Metal Fabrication/Welding Certificate

The metal fabrication/welding certificate teaches welding skills in the areas of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), flux core arc welding (FCAW), gas and tungsten arc welding (GTAW), oxy-fuel welding (OFW), oxy-fuel cutting (OFC), and plasma arc cutting (PAC). The students also will receive training in safety and basic blueprint reading, and metallurgy. This certificate gives the student the skills needed to successfully enter the field of welding.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 4790; State CIP Code 48.0508)

First Semester

INDT 125Industrial Safety/OSHA 303
MFAB 180Blueprint and Symbols Reading for Welders2
MFAB 240Metallurgy2
MFAB 124Introduction to Welding3
INDT 155Workplace Skills1
Total Hours11

Second Semester

MFAB 131Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) I*3
MFAB 133Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) I*3
MFAB 136Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) I*3
Total Hours9

Third Semester

MFAB 205Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) II*3
MFAB 210Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) II*3
MFAB 220Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW)*3
Total Hours9

Total Program Hours: 29

Courses

MFAB 124   Introduction to Welding (3 Hours)

Introduction to Welding is a basic welding, tool, and equipment safety course. This course will expose students to the various welding processes and techniques. Tools, equipment and safety related to the metal fabrication area will be discussed and used by the student. This is a hands-on course. Students will be required to purchase and use personal protective equipment (PPE). 1hr lecture and 4hrs lab/wk.

MFAB 128   Basic Machine Tool Technology (3 Hours)

This course provides instruction in the operation of metal cutting machinery, which includes practice in the safe operation of a lathe, vertical mill, and precision grinders. Layout equipment, measuring tools, gauges, hand tools, drilling machine, bench grinder, power saws, and heat treating equipment will also be presented. Machine tool safety, shop math and trigonometry will be emphasized throughout the course. 1 hr. lecture, 5 hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 131   Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Through classroom and/or lab/shop learning and assessment activities, students in this course will describe the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process (SMAW); demonstrate the safe and correct setup of the SMAW workstation; associate SMAW electrode classifications with base metals and joint criteria; demonstrate proper electrode selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the horizontal position; perform basic SMAW welds on selected weld joints; and perform visual inspection of welds. 1hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 133   Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Through classroom and/or shop/lab learning and assessment activities, students in this course will: explain gas metal arc welding process (GMAW); demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GMAW workstation; correlate GMAW electrode classifications with base metals and joint criteria; demonstrate proper electrode selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the horizontal position; produce basic GMAW welds on selected weld joints; and conduct visual inspection of GMAW welds. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 136   Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Through classroom and/or lab/shop learning and assessment activities, students in this course will: explain the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW); demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GTAW workstation; relate GTAW electrode and filler metal classifications with base metals and joint criteria; build proper electrode and filler metal selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the horizontal position; perform basic GTAW welds on selected weld joints; and perform visual inspection of GTAW welds. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 140   Maintenance Repair Welding* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform oxyfuel cutting (OFC), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc cutting (PAC). Basic blueprint and standard AWS welding symbols will be introduced. Selected welds and assignments will be tested according to industry and AWS standards. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z-87.1 approved safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment as required by employers. This course is designed for individuals who have welding experience or who are employed by a company that requires welding skills. This course can be customized for advanced training. 1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 152   Manufacturing Materials and Processes (3 Hours)

This is a beginning course in metal fabrication technology that is appropriate for the metal fabrication major and other interested students. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify various manufacturing materials and processes currently used in industry. The capabilities and applications of machine tool, general fabrication, welding processes, robotics, cut-off equipment and other manufacturing processes and equipment will be studied. Lectures will be supplemented by class tours and demonstrations of various processes and equipment. Students are required to wear safety glasses during demonstrations. 3 hrs. lecture-demonstrations/wk.

MFAB 180   Blueprint and Symbols Reading for Welders (2 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify basic welding positions and explain, list, sketch, draw, use or describe current American Welding Society (AWS) welding symbols and weld joint configurations. The student will be introduced to several methods of producing welding blueprints, object representatives, and specific meanings of selected lines, surface features, sectional views and basic math formulas used in the welding industry. The student will be able to identify the symbols used for fillet welds and groove welds made with and without backing. Topics such as pipe welding representations, pipe welding connections, pipe welding classifications, welder certification, metallurgical effects of heat on metals and the importance of weld quality and welding safety will be studied. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MFAB 203   Introduction to Ornamental Iron* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Several years ago one of our JCCC partners Mr. Robert Foust Owner of, "Bobs Ornamental Iron Studios" asked if we train our MFAB students in the ornamental iron trade. He stated that welders are easy to find, good welders are hard to find, but good welders with that special eye for art, and especially welders that like to do railings, stairways, black smithing, and artistic sculptures that are one of a kind. welders that demand quality welds and excellent workmanship are very hard to find. With metal making a come back in the building trades JCCC would be the only school in the area that would be offering this skill. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 205   Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to weld fillet welds in the vertical-up (3F), and overhead (4F) weld positions, and groove joints in the vertical up, (3G) and overhead position (4G) weld positions with and/or without backing to industry standards. Students will be required to prepare materials using oxy-fuel cutting techniques. Students will perform a welding proficiency test equal to or exceeding the American Welding society (AWS) standard D1.1. Structural welding code. Students will be expected to provide basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 210   Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 130 or MFAB 133

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to perform more advanced welds in selected positions on a variety of metal thicknesses. Mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum metals will be utilized. Emphasis will be on short circuit, spray arc and pulse arc modes of metal transfer using larger diameter wire electrode. Industry standard testing techniques will be used. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 215   Fabrication Practices I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Upon completion of this class, the student should be able to work from discipline specific drawings to manufacture and assemble a mock building section. This class is a capstone course and is intended to serve all MFAB graduate students who have completed the fundamental skills coursework within the metal fabrication certificate or degree programs. The Fabrication Practices I class is part one of an advanced comprehensive class intended to put to practical use the skills obtained throughout the existing Metal Fabrication and Welding Technology Career program. This class will put emphasis on structural steel fabrication, erection, and assembly. The coursework will focus on modern welding fabrication techniques and practices used in the manufacturing and installation of structural steel, piping systems, and miscellaneous welded mechanical items. Students will work in teams of three or four persons. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 220   Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW)* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 130 or MFAB 133

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to identify safety rules associated with the flux core arc welding (FCAW) process, identify FCAW equipment components, and perform welds in selected positions on a variety of metal thicknesses to industry standards. 1hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 240   Metallurgy (2 Hours)

Metallurgy is the study of the science and technology of metals. This course covers the extractive, mechanical and physical phases of metallurgy. Topics include the identification of metals, types and classification of metals, heat treatment procedures and common steel manufacturing processes. AWS terms and definitions will be emphasized throughout the course. 2 hrs. lecture-demonstration/wk.

MFAB 241   Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to do more advanced GTAW welding projects. Weld in a variety of positions and on several thicknesses of material. Emphasis will be on safety, quality, measurements, and out of position welding. Students will weld on tubular material of a variety of sizes and thicknesses. Square and/or round tube will be fabricated to mate at several common angles using power tools and equipment. 1hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 250   Fabrication Practices II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 215 or MFAB 260

Upon completion of this class, the student should be able to work from discipline specific drawings to manufacture and assemble a mock piping loop, storage tank/vessel, and miscellaneous parts. This class is intended to serve all MFAB graduate students and current MFAB students who have completed the fundamental skills coursework within the metal fabrication certificate or degree programs. The Fabrication Practices II class is part two of an advanced comprehensive class intended to put to practical use the skills obtained throughout the existing Metal Fabrication and Welding Technology Career program. This class will put emphasis on pressure holding tanks and pressure vessels. Coursework will focus on modern welded fabrication techniques and practices used in the manufacturing and installation of steel pipe, tank and vessel systems, and miscellaneous welded mechanical structural items. Students will work in teams of three or four persons. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs lab/wk.

MFAB 255   Advanced Machine Tool Technology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 128 or MFAB 170

This course provides students further instruction and practice on machine tool operations. Advanced techniques using lathes, milling machine, drill presses and precision grinders and the use of specialized tooling, clamps, and jigs is covered. Machining techniques requiring special applications such as steady rest, and centering techniques will be addressed. Students will learn the various techniques of working with stock to produce parts from drawing, plans and sketches. Hardening, tempering and basic metallurgy will also be covered. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MFAB 259   Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MFAB 125 or MFAB 205

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to weld one-inch thick groove joints in the flat (1G), horizontal (2G), vertical up, (3G) and overhead (4G) weld positions, with and/or without backing to industry standards. The course will cover unlimited thickness qualifications. Students will use heat sensing tools and equipment to pre heat, maintain inter-pass temperature, and properly post heat selected welds. Students will perform a welding proficiency test equal to or exceeding the American Welding Society (AWS) standard D1.1. Structural welding code. Students will be expected to provide basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

MFAB 271   Metal Fabrication Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hrs. lecture, 15 hrs. minimum on-the-job training/wk.

MFAB 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

MFAB 124

  • Title: Introduction to Welding
  • Number: MFAB 124
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Description:

Introduction to Welding is a basic welding, tool, and equipment safety course. This course will expose students to the various welding processes and techniques. Tools, equipment and safety related to the metal fabrication area will be discussed and used by the student. This is a hands-on course. Students will be required to purchase and use personal protective equipment (PPE). 1hr lecture and 4hrs lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify basic safety rules.
  2. Explain the oxy-fuel cutting and welding systems.
  3. Describe selected types of power cutting equipment, and metal fabrication hand tools.
  4. List welding processes associated with different metals.
  5. Explain the American Welding Society (AWS) electrode identification system.
  6. Explain the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process.
  7. Demonstrate the plasma arc cutting (PAC) processes.
  8. Demonstrate selected oxy-fuel welds and cuts.
  9. Demonstrate shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)  techniques.
  10. Demonstrate gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety  
  A. Identify Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).  
  B. List several JCCC/MFAB safety rules.  
  C. Identify several hazards associated with welding.  
  D. List compressed gasses used in industry.  
  E. Identify the parts of a fire triangle. 
  F. Demonstrate the assembly of oxy-fuel equipment.  
 
II. Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting Apparatus  
  A. Identify the five types of joints.  
  B. Identify safety devices on oxygen and acetylene cylinders.  
  C. Describe how acetylene gas is made and stored.  
  D. Describe the fundamentals of combustion.  
  E. Demonstrate safe handling of gas cylinders.  
  F. Explain why high-pressure cylinders utilize double seating valves.  
  G. Identify safe and proper procedure to set up and shut down an oxy-fuel cutting torch.  
  H. Demonstrate lighting and adjusting for three types of flame.  
  I. Demonstrate proper handling and manipulation of an oxy-fuel cutting torch.  
 
