Recording Arts Certificate

This certificate is designed to prepare students to work in the creative field of digital audio technology. Students will develop traditional recording studio skills along with skills needed to work with current digital audio technology. Students who successfully complete the program will have a good foundation to find work as an audio engineer, a studio musician, a music producer, or as a songwriter or composer. There is no prerequisite for this certificate.

(Major Code 5090; State CIP Code 24.0101)

First Semester

MUS 156MIDI Music Composition3
Total Hours3

Second Semester

MUS 157Introduction to Digital Audio*3
Total Hours3

Third Semester

MUS 158Recording Studio I*4
Total Hours4

Fourth Semester

MUS 159Recording Studio II*4
Total Hours4

Total Program Hours: 14

Courses

MUS 121   Introduction to Music Listening (3 Hours)

This course is designed to enhance student music listening. Students will learn to identify changes in the elements of music through the different stylistic periods of classical music. Factual and historical information will be presented to broaden the student's cultural and music appreciation. Students will hear recorded examples of music from the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th-century eras, as well as popular American forms and music from non-Western cultures. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 123   Introduction to Music Fundamentals (2 Hours)

This course is designed to present the fundamentals of music theory to students who have no previous background or training in that subject. Students will receive detailed instruction in naming notes; scales and chords; building intervals; and correlating these skills to the keyboard. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 125   Introduction to Jazz Listening (3 Hours)

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no prior knowledge of the American art form of jazz music. Through reading and listening, the student will learn the basic structure of the elements of music and how these are organized to create jazz. Topics to be covered will include rhythm, harmony, and form; Dixieland style; swing style; bop; and contemporary jazz. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 126   Introduction to World Music (3 Hours)

This course provides students with an introduction to the musical heritage of the world. Through an interdisciplinary approach targeting the arts, humanities and social sciences, the course fosters skills necessary to gain a deeper appreciation of both familiar and unfamiliar musical traditions. The course will survey a representative cross section of the major musical traditions of the world, which may include Native American, Black American, sub-Saharan African, Eastern European/Bosnian, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese and Latin American/Brazilian traditions. Note: The course does not require the ability to read music. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 128   History of Rock and Roll Music (3 Hours)

Through the study of the history of Rock and Roll music, students will discover how the various styles and structures of Rock have evolved, and how these styles reflected the social and cultural events in each stylistic era. By studying this history the students will also learn about the major Rock artists and what their contributions were to the development of the art form and the social climate in which the artist lived. The course will also address the role of technology on the development of the music and the music business. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 131   Sight-Singing and Ear Training I (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 123 with a grade of 'C' or higher or department approval

This course is an introduction to sight singing and ear training. Basic methods of reading music are presented and practiced. Students are also trained to recognize aurally and notate the basic elements of music: intervals, diatonic melodies, simple rhythms, chord qualities, and basic harmonic progressions. The content is designed to complement the Harmony I course, though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 132   Sight-Singing and Ear Training II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 131

This course is a continuation of the class Sight-singing and Ear Training I. The content is designed to complement the Harmony II course though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

MUS 133   Sight-Singing and Ear Training III (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 132

This course is a continuation of the classes Sight-singing and Ear Training I and II. The content is designed to complement the Harmony III course, though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 141   Music Theory: Harmony I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 123 with a grade of 'C' or higher or department approval

This course is a basic study of the harmonic system sited in Western music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in areas of music composition. Students will learn the basic skills involved in writing and analyzing music of this nature as well as play simple chord progressions on the piano. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 141H   HON: Music Theory: Harmony I (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

MUS 142   Music Theory: Harmony II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 141 or passing equivalency test

Harmony II is a continuation of the study of the harmonic system used in music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in certain areas of music composition. The course covers use of non-harmonic tones, supertonic and dominant sevenths, functions of the submediant and mediant triads, advanced melodic writing and secondary dominant chords. Student will learn to harmonize melodies at the keyboard and play simple chord progressions on the piano. Music of the period will be analyzed. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs.lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

MUS 142H   HON: Music Theory: Harmony II (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

MUS 143   Music Theory: Harmony III (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 142 or passing equivalency test

This is a continuation of the study of the harmonic system used in all music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in many areas of music composition today. Important topics include devices of modulation, binary and ternary, and 12 bar blues musical forms and application of part writing procedures to instrumental music. Particular attention will be paid to the nature and functions of diatonic seventh chords, secondary dominants, borrowed chords and Neopolitan chords. Students will work with keyboard harmony exercises of increasing difficulty. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 144   Music Theory: Harmony IV (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 143 or passing equivalency test

Harmony IV is a continuation of the study of the harmonic practices of tonal music and introduction to 20th-century harmony. Topics include augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulation, and advanced chromatic harmonies. An introduction to 20th-Century harmonic organization includes extended tertian harmony, modal harmony, parallelism, pandiatonicism, atonality, serialism, and aleatory music. Students will work with keyboard harmony exercises of increasing difficulty. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 145   Jazz/Commercial Music Theory I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 141

Through the study of Jazz music theory, students will learn the basic elements that comprise the foundation of this style of music. Students will discover how Jazz and Commercial music is constructed, analyzed, and performed by learning intervals, scales, chords, chord progressions, form, and construction of melodies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 151   Mixed Vocal Ensemble I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 152   Mixed Vocal Ensemble II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 151 and audition required

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 153   Mixed Vocal Ensemble III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 152 and audition required

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 154   Mixed Vocal Ensemble IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 153 and audition required

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 155   Introduction to the Recording Studio (2 Hours)

This course is design to provide a basic overview of the contemporary digital recording studio. Students will learn though demonstration and practice how to use current hardware and software used to produce music. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 156   MIDI Music Composition (3 Hours)

MIDI Music Composition I is designed to create a technical and conceptual foundation for further studies in electronic music. Students will learn and demonstrate basic compositional techniques, including form, melody, rhythm and harmony. Also, the student will demonstrate the ability to use computers and software to create and perform music. Emphasis will be on developing skills appropriate to the beginning student for the purpose of creative and technical expression. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

MUS 157   Introduction to Digital Audio (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 155 or MUS 156

Introduction to Digital Audio is designed to further develop skills acquired in MIDI Music Composition I. Students will practice using ProTools digital audio software, combined with a digital audio interface to record, edit and play back music. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of sound, and common audio effects, including reverb, delay and compression. Students will also further develop their compositional skills through demonstration and practice, and create audio recordings of their music. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

MUS 158   Recording Studio I (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 157

This course is designed to develop both the creative abilities and technical skills needed to produce music using modern digital recording techniques and equipment. Students will acquire an increased proficiency with the operation of ProTools, the industry standard digital audio software, and the corresponding digital audio hardware. Students will demonstrate knowledge of microphone types and techniques by conducting simple recording sessions, from set-up to final mix. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

MUS 159   Recording Studio II (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 158

This course is designed for the student interested in the continued development of the creative abilities and technical skills needed to produce music using modern digital recording techniques and equipment. Students will understand simple copyright types and procedures, and create an itemized budget to establish a digital project studio. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge of ProTools, and apply final mastering techniques in order to compile a portfolio of original music for personal, academic or professional purposes. 3 lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

MUS 160   Recording Studio Lab (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 158

This course is designed for students interested in learning how to work in a digital recording studio. Students will prepare for and conduct recording sessions and mix down sessions. Students will gain real world, hands-on experience as a studio musician, audio engineer and musical producer. 2 1/2 hrs. integrated lecture lab/wk.

