Railroad Operations - General Option, A.A.S.

JCCC's associate's degree program in railroad operations can prepare you for an exciting and well-paying career. The more than 500 companies that make up the U.S. railroad industry provide the country's freight and passenger transportation service on a network of some 300,000 route-miles of track. Railroads employ a substantial workforce to service, maintain and manage this extensive transportation network.

In general, this option is designed to provide the student with general knowledge and skills for entry-level employment in the railroad industry. The student is introduced to the history of railroading and the various railroad crafts. Railroad operations, safety, environment and quality also are covered. The student will choose from a list of business and technical electives in order to provide a basis for possible employment and further post-employment training.

For information visit the National Academy of Railroad Sciences. Hover your cursor over the "New Careers" tab and choose from the list.

(Major Code 2800; State CIP Code 49.0208)

First Semester

CPCA 105Introduction to Personal Computers: Windows1
CPCA 108Word Processing I: MS Word*1
CPCA 110Spreadsheets I: MS Excel*1
ENGL 121Composition I*3
MATH 130Technical Mathematics I*3
PHIL 124Logic and Critical Thinking3
RRT 120History of Railroading3
Total Hours15

Second Semester

ENGL 123Technical Writing I*3
MATH 131Technical Mathematics II*3
PHYS 133Applied Physics*5
RRT 121Railroad Technical Careers3
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Total Hours15
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

Third Semester

BUS 121Introduction to Business3
ECON 132Survey of Economics3
or ECON 230 Economics I
PHIL 138Business Ethics1
RRT 150Railroad Operations3
RRT 165Railroad Safety, Quality and Environment3
SPD 125Personal Communication3
Total Hours16

Fourth Semester

Business/Related Electives (see below)6
Technical/Related Electives (see below)12
Total Hours18

Business/Related Electives

ACCT 121Accounting I3
BUS 123Personal Finance3
BUS 140Principles of Supervision3
BUS 141Principles of Management3
BUS 225Human Relations3
BUS 243Human Resource Management3
BUS 261Business Law I*3
MKT 230Marketing3
BOT 101Computerized Keyboarding1

Technical/Related Electives

AUTO 125Introduction to Automotive Shop Practices3
AUTO 165Automotive Engine Repair*4
CET 105Construction Methods3
CET 129Construction Management3
CPCA 138Windows for Microcomputers*1
DRAF 123Interpreting Machine Drawings*2
DRAF 129Interpreting Architectural Drawings2
ELEC 120Introduction to Electronics3
ENGR 180Engineering Land Surveying I*3
HVAC 123Electromechanical Systems4
INDT 125Industrial Safety/OSHA 303
MFAB 152Manufacturing Materials and Processes3
MFAB 133Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) I*3
MFAB 240Metallurgy2

Total Program Hours: 64

Courses

RRT 120   History of Railroading (3 Hours)

This course covers the history and traditions of railroading and the industry's role in North American economic development. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to list and explain the significance of major events in North American railroading. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the fall semester. This course is only taught in the fall semester.

RRT 121   Railroad Technical Careers (3 Hours)

This course includes information about technical careers in railroading, enabling students to choose suitable career paths. This course includes field trips that will demonstrate the relationships among technical work groups in day-to-day railroad operations. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to describe basic technical job functions, requirements and characteristics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the fall semester.

RRT 150   Railroad Operations (3 Hours)

This course includes information about the industry, its major assets, structure and typical operations. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to define the current North American railroading industry characteristics, basic operations components and processes, and industry structure and administrative processes. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the spring semester.

RRT 165   Railroad Safety, Quality and Environment (3 Hours)

This course covers the importance of safety, quality, personal health and environmental awareness to the railroad industry and emphasizes the basic tools and techniques for improving these conditions on the job. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to define and explain the need for improved safety, quality, health and environmental awareness; describe their basic principles; explain the elements of successful programs; and apply these elements to typical tasks on the job. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the spring semester.