III. Powered Cutting and Hand Tools Equipment   
  A. Select the proper power equipment for the operation being performed. 
  B. Select the proper hand tool for the operation being performed.  
  C. Select proper grinding wheel for the operation being performed. 
 
IV. Welding Processes 
  A. Identify welding processes used for mild steel. 
  B. Identify welding processes used for stainless steel. 
  C. Identify welding processes used for aluminum. 
  D. Identify welding processes used for specialized applications. 

V. AWS Electrode Identification  
  A. Select the amperage control for the electrode size, type, and position being used.  
  B. Describe factors that change current values for electrodes.  
  C. Identify the AWS number system for mild steel and stainless steel electrodes.  
  D. List the four classification groups of the AWS mild steel electrodes.  
  E. Explain the functions of the electrode's flux coating.  

VI. GTAW Techniques 
  A. List the advantages of GTAW.  
  B. List the disadvantages of GTAW. 
  C. Describe the set-up and shut down of GTAW equipment. 
  D. Describe different type of tungsten used with GTAW. 
  E. Describe the different types of gases used with GTAW. 
 
VII. SMAW Techniques  
  A. List the advantages of SMAW.  
  B. List the disadvantages of SMAW. 
  C. Explain the forehand welding technique.  
  D. Explain the backhand welding technique.  
  E. Describe the four main welding positions.  
  F. Explain the importance of travel angles and travel speed. 
  G. Demonstrate SMAW welds. 
 
VIII. PAC Techniques 
  A. List the advantages of PAC.  
  B. List the disadvantages of PAC. 
  C. List the best position to use when plasma arc cutting.  
  D. Describe the importance of travel angles and speed when using the PAC. 
  E. Explain the term kerf. 
  F. Demonstrate PAC. 

IX. Oxy-Fuel Welds and Cuts  
  A. List the advantages of oxy-fuel welding and cutting.  
  B. List the disadvantages of oxy-fuel welding and cutting.  
  C. List several welding positions.  
  D. Describe the importance of travel angles and speed.    
  E. Explain why welding tip selection and metal thicknesses matters when welding. 
  F. Demonstrate oxy-fuel welds.  
  G. Demonstrate oxy-fuel cuts.   
  H. Demonstrate oxy-fuel braze welds.  
 
X. GMAW Techniques  
  A. List the advantages of GMAW.  
  B. List the disadvantages of GMAW. 
  C. Explain the forehand welding technique.  
  D. Explain the backhand welding technique.  
  E. Describe the four main welding positions.  
  F. Explain the importance of travel angles and travel speed. 
  G. Demonstrate GMAW welds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests   20% - 40% of grade 
Labratory  20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports  10% - 20% of grade 
Participation  10% - 20% of grade
TOTAL  100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0  - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket:  Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 128

  • Title: Basic Machine Tool Technology
  • Number: MFAB 128
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 5

Description:

This course provides instruction in the operation of metal cutting machinery, which includes practice in the safe operation of a lathe, vertical mill, and precision grinders. Layout equipment, measuring tools, gauges, hand tools, drilling machine, bench grinder, power saws, and heat treating equipment will also be presented. Machine tool safety, shop math and trigonometry will be emphasized throughout the course. 1 hr. lecture, 5 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate safe working habits at all times to include: follow all safety rules and procedures using tools, gauges, and other related shop equipment. Use personal protective equipment (PPE) when and where required.
  2. Have a understanding of simple machine shop drawings. Be able to prepare, and perform layout work. Develop a plan to complete a given project.
  3. Identify and correctly use various measuring tools and gauges.  Explain the fundamentals of geometric dimensioning and tolerance. Prepare an inspection report.
  4. Identify and use various hand tools found in a machine shop. List several types of fasteners and select the proper fastening technique for a specific job. Describe why cutting fluids are necessary.
  5. List the most common general purpose machines you find in a machine shop. Have a understanding of the technique to sharpen metal cutting tools. prepare, setup and safely operate various general purpose machines.
  6. Describe the various parts/controls of a milling machine, and lathe. Have an understanding on how to  safely setup and operate a lathe and milling machine using various cutters, and work-holding devices.
  7. Describe the various parts/controls and levers of a precision surface grinder, to include the difference holding devises.  Have a basic understanding of the pressure to  safely setup and operate a surface grinder.
  8. Explain classifications of industrial metals and their physical properties. Recognize the hazards that are posed when certain metals are machined.
  9. List the difference heat-treating technique and explain the processes related to them. Define the difference heat-treating equipment. Describe metal finishing techniques used in a machine shop.
  10. Define the concept of computer numerical control (CNC) equipment. Have a basic understanding to write a simple manual program. Explain other electro machining processes and their advantages. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Shop Safety 
  A. Explain why it is important to develop safe work habits.  
  B. Apply safe work practices when operating in a machine shop.  
  C. List the personal protective equipment (PPE) required for difference machining operations and when using chemicals and fluids.  
  D. List shop safety hazards and how to correct them. 

II. Drawings and Layout Work  
  A. Explain the information found on a typical mechanical drawing.  
  B. Explain the basics of geometric dimensioning and tolerance.  
  C. Explain why layouts are needed.  
  D. Identify common layout tools.  
  E. Performs basic layout. 
  F. Have a basic understanding of a machining sequence plan.

III. Measurement 
  A. Measure to 1/64 of an inch with a steel rule.  
  B. Measure to .003 of an inch using a Dial Caliper.  
  C. Understand how to read a Vernier measuring tool.  
  D. Measure to .003 of an inch using a micrometer depth gage.
  E. Measure to .001 of an inch using an outside micrometer.  
  F. Measure angles to .5 of a degree using a shop protractor.
  G. Identify various types of gages found in a machine shop.  
  H. Describe the various transfer gages found in a machine shop.  
  I. Understand the basic care and used of differences dial indicators.  
  J. Describe the care and used of gage blocks.  

IV. Hand tools, Fasteners and Cutting Fluids 
  A. Identify the most commonly used machine shop hand tools.  
  B. Explain how to use hand tools correctly and safe.  
  C. Identify several types of fasteners.  
  D. Select the proper fastening technique for a specific job.
  E. Explain why cutting fluids are necessary.  
  F. List how cutting fluids should be applied.  

V. Drilling Machines, Drill, Offhand Grinding and Sawing 
  A. Explain the parts of a twist drill.  
  B. Explain the safety rules that pertain to drilling operations.  
  C. List various drilling machine.  
  D. Have a basic understanding of the technique to sharpen a twist drill.  
  E. Dress and true a grinding wheel, on a pedestal grinder.  
  F. Prepare a pedestal grinder for safe operation.  
  G. Perform a grinding operation.  
  H. Explain the three tooth rule when selecting a saw blade.  
  I. Describe the proper used of a hacksaw.  
  J. Explain the advantages of vertical band saw.  
  K. List the proper blade for a given job. 
  L. Prepare a saw blade by cutting it to the right length, weld and mount it.  
  M. Prepare a band saw for operation.  
  N. Describe the broaching operation.  

VI. Lathe and Milling Machine Operations 
  A. Identify the various parts of a lathe.  
  B. Calculate cutting speeds and feeds for various size and type of materials.  
  C. Describe how a taper is turned on a lathe.  
  D. Calculate tailstock set over for turning a taper.  
  E. Demonstrate the ability to safely setup and operate a lathe for taper turning.  
  F. Describe the characteristics of an American Unified National thread and the used of acme threads.  
  G. Demonstrate the ability to safely setup the lathe for a thread cutting operation, using the correct thread formulas to determent the information needed to cut threads.  
  H. Perform drilling, boring and knurling operations on a lathe.  
  I. Demonstrate the ability to indicate in a square part, using a four jaws chuck, to within .002 of an inch Total Run Out, (TRO).  
  J. Identify the various parts of a mill  
  K. Tram in a milling vise and head for correct alignments.  
  L. Select the proper cutter for the job to be done.  
  M. Explain the various work-holding devices used on a milling machine.  
  N. Demonstrate the ability to set up and perform various cutting, drilling and boring operations on a milling machine.  

VII. Precision Grinding 
  A. Identify the various types of precision grinding machine.
  B. Explain the grinding wheel marking system.  
  C. List safety rules related to precision grinding.  
  D. Select, dress, and true grinding wheels.  
  E. Demonstrate the ability to safely set up and operate a surface grinder.  

VIII. Metal Characteristics 
  A. Explain how metals are classified.  
  B. Describe the characteristics of metals.  
  C. Recognize the hazards that are posed when certain metals are machine.  
  D. List the codes system use to identify steel.  

IX. Heat Treatment of Metals and Metal Finishing 
  A. Explain why some steels are heat-treatable and others are not.  
  B. Explain the difference types of heat treatment processes and how they are performed.  
  C. Describe case hardening of low carbon steels.  
  D. List the difference hardness testing techniques and when they are used.  
  E. Describe how the quality of a machined surface is determined.  
  F. Describe some metal finishing techniques. 

X. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) and Electro machining Processes 
  A. Describe the difference between the incremental and absolute positioning methods.  
  B. Explain how manual and computer-aided programming is done.  
  C. Write a basic manual CNC program.  
  D. Describe electro machining discharge machining (EDM), its advantages and disadvantages.  
  E. Explain electrical discharge wire cutting.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance & Punctuality   5% - 15% 
Midterm Performance Test   5% - 15% 
Lab Safety & Work Habits   20%- 40% 
Projects  20%- 40% 
Other Project(so) may be assigned for  10%- 20%
extra credit 
Final Exam   15%-25% 


Criteria for letter grade 
A = 92-100%  
B = 82 – 91%  
C = 72 – 81%  
D = 62 – 71%  
F = under 62%  


Shop projects are required with a completed inspection sheets. 


NOTE: Drawings will be furnished by the instructor and machining sequence plan will be develop by the student. 

Project grades will be determined as follows: 
  1. Meeting Print requirements, i.e. Dimensions tolerances, machine finish, notes, and general workmanship 100%.
  2. Class work and lab competencies include some subjective evaluations on the part of the instructor and include such items as attendance, punctuality, class participation, and work habits.
  3. Lab competencies will be assigned a level of competency of 0-5, 5 being highest.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z87.1 specifications.Note: Most prescription eye-wear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eye-wear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles, or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eye-wear.
  2. Face Shield: Face Shield is required to be worn over the student Safety glasses when operating wire brush wheel on any grinder. This requirement also apply when using Heat-Treat equipment, and quenching media to include leather apron.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 131

  • Title: Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) I*
  • Number: MFAB 131
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Description:

Through classroom and/or lab/shop learning and assessment activities, students in this course will describe the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process (SMAW); demonstrate the safe and correct setup of the SMAW workstation; associate SMAW electrode classifications with base metals and joint criteria; demonstrate proper electrode selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the horizontal position; perform basic SMAW welds on selected weld joints; and perform visual inspection of welds. 1hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify basic safety rules.
  2. Explain the oxy-fuel cutting and welding systems.
  3. Describe selected types of power cutting equipment, and metal fabrication hand tools.
  4. List welding processes associated with different metals.
  5. Explain the American Welding Society (AWS) electrode identification system.
  6. Explain the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process.
  7. Demonstrate the plasma arc cutting (PAC) processes.
  8. Demonstrate selected oxy-fuel welds and cuts.
  9. Demonstrate shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) techniques.
  10. Demonstrate gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety  
  A. Identify Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).  
  B. List several JCCC/MFAB safety rules.  
  C. Identify several hazards associated with welding.  
  D. List compressed gasses used in industry.  
  E. Identify the parts of a fire triangle. 
  F. Demonstrate the assembly of oxy-fuel equipment.  

II. Oxy-Fuel Welding and Cutting Apparatus  
  A. Identify the five types of joints.  
  B. Identify safety devices on oxygen and acetylene cylinders.  
  C. Describe how acetylene gas is made and stored.  
  D. Describe the fundamentals of combustion.  
  E. Demonstrate safe handling of gas cylinders.  
  F. Explain why high-pressure cylinders utilize double seating valves.  
  G. Identify safe and proper procedure to set up and shut down an oxy-fuel cutting torch.  
  H. Demonstrate lighting and adjusting for three types of flame.  
  I. Demonstrate proper handling and manipulation of an oxy-fuel cutting torch.  

III. Powered Cutting and Hand Tools Equipment 
  A. Select the proper power equipment for the operation being performed. 
  B. Select the proper hand tool for the operation being performed. 
  C. Select proper grinding wheel for the operation being performed. 

IV. Welding Processes 
  A. Identify welding processes used for mild steel.  
  B. Identify welding processes used for stainless steel. 
  C. Identify welding processes used for aluminum.  
  D. Identify welding processes used for specialized applications.  
 
V. AWS Electrode Identification  
  A. Select the amperage control for the electrode size, type, and position being used.  
  B. Describe factors that change current values for electrodes.  
  C. Identify the AWS number system for mild steel and stainless steel electrodes.  
  D. List the four classification groups of the AWS mild steel electrodes.  
  E. Explain the functions of the electrode's flux coating.  

VI. GTAW Techniques 
  A. List the advantages of GTAW.  
  B. List the disadvantages of GTAW. 
  C. Describe the set-up and shut down of GTAW equipment. 
  D. Describe different type of tungsten used with GTAW. 
  E. Describe the different types of gases used with GTAW. 

VII. SMAW Techniques  
  A. List the advantages of SMAW.  
  B. List the disadvantages of SMAW. 
  C. Explain the forehand welding technique.  
  D. Explain the backhand welding technique.  
  E. Describe the four main welding positions.  
  F. Explain the importance of travel angles and travel speed. 
  G. Demonstrate SMAW welds. 

VIII. PAC Techniques 
  A. List the advantages of PAC.  
  B. List the disadvantages of PAC. 
  C. List the best position to use when plasma arc cutting. 
  C. Describe the importance of travel angles and speed when using the PAC. 
  D. Explain the term kerf. 
  E. Demonstrate PAC. 

IX. Oxy-Fuel Welds and Cuts  
  A. List the advantages of oxy-fuel welding and cutting.  
  B. List the disadvantages of oxy-fuel welding and cutting.  
  C. List several welding positions.  
  D. Describe the importance of travel angles and speed.  
  E. Explain why welding tip selection and metal thicknesses matters when welding. 
  F. Demonstrate oxy-fuel welds.  
  G. Demonstrate oxy-fuel cuts.  
  H. Demonstrate oxy-fuel braze welds.  

X. GMAW Techniques  
  A. List the advantages of GMAW.   
  B. List the disadvantages of GMAW.
  C. Explain the forehand welding technique.  
  D. Explain the backhand welding technique. 
  E. Describe the four main welding positions.  
  F. Explain the importance of travel angles and travel speed. 
  G. Demonstrate GMAW welds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade 
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade 
Participation 10% - 20% of grade  
TOTAL 100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100%  
B = 80 - 89%  
C = 70 - 79%  
D = 60 - 69%  
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting. 
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 133

  • Title: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) I*
  • Number: MFAB 133
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Description:

Through classroom and/or shop/lab learning and assessment activities, students in this course will: explain gas metal arc welding process (GMAW); demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GMAW workstation; correlate GMAW electrode classifications with base metals and joint criteria; demonstrate proper electrode selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the horizontal position; produce basic GMAW welds on selected weld joints; and conduct visual inspection of GMAW welds. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain gas metal arc welding process (GMAW).
  2. Demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GMAW workstation.
  3. Correlate GMAW electrode classifications with base metals and joint criteria.
  4. Demonstrate proper electrode selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses.
  5. Build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the flat position.
  6. Build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in the horizontal position.
  7. Produce basic GMAW welds on selected weld joints.
  8. Conduct visual inspection of GMAW welds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. GMAW Process  
  A. Describe different modes of transfer used during he operation of the GMAW process.  
  B. Differentiate between types and uses of current used when operating the GMAW process.  
  C. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of the GMAW process. 
  D. Identify types of welding power sources.  
  E. Identify several different components of the GMAW station. 
  F. Describe basic electrical safety.  

II. GMAW Workstation Set-up and Safety  
  A. Demonstrate the proper inspection of GMAW equipment.  
  B. Demonstrate proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  
  C. Demonstrate proper placement of workpiece connection.  
  D. Check the GMAW equipment for proper setup. 
  E. Inspect the physical welding area for potential hazards and/or safety issues before welding. 
  F. Troubleshoot the GMAW equipment and perform minor maintenance. 

III. GMAW Electrode Classification and Base Metal Joint Criteria  
  A. Identify SMAW electrode classification. 
  B. Explain the American Welding Society (AWS) electrode nomenclature.  
  C. Determine the proper elctrode for given joint based on material and position of weld.  
  D. Determine proper type of electrodes to be used in a variety of industry applications. 
  E. Identify proper electrode storage and handling. 
  F. Identify consumables used during the GMAW process.  

IV. Electrode Selection and Use Based on Metal Types and Thickness  
  A. Identify consumables used during the GMAW process for various electrode sizes.  
  B. Select the proper GMAW electrode type and electrode size relative to the base metal size, type and thickness. 
  C. Select the proper GMAW electrode type and size based on material specifications.  

V. Flat Position Surfacing Pads 
  A. Use the proper safety procedures and PPE. 
  B. Use the proper setup procedures. 
  C. Use the proper metal transfer. 
  D. Create a pad of beads using GMAW. 
  E. Weld exhibits proper uniformity and profile. 

VI. Horizontal Position Surfacing Pads 
  A. Use the proper safety procedures and PPE. 
  B. Use the proper setup procedures. 
  C. Use the proper metal transfer. 
  D. Create a pad of beads using GMAW. 
  E. Weld exhibits proper uniformity and profile. 

VII. GMAW on Selected Weld Joints  
  A. Use the proper safety procedures and PPE. 
  B. Use the proper setup procedures. 
  C. Perform a fillet weld in horizontal position (2F). 
  D. Perform a fillet weld in flat position (1F). 
  E. Perform a groove weld in a flat position (1G). 
  F. Perform a groove weld in a horizontal position (2G). 
  G. Use tools appropriate for the task. 

VIII. Visual Inspection of Welds 
  A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds. 
  B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds.
  C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards. 
  D. Use appropriate inspection tools.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade 
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade 
Participation 10% - 20% of grade  
TOTAL 100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100%  
B = 80 - 89%  
C = 70 - 79%  
D = 60 - 69%  
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting. 
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 136

  • Title: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) I*
  • Number: MFAB 136
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 120 or MFAB 124 or MFAB 127

Description:

Through classroom and/or lab/shop learning and assessment activities, students in this course will: explain the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW); demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GTAW workstation; relate GTAW electrode and filler metal classifications with base metals and joint criteria; build proper electrode and filler metal selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the flat position; build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the horizontal position; perform basic GTAW welds on selected weld joints; and perform visual inspection of GTAW welds. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW).
  2. Demonstrate the safe and correct set up of the GTAW workstation.
  3. Relate GTAW electrode and filler metal classifications with base metals and joint criteria.
  4. Build proper electrode and filler metal selection and use based on metal types and thicknesses.
  5. Build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the flat position.
  6. Build pads of weld beads with selected electrodes and filler material in the horizontal position.
  7. Perform basic GTAW welds on selected weld joints.
  8. Perform visual inspection of GTAW welds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. GTAW Process 
  A. Differentiate between types and uses of current.  
  B. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of GTAW.  
  C. Identifies types of welding power sources.  
  D. Identify different components of a GTAW workstation.  
  E. Describe basic electrical safety.  

II. GTAW Workstation Set-Up and Safety 
  A. Demonstrate the proper inspection of GTAW equipment.  
  B. Demonstrate proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  
  C. Demonstrate proper placement of work piece connection.  
  D. Check the GTAW equipment for proper setup. 
  E. Inspect the physical welding area for potential hazards and/or safety issues before welding.
  F. Troubleshoot the GTAW equipment and perform minor maintenance. 

III. GTAW Electrode and Filler Metal Classification and Base Metal Joint Criteria 
  A. Identify GTAW electrode classification. 
  B. Explain the American Welding Society (AWS) electrode and filler metal nomenclature.  
  C. Determine the proper electrode and filler metal for given joint based on material and position of weld.  
  D. Determine the proper type of electrodes to be used in a variety of industry applications.

IV. Electrode and Filler Metal Selection and Use Based on Metal Types and Thickness  
  A. Use safety hazard precautions and PPE. 
  B. Prepare the tungsten electrode profile relative to base material.  
  C. Demonstrate weld performance by using the GTAW process appropriate to electrode size and filler metal size.  
  D. Select the proper electrode and filler metal type and size relative to metal size, type and thickness.  
  E. Select the proper electrode and filler metal type and size based on material specification. 
  F. Use the appropriate tools for the GTAW task.  

V. Flat Position Surfacing Pads  
  A. Use the proper safety procedures and PPE. 
  B. Use the proper setup procedures. 
  C. Create a pad of beads using GTAW. 
  D. Exhibit proper uniformity and profile on welds. 

VI. Horizontal Position Surfacing Pads  
  A. Use the proper safety procedures and PPE. 
  B. Use the proper setup procedures. 
  C. Create a pad of beads using GTAW. 
  D. Weld exhibits proper uniformity and profile.