MUS 161   Chamber Choir I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 162   Chamber Choir II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 161 and audition

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 162H   HON: Chamber Choir II (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

MUS 163   Chamber Choir III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 162 and audition

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 164   Chamber Choir IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 163 and audition

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 165   Music Composition I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 141 or department approval

This entry-level course provides instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will learn correct notational procedures and compose melodies and short pieces for one or two live performers. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

MUS 166   Music Composition II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 165

This is an intermediate-level course for students seeking instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will learn to use a computer to notate their compositions, will begin to work with tonal harmony, will write music for a trio and/or quartet, and will have a piece performed during a music department recital. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

MUS 167   Music Composition III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 166

This class is an intermediate-level course for the student seeking instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will enhance their ability to use a computer to notate their compositions, will begin to work with nonfunctional tonal harmony, will write music for SATB choir or for vocal soloist, and will have a piece performed during a music department recital. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

MUS 169   Voice Class I (2 Hours)

This is an entry level course for voice study in a group setting. No previous voice study or music instruction is required. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of proper vocal production, as well as techniques for practice, performance, and maintaining vocal health. Vocal technique is approached from a classical perspective, however, the class includes discussion on appropriate usage of the voice in different styles. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 170   Voice Class II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 169

This course is a continuation of Voice Class I, voice study in a group setting. Students will focus on the reinforcement of basic elements of proper vocal production, as well as techniques for practice, performance, and maintaining vocal health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

MUS 175   Songwriting (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval

Songwriting is intended for students that seek instruction in the craft of writing popular songs. Students will learn through demonstration, practice and group critiques, the basic skills of songwriting. These skills include the study of form, lyrics, melodic lines and harmony, and the preparation of charts. Students must be able to play an instrument and/or sing well enough to demonstrate their work. 1 hr. lecture, 1.5 hr. instructional lab/wk.

MUS 176   Jazz Band I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This is an entry-level course in the jazz band performing format for the student with little or no experience in this course of study. The student will learn, through rehearsal and performance, the basic elements of music and how these are utilized in the jazz band. Topics will include simple rhythms, basic melodic construction and major scale construction. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 177   Jazz Band II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 176 or audition required

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior jazz band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn beginning elements of music as applied to the jazz band performing format. Topics covered will include syncopated rhythm, Dorian minor scales and blues form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 178   Jazz Band III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 177 and audition required

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior jazz band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the intermediate levels of jazz band performance will be learned. Topics covered will include Latin style, Mixolydian scales and the 32-bar song form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 179   Jazz Band IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 178 and audition required

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior jazz band experience. Advanced elements of jazz music will be learned through rehearsal and performance. Topics covered will include Lydian scales and ensemble performance techniques. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 185   Live Sound Production I (3 Hours)

This course is designed to teach the basic elements of sound, and the equipment and set-ups required to operate sound at live venues, like churches, live theaters or live musical venues. Students will learn techniques through demonstration, lecture and "hands-on" exercises in a professional facility. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 186   Live Sound Production II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 185

This course is designed to build upon and put into practice concepts learned in Live Sound Production I. Students will study "front of house" methods, monitoring practices, communication systems and troubleshooting. Students will also apply learned concepts to alternate sound systems through "hands-on" practicums. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 187   Jazz Improvisation I (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Audition

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no jazz improvisation experience. Through written work and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic elements of jazz improvisation. Topics to be covered will include identification and performance of basic intervals, major scales, Dorian modes, Mixolydian modes, major seventh chords, minor seventh chords, dominant seventh chords and the basic blues form. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 188   Jazz Improvisation II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 187 and audition required

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least one semester of jazz improvisation. Through performance on the chosen instrument and written studies, the student will learn advanced concepts of jazz improvisation. Topics to be covered include jazz performance style, construction of the improvised solo and 32-bar song form. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 191   Concert Band I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This is an entry-level course in the concert band format for the student with little or no concert band experience. Students will learn the basic elements of music as related to the concert band through rehearsal and performance. Topics include counting and subdividing motifs into melodies; and differentiating between major and minor tonalities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 192   Concert Band II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 191 and audition required

This is a beginning-level course in the concert band format for the student with at least one semester of prior concert band experience. Students will learn the beginning-level elements of music as related to the concert band through rehearsal and performance. Topics to be covered include odd meters, minor scales and homophonic texture. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 193   Concert Band III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 192 or audition required

This is an intermediate course for the student with at least two semesters of prior concert band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn intermediate levels of the elements of music in the concert band format. Topics will include parade march style, concert march style and concert overture style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 194   Concert Band IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 193 or audition required

This is an advanced course for the student with at least three semesters of prior concert band performing experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn the advanced concepts of concert band performance. Topics will include polyphonic texture, concert suite style and medley style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 195   Vocal Jazz Ensemble I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This is an entry-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include 8th note swing, jazz syncopation and 32-bar song form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 196   Vocal Jazz Ensemble II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 195 and audition required

This is a beginning-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include Dorian minor scales, Mixolydian scales and 12-bar blues form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 197   Vocal Jazz Ensemble III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 196 and audition required

This is an intermediate-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include beginning improvisation, Latin rhythm and major scales. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 198   Vocal Jazz Ensemble IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 197 and audition required

This is an advanced-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include scat, improvisation in 32-bar song form, Lydian scales and ballad style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 201   Chamber Ensemble I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience in the chamber ensemble performing format. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn the basic fundamentals of this performing medium. Topics to be covered will include tone quality, intervals and rhythmic patterns. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 202   Chamber Ensemble II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 201 or placement by instructor

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of experience in the chamber ensemble performing format. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument the student will learn the basic fundamental of this performing medium. Topics to be covered will include minor scales, chord construction and compound rhythms. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 203   Chamber Ensemble III (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 202 or placement by instructor

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of chamber ensemble experience. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn intermediate-advanced concepts of chamber ensemble performance. Topics to be covered include sight reading, intonation and style. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 204   Chamber Ensemble IV (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 203 or placement by instructor

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior ensemble experience. Through performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn the advanced concepts of chamber ensemble performance. Topics to be covered will include balance and cooperative expression. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

MUS 211   Orchestra I (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Audition required

This is an entry-level course in the orchestra format for the student with little or no orchestra experience. Students will learn the basic elements of music as related to the orchestra through rehearsal and performance. Topics include counting and subdividing duple, triple and quadruple rhythm; assembling melodic motifs into melodies; and differentiating between major and minor tonalities. Students will rehearse and perform with the Overland Park Civic Orchestra. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.(1 evening/wk.).

MUS 212   Orchestra II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 211 and audition required

This is a beginning-level course in the orchestra format for the student with at least one semester of prior orchestra experience. Students will learn the beginning-level elements of music as related to the orchestra through rehearsal and performance. Topics to be covered include odd meters, minor scales and homophonic texture. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.(1 evening/wk.).

MUS 221   Piano Class I (2 Hours)

This course provides a basic knowledge of music and the essential techniques required to play the piano. Students will learn essential musical terminology, including musical notation and symbols, major and minor key signatures, and the harmonization of melodies using tonic and dominant triads. Specific piano-related terminology will include finger exercises, basic keyboard repertoire using major and minor five-finger patterns, major and minor scales, major and minor triads in root position, ensemble playing of two to four parts, and the formation of good practice habits. Group Piano II should follow the successful completion of this course. Private piano lessons are encouraged for students who successfully complete both courses. 2 hrs./wk.

MUS 222   Piano Class II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 221 and department approval required

This is a beginning-level course that provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn and review musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales; exercises and repertoire using major, minor, diminished and augmented triads in root position and inversions; chord progressions; ensemble playing of two to four parts; and use of the damper pedal. This course is the continuation of MUS 221. Completion of this course should precede Applied Piano I. This course is for beginners able to progress at a fast pace, students with minimal previous experience or students who have completed MUS 221. 2 hrs./wk.

MUS 223   Piano Class III (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: MUS 222 or department approval

This is an intermediate course that provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn and review musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales and modes; exercises and repertoire using major, minor, diminished and augmented triads in root position and inversions; chord progressions; ensemble playing of two to four parts; and use of the damper pedal. This course is the continuation of MUS 222. Completion of this course should precede Applied Piano I. This course is designed for students who have completed one year of study or who have completed MUS 222. 2 hrs./wk.

MUS 226   Applied Guitar I (Class) (1 Hour)

Students will be provided with a foundation in guitar technique upon which to base further study of the instrument. The course consists of an introduction to the use of the guitar as a solo, accompaniment and ensemble instrument. 1 hr./wk.

MUS 227   Applied Guitar II (Class) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 226 or department approval

This continuation of MUS 226 builds a foundation in guitar technique upon which to base further study of the instrument. The course continues to teach techniques that enable students to use the guitar as a solo, accompaniment and ensemble instrument. 1 hr./wk.

MUS 231   Applied Voice I (Private) (1 Hour)

This course is designed to introduce the student to beginning vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 232   Applied Voice II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 231

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in beginning vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire. Note: An honors contract is available. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 233   Applied Voice III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 232

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in beginning intermediate vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 234   Applied Voice IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 233

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in intermediate vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 236   Applied Piano I (Private) (1 Hour)

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no prior piano training. This course provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn essential musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor five-finger patterns; and exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 237   Applied Piano II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 236

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate-level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include major scales and the natural and harmonic forms of the minor scales, rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of duple and triple meter and the basic keyboard literature of the intermediate level.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 238   Applied Piano III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 237

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate-level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include scale, the melodic form of the minor scale, rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of compound meter, and the basic keyboard literature of the intermediate level.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 239   Applied Piano IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 238

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include Dorian and Mixolydian modes, pentatonic scales and performance of a Chopin etude.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 241   Applied Guitar I (Private) (1 Hour)

In this private study in basic guitar technique, emphasis will be upon playing position, posture, tone production and basic music reading skills. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 242   Applied Guitar II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 241 or department approval

This is a continuation of private study in basic guitar technique. Emphasis will be upon playing position, posture, tone production and basic music-reading skills. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 243   Applied Guitar III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 242 or department approval

In this private study in intermediate guitar technique, emphasis will be on playing position, posture, tone production and intermediate music reading skills. Students will progress toward playing literature requiring intermediate skill levels.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 244   Applied Guitar IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 243 or department approval

In this continuation of private study in intermediate guitar technique, emphasis will be on playing position, posture, tone production and intermediate music reading skills. Students will progress toward playing literature requiring intermediate skill levels.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 246   Applied Classical Guitar I (Private) (1 Hour)

Private study in basic classical guitar technique and repertoire. Emphasis will be upon classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 247   Applied Classical Guitar II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 246 or department approval

This continuation of private study in basic classical guitar technique and repertoire will emphasize classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will continue with studies and short pieces, then progress toward longer pieces with the intent of performing these in a recital situation.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 248   Applied Classical Guitar III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 247 or department approval

In this private study in intermediate classical guitar technique and repertoire, emphasis will be on classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will progress toward playing and performing more advanced pieces and guitar studies.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 249   Applied Classical Guitar IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 248 or department approval

This continuation of private study in intermediate classical guitar technique and repertoire will emphasize classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will progress toward playing and performing more advanced pieces and guitar studies.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 251   Applied Brass I (Private) (1 Hour)

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience in performing on a brass instrument. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic concepts of brass performance. Topics to be covered include tone production, basic musical intervals and major scales.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 252   Applied Brass II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 251 or placement by instructor

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior brass instrument study. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the beginning concepts of brass performance. Topics to be covered include embouchure development, minor scales and duple and triple rhythmic patterns.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 256   Applied Percussion I (Private) (1 Hour)

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no training in percussion instruments. The student will learn the beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include basic duple and triple rhythm, snare drum rudiments and basic snare drum performance patterns.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 257   Applied Percussion II(Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 256 or placement by instructor

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include compound rhythm, snare drum rudiments and basic timpani skills.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 258   Applied Percussion III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 257 or placement by instructor

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include snare drum rudiments, basic mallet percussion skills and suspended cymbal skills.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 259   Applied Percussion IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 258 or placement by instructor

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn advanced concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include snare drum rudiments, crash cymbal techniques and drum set skills.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 261   Applied Woodwind I (Private) (1 Hour)

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience performing on a woodwind instrument. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic elements of woodwind performance. Topics to be covered include tone production, basic intervals and major scales.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 262   Applied Woodwind II (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 261 or placement by instructor

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior woodwind study. The student will learn beginning concepts of woodwind performance on the chosen instrument through written exercises and performance. Topics to be covered include embouchure development, minor scales and duple and triple meters.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 263   Applied Woodwind III (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 262 or placement by instructor

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior woodwind study. The student will learn the intermediate concepts of woodwind performance through written exercises and performance. Topics to be covered include chromatic scale, quadruple rhythmic patterns and chord construction.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 264   Applied Woodwind IV (Private) (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MUS 263 or placement by instructor

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior woodwind study. Through written exercises and performance, the student will learn the advanced concepts of woodwind performance. Topics to be covered include pentatonic scale, whole tone scale and melodic contour.

Associated Costs: These are additional (out-of-pocket) expense considerations that students should expect in addition to the course tuition, fees, and textbooks. $150.

MUS 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

MUS 121

  • Title: Introduction to Music Listening
  • Number: MUS 121
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to enhance student music listening. Students will learn to identify changes in the elements of music through the different stylistic periods of classical music. Factual and historical information will be presented to broaden the student's cultural and music appreciation. Students will hear recorded examples of music from the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th-century eras, as well as popular American forms and music from non-Western cultures. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify verbally and aurally the changes in the elements of music from each era.
  2. Differentiate characteristic sounds within these different eras and styles.
  3. Match composers, genres, and forms to specific music eras and styles.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Elements of music
   A. Define the elements of music (melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, and
form) and describe aural examples. 
   B. Recognize and define tempo and dynamic terms.
   C. Identify visual and aural examples of the basic instruments and
instrumental ensembles used in western music. 

II. Musical developments through the stylistic periods of classical music
(Medieval through twentieth century)
   A. List the important composers, genres, and music forms of each era.
   B. Describe and aurally recognize the genres and simpler forms of era.
   C. Describe how the elements of music are used in each era or stylistic
period of classical music.
   D. Summarize the economic, social, and political effects on music in
each era.
   E. Describe the aesthetic qualities of each classical stylistic
period.
   F. State how musicians function in the society of each period of
classical music.
   G. Identify and describe specific pieces studied in class that are
representative of each stylistic era.

III. Popular styles and music from nonwestern cultures
   A. Describe the evolution of jazz from its roots in ragtime and blues
through jazz fusion.
   B. Match important jazz performers to the kinds of jazz they
performed.
   C. Describe the origins and varieties of rock music. 
   D. Briefly describe the development of American musical theater.
   E. Aurally recognize instruments from nonwestern cultures. 
   F. Differentiate the sounds and aesthetics from music of Africa, India,
and China.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Based on any combination of the following methods, specified in
individual syllabi:

1. Several Unit Tests, written and aural, covering the elements of music,
the stylistic eras of music history, and popular styles and nonwestern
musics
2. Comprehensive final exam, written and/or aural
3. Attendance at concerts and reports based on these concerts
4. Brief class presentation on topic pertinent to the class agreed upon by
the instructor and student

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 123

  • Title: Introduction to Music Fundamentals
  • Number: MUS 123
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course is designed to present the fundamentals of music theory to students who have no previous background or training in that subject. Students will receive detailed instruction in naming notes; scales and chords; building intervals; and correlating these skills to the keyboard. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the music staff and name notes in the treble, bass, alto, and tenor clefs.
  2. Recognize, construct and play major and minor scales.
  3. Recognize and construct key signatures of all major and minor keys.
  4. Construct the grand circle of fifths for major and minor scales and briefly discuss its musical significance.
  5. Play, clap, or sing rhythmic notation for duple, triple and quadruple meters.
  6. Recognize, construct, and play major, minor, diminished, and augmented intervals.
  7. Recognize, construct and play chords, inversions and simple chord progressions.
  8. Recognize meters and some intervals aurally. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The music staff
   A. Quickly name verbally and in written form the lines and spaces in
the treble clef
   B. Quickly name verbally and in written form the lines and spaces in
the bass clef
   C. Name verbally and in written form the lines and spaces of the alto
and tenor C clefs

II. Major scales and keys
   A. Construct in written form all major scales in treble and bass clefs
   B. Identify major keys immediately by the key signature
   C. Play all major scales at the keyboard

III. Minor scales and keys
   A. Construct in written form all three forms of minors scales
   B. Identify minor keys immediately by the key signature
   C. Play all three forms of all minor scales at the keyboard

IV. Rhythm 
   A. Recognize verbally and in written form note values of whole notes to
sixteenth notes
   B. Recognize verbally and in written form rest values of whole rests to
sixteenth rests
   C. Identify aurally and visually duple, triple, and quadruple meter or
time signatures and note groupings
   D. Perform (by handclapping) duple, triple, and quadruple patterns
involving whole to eighth values
   E. Reproduce in written form (rhythmic dictation) rhythmic patterns
involving whole to eighth values that are played or clapped by the
instructor

V. Intervals
   A. Recognize aurally and construct in written form the following
intervals: m2, M2, m3, M3, P4, P5, m6, M6, m7, M7, P8
   B. Play any interval from any note on the keyboard
   C. Construct in written form all augmented and diminished intervals

VI. Chords
   A. Recognize visually and construct in written form major, minor,
diminished, and augmented triads and their inversions
   B. Recognize visually and construct in written form dominant seventh
chords and their inversions
   C. Recognize visually and construct in written form half diminished and
fully diminished seventh chords and their inversions

VII. The I - IV - V - I chord progression
   A. Recognize aurally the I - IV - V - I chord progression
   B.  Play the progression on the keyboard in at least the following
keys:  C major, F major, G major, Bb major, D major

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written examinations                       75%
 2. Aural and keyboard examinations            15%
 3. Attendance, homework, class participation  10%
Total:                                        100%

Grading Criteria:
90 -  100% = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 125

  • Title: Introduction to Jazz Listening
  • Number: MUS 125
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no prior knowledge of the American art form of jazz music. Through reading and listening, the student will learn the basic structure of the elements of music and how these are organized to create jazz. Topics to be covered will include rhythm, harmony, and form; Dixieland style; swing style; bop; and contemporary jazz. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a written and aural knowledge of the terms common to Jazz style including: a) Rhythm, b) Harmony, c) Form, d) Improvisation
  2. Identify the structure and organization of each of the elements from number 1 above in each of the major stylistic periods of American Jazz: a) Dixieland, b) Swing, c) Bop, d) Contemporary 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythm
   A. Compose a written definition of duple, triple and quadruple meter.
   B. By listening only, physically tap the pulse of music either with the
foot or hand.
   C. After identifying the basic pulse of taping, orally organize the
pulses into meter and identify the down beat of each measure.
   D. Compose a written log that will track the changes in rhythm that
occur in each style period.
   E. Orally explain the changes noted in the log from above in an
individual session with the instructor.

II. Harmony
   A. Define orally and in written form the structure of tercial harmony.
   B. Diagram using musical notation the triads built on each degree of a
major scale.
   C. Label the triads with the proper Roman numeral symbols.
   D. Explain orally the basic I -IV-II-V- I chordal progression.
   E. Identify aurally the basic chordal progression from above in both a
Blues form and 32 bar song form.

III. Form
   A. Identify by reading musical notation and aurally a basic 12 bar
blues form.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation and aurally a basic 32 bar
blues form.
   C. Compose an original melody and text set to a 12 bar blues form.
   D. Perform the text above with a Blues play-along recording before the
class.

IV. Improvisation
   A. Compose a written definition of improvisation.
   B. Identify aurally improvisation and describe the range and contour of
the improvisation.
   C. Choose two major Jazz artists and identify, compare and contrast
their individual improvisational styles in the form of a written log.
   D. Graph the improvisation of at least one major artist from each style
period as directed by the instructor.

V. Style Identification
   A. Dixieland
      1. Identify aurally the rhythmic characteristics.
      2. Explain the structure of the harmony.
      3. Identify aurally the basic form.
      4. Identify in written form the improvisational style of Louis
Armstrong.
   B. Swing
      1. Identify aurally the rhythmic characteristics.
      2. Explain the structure of the harmony.
      3. Identify aurally the basic form.
      4. Compare and contrast the improvisational style of Dixieland and
Swing in the form of a written log.
   C. Bop
      1. Identify aurally the rhythmic characteristics.
      2. Explain the structure of the harmony.
      3. Identify aurally the basic form.
      4. Compare and contrast the improvisational style of Dixieland,
Swing and Bop in the form of a written log.
   D. Contemporary
      1. Identify aurally the rhythmic characteristics.
      2. Explain the structure of the harmony.
      3. Identify aurally the basic form.
      4. Compare and contrast the improvisational style of Dixieland,
Swing, Bop and Contemporary in the form of a written log.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written Exam: rhythm, harmony, form and improvisation - 30% of
grade.
2. Listening Exam: cover same areas as above - 35% of grade.
3. Aural identification of Dixieland, Swing, Bop and Contemporary - 35% of
grade.

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 126

  • Title: Introduction to World Music
  • Number: MUS 126
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to the musical heritage of the world. Through an interdisciplinary approach targeting the arts, humanities and social sciences, the course fosters skills necessary to gain a deeper appreciation of both familiar and unfamiliar musical traditions. The course will survey a representative cross section of the major musical traditions of the world, which may include Native American, Black American, sub-Saharan African, Eastern European/Bosnian, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese and Latin American/Brazilian traditions. Note: The course does not require the ability to read music. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define a variety of non-Western musical cultures (folk and popular).
  2. Place music in a social and cultural context to reach a better understanding of its role in different societies.
  3. Discuss how music defines, supports and enriches the human aesthetic experience and daily life.
  4. Evaluate the relative hierarchy of fundamental music elements (including rhythm, meter, harmony, melody and form) in particular musical cultures to better understand the organizational principles behind applied musical examples.
  5. Listen actively to music to explain analytical perspectives with musical terminology.
  6. Describe music as human expression by borrowing methods from history and anthropology.
  7. Apply investigative research methods to any music through an introduction to basic music references sources.
  8. Examine the specific relationship between instruments, ensembles and musical functions in various cultures.
  9. Demonstrate results of first-hand experience with ethnomusicological activity as a result of individual field projects. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate a Written and Aural Knowledge of the Terms Common to
Folk and Popular Music Traditions
   A. Rhythm
   B. Melody
   C. Harmony
   D. Genre and form
   E. Performance context
   F. Text
   G. Composition/improvisation
   H. Transmission
   I. Movement

II. Construct a Working Definition of Music (and apply it to various
cultures) by Considering the Relative Hierarchy of Musical Elements
   A. Construct analysis guidelines for listening exercises
   B. Examine ideology behind music making: function, ceremony,
entertainment, etc.

III. Define Ethnomusicology and Demonstrate Written and Aural Knowledge of
Contextual Analysis
   A. Examine societal implications of cultural activity and identify
music as relevant to the human aesthetic experience and to daily life
   B. Find connections between primitive and evolved societies
   C. Define parallels between anthropology, history, literature and
music
   D. Examine basic reference tools and specific research methodologies
for ethnomusicological inquiry

IV. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Sub-Saharan Africa and Identify Cultures and
Subcultures of African Music Making Such As:
   A. Agbekor music of the Ewe people
   B. Drum language for Agbekor
   C. Music of the Shona people

V. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to the North American Ethnic and Popular Styles
(specifically comparing to African origins) Such As:
   A. Blues
   B. Jazz

VI. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to the Native North American Indian (specifically
targeting the Navajo culture) Such As:
   A. Yeibichai song tradition
   B. Circle dance songs
   C. the Native American Church

VII. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Eastern Europe (specifically targeting Bosnia) Such
As:
   A. Bosnian Highland Village Musical Traditions
   B. Bosnian Lowland Village Musical Traditions
   C. Popular Musical Styles of Bosnian Culture

VIII. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Southern India Such As:
   A. General theory of raga, tala, musical structure and improvisation
   B. South Indian Karnataka Sangeeta
   C. The influence of Indian music on the West

IX. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Indonesia Such As:
   A. Central Java and the gamelan (instruments, performance contexts)
   B. Shadow puppetry
   C. Indonesian popular music and transnational exchange

X.  Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Japan (specifically the aesthetic sense of timbre,
pitch collections/scales; melody and harmony; rhythm; and form) Such As:
   A. Shakuhachi flute repertory
   B. Shamisen repertory
   C. Folk song
   D. Popular music
   E. Kabuki and Noh theater traditions

XI. Define Selected Musical Styles and Identify Characteristic Sounds of
Traditions Relevant to Latin America and Identify Cultures and Subcultures
of Latin American Music Making Such As:
   A. Quichua of Ecuador
   B. Nueva cancion of Chile
   C. Brazilian candomble
   D. Brazilian carnival traditions: samba

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                                  60% of grade
Field Project                                 25% of grade
Weekly Assignments/Participation/Attendance   15% of grade
  Total                                      100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F – Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 128

  • Title: History of Rock and Roll Music
  • Number: MUS 128
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Through the study of the history of Rock and Roll music, students will discover how the various styles and structures of Rock have evolved, and how these styles reflected the social and cultural events in each stylistic era. By studying this history the students will also learn about the major Rock artists and what their contributions were to the development of the art form and the social climate in which the artist lived. The course will also address the role of technology on the development of the music and the music business. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Outline the history and development of Rock and Roll from African work songs to present day styles.
  2. Aurally identify and verbally discuss the elements of the music including rhythm, texture, lyrics, and instruments.
  3. Discuss the effect of Rock music on social and cultural movements and how economic factors have fostered changes in the music.
  4. Compare and contrast the major styles and historical eras of Rock music.
  5. Discuss the effects of modern technology and the Internet on the development of current Rock styles and the rock music business. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

   I. Rock Music-Origin and Development 
      A. Explain the significance of the African Slave work songs as the
origin of rock and Roll Music. 
      B. Discuss the development of Rock music after it was taken over by
White Americans and then refashioned from the original work songs. 

  II. Rock Music-The Elements
      A. Aurally identify and verbally  discuss the elements of music that
shape the Rock style. These elements include:
         1. Basic rhythmic cells
         2. Textures of thin, thick, light, and heavy sounds
         3. The lyrics of songs and how the words are combined with the
rhythmic cells and texture.
         4. The instruments used in Rock music and how these instruments
shape rhythm, texture, and lyrics.

 III. Rock Music-Social and Cultural Aspects
      A. Explain how the styles of Rock music were shaped and changed by:
         1. The population growth of post World War II resulting in the
youth culture known as the "Baby Boomers".
         2. The Civil rights movement
         3. The anti war protests of the 1960's.
      B. Explain whyRock music is sometimes known as "the music of
rebellion".
      C. Discuss how the lyrics of Rock music reflect the social and
cultural changes.
      D. Discuss the significance of economic changes on the styles of
Rock music.

  IV. Rock Music-Historical Eras
      A. Aurally and verbally identify all the major historical eras of
Rock music according to the elements of music.
      B. Discuss the major artists of each era and the significance of
their contributions to the art form.

   V. Rock Music and Technology
      A. Discuss how the continual change in computers and computer
software affect and change the styles of Rock music.
      B. Discuss the role of the Internet in shaping the styles and
artists of modern day Rock music.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Unit exams, aural and written components, covering the major
criteria of each unit. 40% of final grade
 
2. Comprehensive final exam, aural and written. 40% of final grade.
 
3. In depth written paper utilizing one of the course objectives. 20% of
final grade.
 
Scale:
 
A=90-100%
B=80-89%
C=70-79%
D=60-69%
F=below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 131

  • Title: Sight-Singing and Ear Training I*
  • Number: MUS 131
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 123 with a grade of 'C' or higher or department approval

Description:

This course is an introduction to sight singing and ear training. Basic methods of reading music are presented and practiced. Students are also trained to recognize aurally and notate the basic elements of music: intervals, diatonic melodies, simple rhythms, chord qualities, and basic harmonic progressions. The content is designed to complement the Harmony I course, though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Sing and recognize aurally major, natural minor, melodic minor, and harmonic minor scales.
  2. Sight-sing any diataonic melody in a simple rhythm in any major or minor key in both the treble and bass clefs.
  3. Recognize and reproduce any interval in both written and aural forms.
  4. Notate any diatonic melody in simple rhythms upon hearing the melody.
  5. Notate basic rhythms in both simple and compound meters.
  6. Recognize major, minor, diminished, and augmented chord qualities in at least root position chords.
  7. Recognize and notate harmonic progressions using I, ii, IV (iv), V, and vi chords.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sight-singing
   A. Adapt solfege syllables to any major or minor key.
   B. Sing assigned solfege exercises from memory.
   C. Sing melodies and two part music in both major and minor keys that
use stepwise movement and intervals in the I (i) and V chords in both
simple and compound time.

II. Intervals
   A. Identify in both written and aural forms the following intervals:
m2, M2, m3, M3, P4, P5, m6, M6, m7, M7, and P8
   B. Sing any of the following intervals: m2, M2, m3, M3, P4, P5, m6, M6,
m7, M7, and P8

III. Rhythmic Dictation
   A. Notate simple rhythmic patterns using duple and triple subdivisions
of the beat
   B. Notate simple rhythms using dotted half or quarter notes

IV. Melodic Dictation
   A. Identify aurally up to three notes of the scale
   B. Notate melodies that use intervals in the I and V chords
   C. Notate any diatonic melody in a simple rhythm

V. Harmonic dictation
   A.  Identify aurally the qualities of the following chords: major,
minor, augmented, and diminished
   B. Recognize and sing any major, natural minor, melodic minor, and
harmonic minor scale
   C. Notate harmonic progressions using I (i), ii, IV (iv), V, and vi
chords
   D. Recognize aurally the mode of melodic or harmonic excerpts
A. Notate simple rhythmic patterns in simple meter using at least duple divisions of the beat B. Notate simple rhythmic patterns in compound meter using at least triple divisions of the beat

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written and aural examinations             70 - 90%
2. Daily quizzes                               0 - 15%
3. Attendance, homework, class participation  10 - 15%
   Total                                        100%  

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 132

  • Title: Sight-Singing and Ear Training II*
  • Number: MUS 132
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 131

Description:

This course is a continuation of the class Sight-singing and Ear Training I. The content is designed to complement the Harmony II course though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Sight-sing any diatonic melodies using all intervals and quadruple or sextuple divisions of the beat in treble, bass, and C clefs
  2. Recognize aurally and visually all diatonic intervals
  3. Notate rhythm patterns that involve quadruple or sextuple divisions of the beat
  4. Notate any diatonic melody with quadruple divisions or sextuple divisions of the beat
  5. Notate harmonic progressions using all the diatonic chords except iii (III)
  6. When listening, detect simple errors in notated melodies, rhythms, and harmonic progressions 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sight-singing
   A. Sight-sing simple diatonic melodies in simply rhythms in the alto
and tenor clefs
   B. Sight-sing diatonic melodies that use all intervals and more complex
rhythmic divisions of the beat 

II. Intervals
   A. Identify in both written and aural forms all diatonic intervals
   B. Sing all diatonic intervals

III. Rhythmic Dictation
   A. Notate rhythmic patterns using quadruple and sextuple subdivisions
of the beat
   B. Notate rhythms using dotted eighth notes as well as half or quarter
notes

IV. Melodic Dictation
   A. Notate longer (at least two phrases) diatonic melodies
   B. Notate melodies that use intervals in the IV and vii°chords, as
well as I and V chords
   C. Notate any diatonic melody that uses larger diatonic leaps and
quadruple divisions of the beat

V. Harmonic dictation
   A. Notate non harmonic tones in simple chord progressions
   B. Notate harmonic progressions using the following chords: I (i), ii,
(ii°), iii (III), IV (iv), V, vi (VI), and vii°  

VI. Error detection
   A. Identify errors in melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structures

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written and aural examinations (7 unit tests) 70 - 90%
2. Daily quizzes                                  0 - 15%
3. Attendance, homework, class participation      0 - 15%
   Total                                           100%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 133

  • Title: Sight-Singing and Ear Training III*
  • Number: MUS 133
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 132

Description:

This course is a continuation of the classes Sight-singing and Ear Training I and II. The content is designed to complement the Harmony III course, though it is not necessary they be taken in the same semester. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Sight-sing melodies with complex rhythms that use chromatic tones and modulate to closely related keys
  2. Recognize and sing all harmonic intervals
  3. Notate complex melodies that use chromaticism and modulate
  4. Notate complex rhythms
  5. Notate harmonic progressions using all diatonic chords and modulation to closely related keys
  6. Upon hearing, detect errors in complex notated melodies, rhythms, and harmonies 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sight-singing
   A. Sight-sing melodies that use chromatic tones, secondary dominants,
or modulation to closely related keys
   B. Sight-sing melodies that have syncopations, divided beat patterns in
simple and compound time, duplet divisions of dotted note values, triplet
divisions of undotted note values, and hemiola

II. Intervals
   A. Recognize and sing all harmonic intervals
   B. Notate two intervals when played in succession

III. Rhythmic Dictation
   A. Notate rhythms with quarter and eighth divisions of the beat
   B. Notate rhythms with triple and triplet subdivisions
   C. Notate simple two-voice rhythms    

IV. Melodic Dictation
   A. Notate short melodies from music literature
   B. Notate melodies with sequences
   C. Notate short melodies that modulate to closely related keys

V. Harmonic dictation
   A. Identify chord qualities of MM, mm, Mm, dm, and dd 7th chords
   B. Notate harmonic progressions involving all diatonic triads 
   C. Notate harmonic progressions with modulations to closely related
keys

VI. Error detection
   A. Identify errors in triads and dominant seventh chords in four parts
   B.  Identify errors in more complex rhythms

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written and aural examinations             80%
2. Attendance, homework, class participation  20%
   Total:                                    100%
 
Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 141

  • Title: Music Theory: Harmony I*
  • Number: MUS 141
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 123 with a grade of 'C' or higher or department approval

Description:

This course is a basic study of the harmonic system sited in Western music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in areas of music composition. Students will learn the basic skills involved in writing and analyzing music of this nature as well as play simple chord progressions on the piano. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize basic music fundamentals of keys, key signatures, major and minor scales, pitch intervals, circle of fifths, triads, seventh chords, rhythmic time values, and time signatures.
  2. Identify the function and purpose of diatonic chords in the harmonic spectrum, naming correct and incorrect chord progressions.
  3. Harmonize and write music for four voices based on the functional harmonic practices and correct voice leading of music from 1650-1900.
  4. Transcribe parts for transposing instruments and write parts using various C clefs, especially the alto and tenor clef.
  5. Analyze both melodically and harmonically simple four part chorales and hymns using Roman numeral analysis techniques.
  6. Recognize triads and seventh chords in inversion, describing their inverted purpose and function.
  7. Recognize the form and practices of good melodic writing as practiced in the historical period under study.
  8. Compose simple original melodies using the basic practices under study.
  9. Play all major and minor chords, scales, and cadences at the piano.
  10. Harmonize simple melodies with I (i), IV (iv) and V chords. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Accurate and accessible knowledge of music fundamentals
   A. Recognize and name keys and key signatures for both major and minor
keys
   B. Spell any major, natural minor, harmonic minor, or melodic minor
scale
   C. Diagram the circle of fifths
   D. Spell any major, minor, diminished, or augmented triad
   E. Name the five common types of seventh chords and spell any of them
using any pitch as the chord root
   F. Demonstrate an understanding of rhythmic time values
   G. Identify simple and compound time signatures
   H. Rebar rhythmic values to correctly indicate the meter

II. Diatonic chords and progressions in major and minor keys
   A. Name the diatonic types of chords in major keys
   B. Write all the options for chords in minor keys
   C. Name the most common chords used in minor keys
   D. Name appropriate and inappropriate chord progressions in tonal
music

III. Diatonic four voice part writing
   A. Harmonize given melodies and/or bass lines with the other 2-3 parts
using correct voice leading and part writing procedures.
   B. Harmonize given melodies and/or bass lines with appropriate chord
progressions.

IV. Transcribing parts for transposing and C clef instruments
   A. Name common transposing and C clef instruments
   B. Rewrite a part using the correct transposition for any transposing
instrument
   C. Rewrite a part for any instrument using a C clef

V. Roman numeral analysis of simple diatonic four part music
   A. Identify roots and types of chords using Roman numeral analysis in
hymns and chorales
   B. Identify chord and seventh chord inversions with figured bass
inversion symbols in hymns and chorales

VI. Chord inversions
   A. Recognize chords and seventh chords in inversion
   B. Name the correct inversion symbol for any inverted chord
   C. Describe the correct uses of inverted chords
   D. Write simple four part music using inverted chords appropriately in
tonal music practice

VII. Melody
   A. Recognize the form and practices of good melodic writing as
practiced in the common practice era
   B. Recognize errors in good melodic writing as practiced in the common
practice era
   C. Compose simple diatonic melodies using the practices under study

VIII. Keyboard skills
   A. Play any major and minor chord
   B. Play any major or minor scale
   C. Play plagal and authentic cadences in any major or minor key
   D. Harmonize simple melodies with I (i), IV (iv), or V chords

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written examinations (4-5 exams) 65-80% 
2. Attendance, homework, class participation, chapter quizzes 10-15%
3. Keyboard harmony application 10-15%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 141H

No information found.

MUS 142

  • Title: Music Theory: Harmony II*
  • Number: MUS 142
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 141 or passing equivalency test

Description:

Harmony II is a continuation of the study of the harmonic system used in music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in certain areas of music composition. The course covers use of non-harmonic tones, supertonic and dominant sevenths, functions of the submediant and mediant triads, advanced melodic writing and secondary dominant chords. Student will learn to harmonize melodies at the keyboard and play simple chord progressions on the piano. Music of the period will be analyzed. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs.lecture/wk. This course is typically taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Quicken the verbal and written response rates of the skills and knowledge gained in Harmony I.
  2. Recognize basic cadences, phrases, and periods and describe how they delineate structure in music.
  3. Recognize all types of non-harmonic tones and use them accurately in conventional partwriting.
  4. Recognize all seventh chords and use them in conventional partwriting.
  5. Using Roman numeral analysis technique, analyze both melodically and harmonically music that uses diatonic chords, including seventh chords
  6. Harmonize melodies and bass lines with a clear and accurate understanding of harmonic progression and the essentials of conventional partwriting.
  7. Recognize and spell secondary dominant chords.
  8. Play plagal and authentic cadences in every major and minor key.
  9. Harmonize melodies with appropriate chord progressions at piano in various keys as required by the instructor.
  10. Play simple chord progressions as specified by the instructor. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Skills and knowledge from Harmony I 
   A. Quickly spell major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads from
any note
   B. Quickly identify all major and minor key signatures
   C. Quickly identify any written interval
   D. Name common chord progressions in both major and minor keys
   E. Name uncommon or inappropriate chord progression in major and minor
keys 

II. Melodic Line, Cadences, and Form
   A. Recognize plagal, authentic, deceptive, Phrygian, and half cadences
in single melodic lines and harmonic structures
   B. Recognize and label phrases in melodic lines and harmonic
structures
   C. Define and recognize the following forms in melodic structures:
melodic extensions, phrase group, contrasting period, parallel period, and
double period
   D. Incorporate all cadences into appropriate part writing exercises
   E. Harmonize melodies at the keyboard demonstrating understanding of
melodic construction and harmonic function

III. Nonharmonic Tones
   A. Identify all nonharmonic tones in analyzing music examples
   B. Define all nonharmonic tones by their note of approach, dissonance,
and note of resolution
   C. Integrate nonharmonic tones appropriately into part writing
exercises

IV. Seventh chords
   A. Define and quickly spell all types of seventh chords
   B. Name the most common seventh chords used in traditional harmonic
progressions
   C. Integrate these chords into part writing exercises
   D. Identify when melodic lines imply the harmonic support of the V7
chord

V. Roman numeral analysis of diatonic music excerpts
   A. Identify roots of chords and types of chords used in excerpts from
common practice period music
   B. Identify root position and inverted chords

VI. Harmonizing melodic and bass lines
   A. Recognize chords implied by a single bass or melodic line
   B. Write three other parts using appropriate chord progressions and
partwriting procedures

VII. Secondary Dominant Chords; Elementary modulation
   A. Spell secondary dominant chords in any key
   B. Describe how secondary dominant chords are used in harmonic
progressions and modulation
   C. Recognize and analyze secondary dominants in musical passages
   D. Utilize secondary dominant chords in harmonizing melodies that
modulate

VIII. Keyboard applications
   A. Play plagal and authentic cadences in every major and minor key
using one of the patterns provided by the instructor
   B. Harmonize melodies with appropriate chord progressions at the piano
in various keys as required by the instructor.
   C. Play simple chord progressions that include secondary dominants as
specified by the instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written examinations (4-5 exams) 65-80% 
2. Attendance, homework, class participation, chapter quizzes 10-15%
3. Keyboard harmony application 10-15%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 142H

No information found.

MUS 143

  • Title: Music Theory: Harmony III*
  • Number: MUS 143
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 142 or passing equivalency test

Description:

This is a continuation of the study of the harmonic system used in all music composed from 1650 to 1900 and still in use in many areas of music composition today. Important topics include devices of modulation, binary and ternary, and 12 bar blues musical forms and application of part writing procedures to instrumental music. Particular attention will be paid to the nature and functions of diatonic seventh chords, secondary dominants, borrowed chords and Neopolitan chords. Students will work with keyboard harmony exercises of increasing difficulty. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize diatonic seventh chords and use them correctly in part writing.
  2. Recognize and correctly use secondary dominant and leading tone chords.
  3. Analyze music using common chord, direct modulation, and other modulatory techniques.
  4. Recognize and analyze pieces in binary, rounded binary, ternary, and 12 bar blues forms.
  5. Recognize and correctly use borrowed chords and Neopolitan chords.
  6. Harmonize, at the keyboard, melodies that imply the use of seventh chord sequence, secondary dominants, and modulation.
  7. Use these elements and techniques of part writing previously learned in composing brief pieces of instrumental music. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Diatonic Seventh Chords
   A. Spell and name the qualities of all seventh chords in major and
minor keys.
   B. Discuss and analyze ways seventh chords are used in traditional
harmonic progressions.

II. Secondary Dominant and Leading Tone Chords
   A. Define and spell a secondary dominant and leading tone chords in any
key.
   B. Name the common usages of secondary dominant and leading tone
chords.
   C. Analyze and part write music using secondary dominant and leading
tone chords.

III. Modulatory Techniques
   A. Analyze passages of music common chord or direct modulation.
   B. Name common pivot chords in related keys.
   C. Recognize the use of sequential modulation, monophonic modulation,
and common tone modulation.
   D. Correctly harmonize in written form melodies that imply a
modulation.

IV. Binary, Ternary and 12 Bar Blues Forms
   A. Define verbally binary, rounded binary, ternary form, and 12 bar
blues forms.
   B. Recognize and analyze passages or pieces of music in binary, rounded
binary, ternary, and 12 bar blues forms.

V. Borrowed and Neopolitan Chords
   A. Define and identify common and rare borrowed chords in any key.
   B. Describe which chord members may be altered to result in an altered
or borrowed chord.
   C. Define and identify Neopolitan chords in any key.
   D. Describe and analyze how borrowed and Neopolitan chords function in
harmonic progressions.
   E. Correctly harmonize in written form melodies that imply the use of
these chords.

VI. Keyboard Harmony Applications
   A. Harmonize melodies at the keyboard using seventh chord sequence.
   B. Harmonize, at the keyboard, melodies that imply the use of a
secondary dominant chord.
   C. Harmonize at the keyboard phrases that imply a modulation.

VII. Application of Part-Writing Procedures to Instrumental Writing
   A. Name at least five ways traditional part writing is altered or
adapted when writing in other styles or for instruments.
   B. Analyze ways composers alter and adapt traditional part writing.
   C. Write music in which a figured bass is realized, a traditional folk
song melody is accompanied or arranged, and an original piece is composed
using devices of music learned in this course.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written examinations                         50%-70% 
2. Attendance, homework, class participation, 
   chapter quizzes                              15%-30%
3. Keyboard harmony application                  5%-15%
4. Composition projects                         15%-30%

Grading Criteria:
   90 - 100%  = A
   80 -  89%  = B
   70 -  79%  = C
   60 -  69%  = D
    0 -  59%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 144

  • Title: Music Theory: Harmony IV*
  • Number: MUS 144
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 143 or passing equivalency test

Description:

Harmony IV is a continuation of the study of the harmonic practices of tonal music and introduction to 20th-century harmony. Topics include augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulation, and advanced chromatic harmonies. An introduction to 20th-Century harmonic organization includes extended tertian harmony, modal harmony, parallelism, pandiatonicism, atonality, serialism, and aleatory music. Students will work with keyboard harmony exercises of increasing difficulty. Selected software programs will enhance student skills and understanding. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize, spell, and correctly use augmented sixth chords.
  2. Recognize, spell, and correctly use enharmonic chords.
  3. Recognize, spell, and correctly use altered dominant sonorities.
  4. Recognize, spell, and correctly use ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords.
  5. Describe and analyze music using the following 20th century harmonic practices: impressionism, modal harmony, pandiatonicism, atonality, serialism, and aleatory techniques.
  6. Use harmonic structures from this course along with techniques of part writing previously learned to compose brief pieces of music.
  7. Harmonize at the keyboard, melodies that imply the use of augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulation, and altered dominant chords or extended tertian chords. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Augmented Sixth Chords
   A. Define, spell, and identify augmented sixth chords in any key.
   B. Describe and analyze how augmented sixth chords function in any
key.
   C. Correctly harmonize, in written form, melodies that imply the use of
augmented sixth chords.

II. Enharmonic Chords and Modulation
   A. Define, spell, and identify enharmonic chords.
   B. Analyze pieces that modulate using the Mm7th and the o7 sonorities.
   C. Correctly harmonize, in written form, melodies that imply the use of
enharmonic chords.

III. Altered Dominant Sonorities
   A. Define, spell, and identify altered dominant sonorities.
   B. Describe and analyze how altered dominant sonorities function in
modulations.
   C. Correctly harmonize, in written form, melodies that can use altered
dominant sonorities.

IV. Ninth, Eleventh, and Thirteenth Chords
   A. Define, spell, and identify 9th, 11th, and 13th chords.
   B. Discuss their use in tonal music in the common practice period.
   C. Discuss and analyze their use in impressionism.

V. 20th Century Harmonic Practice
   A. Describe and recognize the use of the following 20th century
harmonic practices: impressionism, modal harmony, pandiatonicism,
atonality, serialism, and aleatory techniques.
   B. Analyze 20th century music accurately using the aforementioned
practices.

VI. Keyboard Harmony Application
   A. Harmonize melodies at the keyboard using augmented sixth chords.
   B. Harmonize melodies at the keyboard using enharmonic modulation.
   C. Harmonize melodies at the keyboard using altered dominant chords or
extended tertian chords.

VII. Application of Part Writing Procedures and Harmonic Structures to
Compositions
   A. Compose a brief piece of music using augmented sixth chords,
enharmonic modulation, or altered dominant chords.
   B. Compose a brief passage of music using one of the ways of
structuring harmony in 20th century practices.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Written examinations                           50%-70%
2. Attendance, homework, class participation,
   chapter quizzes                                15%-30%
3. Keyboard harmony application                    5%-15%
4. Composition projects                           15%-30%

Examinations will test the material covered in the course content and
assess the students' abilities to perform the skills described above.

In computing the grades, the following scale will be used:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 145

  • Title: Jazz/Commercial Music Theory I*
  • Number: MUS 145
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 141

Description:

Through the study of Jazz music theory, students will learn the basic elements that comprise the foundation of this style of music. Students will discover how Jazz and Commercial music is constructed, analyzed, and performed by learning intervals, scales, chords, chord progressions, form, and construction of melodies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Aurally identify and be able to write out the basic intervals, scales, and chords used in Jazz/Commercial music.
  2. Aurally identify and be able to write out the basic chord progressions used in Jazz/Commercial music.
  3. Aurally and visually identify Blues and Thirty-two Bar forms.
  4. Construct melodies using all of the above basic skills. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

  I. Interval, Scales, and Chords
     A. Aurally and visually identify the intervals of a minor second
through major ninth in both treble and bass clefs.
     B. Aurally and visually identify major, natural minor,melodic minor,
Dorian, Mixolydian, and Lydian scales in both treble and bass clefs.
     C. Be able to write any of the scales listed in B above from any
pitch in both treble and bass clefs.
     D. Aurally and visually identify major, minor, dominant, and altered
dominant chords.
     E. Be able to write all of the chords listed in D above from any
pitch in both treble and bass clefs.

 II. Chord Progression
     A. Aurally and visually identify in both major and minor tonalities
the standard ii-V-I chord progression.
     B. Aurally and visuslly identify the standard "Rhythm Changes" chord
progression.
     C. Aurally and visually identify a standard "Blues" chord
progression.
     D. Be able to write out in both treble and bass clefs all of the
chord progressions listed above.

III. Musical Forms
     A. Aurally and visually identify 8 and 12 bar Blues forms.
     B. Aurally and visually identify AB, AABA, ABAC song forms
     C. Aurally and visually identify verse/chorus song forms.

 IV. Constuct Melodies
     A. Compose simple melodies using the basic interval, scale,and chord
progression skills.
     B. Construct simple melodies in each of the musical forms studied.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Unit exams, aural and written, covering the components of each
unit. 10-30%
2. Comprehensive final exam, aural and written. 10-30%
3. Musical composition project utilizing all the concepts studied. 20-40%
 
Scale:
 
A=90-100%
B=80-89%
C=70-79%
D=60-60%
 
Below 60%=failing grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 151

  • Title: Mixed Vocal Ensemble I*
  • Number: MUS 151
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to varied choral literature of various periods in music history.
B. To provide the opportunity for students to develop knowledge and an appreciation for music written for specific types of ensembles.
C. To develop vocal technique and skills.    
D. To develop musicianship.                         
E. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of responsibility by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  4. Describe at least one stylistic characteristic in each piece or genre studied.
  5. Demonstrate at least one level of improvement in two of the following three areas: musicianship, vocal production, IPA and text pronunciation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Music Repertoire
Literature will be chosen that is designed with the type of ensemble and
the individual singers skills in mind.  It will be as varied as possible
in style, within those parameters.
   A. Describe at least one musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.   
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.
   D. Name at least one way that the performance of the chosen literature
differs from standard choral literature.

II. Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing sight
reading skills will be given and exercises in sight reading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in music reading skills.

III. Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal agility, choral
blend, and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate vocal exercises.
   B. State the function of each exercise.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in two areas of vocal
technique.

IV. Choral Texts.
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet. Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied. Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least one other language including Italian,
Latin, Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of at least 10 symbols in the International
Phonetic Alphabet.
   C. Name at least one characteristic about each text and language
studied in the semester.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
Class absences:
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts. Accurate performance in class of the
vocal technique exercises.  Accurate performance at concerts of the music
studied in the semester. 80%

Written Exam:  music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information  10%
Aural Exam:  sight reading, text pronunciation 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 152

  • Title: Mixed Vocal Ensemble II*
  • Number: MUS 152
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 151 and audition required

Description:

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to varied choral literature of various
periods in music history.
B. To provide the opportunity for students to develop knowledge and an
appreciation for music written for specific types of ensembles.
C. To develop vocal technique and skills.
D. To develop musicianship.
E. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of responsibility by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  4. Describe at least two stylistic characteristics in each piece or genre studied.
  5. Demonstrate at least one level of improvement in two of the following three areas: musicianship, vocal production, IPA and text pronunciation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Music Repertoire.
Literature will be chosen that is designed with the type of ensemble and
the individual singers skills in mind.  It will be as varied as possible
in style, within those parameters.
   A. Describe at least two musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.   
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.
   D. Name at least one way that the performance of the chosen literature
differs from standard choral literature.

II. Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing sight
reading skills will be given and exercises in sight reading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in music reading skills
from the previous semester.

III. Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal agility, choral
blend, and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate vocal exercises.
   B. State the function of each exercise.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in two areas of vocal
technique from the previous semester.

IV. Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least one other language including Italian,
Latin, Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of at least 20 symbols in the International
Phonetic Alphabet.
   C. Name at least two characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
    Over 9  F
 Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
 Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
 in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
 performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam: music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information 10%
 Aural Exam: sight reading, text pronunciation 10%

 Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 153

  • Title: Mixed Vocal Ensemble III*
  • Number: MUS 153
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 152 and audition required

Description:

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to varied choral literature of various
periods in music history.
B. To provide the opportunity for students to develop knowledge and an
appreciation for music written for specific types of ensembles.
C. To develop vocal technique and skills.
D. To develop musicianship.
E. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of responsibility by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Pronounce with at least 50% accuracy a new text in one foreign language.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Describe at least three stylistic characteristics in each piece or genre studied.
  6. Demonstrate at least one level of improvement in two of the following three areas: musicianship, vocal production, IPA and text pronunciation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Music Repertoire.
Literature will be chosen that is designed with the type of ensemble and
the individual singers skills in mind.  It will be as varied as possible
in style, within those parameters.
   A. Describe at least three musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.   
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.
   D. Name at least three ways that the performance of the chosen
literature differs from standard choral literature.

II. Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing sight
reading skills will be given and exercises in sight reading will be
practiced. There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Define and perform vocally most common expression marks.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in music reading skills
from the previous semester.

III. Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal agility, choral
blend, and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate vocal exercises.
   B. State the function of each exercise.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in two areas of vocal
technique from the previous semester.

IV. Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least one other language including Italian,
Latin, Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of at least 30 symbols in the International
Phonetic Alphabet.
   C. Name at least three characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.
   D. Pronounce accurately at least 50% of one new text in a foreign
language correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
 Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
 Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam:  music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information  10%
 Aural Exam:  sight reading, text pronunciation 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 154

  • Title: Mixed Vocal Ensemble IV*
  • Number: MUS 154
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 153 and audition required

Description:

Choral ensembles are open to participation by the student body. Choral experience or skill is desired in some ensembles but not in others. The ensemble will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. The literature will be specific to the nature of the group and the skills of the students involved. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

1. To give students exposure to varied choral literature of various
periods in music history.
2. To provide the opportunity for students to develop a knowledge and
appreciation for music written for specific types of ensembles.
3. To develop vocal technique and skills.
4. To develop musicianship.
5. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of responsibility by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Pronounced with 50 percent accuracy new texts in two foreign languages.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Describe at least three stylistic characteristics in each piece or genre studied.
  6. Demonstrate at least one level of improvement in the following three areas: musicianship, vocal production, IPA and text pronunciation. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Music Repertoire – Literature will be chosen that is designed
with the type of ensemble and the individual singer’s skill in mind. It
will be as varied as possible in style, within those parameters.
   A. Describe at least three musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.
   D. Name at least three ways that the performance of the chosen
literature differs from standard choral literature.

II. Musicianship – In at least two of every three classes, instruction
in developing sightreading skills will be given and exercises in
sightreading will be practiced. There will also be instruction or review
of musical expression symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Define and perform vocally most common expression marks.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in music reading skills
from the previous semester.

III. Vocal Technique – In each class, exercises will be given to develop
breath control and support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal
agility, choral blend and intonation.
   A. Demonstrate vocal exercises.
   B. State the function of each exercise.
   C. Demonstrate at least one level of growth in two areas of vocal
technique from the previous semester.

IV. Choral Texts – Introductory information will be given throughout the
semester about International Phonetic Alphabet. Information will be given
about the origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied. Pieces
will be sung in English and in at least one other language including
Italian, Latin, Spanish, French and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of at least 40 symbols in the International
Phonetic Alphabet.
   C. Name at least three characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.
   D. Pronounce accurately at least 50 percent of new texts in two foreign
languages correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Absences = 80% of grade
  Class absences 1-3 = A
                 4-5 = B
                 6-7 = C
                 8-9 = D
                 Over 9 = F
  Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences
  Missing a concert lowers the final grade two letters

Attendance in class and at concerts. Accurate performance in class of the
vocal technique exercises. Accurate performance at concerts of the music
studies in the semester. = 80%

Written Exam.  Music expression marks, stylistic characteristics and
textual information = 10%

Aural Exam.  Sightreading, text pronunciation = 10%

90 – 100%  =  A
89 -  89%  =  B
70 -  79%  =  C
60 -  69%  =  D
Below 60%  =  F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 155

  • Title: Introduction to the Recording Studio
  • Number: MUS 155
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course is design to provide a basic overview of the contemporary digital recording studio. Students will learn though demonstration and practice how to use current hardware and software used to produce music. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Utilize current hardware used to record music. Hardware to be covered will include the digital, automated mixer, microphones, pre-amps and studio monitors.
  2. Utilize ProTools software to record and edit music. Essential topics include information on setting up tracks, assigning inputs and outputs, the use of effects and basic audio editing.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Hardware
   A. Demonstrate the ability to use the digital automated mixer.
      1. Set up a track for recording.
      2. Adjust the input level.
      3. Use the talk back feature.
   B. Explain standard uses for the basic microphone types.
      1. Know when to use a dynamic microphone.
      2. Know when to use a condenser microphone.
      3. Know when to use a ribbon microphone.
   C. Use basic microphone placement techniques.
      1. Mono microphone placement.
         a. Mic a guitar cabinet.
         b. Mic a bass cabinet.
         c. Mic a vocalist.
         d. Mic a wind instrument.
         e. Mic a stringed instrument.
      2. Stereo microphone placement.
         a. Set up a spaced pair of microphones.
         b. Set up an XY pair of microphones.
         c. Set up the "Decca Tree" using 3 microphones.
      3. Pre-amps.
         a. Insert a microphone pre-amp into the audio signal chain.
         b. Adjust the gain and drive to achieve a desired sound.
      4. Studio monitors.
         a. Explain the use of passive studio monitors.
         b. Explain the use of active studio monitors.

II. ProTools Digital Audio Software
   A. Use proper file management techniques.
   B. Set up a session.
      1. Set up tracks as needed.
      2. