American Sign Language Studies Certificate

The American Sign Language (ASL) Studies sequence of courses has been developed based on the need for professionals and community members to develop conversational proficiency in ASL and understanding of Deaf culture. This program is intended as supplementary education only and does not prepare the learner to work as an interpreter.

Students must earn a grade of "C" or higher in all ASL courses.

Please note: ASL 145, ASL 122 and ASL 147 are only offered in the fall semester; ASL 123, ASL 135 and ASL 150 are only offered in the spring semester.

(Major Code 6800; State CIP Code 16.1603)

First Semester

Health/Physical Education Elective *1
ASL 120Elementary American Sign Language I3
ASL 145Introduction to the Deaf Community*3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
Total Hours10
^

Health/Physical Education Elective

Second Semester

Social Science or Economics Elective *3
ASL 121Elementary American Sign Language II*3
ENGL 122Composition II*3
Total Hours9
^

 Social Science or Economics Elective

Third Semester

Math Elective (see list below)3
ASL 122Intermediate American Sign Language I*3
ASL 147Fingerspelling I*2
Total Hours8

Fourth Semester

ASL 123Intermediate American Sign Language II*3
ASL 135Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics*3
ASL 150American Sign Language Literature*3
Total Hours9

Math Elective

MATH 115Elementary Algebra*3
MATH 116Intermediate Algebra*3
MATH 118Geometry*3
MATH 120Business Mathematics*3
MATH 130Technical Mathematics I*3
MATH 131Technical Mathematics II*3
MATH 165Finite Mathematics*3
MATH 171College Algebra*3
MATH 172Trigonometry*3
MATH 173Precalculus*5
MATH 175Discrete Mathematics and its Applications*3
MATH 181Statistics*3
MATH 225Mathematics as a Decision Making Tool*3
MATH 231Business and Applied Calculus I*3
MATH 232Business and Applied Calculus II*3
MATH 241Calculus I*5
MATH 242Calculus II*5
MATH 243Calculus III*5
MATH 254Differential Equations*4

Total Program Hours: 36

American Sign Language Courses

ASL 120   Elementary American Sign Language I (3 Hours)

This class will focus on the development of beginning American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. A minimum grade of "C" is required to continue in the ASL program. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 120 and FL 180 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

ASL 121   Elementary American Sign Language II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This course will focus on continued development of elementary American Sign Language skills beyond those taught in Elementary ASL I. Students will work on developing communication competencies, concentrating on comprehension and production skills. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 121 and FL 181 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

ASL 122   Intermediate American Sign Language I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

ASL 123   Intermediate American Sign Language II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

ASL 135   Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisities require a grade of "C" or higher

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. lecture/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 145   Introduction to the Deaf Community (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180 with a grade of "C" or higher

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs./wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 147   Fingerspelling I (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 150   American Sign Language Literature (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 with a grade of "C or higher

This course will provide introduction, discussion, and demonstration of literature in American Sign Language (ASL). The literature involves ASL Poetry, ASL Storytelling/Narratives, Deaf Humor, Deaf Folklore and other genres that have been passed on from one generation to another by culturally deaf people. Students will receive, analyze and retell a variety of ASL literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 150 and ASL 150 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Interpreter Training Courses

INTR 122   Intermediate American Sign Language I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: Students accepted in the interpreter training program must take corequisites of INTR 130 and INTR 126 and (INTR 147 or ASL 145) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

INTR 123   Intermediate American Sign Language II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: For students accepted in the interpreter training program: INTR 131 and INTR 135 and INTR 242 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

INTR 126   Classifiers in American Sign Language (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or ASL 121 with grade of "C" or higher and acceptance in the interpreter training program

Corequisites: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 130 and (INTR 147 or ASL 147) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145)

The course will provide an in-depth analysis of classifiers in ASL through discussion and demonstration of the three different categories of classifiers in ASL: representative classifiers (noun and its action), descriptive classifiers (size-and-shape, extent, perimeter, pattern and texture), and instrumental classifiers (manipulative and handle). Students will learn to comprehend and produce classifiers from all three categories. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

INTR 130   Survey of the Interpreting Profession (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or FL 181 or ASL 121 with a grade of "C" or higher and acceptance in the interpreter training program

Corequisites: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 126 and (INTR 147 or ASL 147) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course provides an introduction to interpreting as an occupation. Students will come to understand interpersonal communication skills, professional ethics, parameters of responsibilities, community resources and legal ramifications as they relate to the interpreter. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

INTR 131   Interpreting Preparation Skills (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 130 with a grade of "C" or higher and acceptance into the interpreter training program

Corequisites: INTR 123 and INTR 135 and INTR 242 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course provides students with a foundation in the theory of interpretation. Students will explore the Colonomos Model of interpreting and apply this model by first using pre-interpreting skills in isolation. Then students will progress from producing translations to interpreting consecutively. 4 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/wk.

INTR 135   Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: for students accepted in the interpreter training program enroll in: INTR 123 and INTR 242 and INTR 131 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

INTR 145   Introduction to the Deaf Community (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Acceptance to interpreter training program

Prerequisites or corequisites: ANTH 125 and SPD 120 for Interpreter Training Program Corequisites for Interpreter Training Prog: INTR 122 and INTR 126 and INTR 130 and INTR 147 all with a grade of "C" or higher Note: Prerequisite or corequisite of INTR 120 or ASL 120 or FL 180 required for students in the American Sign Language Studies Certificate

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

INTR 147   Fingerspelling I (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or FL 181 or ASL 121 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: For students accepted in the interpreter training program, enroll in: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 126 and INTR 130 and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

INTR 181   Interpreting Practicum I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: INTR 130 and INTR 145 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 223 and INTR 226 and INTR 250 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Students will observe skilled interpreters in various interpreting situations in a variety of settings during the semester. 2 hrs. lab, field work/wk.

INTR 223   Advanced American Sign Language (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 123 or ASL 123 or FL 271 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 250 and INTR 226 and INTR 181 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course is a continuation of Intermediate American Sign Language II. Students will learn about culturally significant topics related to the Deaf community, more complex ASL grammatical features and conversational skill development. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of ASL will be taught to a variety of contexts in simulated, typical interaction. Students will have opportunities to utilize what they learn about advanced ASL through class activities, dialogues, short stories, general conversations and class discussions. Sign comprehension and production skills will be emphasized. This course meets for six hours of internship/week.

INTR 226   Specialized and Technical Vocabulary (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 123 or ASL 123 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 181 and INTR 250 and INTR 223 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course will expand the interpreter training students' vocabulary related to specialized and technical contexts. Students will discuss vocabulary use in a variety of contexts to include socially restricted terms and phrases Deaf people use; colloquialisms; varying registers; terminology in medical, mental health, religion, sex, drugs; and strong language in ASL. Students' development of comprehension and production skills in common formal and informal settings will be emphasized. Students will also discuss Signing Exact English (SEE II) and the differences from American Sign Language (ASL). 4 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/wk.

INTR 242   Fingerspelling II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 147 with a grade of "C" or higher Corerequisites: INTR 123 and INTR 131 and INTR 135 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course focuses on continued development of expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word and phrase recognition and expression. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

INTR 248   Deaf Community Ethnography (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 145 or ASL 145 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: (INTR 123 or ASL 123) and INTR 131 and (INTR 135 or ASL 135) and INTR 242 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This advanced course will provide students the opportunity to explore power and oppression issues experienced by d/Deaf people. Specific attention will be given to society's views of the d/Deaf community and the influence of various media on these views. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

INTR 250   Interpreting I (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 131 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 181 and INTR 223 and INTR 226 all with a grade of "C" or higher

In this introduction to interpreting principles, emphasis will be on English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English skills. Students will participate in sequential drills and apply these skills in class. 10 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

INTR 251   Interpreting II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 250 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 262 and INTR 282 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This is an advanced course concentrating on continued develop of English-to-ASL, ASL transliteration skills development. Students will have the opportunity to use these skills as stimulus material gradually becomes more advanced. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

INTR 262   Seminar on Interpreting (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 250 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 251 and INTR 282 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course provides students with knowledge of stress management as applied to both the physical demands and mental conditions of sign language interpreting. Students will learn and apply decision-making techniques in regard to the Interpreter (RID) Code of Ethics. Additionally, the course provides students with knowledge of career development theory, career decision-making and the job-search process. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

INTR 282   Interpreting Practicum II (6 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 181 with a grade of "C" or higher

Corequisites: INTR 251 and INTR 262 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

This course provides students with an opportunity to observe and interpret in an off-site setting with the supervision of an experienced interpreter. Students will actively engage in discussions relating to the difficulties and rewards of working in a realistic interpreting environment. The fieldwork totals 270 hours a semester.

INTR 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ASL 120

  • Title: Elementary American Sign Language I
  • Number: ASL 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This class will focus on the development of beginning American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. A minimum grade of "C" is required to continue in the ASL program. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 120 and FL 180 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mastery of basic skills in the visual/gestural medium as a channel for linguistic communication.
  2. Demonstrate a basic sign vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of vocabulary used for grammatical patterns in various sentence types.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Utilize Both Non-Verbal and Verbal Communication 
   A. Communicate the context of a message through eye contact, facial
expression and body language
   B. Demonstrate basic ASL signs 
   C. Practice manual and physical coordination
   D. Receive and express a message by communicating its content through
manual and physical coordination in ASL
        
II. Demonstrate Appropriate Vocabulary Used For Grammatical Patterns in
Various Sentence Types Including Time, Pronouns, Subject/Object
Relationships, Classifiers, SASSES, Plurals, Locatives, Temporal Aspects
and Distribution Aspects
   A. Introduce oneself
      1. Ask for and give names in ASL
      2. Confirm and correct information by using positive and negative
headshakes
      3. Use yes/no questions, Wh-questions, personal pronouns and
spatial
referencing
   B. Exchange personal information
      1. Ask if the person is deaf or hearing and where that person
learned sign language 
      2. Respond to information in ASL
      3. Use yes/no and Wh-questions and the not-negation in ASL
   C. Talk about surroundings
      1. Ask/tell where.  
      2. Express wants and correct information
      3. Use real - world orientation and non-manual markers
   D. Tell where you live
      1. Ask/tell where and how you come to class
      2. Use Wh-questions and real world orientation and noun-verb pairs
   E. Talk about your family
      1. Ask/tell about marital status and siblings
      2. Practice the number of siblings and family members involved
      3. Use possessive pronouns, yes/no questions, negative responses
and contrastive structure.
   F. Tell about activities
      1. Receive and express apologizing, giving reasons and opinions and
suggesting activities
      2. Using time signs, what-questions, dual pronouns, phrasing and
listing activities

III. Practice Producing and Receiving Numbers
   A. From 1 - 30
   B. Multiples of 5 (up to 100)

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive and receptive skill tests  75%
Quizzes                               10%
Class attendance/participation         7%
Response papers                        5%
Lab report                             3%
 Total                               100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 121

  • Title: Elementary American Sign Language II*
  • Number: ASL 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will focus on continued development of elementary American Sign Language skills beyond those taught in Elementary ASL I. Students will work on developing communication competencies, concentrating on comprehension and production skills. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 121 and FL 181 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mastery of basic skills in the visual/gestural medium as a channel for linguistic communication.
  2. Demonstrate conversational skills with various ASL sentence types and tense.
  3. Receive and express information by using varied types of signing structures.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Expressive and Receptive Communication Skills:
   A. Use varied sentence types (including Rhetorical and Conditional)
   B. Recognize and practice signs in ASL related to time
   C. Sign properly in pronouns and subject/object relationships in ASL
   D. Describe objects and people with sign classifiers, pluralization,
and locatives
   E. Acquire a basic understanding of temporal and distributional
aspects
in conversation

II. Demonstrate Vocabulary Used for Various Types of Language Functions
and Grammar:
   A. Give directions
      1. Ask/tell where, explain needs, interrupt conversations, confirm
and express uncertainty
      2. Use ordinal numbers, topic/comment structure and spatial
referencing in ASL
   B. Describe others
      1. Identify people who are present, confirming and correcting
      2. Use Wh-questions, descriptive classifiers, body part classifiers
and describe clothing 
   C. Make requests
      1. Describe locations and commands, offer assistance,
accept/decline
offers and ask for clarification
      2. Use spatial verbs, inflected verbs, spatial reference and role
shift
   D. Talk about family and occupations
      1. Explain relationships
      2. Ask/tell how long and how old
      3. Use possessive pronouns and dual personal pronouns
      4. List principle:  ranking family members      
   E. Attribute qualities to others
      1. Contradict opinions
      2. Use one-character role shifting
      3. Practice contrastive structure
   F. Talk about routines
      1. Solve conflicts
      2.Tell what time and when
      3. Use temporal sequencing, time signs and frequency 
   G. Practice producing and receiving numbers
      1. From 51-98
      2. Multiples of 5, 10, and 11 
      3. Related to money
      4. Related to time on a clock
      5. Related to age

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive and receptive tests  75% of grade
Quizzes                         10% of grade
Response papers                 10% of grade
Lab reports                      3% of grade
Class attendance/participation   2% of grade
 Total                         100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 122

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language I*
  • Number: ASL 122
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate low/mid intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate an intermediate sign vocabulary (continuation of Elementary ASL II).
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversation at the low/mid intermediate level.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Non Verbal Communication
   A. Communicate the context of a message through appropriate eye
contact, facial expressions, body language and ASL

II. Demonstrate Intermediate ASL Verbal Communication Skills
   A. Read and receive intermediate ASL signs and grammar
   B. Express and send intermediate ASL signs and grammar

III. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL

IV. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversation
at the Low/Mid Intermediate Level
   A. Complain, make suggestions and requests
      1. Complain about others, make suggestions, make requests, ask for
permission, express concern, decline and explain why, agree with
condition, agree with shortcoming and ask for clarification
      2. Use recurring time signs, continuous time signs, temporal
aspects: recurring and continuous, inflecting verbs, role shifting,
conditional sentences and clock numbers
   B. Talk about the weekends
      1. Ask about the weekend, describe weekend activities, express
opinions/feelings
      2. Tell about disrupted plans, temporal sequencing, time signs with
durative aspect
      3. Use element classifiers
   C. Exchange personal information
      1. Ask/tell when, tell about life events (when clauses, phrasing
for
sequencing events)
      2. Ask nationality of name, narrate family immigration and history,
correct and elaborate
      3. Use possessive forms, descriptive and locative classifiers,
numbers, dates and addresses
   D. Locate things around the house
      1. Give reason and make request, ask where, give specific location,
correct and confirm information, open conversations
      2. Use topic-comment structure, weak hand as reference, locative
classifiers, yes/no questions, wh-questions
   E. Describe and identify objects
      1. Ask what a word means, give definition, describe object
      2. Use descriptive classifiers (for shapes, patterns and textures),
instrument classifiers, weak hand as reference, topic-comment structure,
non-manual markers and money numbers.
   F. Practice producing and receiving numbers
      1. From 120 – 1,000
      2. Ordinal: 101-109
      3. Multiples of 100 to 1,000

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests          60% of grade
Final Exam                          25% of grade
Papers on Deaf Social Functions and 
     Interviewing with Deaf People   3% of grade
ASL Storytelling                     2% of grade
Pop Quizzes                         10% of grade
 Total                             100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 123

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language II*
  • Number: ASL 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mid/high intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate a mid/high intermediate sign vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.
  4. Demonstrate increased awareness of specific influences on the culture and community of Deaf individuals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL 
   B. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL
conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.

II. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversations
at the Mid/High Intermediate Level.
   A. Narrate unforgettable moments 
      1. Receive and express passing, throwing, spilling, tripping and
falling
      2. Receive and express information about injuries and mishaps
      3. Use appropriate language to express kissing, hugging and poking
in a Deaf culture setting.
      4. Receive and express information about unforgettable moments
   B. Share interesting facts
      1. Receive and express information about the whole-part of facts
      2. Receive and express listing facts and comparing facts
      3. Receive and express information about illustrating a fact
   C. Explain rules
      1. Receive and express information about different rules we live by
      2. Practice card games and group games
   D. Tell about accidents
      1. Receive and express information about accidents with horses
      2. Receive and express information about accidents with
transportation
      3. Describe an accident

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests      60% of grade
Final Exam                      25% of grade 
Papers on Deaf Social Functions  3% of grade
Videotape Project                2% of grade 
Pop Quizzes                     10% of grade
 Total                         100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 135

  • Title: Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics*
  • Number: ASL 135
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisities require a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. lecture/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic ASL linguistics with 70% accuracy by completing four exams based on text material.
  2. Create and present a lecture/review on selected text material.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Using Sentence Types
   A. Receive and express Yes-No Questions, Wh-word Questions, Rhetorical
Questions in ASL.
   B. Receive and express commands, conditionals, negation and assertion,
topicalization, relative clauses sentence types in ASL.

II. Understanding the Time concept in ASL
   A. Receive and express relative time- The "Time Line".
   B. Receive and express non-manual adverbs, incorporation of number,
passive hand as reference point.
   C. Receive and express regularity signs, duration-related signs,
repetition and duration-related signs, and tense using ASL.

III. Applying Pronominalization in ASL
   A. Receive and express pronouns referring to "present" people, things,
and places.
   B. Receive and express indexing, plural pronouns, eye-indexing,
possessive reference, reflexive/emphatic reference, demonstrative
reference, pronouns referring to "non-present" people, things, places.
   C. Receive and express setting up referents in space: What, Where, and
How, and setting up referents on the non-dominant hand in ASL.

IV. Utilizing Subjects and Objects in ASL
   A. Receive and express verbs, directionals, sign order and
topicalization.
   B. Receive and express body and gaze shifting, direct address, and what
are subjects and objects in ASL.

V. Understanding what Classifiers are in ASL and its' role.
   A. Receive and express classifiers that represent noun functions,
classifiers that represent singulars and pluralizations.
   B. Receive and express classifiers that represent size, shape,
depth,and texture (also known as descriptive classifiers) in ASL.

VI. Applying Locatives in ASL space.
   A. Receive and express different ways to express locative relationships
in ASL.
   B. Receive and express directional verbs, indexing, and separate
locative signs in ASL.

VII. Utilizing Pluralization in ASL
   A. Receive and express number agreement rules, ways to indicate
plurality with different types of signs, singular classifiers, plural
classifiers.
   B. Receive and express pronouns, number signs, and verbs in ASL.

VIII. Applying Temporal Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for temporal aspect
in ASL.

IX. Applying Distributional Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for distributional
aspect in ASL.

X. Understanding the History of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language
   A. Explain the meaning of a "language",  the history of American Sign
Language and how it affected deaf culture.
   B. Explain the history of using English in the Deaf Community and
compare it to ASL.
   C. Receive and express sign formations and variations, and selected
sign types in ASL.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams              58% of grade
Final exam         38% of grade
Review Activities   4% of grade
 Total            100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 145

  • Title: Introduction to the Deaf Community*
  • Number: ASL 145
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180 with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs./wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate understanding of cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community.
  2. Examine major events in Deaf history.
  3. Identify the well-known Deaf/deaf or hearing figures in the Deaf Community.
  4. Compare the language, values, norms, traditions, and Deaf identity associated with the community and non-Deaf (hearing) community.
  5. Describe the culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/community versus the pathological perspective.
  6. Demonstrate an awareness of pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community
   A. Examine the concepts of language and identity
   B. Discuss the language/mode continuum within the d/Deaf community
(Oral, cued speech, MCE, Contact Variety, ASL, etc)
   C. Examine the collectivistic nature of the d/Deaf community and
implications for diversity.
   D. Examine multiculturalism/diversity within the Deaf community (race,
gender, sexual orientation, etc)

II. Resources available in the Deaf Community
   A. Identify resources of the Deaf Community (organizations/clubs,
advocacy agencies and Commissions for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Deaf
residential schools)
   B. Describe Deaf Community organizations related to local and national
clubs and sports (sports, advocacy, religious, political, multi-cultural,
and social) 
   C. Examine how access and public awareness have changed the lives of
d/Deaf and hard of hearing people.  

III. Major events in Deaf history
   A. Examine historical events 
   B. Identify well-known Deaf/deaf and hearing figures

IV. Significant features of Deaf Culture.
   A. Identify and examine social interaction rules, values, language and
tradition, group identity
   B. Compare and contrast features of Deaf culture with mainstream,
non-Deaf American culture. 
      1. identify elements of high context culture and low context
culture
      2. identify differences between collectivistic and individualistic
cultures
   C. Discuss and reflect on individual reactions and pre-conceived
ideas.

V. Culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/Community versus the
pathological perspective.
   A. Examine the term “disability” by identifying connotations,
assumptions, stigma, etc.
   B. Examine what it means to be a cultural/linguistic minority within
mainstream, American society. 
   C. Discuss the terms hearing, d/Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing
impaired
   D. Compare and contrast views of various stakeholders within Deaf
Education (parents, administrators, teachers of the Deaf, Special
Educators, etc).
   E. Examine philosophies of Manual Communication and the Oral Method 
   F. Examine the phenomenon of Cochlear Implants and the effects on
mainstream views of Deaf people as well as effects within the d/Deaf
community.

VI. Pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community
   A. Discuss implications of the diverse range of educational choices for
parents (Oral, Aural, cued speech,  mainstream, residential)
   B. Examine the influences of media on the d/Deaf community 
   C. Examine the role of national and local service agencies and
providers in legislation and politics related to d/Deaf people

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1 Oral Presentation   15%
7 Reaction Papers     10%
1 Biography Research  25%
2 Written Exams       50%
            Total    100%
 
Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 147

  • Title: Fingerspelling I*
  • Number: ASL 147
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perceive fingerspelled words and numbers of common, familiar topics, objects and activities.
  2. Demonstrate individual fingerspelled words and numbers accurately.
  3. Demonstrate comprehension of lecture material on performance exams.
  4. Engage in practice of fingerspelling presentations, games and videotapes available in the Language Resource Center.
  5. Perceive and demonstrate common fingerspelled-loan signs.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The appropriate use of fingerspelling in ASL discourse.
   A. Recognize and produce titles and names of people, places, books,
movies, programs, etc. 
   B. Recognize and produce numerical and alphabetical information related
to locations and addresses.
   C. Recognize and produce fingerspelling for expression of words that do
not have lexical signs (technical words, acronyms, specialized
vocabulary).
   D. Recognize ways that fingerspelling is sometimes used for other
communicative purposes (emphasis, surprise, clarification).

II. Skills related to comprehension and production of fingerspelling
   A. Comprehend and produce fingerspelled words from identified topic
categories (i.e., food, beverages, cities/towns, nature, automobiles,
etc.).
   B. Comprehend and produce numerical information (addresses, phone
numbers, personal information, basic math).
   C. Comprehend and produce lexicalized loan signs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Receptive Skill Tests   45% of grade
3 Expressive Skill Tests  30% of grade 
  Projects/Assignments     5% of grade
  Final Exam              20% of grade
                         100%
Grade Criteria:
A = 100%-93%   
B =  92%-85% 
C =  84%-78% 
D =  77%-70% 
F =  69%-0%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ASL 150

  • Title: American Sign Language Literature*
  • Number: ASL 150
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 with a grade of "C or higher

Description:

This course will provide introduction, discussion, and demonstration of literature in American Sign Language (ASL). The literature involves ASL Poetry, ASL Storytelling/Narratives, Deaf Humor, Deaf Folklore and other genres that have been passed on from one generation to another by culturally deaf people. Students will receive, analyze and retell a variety of ASL literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 150 and ASL 150 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 122

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language I*
  • Number: INTR 122
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: Students accepted in the interpreter training program must take corequisites of INTR 130 and INTR 126 and (INTR 147 or ASL 145) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate low/mid intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate an intermediate sign vocabulary (continuation of Elementary ASL II).
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversation at the low/mid intermediate level. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Non Verbal Communication
   A. Communicate the context of a message through appropriate eye
contact, facial expressions, body language and ASL

II. Demonstrate Intermediate ASL Verbal Communication Skills
   A. Read and receive intermediate ASL signs and grammar
   B. Express and send intermediate ASL signs and grammar

III. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL

IV. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversation
at the Low/Mid Intermediate Level
   A. Complain, make suggestions and requests
      1. Complain about others, make suggestions, make requests, ask for
permission, express concern, decline and explain why, agree with
condition, agree with shortcoming and ask for clarification
      2. Use recurring time signs, continuous time signs, temporal
aspects: recurring and continuous, inflecting verbs, role shifting,
conditional sentences and clock numbers
   B. Talk about the weekends
      1. Ask about the weekend, describe weekend activities, express
opinions/feelings
      2. Tell about disrupted plans, temporal sequencing, time signs with
durative aspect
      3. Use element classifiers
   C. Exchange personal information
      1. Ask/tell when, tell about life events (when clauses, phrasing for
sequencing events)
      2. Ask nationality of name, narrate family immigration and history,
correct and elaborate
      3. Use possessive forms, descriptive and locative classifiers,
numbers, dates and addresses
   D. Locate things around the house
      1. Give reason and make request, ask where, give specific location,
correct and confirm information, open conversations
      2. Use topic-comment structure, weak hand as reference, locative
classifiers, yes/no questions, wh-questions
   E. Describe and identify objects
      1. Ask what a word means, give definition, describe object
      2. Use descriptive classifiers (for shapes, patterns and textures),
instrument classifiers, weak hand as reference, topic-comment structure,
non-manual markers and money numbers.
   F. Practice producing and receiving numbers
      1. From 120 – 1,000
      2. Ordinal: 101-109
      3. Multiples of 100 to 1,000

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests          60% of grade
Final Exam                          25% of grade
Papers on Deaf Social Functions and 
     Interviewing with Deaf People   3% of grade
ASL Storytelling                     2% of grade
Pop Quizzes                         10% of grade
 Total                             100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 123

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language II*
  • Number: INTR 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: For students accepted in the interpreter training program: INTR 131 and INTR 135 and INTR 242 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mid/high intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate a mid/high intermediate sign vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.
  4. Demonstrate increased awareness of specific influences on the culture and community of Deaf individuals. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL 
   B. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL
conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.

II. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversations
at the Mid/High Intermediate Level.
   A. Narrate unforgettable moments 
      1. Receive and express passing, throwing, spilling, tripping and
falling
      2. Receive and express information about injuries and mishaps
      3. Use appropriate language to express kissing, hugging and poking
in a Deaf culture setting.
      4. Receive and express information about unforgettable moments
   B. Share interesting facts
      1. Receive and express information about the whole-part of facts
      2. Receive and express listing facts and comparing facts
      3. Receive and express information about illustrating a fact
   C. Explain rules
      1. Receive and express information about different rules we live by
      2. Practice card games and group games
   D. Tell about accidents
      1. Receive and express information about accidents with horses
      2. Receive and express information about accidents with
transportation
      3. Describe an accident

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests      60% of grade
Final Exam                      25% of grade 
Papers on Deaf Social Functions  3% of grade
Videotape Project                2% of grade 
Pop Quizzes                     10% of grade
 Total                         100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 126

  • Title: Classifiers in American Sign Language*
  • Number: INTR 126
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or ASL 121 with grade of "C" or higher and acceptance in the interpreter training program
Corequisites: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 130 and (INTR 147 or ASL 147) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145)

Description:

The course will provide an in-depth analysis of classifiers in ASL through discussion and demonstration of the three different categories of classifiers in ASL: representative classifiers (noun and its action), descriptive classifiers (size-and-shape, extent, perimeter, pattern and texture), and instrumental classifiers (manipulative and handle). Students will learn to comprehend and produce classifiers from all three categories. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and explain the three different categories of Classifiers in ASL.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate use of Classifiers in ASL.
  3. Demonstrate conversational skills incorporating Classifiers in ASL.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Define and Give Examples of Classifiers in ASL From Each Category:

   A. Representative Classifiers
      1. Semantic Classifiers
      2. Locative Classifiers
      3. Body Part Classifiers
      4. Plural Classifiers
   B. Descriptive Classifiers
      1. Size and Shape Specifier (SASS) Classifiers
      2. Body Classifiers
      3. Element Classifiers
      4. Letter/Number Classifiers
   C. Instrumental Classifiers
      1. Manipulative Classifiers
      2. Handle Classifiers

II. Demonstrate Appropriate Use of Classifiers in ASL From Each Category:
   A. Representative Classifiers
      1. Semantic Classifiers
      2. Locative Classifiers
      3. Body Part Classifiers
      4. Plural Classifiers
   B. Descriptive Classifiers
      1. Size and Shape Specifier (SASS) Classifiers
      2. Body Classifiers
      3. Element Classifiers
      4. Letter/Number Classifiers
   C. Instrumental Classifiers
      1. Manipulative Classifiers
      2. Handle Classifiers

III. Demonstrate Effective Conversational Skills Incorporating Classifiers
in ASL From Each Category:
   A. Representative Classifiers
      1. Semantic Classifiers
      2. Locative Classifiers
      3. Body Part Classifiers
      4. Plural Classifiers
   B. Descriptive Classifiers
      1. Size and Shape Specifier (SASS) Classifiers
      2. Body Classifiers
      3. Element Classifiers
      4. Letter/Number Classifiers
   C. Instrumental Classifiers
      1. Manipulative Classifiers
      2. Handle Classifiers

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Attendance/Participation                   10%
 Written Objective Examination              15%
 Assignments                                25%
 Evaluation of Receptive/Expressive Skills  50%
 Total                                     100%

Grading Criteria: (70% passing)
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 130

  • Title: Survey of the Interpreting Profession*
  • Number: INTR 130
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or FL 181 or ASL 121 with a grade of "C" or higher and acceptance in the interpreter training program
Corequisites: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 126 and (INTR 147 or ASL 147) and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course provides an introduction to interpreting as an occupation. Students will come to understand interpersonal communication skills, professional ethics, parameters of responsibilities, community resources and legal ramifications as they relate to the interpreter. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe how cultural perspectives impact communication.
  2. Define roles and responsibilities of an interpreter in various settings in a manner consistent with the interpreting Code of Ethics.
  3. Discuss the ramification of the laws regarding the use of interpreting.
  4. Identify national, state and local Certification processes and resources.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of history, current trends and terminology of sign language and oral interpreting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Communication
   A. Define communication.
   B. Identify the components of communication.
   C. Describe the impacts of culture on communication.
   D. Describe the impact of power dynamics on communication.
   E. Describe the impact of majority/minority roles on communication.  

II. Overview of Deafness, History of Interpreting, Terminology
   A. Characterize deafness in society.
   B. Define the philosophical approaches to interpreting.
   C. Relate federal and state legislation to the interpreting
profession.
   D. Identify sign language varieties and the sign language continuum.
   E. Define relevant terminology.
   F. Classify translation, transliteration, and interpretation.

III. Research, Role, Ethics
   A. Trace professional evaluation and certification procedures.
   B. Outline the interpreting process.
   C. Define the RID Code of Ethics.
   D. Apply the Code of Ethics in certain interpreting scenarios.
   E. Recognize and choose appropriate stress management practices for
interpreters.
   F. Recognize and avoid potential interpreting-related injuries.

IV. Critiques and Reports
   A. Present and critique current related events. 
   B. Observe people interacting and report the observations
   C. Observe and describe an interpreted interaction

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Critiques     25% of grade
Observations  20% of grade
Midterm Exam  20% of grade
Final         35% of grade
 Total       100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 131

  • Title: Interpreting Preparation Skills*
  • Number: INTR 131
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 130 with a grade of "C" or higher and acceptance into the interpreter training program
Corequisites: INTR 123 and INTR 135 and INTR 242 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course provides students with a foundation in the theory of interpretation. Students will explore the Colonomos Model of interpreting and apply this model by first using pre-interpreting skills in isolation. Then students will progress from producing translations to interpreting consecutively. 4 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the Colonomos Model of Interpreting in detail.
  2. Discuss the Task Analysis of interpreting in general and in relation to the Colonomos Model.
  3. Demonstrate effective pre-interpreting skills.
  4. Apply the Colonomos model of Interpreting 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Task Analysis
   A. Define and apply each task in the context of interpreting
      1. Audience assessment
      2. Decision making
      3. Listening
      4. Attending
      5. Concentrating
      6. Anticipation and prediction
      7. Perception
      8. Understanding
      9. Retention
      10. Accessing for prior knowledge
      11. Clozure
      12. Nonverbal behavior search
      13. Analysis
      14. Understanding the gestalt
      15. Image search
      16. Vocabulary search
      17. Internal message formulation
      18. Rehearsal
      19. Production of the message (linguistically acceptable target
language production)
      20. Lag time  – processing time
      21. Characterization
      22. Monitoring output
      23. Correction
      24. Pacing
      25. Modality switching
      26. Generating and receiving lexical items
      27. Meta comments
      28. Learning
      29. Mediation 
      30. Supervisor

II. Colonomos Model of Interpreting
   A. Describe each stage of the model in detail.
   B. Recognize application of the model in sample interpretations
produced by professional interpreters.
   C. Analyze sample work produced by professional interpreters and by the
students themselves.
   D. Demonstrate ability to apply all stages of the model while producing
translations, consecutive interpretations and prepared simultaneous
interpretations.

III. Demonstrate Effective Use of the Following Pre-interpreting Skills 
   A. Short-term and long-term recall
   B. Immediate and delayed repetition
   C. Concept-maps of spoken and signed texts
   D. Text analysis
   E. Outlines of spoken and signed texts
   F. Summaries of spoken and signed texts
   G. Prediction and anticipation 
   H. Non-linguistic visual to gesture 
   I. Non-linguistic visual to American Sign Language
   J. Non-linguistic visual to Spoken English

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Attendance/Participation  15% of grade
 Examinations              50% of grade
 Projects/Assignments      35% of grade
 Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:
 A = 93 - 100% 
 B = 85 - 92% 
 C = 78 - 84% 
 D = 70 - 77% 
 F =  0 - 69%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 135

  • Title: Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics*
  • Number: INTR 135
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: for students accepted in the interpreter training program enroll in: INTR 123 and INTR 242 and INTR 131 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic ASL linguistics with 70% accuracy by completing four exams based on text material.
  2. Create and present a lecture/review on selected text material. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Using Sentence Types
   A. Receive and express Yes-No Questions, Wh-word Questions, Rhetorical
Questions in ASL.
   B. Receive and express commands, conditionals, negation and assertion,
topicalization, relative clauses sentence types in ASL.

II. Understanding the Time concept in ASL
   A. Receive and express relative time- The "Time Line".
   B. Receive and express non-manual adverbs, incorporation of number,
passive hand as reference point.
   C. Receive and express regularity signs, duration-related signs,
repetition and duration-related signs, and tense using ASL.

III. Applying Pronominalization in ASL
   A. Receive and express pronouns referring to "present" people, things,
and places.
   B. Receive and express indexing, plural pronouns, eye-indexing,
possessive reference, reflexive/emphatic reference, demonstrative
reference, pronouns referring to "non-present" people, things, places.
   C. Receive and express setting up referents in space: What, Where, and
How, and setting up referents on the non-dominant hand in ASL.

IV. Utilizing Subjects and Objects in ASL
   A. Receive and express verbs, directionals, sign order and
topicalization.
   B. Receive and express body and gaze shifting, direct address, and what
are subjects and objects in ASL.

V. Understanding what Classifiers are in ASL and its' role.
   A. Receive and express classifiers that represent noun functions,
classifiers that represent singulars and pluralizations.
   B. Receive and express classifiers that represent size, shape, depth,
and texture (also known as descriptive classifiers) in ASL.

VI. Applying Locatives in ASL space.
   A. Receive and express different ways to express locative relationships
in ASL.
   B. Receive and express directional verbs, indexing, and separate
locative signs in ASL.

VII. Utilizing Pluralization in ASL
   A. Receive and express number agreement rules, ways to indicate
plurality with different types of signs, singular classifiers, plural
classifiers.
   B. Receive and express pronouns, number signs, and verbs in ASL.

VIII. Applying Temporal Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for temporal aspect
in ASL.

IX. Applying Distributional Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for distributional
aspect in ASL.

X. Understanding the History of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language
   A. Explain the meaning of a "language",  the history of American Sign
Language and how it affected deaf culture.
   B. Explain the history of using English in the Deaf Community and
compare it to ASL.
   C. Receive and express sign formations and variations, and selected
sign types in ASL.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams              58% of grade
Final exam         38% of grade
Review Activities   4% of grade
 Total            100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 145

  • Title: Introduction to the Deaf Community*
  • Number: INTR 145
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Acceptance to interpreter training program
Prerequisites or corequisites: ANTH 125 and SPD 120 for Interpreter Training Program Corequisites for Interpreter Training Prog: INTR 122 and INTR 126 and INTR 130 and INTR 147 all with a grade of "C" or higher Note: Prerequisite or corequisite of INTR 120 or ASL 120 or FL 180 required for students in the American Sign Language Studies Certificate

Description:

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate understanding of cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community.
  2. Examine major events in Deaf history.
  3. Identify the well-known Deaf/deaf or hearing figures in the Deaf Community.
  4. Compare the language, values, norms, traditions, and Deaf identity associated with the community and non-Deaf (hearing) community.
  5. Describe the culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/community versus the pathological perspective.
  6. Demonstrate an awareness of pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community
   A. Examine the concepts of language and identity
   B. Discuss the language/mode continuum within the d/Deaf community
(Oral, cued speech, MCE, Contact Variety, ASL, etc)
   C. Examine the collectivistic nature of the d/Deaf community and
implications for diversity.
   D. Examine multiculturalism/diversity within the Deaf community (race,
gender, sexual orientation, etc)

II. Resources available in the Deaf Community
   A. Identify resources of the Deaf Community (organizations/clubs,
advocacy agencies and Commissions for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Deaf
residential schools)
   B. Describe Deaf Community organizations related to local and national
clubs and sports (sports, advocacy, religious, political, multi-cultural,
and social) 
   C. Examine how access and public awareness have changed the lives of
d/Deaf and hard of hearing people.  

III. Major events in Deaf history
   A. Examine historical events 
   B. Identify well-known Deaf/deaf and hearing figures

IV. Significant features of Deaf Culture.
   A. Identify and examine social interaction rules, values, language and
tradition, group identity
   B. Compare and contrast features of Deaf culture with mainstream,
non-Deaf American culture. 
      1. identify elements of high context culture and low context
culture
      2. identify differences between collectivistic and individualistic
cultures
   C. Discuss and reflect on individual reactions and pre-conceived
ideas.

V. Culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/Community versus the
pathological perspective.
   A. Examine the term “disability” by identifying connotations,
assumptions, stigma, etc.
   B. Examine what it means to be a cultural/linguistic minority within
mainstream, American society. 
   C. Discuss the terms hearing, d/Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing
impaired
   D. Compare and contrast views of various stakeholders within Deaf
Education (parents, administrators, teachers of the Deaf, Special
Educators, etc).
   E. Examine philosophies of Manual Communication and the Oral Method 
   F. Examine the phenomenon of Cochlear Implants and the effects on
mainstream views of Deaf people as well as effects within the d/Deaf
community.

VI. Pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community
   A. Discuss implications of the diverse range of educational choices for
parents (Oral, Aural, cued speech,  mainstream, residential)
   B. Examine the influences of media on the d/Deaf community 
   C. Examine the role of national and local service agencies and
providers in legislation and politics related to d/Deaf people

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1 Oral Presentation   15%
7 Reaction Papers     10%
1 Biography Research  25%
2 Written Exams       50%
            Total    100%
 
Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 147

  • Title: Fingerspelling I*
  • Number: INTR 147
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 121 or FL 181 or ASL 121 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: For students accepted in the interpreter training program, enroll in: (INTR 122 or ASL 122) and INTR 126 and INTR 130 and (INTR 145 or ASL 145) all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perceive fingerspelled words and numbers of common, familiar topics, objects and activities.
  2. Demonstrate individual fingerspelled words and numbers accurately.
  3. Demonstrate comprehension of lecture material on performance exams.
  4. Engage in practice of fingerspelling presentations, games and videotapes available in the Language Resource Center.
  5. Perceive and demonstrate common fingerspelled-loan signs. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The appropriate use of fingerspelling in ASL discourse.
   A. Recognize and produce titles and names of people, places, books,
movies, programs, etc. 
   B. Recognize and produce numerical and alphabetical information related
to locations and addresses.
   C. Recognize and produce fingerspelling for expression of words that do
not have lexical signs (technical words, acronyms, specialized
vocabulary).
   D. Recognize ways that fingerspelling is sometimes used for other
communicative purposes (emphasis, surprise, clarification).

II. Skills related to comprehension and production of fingerspelling
   A. Comprehend and produce fingerspelled words from identified topic
categories (i.e., food, beverages, cities/towns, nature, automobiles,
etc.).
   B. Comprehend and produce numerical information (addresses, phone
numbers, personal information, basic math).
   C. Comprehend and produce lexicalized loan signs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Receptive Skill Tests   45% of grade
3 Expressive Skill Tests  30% of grade 
  Projects/Assignments     5% of grade
  Final Exam              20% of grade
                         100%
Grade Criteria:
A = 100%-93%   
B =  92%-85% 
C =  84%-78% 
D =  77%-70% 
F =  69%-0% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 181

  • Title: Interpreting Practicum I*
  • Number: INTR 181
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 0
  • Lab Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 0

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 130 and INTR 145 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 223 and INTR 226 and INTR 250 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

Students will observe skilled interpreters in various interpreting situations in a variety of settings during the semester. 2 hrs. lab, field work/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a basic mastery of the interpreting skills needed to become a professional, certified interpreter.
  2. Demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding the working interpreter’s environment.
  3. Begin development of a personal philosophy of interpreting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Students will increase their knowledge of interpreting practices by
attending and actively participating in weekly class discussion groups
   A. Discuss practicum observations and experiences
   B. Ask questions about interpreting practices they are unsure about
   C. Demonstrate knowledge of advanced principles and practices in
interpreting

II. Students will attend assigned practicum sites and participate actively
in interpreting
   A. Twenty-three hours of active observation required
   B. Twenty-two hours of accurate and appropriate interpreting required
   C. Prepare written notices regarding the interpreting process,
techniques and professional ethics
   D. Demonstrate a high level of skill at interpreting and
transliterating in a realistic environment

III. Students will increase their knowledge and skill at interpreting
through direct interaction with a professional interpreter
   A. Participate in feedback sessions with the professional interpreter
at the practicum site for one-half hour each week
   B. Discuss the interpreting process and plan for the next observation
or interpreting experience

IV. Develop a personal philosophy of interpreting as a profession
   A. Prepare and submit a written philosophy statement

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class/group discussion, attendance and participation 25% of grade
Log books; 48 hours in advance                       25% of grade
Meetings with professional interpreter               25% of grade
Practicum site attendance                            25% of grade
 Total                                              100%   

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 223

  • Title: Advanced American Sign Language*
  • Number: INTR 223
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 123 or ASL 123 or FL 271 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 250 and INTR 226 and INTR 181 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course is a continuation of Intermediate American Sign Language II. Students will learn about culturally significant topics related to the Deaf community, more complex ASL grammatical features and conversational skill development. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of ASL will be taught to a variety of contexts in simulated, typical interaction. Students will have opportunities to utilize what they learn about advanced ASL through class activities, dialogues, short stories, general conversations and class discussions. Sign comprehension and production skills will be emphasized. This course meets for six hours of internship/week.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversations at the advanced level.
  2. Expand on the functions, grammar and vocabulary presented in the classroom.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to tell anecdotes and stories about various topics, and reminiscing events related to topics presented in the class.
  4. Apply various signing skills on a discourse level.
  5. Demonstrate appropriate listening skills (e.g., learn appropriate listener responses, and rehearse conversation strategies).
  6. Apply appropriate language skills in a variety of inter-relational scenarios. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL
Conversations at the Advanced Level
   A. Talk about money
      1. Demonstrate the comprehension, production of basic money
vocabulary
      2. Receive and express discussing banking and finances
   B. Make major decisions 
      1. Demonstrate the comprehension and production of making major
decisions
      2. Receive and express information discussing housing situations and
transportation situations
      3. Receive and express information discussing major decisions
   C. Discuss health conditions
      1. Describe parts of the human body
      2. Receive and express information describing symptoms, causes and
treatments
      3. Use presentation on health conditions

II. Practice Storytelling
   A. Analyze, compare and explain short stories
   B. Practice retelling short stories
   C. Receive and express short stories with wh-questions

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests 50% of grade
Final Exam                 25% of grade
Videotape Project          15% of grade
Assignments                 5% of grade
Pop Quizzes                 5% of grade
  Total                   100% 

Grading Criteria:

  93 - 100% = A
  85 -  92% = B
  78 -  84% = C
  70 -  77% = D
   0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 226

  • Title: Specialized and Technical Vocabulary*
  • Number: INTR 226
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 123 or ASL 123 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 181 and INTR 250 and INTR 223 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course will expand the interpreter training students' vocabulary related to specialized and technical contexts. Students will discuss vocabulary use in a variety of contexts to include socially restricted terms and phrases Deaf people use; colloquialisms; varying registers; terminology in medical, mental health, religion, sex, drugs; and strong language in ASL. Students' development of comprehension and production skills in common formal and informal settings will be emphasized. Students will also discuss Signing Exact English (SEE II) and the differences from American Sign Language (ASL). 4 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate comprehension and production skills with specialized and technical vocabulary.
  2. Recognize the differences of sign vocabulary, grammar rules, and sentence structures between Signed Exact English (SEE II) and American Sign Language (ASL).
  3. Demonstrate basic comprehension and production skills with SEE II.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Comprehension and Production of Vocabulary Related to
the Following Contexts:
   A. Medical settings
      1. Doctor’s office
      2. Hospital
      3. Clinic
   B. Mental health
      1. Therapy
      2. Counseling
      3. Psychiatric
   C. Religious settings
      1. Prayers 
      2. Blessings

II. Demonstrate Comprehension and Production of Vocabulary and/or Phrases
Related to the Following Topics:
   A. Educational Subject Areas
      1. Mathematics
      2. Science
      3. History 
      4. Geography
   B. Technical 
      1. Computers
      2. Corporate jargon 
   C. Sex
      1. Female/male reproductive system
      2. Birth control
   D. Drugs 
      1. Recreational 
      2. Medical
   E. Strong language in ASL

III. Recognize the Following Differences Between SEE II and ASL:
   A. Use of sign vocabulary 
   B. Grammar rules
   C. Sentence structures 

IV. Demonstrate Comprehension and Production Skills in SEE II:
   A. Use of sign vocabulary 
   B. Grammar rules
   C. Sentence structures

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Attendance/Participation                   10%
 Written Objective Examination              15%
 Evaluation of Expressive/Receptive skills  50%
 Assignments                                25%
 Total                                     100%

Grading Criteria: (70% passing)
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 242

  • Title: Fingerspelling II*
  • Number: INTR 242
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 147 with a grade of "C" or higher Corerequisites: INTR 123 and INTR 131 and INTR 135 and INTR 248 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course focuses on continued development of expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word and phrase recognition and expression. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perceive and demonstrate fingerspelled words of specialized terms in medicine, education, subjects (courses), religion, famous places, persons, legal, ethnic/minority, government/politic, rehabilitation/counseling
  2. Perceive and demonstrate fingerspelled words and numbers in sentences and phrases
  3. Demonstrate comprehension of lecture material on performance exams
  4. Engage in practice of fingerspelling skills by interacting with students in class with fingerspelling presentations and games and videotapes available in the Language Resource Center 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fingerspelling Comprehension
   A. Perceive the fingerspelled words in the sentences and phrases
   B. Perceive the numbers in the sentences and phrases 

II. Fingerspelling Production
   A. Demonstrate the fingerspelled words in the sentences and phrases
   B. Demonstrate the numbers in the sentences and phrases

III. Fingerspelling in Contexts
   A. Send and receive fingerspelled conversation generated by games,
class presentations and other social/class activities
   B. Practice sending and receiving fingerspelled conversations generated
by videotapes in the Language Resource Center

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Receptive Tests        60% of grade
3 Expressive Tests       12% of grade
1 Class Presentation      4% of grade
1 Fingerspelling Game     4% of grade
1 Final Examination      20% of grade
  Total                 100%

Grading Criteria:

93 - 100% A
85 -  92% B
78 -  84% C
70 -  77% D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 248

  • Title: Deaf Community Ethnography*
  • Number: INTR 248
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 145 or ASL 145 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: (INTR 123 or ASL 123) and INTR 131 and (INTR 135 or ASL 135) and INTR 242 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This advanced course will provide students the opportunity to explore power and oppression issues experienced by d/Deaf people. Specific attention will be given to society's views of the d/Deaf community and the influence of various media on these views. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Examine the label of disability as a cultural formation that changes over time.
  2. Analyze the use of disability as an expression of power and the resulting implications.
  3. Examine the types of discrimination faced by disabled people in their everyday lives throughout American history.
  4. Discuss the concepts related to visual language and visual literacy gaze.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Role of “Disability” as a Cultural Formation
   A. Explore the history of “disability” as a label. 
   B. Examine various manifestations and implications of “disability”
versus ethnicity or cultural minority as labels.
   C. Examine and describe Alexander Graham Bell’s views related to the
Deaf population.
   D. Examine the pathological and psychological approach of deafness as
abnormal.

II. The Role of “Disability” as an Expression of Power and the
Resulting Implications
   A. Examine the achievements of the disability community related to the
passage of laws and recognition of accessibility issues.
   B. Examine roles and status of gender, race, class, and ethnicity.
   C. Examine the occurrence and consequences of elite discourse and
racism.
   D. Examine the “catch-22” that results from paternalism.

III. The Types of Discrimination faced by Disabled People in their
Everyday Lives throughout American History
   A. Examine the role of negativism and positivism.
   B. Discuss the various influences and ramifications of Eugenics on
society.
   C. Identify ways that stereotyping influences discrimination (race,
gender, abilities, sexual orientation, religion, etc)
   D. Describe and discuss the existence and consequences of audism

IV. The Role of Visual Language and Visual Literacy Gaze
   A. Examine the “Deaf Visual Way of Being”.
   B. Identify and examine influences of the media (television, theatre,
news, magazines, etc).
   C. Examine various elements of “Deaf Vision” portrayed in works by
Deaf artists.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          50% of grade
Projects/Assignments  50% of grade
  Total              100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 250

  • Title: Interpreting I*
  • Number: INTR 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 10
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 10

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 131 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 181 and INTR 223 and INTR 226 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

In this introduction to interpreting principles, emphasis will be on English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English skills. Students will participate in sequential drills and apply these skills in class. 10 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the C/J model of Sign Language Interpretation by referring to the model while discussing/writing about the process of interpretation/transliteration.
  2. Apply text information to skill acquisition and skill development.
  3. Simultaneously interpret English to ASL with at least 80% accuracy.
  4. Simultaneously interpret ASL to English with at least 80% accuracy.
  5. Simultaneously transliterate English to Signed English/PSE with at least 80% accuracy.
  6. Simultaneously transliterate Signed English/PSE to English with at least 80% accuracy.
  7. Demonstrate continued second language (ASL) development by participation in class discussion.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interpretation vs. Transliteration
   A. Identify a model interpretation
   B. Identify a model transliteration
   C. Compare and contrast interpretation and transliteration

II. Theory of Interpretation
   A. Describe the current approaches to interpretation
   B. Describe the C/J model of interpretation

III. The Message, Analysis, Spontaneously Speaking (Signing),
Reconstruction of Ideas and Memory
   A. Effectively identify the intended meaning of a spoken (signed) text
   B. Reconstruct a message using a variant of the original language
   C. Perform basic dual task functions
   D. Simultaneously repeat a spoken text
   E. Simultaneously repeat a signed text

IV. Expression, Meaning, and Proper Context
   A. Compile a personal dictionary of first language vocabulary and
expressions
   B. Compile a personal dictionary of second language vocabulary and
expressions
   C. Analyze new or unknown vocabulary in terms of context and intent

V. Transliteration, Close Skills
   A. Demonstrate effective language close skills
   B. Demonstrate effective language and context inference skills

VI. Consecutive Interpretation
   A. Successfully interpret consecutively with 90% accuracy

VII. Uninterpretable
   A. Identify uninterpretable texts

VIII. Interpretation
   A. Successfully interpret voice-to-sign with 80% accuracy
   B. Successfully interpret sign-to-voice with 80% accuracy

IX. Transliteration
   A. Successfully transliterate voice-to-sign with 80% accuracy
   B. Successfully transliterate sign-to-voice with 80% accuracy

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Video Journals        15% of grade
Class Participation   15% of grade
Quizzes (4)           33% of grade
Midterm               15% of grade
Final                 22% of grade
  Total              100%

Grading Criteria:
93 - 100% A
85 -  92% B
78 -  84% C
70 -  77% D
 0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 251

  • Title: Interpreting II*
  • Number: INTR 251
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 250 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 262 and INTR 282 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This is an advanced course concentrating on continued develop of English-to-ASL, ASL transliteration skills development. Students will have the opportunity to use these skills as stimulus material gradually becomes more advanced. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate skill in performing the components of the Colonomos model while both interpreting and transliterating.
  2. Analyze interpretations done by other interpreters as well as the students themselves.
  3. Consecutively and simultaneously interpret selected spoken English texts into ASL accurately.
  4. Consecutively and simultaneously interpret selected ASL texts into spoken English accurately.
  5. Consecutively and simultaneously (CASE) transliterate selected spoken English texts into Contact Sign accurately.
  6. Consecutively and simultaneously (CASE) transliterate selected Contact Sign texts into spoken English accurately.
  7. Interpret/transliterate interactive situations effectively.
  8. Demonstrate understanding of team interpreting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Conceptual Accuracy
   A. Correlate English vocabulary to conceptually accurate sign
vocabulary
   B. Analyze an advanced text for meaning
   C. Identify cultural indicators influencing text meaning

II. ASL/CASE to Spoken English Interpreting – Consecutive and
Simultaneous
   A. Analyze sample work done by peers and professional interpreters. 
   B. Accurately interpret various spoken messages (contexts, register,
settings, etc) into equivalent and appropriate ASL.
   C. Demonstrate appropriate processing skills as defined by the
Colonomos model.