VII. GTAW on Selected Weld Joints 
  A. Conduct proper base metal preparation.  
  B. Use safety hazard precautions and PPE. 
  C. Demonstrate proper GTAW equipment setup and troubleshooting.  
  D. Perform a fillet weld in horizontal position (2F).  
  E. Perform a fillet weld in flat position (1F). 
  F. Perform a groove weld in a flat position (1G). 
  G. Perform a groove weld in a horizontal position (2G). 
  H. Use tools appropriate for the task. 

VIII. Visual Inspection of Welds  
  A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds. 
  B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds. 
  C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards. 
  D. Use appropriate inspection tools.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade 
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade 
Participation 10% - 20% of grade  
TOTAL 100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100%  
B = 80 - 89%  
C = 70 - 79%  
D = 60 - 69%  
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting. 
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 140

  • Title: Maintenance Repair Welding*
  • Number: MFAB 140
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to perform oxyfuel cutting (OFC), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and plasma arc cutting (PAC). Basic blueprint and standard AWS welding symbols will be introduced. Selected welds and assignments will be tested according to industry and AWS standards. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z-87.1 approved safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment as required by employers. This course is designed for individuals who have welding experience or who are employed by a company that requires welding skills. This course can be customized for advanced training. 1 hr. lecture, 4 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and practice appropriate safety rules.
  2. Demonstrate safety when setting up and shutting down welding related equipment.
  3. Identify basic welding joints, welding positions, basic weld symbols and materials used when maintenance repair welding.
  4. Identify basic welding blueprint information and welding symbols including sketches and freehand drawings.
  5. Explain the basic theory of the SMAW, GMAW, PAC, OFC processes.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to read and use a tape measure and perform minor maintenance, adjustments and/or repairs to welding related equipment.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of SMAW, GMAW electrodes and the AWS electrode identification system.
  8. Successfully produce a variety of welds using the SMAW/GMAW processes with selected electrodes.
  9. Display the ability to make a variety of OFC and PAC cuts.
  10. Define and recognize basic metallurgy terminology used when welding ferrous metals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety
   A. Identify safety rules. 
   B. Answer questions about common safety rules used in the welding repair industry. 
   C. Identify, select and use proper personal protective clothing and equipment for the OFC, PAC, SMAW, GMAW, grinding and sawing processes. 
   D. List the components of the fire triangle. 
   E. Complete statements concerning basic rules for the use and care of fuel gas and shielding gas cylinders. 
   F. Complete statements concerning eye protection. 
   G. List hazards concerning electrical safety for arc welding and plasma arc cutting. 
   H. Select correct shade filter lens for the OFC, PAC, SMAW and GMAW processes. 
   I. List statements that are true concerning environmental safety. 

II. Demonstrate Steps to Safely and Correctly Set Up and Shut Down the Following Equipment and Processes
   A. Oxy-acetylene equipment for cutting (OFC).  
   B. Plasma arc cutting power sources (PAC). 
   C. SMAW power source. 
   D. GMAW power source. 

III. Welding Joints, Symbols and Positions 
   A. List the five basic weld joints. 
   B. Identify selected basic weld symbols. 
   C. Compare and contrast 1G, 2G, 3G, 4G groove weld positions with the 1F, 2F, 3F, 4F fillet weld positions. 

IV. Blueprints, Sketches, Shop Drawings
   A. Identify basic lines used when reading blueprints, sketches and shop 
drawings. 
   B. Select correct weld symbols for weld joint configuration. 
   C. Interpret selected blueprints, sketches and freehand shop drawings. 
   D. Identify arrow side and other side in reference to weld symbols. 
   E. List and identify several essential lines used when interpreting blueprints. 

V. Basic Theory of Welding and Cutting Processes 
   A. Explain the basic theory of the SMAW process. 
   B. Explain the basic theory of the GMAW process. 
   C. Explain the basic theory of the OFC cutting process. 
   D. Explain the basic theory of the PAC cutting process. 
   E. List factors to consider when setting up a welding or cutting process. 

VI. Measurement, Measuring Tools and Minor Equipment Repair 
   A. Complete statements concerning the use of a tape measure. 
   B. Demonstrate the ability to correctly identify increments found on a tape measure. 
   C. Use a tape measure to accurately lay out dimensions for cutting and welding activities. 
   D. Demonstrate the ability to use a combination square. 
   E. Demonstrate the ability to use a framing square. 
   F. Demonstrate the ability to use an adjustable square. 
   G. Demonstrate the ability to use a 24-inch level. 
   H. Demonstrate the ability to use a straight edge. 
   I. Demonstrate the ability to use a protractor by identifying selected angles.
   J. Demonstrate the ability to change out a GMAW gun liner. 
   K. Demonstrate the ability to remove and replace a SMAW electrode holder. 
   L. Demonstrate the ability to remove and replace a work piece connection. 
   M. Demonstrate the ability to remove and replace the components of a GMAW gun. 
   N. Demonstrate the ability to adjust a GMAW/SMAW power supply to a predetermined voltage or amperage. 
   O. Demonstrate the ability to adjust the GMAW wire feed speed. 
   P. Identify, select and/or list common hand and power tools. 
   Q. List components of the SMAW, OFC, GMAW and PAC equipment. 
   R. List safe operating rules for the use and care of hand and power tools. 
   S. List safe operating rules for SMAW, OFC, GMAW and PAC equipment. 

VII. Electrode Selection and Identification 
   A. Demonstrate the ability to use the AWS numbering system to identify a selected electrode's characteristics when using the SMAW process. 
   B. Demonstrate the ability to use the AWS numbering system to identify a selected electrode's characteristics when using the GMAW process. 
   C. Compare and contrast SMAW electrodes to GMAW electrodes. 
   D. Identify several methods to identify electrodes. 
   E. List several common AWS electrode classifications a maintenance welder must know. 

VIII. SMAW and GMAW 
   A. Use proper safety techniques while performing SMAW and GMAW. 
   B. Demonstrate the ability to successfully perform selected welds using E-6010-1/8 electrodes. 
   C. Demonstrate the ability to successfully perform selected welds using E-7024-1/8 electrodes. 
   D. Demonstrate the ability to successfully perform selected welds using E-7018-1/8  and 3/32 electrodes. 
   E. Demonstrate the ability to successfully perform selected welds using S-70-X .035 electrodes. 
   F. List electrode selection considerations. 

IX. Oxy-fuel and Plasma Arc Cutting Processes 
   A. Use proper safety techniques while performing OFC. 
   B. Successfully produce selected cutting assignments using the OFC process. 
   C. Use proper safety techniques while performing PAC. 
   D. Successfully produce selected cutting assignments using the PAC process. 

X. Metallurgy 
   A. Match terms related to ferrous metal. 
   B. Identify alloy characteristics used to enhance metal. 
   C. Identify reasons for proper metal identification. 
   D. Conduct spark tests to identify common metals. 
   E. List ways a maintenance welder may use to determine a type of metal.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Note:
1. Lab competencies will be assigned a level of competency of 0-10, 10
being high.
2. Demonstrate by achieving 100% on a safety test.
3. Demonstrate by achieving a minimum of 90% each on two quizzes.

Lab Competencies   50%
Participation      10%
Classroom/Quizzes   5%
Mid-Term Exam      10%
Written Final Exam 15%
Final Weld Test    10%
Total             100%

Tests                          20-40% of grade
Labratory                    20-40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports    10-20% of grade
Participation                10-20% of grade  
TOTAL                   100%
Grade Criteria: A = 90 - 100% B = 80 - 89% C = 70 - 79% D = 60 - 69% F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities and tours associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear
  2. Face Shields: When grinding is being performed, full face safety shields must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 152

  • Title: Manufacturing Materials and Processes
  • Number: MFAB 152
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in metal fabrication technology that is appropriate for the metal fabrication major and other interested students. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify various manufacturing materials and processes currently used in industry. The capabilities and applications of machine tool, general fabrication, welding processes, robotics, cut-off equipment and other manufacturing processes and equipment will be studied. Lectures will be supplemented by class tours and demonstrations of various processes and equipment. Students are required to wear safety glasses during demonstrations. 3 hrs. lecture-demonstrations/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate safety at all times to include: follow all safety rules and procedures when using hand held tools, power tools, cut off equipment and other manufacturing processes.
  2. Identify and use personal protective equipment (PPE) when using equipment related to manufacturing materials and processes.
  3. Locate and identify controls, switches, dials, levers, buttons, guards and operating devices, gauges, rules, calipers and micrometers related to equipment used in the manufacturing and materials process.
  4. Identify and explain related materials, consumables and equipment to include: abrasives, abrasive cut off machines, shearing, sawing, threaded fasteners, fastening systems, punches, hydraulic presses, drill presses, adhesives, bonding of adhesives, processes associated with types and methods of applying adhesives.
  5. Identify selected manufacturing materials, processes and technical terms.
  6. Explain thermoplastics and thermo sets.
  7. Identify woods and wood processing methods.
  8. Identify and explain special machining methods to include: electrical discharge machining, chemical machining, water jet cutting, laser systems, process machines such as bending, roll forming, drawing, spinning, pressing equipment, feeds and speeds, tools, robotic systems, sequencing operations, cutting processes and quality planning. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety
   A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times according to the
JCCC safety sheet.
   B. Explain the safe and correct use of selected hand tools and power
tools.
   C. Explain the safe and correct use of cut off equipment and other
manufacturing processes.
   D. List general shop safety rules for use and care of hand and power
tools.
   E. Explain the evolution of safety standards of the manufacturing
industry.
   F. List specific safety rules for selected manufacturing processes.

II. Identify and Use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
   A. Select correct PPE for specific manufacturing processes.
   B. Use PPE for specific manufacturing processes.
   C. Describe how to achieve accurate cuts using cut off equipment.
   D. Perform assigned tasks using hand and power tools in a safe and
correct manner.
   E. List specific rules for selecting the correct PPE for a designated
task.

III. Locate and Identify Various Controls and Related Tools and Equipment
Used in Manufacturing and Materials Processes
   A. Identify correct controls for equipment used in the manufacturing
and materials process.
   B. Demonstrate the correct and safe method when using equipment related
to the manufacturing and materials process.
   C. Describe the use of measuring devices related to manufacturing and
materials processes.
   D. List precautions and safety practices for the safe operation of
equipment.
   E. List gauging and measuring devices used with manufacturing and
material processing for dimensioning, measurement and quality control.

IV. Identify and Explain Materials and Consumables Related to the
Manufacturing and Material Processes
   A. Explain properties of materials.
   B. List physical, chemical and mechanical properties of selected
materials.
   C. Explain how thermoplastics and wood structure and properties fit
into the manufacturing and materials process.
   D. List related equipment.