RRT 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

RRT 120

  • Title: History of Railroading
  • Number: RRT 120
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the history and traditions of railroading and the industry's role in North American economic development. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to list and explain the significance of major events in North American railroading. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the fall semester. This course is only taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the early developments of North American Railroads.
  2. List and explain the contributions of railroads in the growth of North American in the 19th Century.
  3. List the technological developments in the 1870-1900 period.
  4. Describe the contributions of railroads to the first half of the 20th Century North American’s growth.
  5. List the technological developments in the 1900-1949 period.
  6. Describe the contributions of railroads to the second half of the 20th Century North American’s growth.
  7. Discuss the differences between U. S. railroads and other major railroads in the world. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Railroads Beginnings
   A. Describe the early developments in steam power.
   B. Describe the early developments in rail design.
C. List the contributions of early railroaders Murdock, Trevithick,
Stephenson, and other.
   D. Explain the early development of the American, Canadian, and Mexican
railroad.

II. Railroads Contributions To 19th Century North American Growth
   A. Explain the role of railroads in the Civil War.
   B. Describe the effects of the railroad in the post-war rebuilding of
the South.
   C. Explain and give examples of how railroads affected the expansion
and economic growth of the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
   D. List the contributions that railroads had on the movements of
immigration groups.
   E. List how Governmental involvements and land grants shaped the routes
of the railroads.

III. Technological Developments 1870-1900
   A. List mechanical developments.
   B. List the changes in track and structures.
   C. Explain the development of signal systems.
   D. Explain how the standardization of gauges and couplers affected the
growth of railroads.

IV. Railroads contributions to 20th Century North American growth
   A. Explain the effect of railroad monopolies and the growth of labor
unions.
   B. Describe The Golden Age of Railroading.

V. Technological developments 1900-1949
   A. List the renovations and developments in mechanical equipment,
track, and structures.
   B. List the renovations and developments in electrical equipment (i.e.,
signals and communication equipment).

VI. Railroads In the Second Half Of the 20Th Century
   A. Explain the effect of commercial aviation and the automobile on
passenger trains.
   B. List the major mergers and their effect on North American
railroads.
   C. Describe how intermodal transport has affected the movement of
fright in the U. S.

VII. Railroads Around the World: Comparing North American Railroads
   A. Describe the structure of Asian railroads.
   B. Describe the structure of European railroads.
   C. Describe the structure of Australia railroads.
   D. Explain how NAFTA and other agreements have and will effect U.S.
railroads.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The instructor evaluates each student’s performance with periodic
quizzes (40% of grade) and a final examination (60% of grade).

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

RRT 121

  • Title: Railroad Technical Careers
  • Number: RRT 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course includes information about technical careers in railroading, enabling students to choose suitable career paths. This course includes field trips that will demonstrate the relationships among technical work groups in day-to-day railroad operations. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to describe basic technical job functions, requirements and characteristics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the railroad industry pre-employment expectations in the technical work groups.
  2. List and describe the careers available in the four departments of the a typical railroad organization.
  3. List and describe each of the entry-level positions and explain their required basic skills needed in the Transportation Department.
  4. List and describe each of the entry-level positions and explain their required basic skills needed in the Engineering Services Department.
  5. List and describe each of the entry-level positions and explain their required basic skills needed in the Mechanical Department. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Railroad Expectations
   A. List the railroad preemployment expectations.
   B. List the expectations of and benefits to employees in technical work
groups.
   C. List and describe the common railroad industry working conditions.

II. Overview Of Technical Careers
   A. Describe the typical railroad organization.
   B. List and describe the common careers in the Transportation
department.
   C. List and describe the common careers in the Engineering services
department.
   D. List and describe the common careers in the Mechanical department
(sometimes called motive power).
   E. List and describe the common careers in the Support Staff areas.

III. Detailed Study Of Entry-Level Technical Positions In the
Transportation Department
   A. Describe the basic skills needed by the switchman.
   B. Describe the basic skills needed by the trainman.
   C. Describe the basic skills needed by the dispatcher (on some
railroads).
   D. Describe the basic skills needed by the CSC representative.
   E. Describe the basic skills needed by the crew caller.
   F. Describe the basic skills needed by the clerk.
   G. Describe the basic skills needed by the conductor (on some
railroads).
   H. Describe the basic skills needed by the field observation.

