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Sponsor's mid-term evaluation       25% of grade
Instructor's mid-term evaluation    25% of grade
Sponsor's final evaluation          25% of grade 
Instructor's final evaluation       25% of grade
                                   100%

Internship performance will be evaluated by the sponsor as well as the
instructor at midterm and at the end of the semester.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The student must have transportation available to conduct the intern interview process and to report to the company for employment as an intern.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 273

  • Title: Career Preparation*
  • Number: CIM 273
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CIM 230 and CIM 250
Prerequisites or corequisites: CIM 270

Description:

This course will provide interactive media majors instruction in the presentation of his or her work in a digital portfolio format of professional quality. A printed and written resume will be produced. Self-promotion, networking, job searches and interview skills will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk. CIM 273 is the same course as ANI 273; do not enroll in both. This course is taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify the types of interactive media projects appropriate for inclusion in a professional portfolio
  2. Select from his/her body of work those projects that meet his/her professional goals
  3. Evaluate and select the best digital media for presentation
  4. Design an effective digital presentation form
  5. Describe and list the basic components and structure of a professional resume
  6. Design and produce a professional resume in both digital and printed forms
  7. Describe effective job search skills and interviewing techniques
  8. Demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Digital Portfolio
   A. Select appropriate level of work and determine the total number of
pieces
   B. Research and select the appropriate digital media for presentation
   C. Prepare projects for the selected type of digital media
   D. Rework projects as necessary for the final portfolio
   E. Sequence the work for greatest narrative  impact
 
II. Professional Resume
   A. Collect resume information
   B. Select an appropriate type of resume
   C. Write the resume copy
   D. Design the resume for both digital and print forms
   E. Produce the resume for both digital and print forms
 
III. Professional Considerations
   A. Establish personal and professional goals
   B. List professional organizations and contacts
   C. List professional publications
   D. Demonstrate interview techniques
   E. Describe how to conduct a job search
   F. Describe how to evaluate a job offer

IV. Attitudes and Work Habit
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits 
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Digital portfolio  50% 
    Printed resume     20% 
    Electronic resume  10% 
    Performance        20% 
                      100%
 Grade Criteria:
    A =   90 - 100%     
    B =   80 -  89%     
    C =   70 -  79%     
    D =   60 -  69%     
    F =   below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

CIM 291

No information found.