V. Identify Technical Terms Used for Material Processes
   A. Explain the nature of manufacturing.
   B. Define terms used for casting and molding.
   C. Define metallurgical forming terms.
   D. Explain the term “separating.”
   E. List three major types of conditioning processes.

VI. Identify Thermoplastics as Related to Manufacturing and Materials
Processes
   A. Define thermoplastics.
   B. Explain the application of plastics in the manufacturing and
materials process.
   C. List plastic processing techniques.
   D. Explain structural and non-structural adhesives.
   E. List seven types of clamping methods used for assembly with
adhesives.
   F. Explain methods of applying adhesives.
   G. List types of adhesives.

VII. Identify Woods as Related to Manufacturing and Material Processes
   A. Define properties of wood structure.
   B. Explain the processing methods of wood materials.
   C. List several types of wood working joints suited for the
manufacturing and materials process.

VIII. Identify and Explain Special Machine Methods Used in Manufacturing
and Material Processes
   A. Explain automated manufacturing processes.
   B. Explain the operation of turning and milling materials and CNC
machines.
   C. List several operations/applications that can be performed on a
milling machine.
   D. Explain other methods of machining to include water jet cutting and
laser cutting, robotic systems, sequencing and quality planning.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Participation       5%
Class Discussion    5%
Assignments/Essays 25%
Tests/Quizzes      20%
Mid-Term           20%
Final Exam         25%
Total             100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities and tours associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 180

  • Title: Blueprint and Symbols Reading for Welders
  • Number: MFAB 180
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify basic welding positions and explain, list, sketch, draw, use or describe current American Welding Society (AWS) welding symbols and weld joint configurations. The student will be introduced to several methods of producing welding blueprints, object representatives, and specific meanings of selected lines, surface features, sectional views and basic math formulas used in the welding industry. The student will be able to identify the symbols used for fillet welds and groove welds made with and without backing. Topics such as pipe welding representations, pipe welding connections, pipe welding classifications, welder certification, metallurgical effects of heat on metals and the importance of weld quality and welding safety will be studied. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe several ways a draftsperson can relate information to welders.
  2. Identify line representation and sectional views.
  3. Describe mechanical, physical, and chemical properties and their relationship to weld joint design.
  4. Identify fillet and groove welds, weld bead contours, and weld bead finishes.
  5. Describe weld bead backing, backing spacers and consumable inserts.
  6. List specific contour finishes and applications of plug and slot welds.
  7. Explain specifications and applications of surfacing welds.
  8. Explain spot welding, seam welding, and stud welding.
  9. Explain terms used when pipe welding and pipe fitting.
  10. Identify metallurgical terms used by welders and draftspersons and their relationship to fabrication of objects found on a print. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Related blue print and welding symbol information for welders.
   A. Explain the history of prints.
   B. List several names used to identify prints from the past to the
present.
   C. List several tools a draft person must use to make a print.
   D. Identify several types of media that prints are developed on.
   E. Match and /or complete statements to include:
      1. Paper
      2. Line description
      3. Angles
      4. Title blocks
      5. Drawing tools

II. Representation of objects, lines and views.
   A. Identify line representations views of weld joints.
   B. Explain groove welds and fillet welds.
   C. Define the terms, weld symbol, sketch, axonometric drawing,
isometric drawing, and oblique drawing.
   D. List several types of weld examination methods and their letter
designation.
   E. List several types of lines and views found on sketches and prints.
   F. Sketch, match and/or complete statements specific to weld symbols,
lines, and views found on sketches or prints.

III. Weld joint design and properties.
   A. Identify several mechanical properties of selected types of metals
and their behavior under applied loads.
   B. Define physical properties, and chemical properties as related to
weld joint design.
   C. List weld joint selections to include:
      1. Joint types
      2. Joint weld positions
      3. Weld joint access
      4. Weld joint locations
   D. Match and/or complete statements specific to weld joint design and
properties of metals.

IV. Types of weld processes, contours and finishes, fasteners and
structural shapes.
   A. Define the terms Fasteners, Structural shapes, and Weld Processes
used in the metal working trade to include:
      1. Oxy-Fuel Cutting (OFC)
      2. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
      3. Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
      4. Flux-Core Arc Welding (FCAW)
      5. Resistance Welding (RW)
      6. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
   B. Identify and discuss several fasteners used in the welding trade. 
   C. Identify and discuss several structural steel shapes used in the
welding trade.
   D. List types and finish requirements that may be found on a print. 
   E. Explain a concave symbol and, convex symbol, and combined weld
symbols as they relate to weld completions.
   F. Match and/or complete statements specific to fasteners, structural
shapes, weld symbols, and welding processes.

V. Weld bead backing, spacers, inserts consumable, and melt through
welds.
   A. Define the terms back weld, backing weld, inserts, spacers, and melt
through welds.
   B. Identify and discuss symbols used to identify back or backing
welds.
   C. Identify and discuss symbols used to describe a melt through weld.
   D. Identify and discuss symbols used to describe a consumable insert.
   E. Match and/or complete statements specific to bead backing, spacers,
inserts consumable, and melt through welds.

VI. Applications of plug and slot welding.
   A. Define the terms plug weld and Slot weld.
   B. Identify and discuss symbols used to identify plug welding and slot
welding.
   C. Match and/or complete statements specific to plug and slot welding.

VII. Applications of surfacing welds.
   A. Define the term surfacing welds.
   B. Identify and discuss symbols used to identify surfacing welding.
   C. Match and/or complete statements specific to surfacing welds.

VIII. Applications of spot, seam, and stud welds.
   A. Define the terms spot, seam, and stud welds
   B. Identify and discuss symbols used to identify spot, seam, and stud
welding.
   C. Match and/or complete statements specific to spot, seam, and stud
welding.

IX. Pipe welding and pipe fitting terms.
   A. Define the terms fitting, single line drawing, double line drawing,
and pipe connections.
   B. List types of weld joints found when pipe welding to include:
      1. Flange joints
      2. Screwed joints
   C. Describe pipe edge preparation, weld fit up, root pass, hot pass,
filler pass, cover pass.
   D. Identify AWS pipe welding positions
   E. List organizations that set pipe welding standards.
   F. Match and/or complete statements specific to pipe welding.

X. Metallurgical terms used by welders and draftspersons.
   A. Define the terms metal, pure metal, alloy.
   B. List types of metal lattices.
   C. Identify several types of metals welders use in the welding trade.
   D. Describe the effects of heat on welded structures.
   E. Define the “heat -affected zone”.
   F. Explain the terms pre-heat, and post-heat.
   G. Define weld quality, weld defects, weld testing, and welder
certification.
   H. Match and/or complete statements specific to welding
metallurgy.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Semester grades will be determined as follows:

Chapter tests        40%
Quizzes/Homework     30%
Class participation  10%
Final Written Exam   20%
TOTAL               100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. AWS Entry Level Welder Certification. Johnson County Community College has agreed to act as an American Welding Society Participating Organization in the Training and Testing of Entry Level Welders and abides by the requirements of AWS QC10, Specification for Qualification and Certification of Entry Level Welders and AWS EG2.0, Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel - Entry Level Welder. Students successfully completing all of the courses in the JCCC Metal Fabrication Vocational Certificate (including the required AWS workmanship tests) are eligible to apply for certification which requires a practical knowledge written test and limited thickness SMAW performance tests. Students meeting these requirements will be listed on the AWS National Registry of Entry Level Welders. To apply, simply contact your instructor or the JCCC Academic Director of Industrial Technology Programs (ATB 123). 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 203

  • Title: Introduction to Ornamental Iron*
  • Number: MFAB 203
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Description:

Several years ago one of our JCCC partners Mr. Robert Foust Owner of, "Bobs Ornamental Iron Studios" asked if we train our MFAB students in the ornamental iron trade. He stated that welders are easy to find, good welders are hard to find, but good welders with that special eye for art, and especially welders that like to do railings, stairways, black smithing, and artistic sculptures that are one of a kind. welders that demand quality welds and excellent workmanship are very hard to find. With metal making a come back in the building trades JCCC would be the only school in the area that would be offering this skill. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate appropriate shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Discuss welding processes associated with ornamental iron fabrication.
  3. Design ornamental iron products.
  4. Discuss the importance of quality of work and material selection.
  5. Discuss ornamental iron layout techniques.
  6. Demonstrate correct welding techniques with selected processes.
  7. Discuss how to repair older style ornamental iron and make matching designs. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules and Procedures 
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times.  
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with ornamental iron work.  

II. Welding Processes  
  A. Identify shielding gas types.  
  B. List several mixed gas selections.  
  C. List several types of gas regulation devices.  
  D. Demonstrate correct cylinder selection, safe handling, and storage of cylinders. 

III. Ornamental Iron Design 
  A. Demonstrate base metal selection  
  B. Demonstrate base metal preparation  
  C. Demonstrate filler metal selection  
  D. Demonstrate SMAW and GMAW bead profiles in selected positions.  

IV. Material Selection  
  A. Define welding procedures for low carbon steel alloys  
  B. Demonstrate selected assignments.  

V. Ornamental Iron Layout Techniques 
  A. Describe electrode intended uses.  
  B. Define welding procedures for material thicknesses selected. 
  C. Demonstrate selected assignments.  

VI. Ornamental Iron Welding Techniques 
  A. Define Ornamental terms.  
  B. List several preventive actions that can be taken to prevent, discontinuities and weld defects.  
  C. List several corrective actions that can be taken to prevent, discontinuities and weld defects. 

VII. Ornamental Iron Repair 
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE  
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation  
  C. Demonstrate proper welding process and electrode selection 
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques 
  E. Successfully complete selected quality fillet welds

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade
Participation 10% - 20% of grade 
TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 205

  • Title: Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) II*
  • Number: MFAB 205
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to weld fillet welds in the vertical-up (3F), and overhead (4F) weld positions, and groove joints in the vertical up, (3G) and overhead position (4G) weld positions with and/or without backing to industry standards. Students will be required to prepare materials using oxy-fuel cutting techniques. Students will perform a welding proficiency test equal to or exceeding the American Welding society (AWS) standard D1.1. Structural welding code. Students will be expected to provide basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Student PPE and tools estimated $50 - $150

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate appropriate shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Demonstrate SMAW on selected joint configuration.
  3. Prepare mild steel test coupons using the oxy-fuel cutting torch.
  4. Demonstrate SMAW fillet welds in selected weld positions.
  5. Demonstrate SMAW groove welds in selected weld positions.
  6. Conduct visual inspection of SMAW welds.
  7. Conduct destructive testing of SMAW welds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules and Procedures 
   A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times. 
   B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE). 
   C. Describe safety hazards associated with SMAW.

II. SMAW on Selected Joint Configuration 
   A. Identify base materials. 
   B. Perform material and joint preparation 
   C. Define welding procedures for low carbon steel alloys 
   D. Demonstrate SMAW on selected joint configuration.

III. Test Coupon Preparation
   A. Prepare mild steel for welding and testing. 
   B. Use the oxy-fuel cutting torch to prepare test coupons.
   C. Demonstrate accuracy when setting up fillet and groove weld test specimens in the F3 and F4 positions for welding. 
   D. Prepare weld test coupons.

IV. SMAW Fillet Welds in Selected Positions 
   A. Demonstrate proper PPE. 
   B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation. 
   C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection. 
   D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques. 
   E. Successfully complete selected quality fillet welds.

V. SMAW Groove Welds in Selected Positions 
   A. Demonstrate proper PPE. 
   B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation. 
   C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection. 
   D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques. 
   E. Successfully complete selected quality groove welds.

VI. Visual Inspection of Welds 
   A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds.
   B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds.
   C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards.
   D. Use appropriate inspection tools.

VII. Destructive Inspection of Welds
   A. Describe tensile test techniques. 
   B. Describe fillet weld break test. 
   C. Perform bend test.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade
Participation 10% - 20% of grade 
TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 210

  • Title: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) II*
  • Number: MFAB 210
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 130 or MFAB 133

Description:

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to perform more advanced welds in selected positions on a variety of metal thicknesses. Mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum metals will be utilized. Emphasis will be on short circuit, spray arc and pulse arc modes of metal transfer using larger diameter wire electrode. Industry standard testing techniques will be used. 1 hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate appropriate shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Identify shielding gas and regulation of the GMAW process.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to select different types of electrodes for base metal match.
  4. Demonstrate GMAW with low carbon alloy steel on selected joint configuration.
  5. Demonstrate GMAW with stainless steel and aluminum on selected joint configuration.
  6. Demonstrate GMAW fillet welds in selected weld positions.
  7. Demonstrate GMAW groove welds in selected weld positions.
  8. Conduct visual inspection of GMAW welds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules and Procedures  
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times.  
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with GMAW.  

II. Shielding Gases and Regulation Equipment  
  A. Identify shielding gas types.  
  B. List several mixed gas selections.  
  C. List several types of gas regulation devices.  
  D. Demonstrate correct cylinder selection, safe handling, and storage of cylinders.  

III. GMAW Electrode Size and Material 
  A. Demonstrate base metal selection.  
  B. Demonstrate base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate filler metal selection.  
  D. Perform pre-heating, inter-pass, and post heating as needed.  

IV. Low Carbon Alloys Welding with GMAW on Selected Joint Configuration 
  A. Identify base materials.  
  B. Explain the GMAW terms spray arc, and pulse arc.  
  C. Perform material and joint preparation  
  D. Define welding procedures for low carbon steel alloys  
  E. Demonstrate GMAW on selected joint configeration.  

V. Stainless Steel and Aluminum Welding with GMAW on Selected Joint Configuration 
  A. Identify base materials. 
  B. Perform material and joint preparation  
  C. Define welding procedures for material thicknesses selected.  
  D. Demonstrate GMAW on selected joint configeration. 
  E. Demonstrate using push-pull equipment. 
  F. Demonstrate using spool gun equipment. 

VI. GMAW Fillet Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE.  
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality fillet welds. 

VII. GMAW Groove Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE.  
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality groove welds. 

VIII. Visual Inspection of Welds  
  A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds. 
  B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds. 
  C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards. 
  D. Use appropriate inspection tools. 
  E. Perform dye-penetrant inspection of welds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade
Participation 10% - 20% of grade 
TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 215

  • Title: Fabrication Practices I*
  • Number: MFAB 215
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 121 or MFAB 131 and MFAB 130 or MFAB 133 and MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Description:

Upon completion of this class, the student should be able to work from discipline specific drawings to manufacture and assemble a mock building section. This class is a capstone course and is intended to serve all MFAB graduate students who have completed the fundamental skills coursework within the metal fabrication certificate or degree programs. The Fabrication Practices I class is part one of an advanced comprehensive class intended to put to practical use the skills obtained throughout the existing Metal Fabrication and Welding Technology Career program. This class will put emphasis on structural steel fabrication, erection, and assembly. The coursework will focus on modern welding fabrication techniques and practices used in the manufacturing and installation of structural steel, piping systems, and miscellaneous welded mechanical items. Students will work in teams of three or four persons. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the safe and appropriate use of fabrication equipment.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to use layout tools used in the structural steel and general fabrication trades.
  3. Use standard drawing conventions and concepts used for fabrication
  4. Identify standard components used in steel structures and inspection methods.
  5. Describe the methods used for the sizing and dimensioning of standard components used in structural steel fabrication.
  6. Perform quality shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux core arc welding (FCAW), and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes.
  7. Demonstrate steel assembly and erection skills. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Safety 
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times according to JCCC and industry guidelines. 
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when operating welding equipment, hand tools, and related shop equipment. 
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with heavy industrial construction and maintenance. 
  D. Describe inspection and testing methods used to ensure public safety with respect to steel structures, piping systems, storage tanks and vessels.

II. General Layout 
  A. Use applied mathematics. 
  B. Use the English system for linear measurement. 
  C. Demonstrate the ability to convert fractions to decimals and vice versa. 
  D. Demonstrate the ability to convert angular dimensions from degrees to in./ft. of pitch and visa verse. 
  E. Use Applied Geometry to perform common layout practices on steel by using layout tools. 

III. Structural Steel and General Fabrication
  A. Identify the use of standard drawings for the fabrication of structural steel and several miscellaneous welded construction items 
  B. Identify views on structural steel drawings 

IV. Structural Steel Components 
  A. Steel structures and fabrication materials. 
  B. Explain the American Welding Society (AWS) D1.1 Structural Steel Welding Code.  
  C. Identify general code requirements. 
  D. Identify testing and inspection methods. 
  E. Identify visual inspection methods. 
  F. Demonstrate the fabrication and welding of mock up structural components.  

V. Structural Steel Components Sizing and Dimensioning Methods 
  A. Develop a cut list. 
  B. Fabricating components by using- punches and drilling holes, coping, notching, shearing, and burning techniques. 
  C. Use fit up techniques. 

VI. Welding Processes 
  A. Fabricate an industry recognized standard mock up structure. 
  B. Use accepted inspection practices. 
  C. Use standard shop drawings. 
  D. Fit and weld the structure. 
  E. Perform quality welds by means of the SMAW, FCAW, and GMAW processes. 

VII. Assembly and Erection 
  A. Use standard drawings for assembly and erection. 
  B. Use hand tools and equipment common to the trade. 
  C. Use rigging and lifting equipment and techniques. 
  D. Perform, assembly and erection of an in-service mock up. 
  E. Use visual testing, hydro testing and inspecting methods.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade
Participation 10% - 20% of grade 
TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 220

  • Title: Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW)*
  • Number: MFAB 220
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 130 or MFAB 133

Description:

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to identify safety rules associated with the flux core arc welding (FCAW) process, identify FCAW equipment components, and perform welds in selected positions on a variety of metal thicknesses to industry standards. 1hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate appropriate shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Explain the FCAW process.
  3. Identify several FCAW wire electrodes by size and type.
  4. Identify shielding gas and regulation associated with the FCAW process.
  5. Demonstrate FCAW fillet welds in selected weld positions.
  6. Demonstrate FCAW groove welds in selected weld positions.
  7. Conduct visual inspection of FCAW welds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules and Procedures  
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times.  
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE).  
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with FCAW. 

II. FCAW Process 
  A. Define FCAW.  
  B. Describe the FCAW Process.  
  C. Identify modes of operation.  
  D. Explain the FCAW systems.  
  E. Explain several applications of the FCAW process.  

III. FCAW Electrodes  
  A. Identify manufacturing of FCAW filler materials.  
  B. Explain specification of filler material.  
  C. Explain identification labels of self shielding and dual shielding electrodes. 
  D. Describe electrode packaging. 
  D. Select correct FCAW electrode type and size.

IV. Shielding Gases and Regulation Equipment  
  A. Identify shielding gas types.  
  B. List several mixed gas selections.  
  C. List several types of gas regulation devices.  
  D. Demonstrate correct cylinder selection, handling, and storage.  

V. FCAW Fillet Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE.  
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality fillet welds. 

VI. FCAW Groove Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE. 
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality groove welds. 

VII. Visual Inspection of Welds  
  A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds. 
  B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds. 
  C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards.
  D. Use appropriate inspection tools.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Labratory 20% - 40% of grade
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade
Participation 10% - 20% of grade 
TOTAL 100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 240

  • Title: Metallurgy
  • Number: MFAB 240
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Metallurgy is the study of the science and technology of metals. This course covers the extractive, mechanical and physical phases of metallurgy. Topics include the identification of metals, types and classification of metals, heat treatment procedures and common steel manufacturing processes. AWS terms and definitions will be emphasized throughout the course. 2 hrs. lecture-demonstration/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate safety at all times to include: follow all safety rules and procedures during demonstrations and by using the correct and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
  2. Locate, identify and select controls, switches, dials, levers, buttons, guards, test equipment and operating devices related to tasks or laboratory experiments being performed or demonstrated.
  3. Identify, define and interpret definitions, terms, methods and characteristics associated with the science of metallurgy.
  4. Select a variety of testing, analyzing, examinations, charts, tables and processes used to identify properties/abilities of metallurgical classifications.
  5. Discuss how various metals using laboratory and field identification procedures.
  6. Explain and/or describe metal working processes to include: casting, forming, welding, hard facing and effects of heat on metals.
  7. Perform dye penetrant, magnetic particle and spark testing on ferrous and nonferrous materials.
  8. List the characteristics of various heat treatment processes to include: tempering, annealing, case hardening, treatments and quenching. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety
   A List recommended safety precautions when performing laboratory
experiments, tasks and/or demonstrations.
   B. List general safety rules related to metallurgy.
   C. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times according to the
JCCC safety sheet.
   D. Use PPE during demonstrations as required.

II. Identify and Locate Various Controls on Equipment Related to the Study
of Metallurgy
   A. Perform safe and correct set up and shut down of equipment used for
experiments, demonstrations, tasks or laboratory experiments.
   B.  Perform experiments using a variety of equipment and processes.
   C. Demonstrate knowledge and safety when performing selected
metallurgical tasks.

III. Define and Interpret the Study of Metallurgical Characteristics
   A.  Describe various methods and tests used in the study of
metallurgy.
   B.  Interpret charts, tables and graphs used in the study of
metallurgy.
   C. Define selected metallurgical terms.
   D.  List common terms associated with metallurgy.

IV. Select a Variety of Metallurgical Tests
   A. Demonstrate knowledge of metallurgical factors by selecting the
correct charts, tables and processes for selected assignments.
   B. Discuss processes of identification of metals using metallurgical
methods.
   C. List metal properties and abilities.
   D. Define terms related to properties of metals.
   E. List various selected metals unique abilities.

V. Analyze and Identify Various Metals and Their Uses
   A. Discuss how to determine the composition of selected metals.
   B.  Discuss techniques  used in laboratory and field testing. devices.
   C. List procedures to correctly and safely identify selected metals.

VI. Explain the Metal Working Processes
   A.  Describe factors related to safety and the environment when
producing metal.
   B. List and define several processes used in the metal working
industry.
   C. Explain terms used in the metal working industry.
   D. Explain the effects of heat on metals.
   E. List several common metal working processes.

VII. Explain a Variety of Tests Used on Metals
   A. List the steps used for dye penetrant testing (PT).
   B. Explain the results of the PT.
   C. Explain how the magnetic particle test works.
   D. Explain the spark test method.
   E. Identify the results from the spark test on several metal samples.
   F. List factors that determine if a metal is ferrous or non ferrous.

VIII. Explain the Characteristics of Heat Treatment Processes
   A. Explain the term, tempering.
   B. Explain the term, annealing.
   C. Explain the term, case hardening.
   D. Explain the term, quenching.
   E. Explain the term, surfacing.
   F. List examples of the five metallurgical characteristics and give
examples where each may be used.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Participation          10%
Quizzes                15%
Assignments            25%
Periodic Review tests  20%
Final Exam             30%
TOTAL                 100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 241

  • Title: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) II*
  • Number: MFAB 241
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 136 or MFAB 160

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to do more advanced GTAW welding projects. Weld in a variety of positions and on several thicknesses of material. Emphasis will be on safety, quality, measurements, and out of position welding. Students will weld on tubular material of a variety of sizes and thicknesses. Square and/or round tube will be fabricated to mate at several common angles using power tools and equipment. 1hr. lecture, 4hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate appropriate shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Demonstrate the use of measuring tools.
  3. Demonstrate GTAW welds on several thicknesses of material in all positions.
  4. Demonstrate GTAW fillet welds in selected weld positions.
  5. Demonstrate GTAW groove welds in selected weld positions.
  6. Demonstrate GTAW groove welds on round tubing material.
  7. Conduct visual inspection of GTAW welds.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules and Procedures  
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times.  
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE). 
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with GTAW. 

II. Measuring Devices and Tools 
  A. Demonstrate the layout of a pipe saddle, cut, and weld of a 90 degree round 2” diameter tube or pipe.  
  B. Demonstrate the layout a pipe saddle, cut, and weld of a 90-degree, square 2” tube with 3/16” wall thickness. 
  C. Demonstrate the fit-up fabricating technique to notch a pipe saddle in a 2” diameter pipe or tube to mate with another 2” diameter pipe or tube to form a 90-degree angle.  

III. Material Thickness 
  A. Demonstrate quality fillet tee joint welds on selected thin square tubing.  
  B. Demonstrate quality fillet tee joint welds on selected thick round tubing.  
  C. Demonstrate quality fillet tee joint welds on thick to thin material in selected positions. 

IV. GTAW Fillet Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE.  
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality fillet welds. 

V. GTAW Groove Welds in Selected Positions  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE. 
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality groove welds. 

VI. GTAW Groove Welds on Round Tubing  
  A. Demonstrate proper PPE. 
  B. Demonstrate correct base metal preparation.  
  C. Demonstrate proper electrode selection.  
  D. Demonstrate proper welding techniques.  
  E. Successfully complete selected quality groove welds. 

VII. Visual Inspection of Welds  
  A. Identify common visual discontinuities and defects on welds. 
  B. Determine cause of discontinuities and defects of welds. 
  C. Inspect welds for pass/fail ratings according to industry standards. 
  D. Use appropriate inspection tools. 
  E. Perform dye-penetrant inspection of welds.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Laboratory 20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade 
Participation 10% - 20% of grade  
TOTAL 100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100%  
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79%  
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 250

  • Title: Fabrication Practices II*
  • Number: MFAB 250
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 215 or MFAB 260

Description:

Upon completion of this class, the student should be able to work from discipline specific drawings to manufacture and assemble a mock piping loop, storage tank/vessel, and miscellaneous parts. This class is intended to serve all MFAB graduate students and current MFAB students who have completed the fundamental skills coursework within the metal fabrication certificate or degree programs. The Fabrication Practices II class is part two of an advanced comprehensive class intended to put to practical use the skills obtained throughout the existing Metal Fabrication and Welding Technology Career program. This class will put emphasis on pressure holding tanks and pressure vessels. Coursework will focus on modern welded fabrication techniques and practices used in the manufacturing and installation of steel pipe, tank and vessel systems, and miscellaneous welded mechanical structural items. Students will work in teams of three or four persons. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the safe and appropriate use of fabrication equipment.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to use layout tools used for storage tanks, storage vessels, welded piping, and in general fabrication trades.
  3. Use standard drawing concepts for welding piping systems, storage tanks and pressure vessels.
  4. Identify standard components used in welded piping systems, storage tanks and pressure vessels.
  5. Describe the methods used for standard components' sizing and dimensioning.
  6. Fabricate a mock piping loop, a storage tank/vessel, and miscellaneous parts to industry-recognized standards.
  7. Demonstrate comprehensive metal fabrication skills by assembling and erecting an in-service mock up. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Safety 
  A. Follow safety rules and procedures at all times according to JCCC and industry guidelines.  
  B. Demonstrate the appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when operating welding equipment, hand tools, and related shop equipment. 
  C. Describe safety hazards associated with heavy industrial construction and maintenance. 
  D.Describe inspection and testing methods used to ensure public safety with respect to steel structures, piping systems, storage tanks and vessels. 

II. Pipe Systems Layout 
  A. Use standard drawings and concepts for pipe configurations. 
  B. Use drawings and layouts pipe configurations 
  C. Identify nomenclatures and dimensional recognition. 
  D. Read and interpret pipe symbols. 
  E. Identify the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B-31.3, Process Piping Code.  
  F. Explain ASME B-31.3 Code structure and intent. 
  G. Use general ASME B-31.3 Code requirements. 
  H. Apply testing and inspection methods.  

III. Pipe Systems Fabrication
  A. Develop skill in basic pipe welding using the following processes, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) 
  B. Perform welds in the 2G position. 
  C. Perform welds in the 5G position.
  D. Perform welds in the 6G position. 
  E. Develop skill in basic pipe welding using the following processes, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) 
  F. Perform welds in the 2G position. 
  G. Perform welds in the 5G position. 
  H. Perform welds in the 6G position. 

IV. Tanks and Vessel Fabrication  
  A. Use standard drawings and concepts for storage tanks & vessels.  
  B. Use drawings and layouts tanks and vessels. 
  C. Identify nomenclatures sizing and dimensioning. 
  D. Identification of tanks and vessel components, and use dimensioning. 
  E. Identify and weld spherical heads. 
  F. Identify and weld nozzles. 
  G. Use ASME, code Section 8, and Pressure Vessel Construction and American Petroleum Institute (API) API-650 standards.  
  H. Use general code requirements. 
  I. Fabricate and weld mock up piping components. 
  J. Develop a cut list. 
  K. Perform fabrication by cutting and grinding. 
  L. Use fit up techniques. 
  M. Perform welding processes. 
  N. Use the GTAW process. 
  O. Use the SMAW process. 
  P. Use the Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) process. 
  Q. Use the Flux Core Arc Weld (FCAW) process. 
  R. Perform required ASME/API inspection techniques.  
 
V. Standard Components Layout 
  A. Use standard drawings and concepts for component assembly and erection.  
  B. Perform nomenclature, sizing and dimensioning. 
  C. Use print/drawing orientation skills. 

VI. Standard Components Fabrication 
  A. Demonstrate welding and fabricating skills for components. 
  B. Use spud wrenches. 
  C. Use impact wrenches. 
  D. Use drift pins. 
  E. Use advanced welding techniques. 
  F. Fabricate components for a mock up piping loop, storage tank/vessel, and miscellaneous
parts from sets of shop drawings.  

VII. Assembly and Erection 
  A. Use proper rigging and lifting techniques for equipment. 
  B. Identify rigging safety. 
  C. Locate rigging equipment. 
  D. Perform assembly and erection of an in-service mock up. 
  E. Use testing and inspecting methods 
  F. Use visual testing.
  G. Identify hydro-testing.  
  H. Assemble and erect a mock piping loop, storage tank/vessel, and miscellaneous parts to industry recognized standards.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests 20% - 40% of grade
Laboratory 20% - 40% of grade 
Quizzes and Reports 10% - 20% of grade 
Participation 10% - 20% of grade  
TOTAL 100% 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100%  
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79%  
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.
  3. Boots: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication/welding labs.
  4. Welding Helmet/Goggles: Approved welding helmet/goggles must be worn while welding/cutting.
  5. Welding Gloves and Jacket: Approved welding gloves and jacket must be worn while welding/ cutting.
  6. Ear Plugs: Approved ear plugs must be worn while in the metal fabrication lab.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 255

  • Title: Advanced Machine Tool Technology*
  • Number: MFAB 255
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MFAB 128 or MFAB 170

Description:

This course provides students further instruction and practice on machine tool operations. Advanced techniques using lathes, milling machine, drill presses and precision grinders and the use of specialized tooling, clamps, and jigs is covered. Machining techniques requiring special applications such as steady rest, and centering techniques will be addressed. Students will learn the various techniques of working with stock to produce parts from drawing, plans and sketches. Hardening, tempering and basic metallurgy will also be covered. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate safe working habits at all times to include: personal protective equipment (PPE) when and where required.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to understand the information on complex drawings and apply that knowledge to a variety of machines and tools to safely produce a completed product meeting print requirements such as dimension tolerance and surface finish.
  3. Identify and correctly use various steel rules, micrometers, calipers and a variety of measuring devices, to accurately determine if machined parts meet the print requirements.
  4. Setup and operate various metal cutting saws and bench grinder to include care and maintenance.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to safely perform various machine operations using an engine lathe.
  6. Setup and operate various milling machines. Identity the different work-holding equipment required to produce metal parts to meet print requirements.
    
  7. Demonstrate the ability to select the proper grinding wheel for grinding a given material, and safety setup and operate the grinding machine.
  8. Calculate by using machine shop formulas, shop math, and trigonometry to determine tap drill sizes, cutting speed, feed rate, thread pitch, thread depth, tail stock offset for cutting tapers and to determine the correct turns and partial turn for indexing head operations.
  9. Select the material properties to determine allowance for grinding and the proper grade of steel to meet print requirements. Explain critical temperature for heat treatment of steel, different quenching media, tempering temperature, and Rockwell hardness testing.
  10. Identify tool steel by appearance, manufacturer stamp code: American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI), or the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), color code on part, and spark testing.
  11. Demonstrate and safely operate heat treat and tempering furnaces, Rockwell tester and quenching operations as well as Case-Harding methods.
  12. Describe Computer Aided Design(CAD)/Computer Aided Machining(CAM) systems, and be able to write a simple Computer Numerical Control (CNC) program for a CNC milling operation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety 
  A. Recognize safe and unsafe work practices in a metal cutting shop.  
  B. Identify and correct hazards in the shop area.  
  C. Select personal protective equipment (PPE) required for machining and other shop operations.   
  D. Demonstrate and apply all machine shop safety rules. 

II. Job Planning 
  A. Identify the meaning of various lines used on engineering drawing.  
  B. Recognize the various symbols on a drawing used to convey information.  
  C. Read and explain engineering drawing or prints. 
  D. Identify the difference machine operations, bench work and tools needed to produce a completed product to print requirement.  

III. Measurement 
  A. Demonstrate the care and maintenance of all measurement equipment. 
  B. Identify types of steel rules and measure a part to 1/64-in accuracy.  
  C. Identify the most common types of outside micrometers and their use.  
  D. Measure the size of a variety of objects to within 0.001 of an inch of accuracy.  
  E. Demonstrate the ability to measure a work piece to within accuracy of .002 of an inch using a dial caliper.  
  F. Measure a hole diameter in a part to within .002 of an inch of accuracy using a telescope gauges and micrometer.  
  G. Measure the depths of a hole to an accuracy of 0.004 of an inch using a dial caliper.  
  H. Measure depths of a slot to an accuracy of .002 of an inch using a micrometer depth gauge.  
  I. Explain the setup and use of a dial bore gage to measure a hole to within .0001 of an inch accuracy.  
  J. Demonstrate the uses of a Vernier height gauge with test dial indicator and transfer the reading to a height gauge to measure the height of a work piece within .0002 of an inch accuracy.
  K. Explain the care use and application of gauge blocks. 
  L. Calculate the gauge block buildups for a give dimension.  
  M. Create angular measurements to an accuracy of 20'(minutes) of a degree using a universal bevel protractor, or combination square with protractor head.  
  N. Create angular measurements to less than 5’ of a degree using a sine bar, gauge blocks, and a dial indicator on a height stand.  
  O. Explain the principles of comparison measurement.
  P. Identify three type of comparators measurement and describe their use. 
  Q. Demonstrate the use of a back plunger indicator.  
  R. Interpret the surface finish symbols that appear on a drawing.  
  S. Select a surface roughness gage to measure the surface finish on a part.  

IV. Metal-Cutting Machines and Bench Grinder 
  A. Demonstrate the ability to safely setup and operate a bench grinder.  
  B. Explain the care and use of cutoff saw, horizontal, and contour band saws. 
  C. Explain the terminology of a saw blade, i.e. pitch, set, width, and gauge.  
  D. Explain the twist drills characteristics and drill size systems.  

V. Engine Lathe 
  A. Explain the necessary safety precautions required to run a lathe.  
  B. Demonstrate the care and maintain of the engine lathe.  
  C. Set the lathe to run a required speed in revolutions per minute (RPM). 
  D. Set the proper feed rate for a finishing cut.  
  E. List all the lathe accessories and their uses.  
  F. Determine the depth of cut you can make in a lathe for a given part.  
  G. Demonstrate by safely setting up and operating a lathe for the following operations: 
     1. Machining between centers. 
     2. Knurling, grooving operations.  
     3. Taper turning operations both internal and external tapers.  
     4. Calculate all the information needed to perform threading operations.  
     5. Chasing thread operations both external and internal thread.  
     6. Turning an eccentric on the lathe. 
     7. Demonstrate the ability to use a steady rest or follower rest when machining a long shaft.  

VI. Milling Machines 
  A. Describe how angular surfaces can be machined.  
  B. Demonstrate the care and maintenance of the milling machine.  
  C. Demonstrate by safely setting up and operating a milling machine for the following operations:  
     1. Machine a part square and parallel.  
     2. Machine an angular surface, both a simple and a compound angle.  
     3. Machine a radius using rotary table.  
     4. Milling a key-way on a shaft.  

VII. Grinding
  A. List the safety rules associated with grinding.  
  B. Demonstrate the care and maintain of grinding machine.  
  C. Demonstrate the ability to select the proper grinding wheel for a given applications. 
  D. Demonstrate the ability to true and dress a given grinding wheel.  
  E. Demonstrate the ability to safely setup and perform the following grinding operations:  
     1. Grinding a part to hold dimensions within +/-.0002 inches accuracy.  
     2. Grinding to produce a surface finish to a given RMS (Roughness Measurement System) finish requirement.  
     3. Grinding a part flat within .0005 inches accuracy.  
     4. Grinding a workpiece square within .0005 of an inch in 4 inches accuracy.  
     5. Grinding a angular surface within +/- .025 degree accuracy. 
     6. Demonstrate the ability to cutoff a part with a cutoff wheel. 
     7. Use the surface grinder as a cylindrical grinder.  

VIII. Shop Math and Trigonometry 
  A. Calculate the length of a saw band for a two-pulley machine.
  B. Calculate the RPM for different sizes of twist drills of a given material.  
  C. Select the feed rate to be used for various operations, such as drilling, reaming, counter sinking, counter boring, and taping.  
  D. Calculate the indexing necessary for a give number of divides, using an indexing head.  
  E. Calculate the information needed to machine a rack and pinion gear set.  
  F. Machine a rack and pinion gear set. 

IX. Metallurgical Information 
  A. Identify six properties of metals.  
  B. Describe the effect of alloying elements on steel.  
  C. Demonstrate the ability to select the proper grade of tool steel for a workpiece.  
  D. List recommendations for tool steel selection to improve machinability, wear resistance. 
  E. Calculate the information to properly heat-treat a workpiece to give hardness. 

X. Tool Steel Classification and Identification 
  A. List the two types of classifications of tool steel. 
  B. Identify the type of steel defined by the AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) numbers. 
  C. Determine the types of steel by its SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) numbers.
  D. Explains the differences between Ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys. 

XI. Heat-Treating Equipment 
  A. Demonstrate the care and maintain of Heat-Treating equipments.  
  B. Demonstrate by safely setting up and operating the heat-treating equipment.  
  C. Demonstrate the ability to anneal a hardened steel part.  
  D. Demonstrate by safely setting up and operating a Rockwell hardness tester.  
  E. Describe cryogenic treatment and tempering. 

XII. CNC and Advanced Machine Technology 
  A. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of Computer Numerical Control (CNC). 
  B. Identify the types of systems and controls use in CNC. 
  C. List the steps required to produce a part by CNC.  
  D. Explain the advantages of Computer Aid Design (CAD) in producing CNC program.  
  E. Demonstrate the ability to write a CNC program for a Simple part using M and G codes. 
  F. Describe the Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) process and its advantages.  
  G. Describe other CNC machining equipment and how it works with regard to Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM), wire and sinker, water jet, and plasma cutting.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lecture and Lab Participation and attendance: 10% - 20%
Lab Safety and Work habits: 20% - 30%
Midterm test Performance Test 5% - 15%
Projects (2) 25% - 35%
Finial Exam 10% - 20%

Criteria for letter grade:
A = 92-100%
B = 82-91%
C = 72-81%
D = 62-71%
F = under 62%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications.

Note: Most prescription eye wear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) provide evidence that existing eye wear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eye wear.

Face Shield: When grinding is being performed, full-face safety shield must be worn in addition to approved safety glasses or goggles.

Footwear: Approved leather footwear is required when working in all metal fabrication labs.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 259

No information found.

MFAB 271

  • Title: Metal Fabrication Internship*
  • Number: MFAB 271
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 16
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students with on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hrs. lecture, 15 hrs. minimum on-the-job training/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe work activities that have been accomplished on the job.
  2. Prepare a resume.
  3. Complete a job application.
  4. Identify the steps in the job search process.
  5. List sources of job opportunities using local newspapers, job postings, and other available media.
  6. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training position.
  7. Keep accurate records of hours worked, job activities, and salary earned.
  8. Utilize classroom/lab knowledge to the work situation.
  9. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment and work.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to work with immediate supervisor, customers (if applicable), and fellow employees.
  11. Apply technical and human relations skills to the employment setting.
  12. Identify the major components of a job interview.
  13. Demonstrate proper conduct during a job interview.
  14. Identify ways to deal with termination of employment.
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of industrial applications and procedures that may have not encountered in other course work.
  16. Describe components of organizational structure including: labor relations, work standards, quality and production control, and work flow patterns.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Internship
   A. Interpret program requirements.
   B. Complete the required forms from the handbook.
   C. Discuss the procedures set forth by the Career Program Facilitator.

II. The Job Search Process
   A. Find three sources of job information.
   B. Identify three job postings in your career program field.
   C. Write a resume

III. Obtaining Employment
   A. Write a letter of inquiry.
   B. Complete a job application.
   C. Describe a job interview.

IV. Employer/Employee Relationships
   A. Define labor relations.
   B. Explain human relations.
   C. Write examples of conflict and resolution.

V. Employee Growth and Development
   A. Define employment advancement.
   B. Examine personal assessment of your job performance.
   C. Depict management opportunities in your career area.

VI. Leadership in the Work Place
   A. Describe qualities of leadership.
   B. Define fellowship.

VII. Dealing with Termination
   A. Define termination with cause.
   B. Define termination without cause.
   C. Describe how to deal with employment termination.

VIII. The Structure of Business and Industry
   A. Explain organizational theory.
   B. Describe work flow patterns.

IX. Conclusion 
   A. Summarize your employer evaluation.
   B. Write a self evaluation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  Employer work assignments:  This includes working not less than 15
hours per week for the semester;  report to work regularly and adhere to
the employer’s work rules and standards; notify the Career Program
Facilitator immediately on any changes in employment status. 50%
  Classroom assignments, turned in on time and complete.
The assignments will be graded on content, spelling and punctuation. 30%
  Employer Evaluations(2),turned in on time and complete. 5%
  Student self-evaluation,turned in on time and complete. 5%
  Attend all assigned Internship meetings with the Facilitator. 10%
 TOTAL      100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. A minimum average of 15 hours per week on-the-job training is required. Students are expected to keep the instructor informed about progress and any job changes. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MFAB 291

No information found.