IV. Detailed Study of Entry-Level Technical Positions in the Engineering
Services Department
   A. Describe the basic skills needed by the assistant signalman.
   B. Describe the basic skills needed by the electronic technician.
   C. Describe the basic skills needed by the towerman.
   D. Describe the basic skills needed by the cable splicer.
   E. Describe the basic skills needed by the track laborer.
   F. Describe the basic skills needed by the work equipment repairman (on
some railroads).
   G. Describe the basic skills needed by the bridge and building
laborer.

V. Detailed Study Of Entry-Level Technical Positions In the Mechanical
Department
   A. Describe the basic skills needed by the clerk.
   B. Describe the basic skills needed by the electrician.
   C. Describe the basic skills needed by the machinist/mechanic.
   D. Describe the basic skills needed by the carman.
   E. Describe the basic skills needed by the laborer.
   F. Describe the basic skills needed by the field observation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The instructor evaluates each student’s performance with periodic
quizzes (40% of grade) and a final examination (60% of grade).

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

RRT 150

  • Title: Railroad Operations
  • Number: RRT 150
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course includes information about the industry, its major assets, structure and typical operations. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to define the current North American railroading industry characteristics, basic operations components and processes, and industry structure and administrative processes. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List and describe the different types of railroads operating in the U. S.
  2. Explain the responsibilities and influences of the organizations governing the railroad industry.
  3. Generate an organizational chart for a typical railroad.
  4. Participate in customer service scenarios involving both internal and external customers.
  5. Determine the type of freight shipment category a train will move on, based on route information, the lading, and the loading conditions.
  6. List and describe the many assets that are controlled by a modern railroad
  7. Describe how centralized functions can and have affected the operation of a modern railroad.
  8. List and explain the different methods to control a train
  9. List and explain the many different steps in the process of moving a fright train from customer to destination.
  10. Evaluate the financial railroad based on its income statement and balance sheet.
  11. Defend a position about the challenges and opportunities of the present-day railroad industry. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rail Systems
   A. List and describe the types of railroads.
   B. Discuss the impact of traffic density.
   C. List the advantages and disadvantages of combining, coordinating,
connecting of tracks and facilities.

II. Governing Organizations
   A. Describe the purpose of the FRA.
   B. Describe the purpose of the ICC (Interstate Commerce Commission).
   C. Describe the purpose and list the powers of OSHA.
   D. Describe the purpose and list the powers of NTSB (National
Transportation Safety Board).
   E. Describe the purpose and list the powers of the DOT.
   F. Explain the scope of the state and local governments in regulating
the railroad industry.
   G. Describe the purpose and list the powers AAR (American Association
of Railroads).
   H. List the Canadian and Mexican equivalents.
   I. Outline the organization of National Transportation Agency
(Canada).

III. Administration and Organization
   A. Define the marketing/sales effort of a railroad.
   B. Define the operations department of a railroad.
   C. Explain the purpose of the finance/accounting areas of a railroad.
   D. List the purpose of the law/public affairs department of a
railroad.
   E. Discuss the purpose of the purchasing/materials management
department in a railroad.
   F. Describe the impact of the information technology department on the
operations of a railroad.
   G. Discuss the impact of department interactions on the overall
operations of a railroad.
   H. Discuss the effect of the labor relations department on the overall
operations of a railroad.

IV. Customers
   A. Discuss the purpose of being customer driven company.
   B. Describe the external customers.
   C. Describe the internal customers.

V. Rail Traffic
   A. Discuss intermodal traffic.
   B. List how to meet customer needs and requirements.
   C. List and explain train types.
   D. Discuss communication determination.

VI. Physical Plant
   A. Explain tracks and structures.
   B. Discuss the need for signals and communications.
   C. List the types of rolling stock.
   D. Explain the complexities of equipment ownership.

VII. Centralized Functions
   A. Discuss the purpose of computer-based management system.
   B. List the advantages of computer-based management system.
   C. List the disadvantages of computer-based management system.

VIII. Train Control
   A. Explain the purpose of block signaling.
   B. Explain the purpose of cab signaling.
   C. Explain the purpose of automatic Train Stop (ATS).
   D. Explain the purpose of interlocking.
   E. Explain the purpose of centralized traffic control (CTC).
   F. Explain the purpose of radio-based manual block control.