III. Spoken English to ASL Interpreting - Consecutive and Simultaneous
   A. Analyze sample work done by peers and professional interpreters.
   B. Accurately interpret various spoken messages (contexts, register,
settings, etc) into equivalent and appropriate ASL.
   C. Demonstrate appropriate processing skills as defined by the
Colonomos model.

IV. Spoken English to CASE Transliterating - Consecutive and Simultaneous
   A. Analyze sample work done by peers and professional interpreters.
   B. Transliterate various spoken messages (contexts, register, settings,
etc) into equivalent and appropriate CASE.
   C. Demonstrate appropriate processing skills as defined by the
Colonomos model.

V. Interactive Texts
   A. Analyze sample work done by peers and professional interpreters.
   B. Transliterate and/or interpret various interactive scenarios both
from video and live role-play scenarios in the classroom and achieve
message equivalence.
   C. Demonstrate understanding of appropriate strategies for stopping
speaker/signer for clarification when necessary.
   D. Demonstrate appropriate processing skills for managing the demands
of interactive situations effectively.
 
VI. Team Interpreting
   A. Demonstrate understanding of how to work effectively within an
interpreting team
   B. Apply appropriate teaming strategies

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance/Participation 10% of grade
Project                  10% of grade
Performance Exams        80% of grade
  Total                 100%

Grading Criteria:

  93 - 100% - A
  85 -  92% = B
  78 -  84% = C
  70 -  77% = D
   0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 262

  • Title: Seminar on Interpreting*
  • Number: INTR 262
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 250 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 251 and INTR 282 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course provides students with knowledge of stress management as applied to both the physical demands and mental conditions of sign language interpreting. Students will learn and apply decision-making techniques in regard to the Interpreter (RID) Code of Ethics. Additionally, the course provides students with knowledge of career development theory, career decision-making and the job-search process. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe, examine and apply elements of personal effectiveness to their personal and professional lives.
  2. Describe the concept of paradigms and analyze its application to various perspectives and behavior.
  3. Demonstrate ability to apply the RID Code of Ethics and decision-making skills to proposed hypothetical scenarios.
  4. Explain repetitive motion injury and identify relevant causes and remedies.
  5. Demonstrate a familiarity with various specializations within the interpreting field.
  6. Apply career theory and job search process information to interpreter professional development

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional/Ethical Development
   A. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the tenets of the RID Code of
Ethics.
   B. Demonstrate mastery of decision-making parameters and ability to
utilize in situational analysis.
   C. Outline special considerations regarding:
      1. Educational interpreting
      2. Legal interpreting.
      3. Medical interpreting.
      4. Mental health interpreting.
      5. Rehabilitation and social service interpreting.
      6. Business and industry interpreting.
      7. Religious interpreting.
      8. Platform and performing arts interpreting.
      9. Law enforcement interpreting.
     10. Deaf-blind interpreting.

II. Personal Effectiveness and Stress Management
   A. Describe the concept of paradigms as related to professional and
personal life.
   B. Differentiate between personality and character ethics and identify
each in practical life examples.
   C. Describe the concept of paradigm shift and related elements.
   D. Describe components of a habit and apply to practical life
examples.
   E. Describe the concept of personal effectiveness.
   F. Create a personal mission statement.
   G. Complete in-class self-awareness and self-esteem assessments.
   H. Define stress and its physical and mental manifestations.
   I. Identify positive and negative stress-coping mechanisms.
   J. Complete in-class self-relaxation exercises.
   K. Produce and categorize listing of current methods/techniques to
reduce interpreter stress physically and mentally.

III. Repetitive Motion Injury
   A. Identify various injury types, causes and symptoms.
   B. Develop diagram charting normal muscle activity vs. injury.
   C. Define and differentiate between “grades of pain” relevant to
interpreting injury.
   D. Describe common day and evening physical experiences of injured.
   E. Identify and analyze disparity of syndromes among persons who are
deaf.
   F. Research and identify current methods of treatment.

IV. Career Development Theory
   A. Identify the historical influences of career development.
   B. Explain the career development process.
   C. Identify and differentiate the career development stages.
   D. Apply career development stages to present personal life stage.
   E. Describe and apply myths of career development.

V. Job Search Process
   A. Identify components of job search process.
   B. List typical job description components and distinguish personal
career priorities.
   C. Define the purpose and function of a resume.
   D. Identify and contrast resume types.
   E. Apply resume guidelines and create professional resume.
   F. Appraise resume via career center review process.
   G. Identify and describe cover letter components.
   H. Identify major interview components and interviewer concerns.
   I. Create and critique professional cover letter.
   J. Identify purpose and critical components of a thank-you letter.
   K. Identify and describe guidelines for thank-you letters.
   L. Create professional thank-you letter.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Oral/Video Projects 70% of grade
Written Projects    30% of grade
  Total            100%

Grading Criteria:

  93 - 100% = A
  85 -  92% = B
  78 -  84% = C
  70 -  77% = D
   0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 282

  • Title: Interpreting Practicum II*
  • Number: INTR 282
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 6
  • Contact Hours: 270
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 270

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 181 with a grade of "C" or higher
Corequisites: INTR 251 and INTR 262 and AAC 150 all with a grade of "C" or higher

Description:

This course provides students with an opportunity to observe and interpret in an off-site setting with the supervision of an experienced interpreter. Students will actively engage in discussions relating to the difficulties and rewards of working in a realistic interpreting environment. The fieldwork totals 270 hours a semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate ability to utilize advanced interpreting skills necessary to be a qualified and certified entry-level interpreter.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the working interpreter’s environment.
  3. Compose a self-reflection paper by summarizing their educational experience in the Interpreter Training Program.
  4. Demonstrate cumulative knowledge of Deaf Culture, ASL Linguistics, Interpreting and Transliterating, and the Profession of Interpreting. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Synthesize and Increase Knowledge of Interpreting Practices 
   A. Discuss practicum observations of working, experienced interpreters
   B. Discuss ethical situations that arise in practicum to help students
continue internalizing the Code of Ethics
   C. Discuss equivalence and linguistic issues that arise in interpreting
situations where the student is either observing or providing the
interpretation

II. Attend Assigned Practicum Sites
   A. Complete 270 contact hours of field work
   B. Determine readiness to progress from observation to interpreting by
working with supervisor
   C. Establish specific job responsibilities and expectations by working
with supervisor 
   D. Develop a professional development plan with the supervisor
   E. Participate in feedback sessions with the supervisor and/or other
assigned interpreters at the sight
   F. Keep a record of time worked and job experiences
 
III. Apply Appropriate Interpreting Skills by Demonstrating:
   A. Confidence in his/her interpreting skills
   B. Competence in sign language communication
   C. Fluency and speed in interpreting and/or transliterating
   D. Knowledge of terminology and sign choices
   E. Assessing communication and language preferences of consumers
   F. Problem-solving skills
   G. Recognizing the human factors that play a role in the work
environment
   H. Interpersonal skills required to work as a member of a team

IV. Develop a Personal Philosophy of Interpreting as a Profession
   A.Reflect on his/her personal philosophy of the field of interpreting 
   B.Create a written philosophy statement

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Capstone Evaluation/Exit examination  60% of grade
Practicum site attendance/performance 25% of grade
Attendance                             5% of grade
Written assignments                   10% of grade
  Total                              100%

Grading Criteria:

  93 - 100% = A
  85 -  92% = B
  78 -  84% = C
  70 -  77% = D
   0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Must be able to attend off-site practicum 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

INTR 291

No information found.