IX. Moving the Freight
   A. Explain the method of processing customers request.
   B. Discuss the linkage of providing equipment for loading rolling
stock.
   C. Explain switching and origination.
   D. Explain the need for classification and blocking.
   E. Discuss the many phases of terminal operations.
   F. List the types of shifters.
   G. Explain the purpose of line-haul operations.
   H. Explain the need for having an operating plan.
   I. Explain the operations of switching and spotting (DEST).

X. Finances
   A. List the sources of revenues for a railroad.
   B. Explain the differences between Retained funds and capital
expenditures.
   C. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of deferred maintenance.
   D. Explain equipment trusts.
   E. Discuss how equipment leases impact the operation of a railroad.
   F. Explain deferred taxes.
   G. List possible expenditures for a railroad.

XI. Challenges and Opportunities
   A. List possible customer challenges.
   B. List possible competitive challenges.
   C. Discuss uncontrollable challenges.
   D. List the sources of operational challenges.
   E. Discuss governing body challenges.
   F. Explore technological challenges.
   G. Describe partnership opportunities for railroads.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The instructor evaluates each student’s performance with periodic
quizzes (40% of grade) and a final examination (60% of grade).

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

RRT 165

  • Title: Railroad Safety, Quality and Environment
  • Number: RRT 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the importance of safety, quality, personal health and environmental awareness to the railroad industry and emphasizes the basic tools and techniques for improving these conditions on the job. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to define and explain the need for improved safety, quality, health and environmental awareness; describe their basic principles; explain the elements of successful programs; and apply these elements to typical tasks on the job. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is only taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define quality, safety, health, and environment in terms of business outcomes and overall customer satisfaction.
  2. List the principles common in safety, quality, health, and environment programs.
  3. Describe the basic process and structures of a program to improve quality.
  4. Describe the critical elements of a successful safety/health program.
  5. List and discuss the steps necessary in improving the environmental awareness in the railroad industry.
  6. List and discuss the steps necessary to manage a hazardous materials handling program. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Investigate the Overall Concepts Of Quality, Safety, Health, and
Environment
   A. Define quality, safety, health, and environmental awareness.
   B. Discuss the relationship between quality, safety, health, and
environmental awareness.
   C. Describe the importance of quality, safety, health, and
environmental awareness in the railroad industry.

II. Principles Common To Quality, Safety, Health, and Environmental
Awareness
   A. Discuss the need for customer satisfaction, both internal and
external customers.
   B. List and describe the steps needed in a continuous improvement
program.
   C. List and describe the steps needed to manage with data.
   D. Describe the modern concept of teamwork.
      1. Describe a horizontal, cross-functional team.
      2. Define the company as team.
      3. Discuss the idea of equality of members.
      4. List methods to insure the empowerment of members.
      5. Describe the method of emphasizing the failure of process, not
team members.

III. Improving Railroad Quality
   A. Define business outcomes and customer satisfaction.
   B. Discuss the need for improved quality throughout the industry.
   C. List and explain the benefits of improved quality in the railroad
industry.
   D. Discuss the basic principles of quality.
   E. List and explain the basic process and structures of a program to
improve quality.
   F. Apply the principles and processes of quality improvement to
real-life business problems in the industry.

IV. Improving Railroad Safety and Health
   A. Describe the railroad environment and working conditions.
      1. Review industry accident/incident statistics.
   B. Discuss the personal case of an accident.
      1. Describe the responsibility of individual and the family.
      2. Discuss the avoidance of pain and suffering.
      3. Discuss the potential loss of work on the employee state of
mind.
   C. Discuss the business case of an accident.
      1. List expenses of an accident.
      2. Describe the interruption to customer service.
      3. Describe the damage to morale and productivity.
      4. List the damages to working environment.
      5. Describe how a high accident rate can lead to difficulty in
recruiting and hiring new employees.
      6. Discuss how fines and penalties can impact the safety program.
      7. Risks of increased legislation, regulation.
      8. Discuss the relationship of safety and health to quality.
   D. List two views of a safety and health program.
      1. Describe the behaviorist’s view.
      2. Describe the humanist’s view.
      3. Discuss the differences and similarities between the two views.
   E. List the principles of an effective safety program.
      1. Describe the "bottom up" method.
      2. List methods to increase involvement of employees.
      3. List methods of measurements.
      4. Describe the flexible process.
      5. List methods to gain management commitment.
      6. List the positive forces in an effective safety program.
      7. Discuss employee behavior in an effective safety program.
   F. Discuss program components: training, measurement, and consequences
for compliance and non-compliance.
      1. List rules and policies.
      2. List possible hazards .
         a. List steps to increase recognition.
         b. List the steps necessary to handle sources of accidents.
         c. List the steps in the elimination of accident causes.
      3. Outline a First aid and CPR program.
      4. Outline the content of a complete Wellness program.
      5. Discuss how an ergonomics program can impact a safety program.
      6. List and discuss the role of health and safety committees.
      7. Discuss accident investigation and analysis.
      8. List the steps in generating an emergency preparedness plan.
      9. List methods of data collection to track hazards.
     10. Discuss the importance of employee recognition.
     11. List and describe the basic personal protective equipment.
     12. List the types of back protection.
   G. List and discuss common injuries and safety hazards.
   H. Describe current trends and issues.
      1. Describe the methods of re-designing jobs and equipment to
eliminate risks.
      2. Discuss how to improve the work environment .
         a. Discuss how to focus on behavior.
         b. Describe how to improve communication.
      3. Discuss the individual worker’s responsibility in accident
prevention.
      4. Discuss the need for employee assistance programs for substance
abuse and its part in accident prevention.

V. Improving Railroad Environmental Awareness
   A. Compare the railroads to heavy industries.
   B. Discuss the rise in environmental consciousness.
      1. Discuss the results of increased public awareness.
      2. List the effects of pollution becoming visible.
      3. List and explain the pollution measurement devices.
   C. Discuss the impact of railroads on the environment.
      1. List the positive effects.
         a. Discuss fuel efficiency.
         b. Discuss emissions efficiency.
         c. Discuss land use.
         d. Describe hazardous material transportation safety.
      2. List the negative effects.
         a. Discuss derailment contamination.
         b. Discuss land contamination from past practices.
   D. List environmental protection legislation.
      1. List and explain levels of regulation and precedence .
      2. List and explain the categories of regulation compliance.
      3. List and explain the effects of regulations on railroads.
   E. List and explain the components of environmental awareness
programs.
      1. Give examples of corporate policies and practices.
      2. List ways for a railroad to show corporate commitment and
demonstration of commitment (environmental management plans).
      3. Discuss methods of increasing employee involvement.
      4. List the steps in starting and running a prevention program.
      5. List possible awareness programs.
      6. List and discuss the steps in a clean-up program.
   F. List the most common dangers.
      1. Discuss derailments producing hazardous chemical spills.
      2. Discuss the sources of fuel contamination.
      3. Explain the methods to cleanup residual contamination from past
practices.

VI. Outline the Steps In Hazardous Materials Handling
   A. Define hazardous materials.
   B. Define hazardous substances.
   C. Discuss the correct method for the safe transportation.
      1. Discuss train makeup.
      2. Give examples of correct positioning.
      3. Explain the correct method of switching.
      4. List the proper steps in placarding the load.
      5. Describe the correct method of providing documentation.
      6. Outline the steps in an emergency response plan.
      7. Explain the differences and similarities in international and
intermodal requirements.
   D. Discuss waste management.
      1. List and outline the steps in collection, labeling, storage,
training, and disposal.
   E. Discuss and give examples in current trends in environmental
awareness.
      1. Explain the need for stringent enforcement .
      2. Explain how increased knowledge and technology will help with
compliance.
      3. Discuss why the emphasis is on prevention.
      4. List the customer requirements for compliance.
      5. Discuss the impact on real estate if a spill occurs.
      6. Discuss the need for phasing out of hazardous materials.
      7. List who has responsibility for storm water.
      8. Emphasis on not dumping, burying, or burning on site.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The instructor evaluates each student’s performance with periodic
quizzes (40% or grade) and a final examination (60% of grade).

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

RRT 291

No information found.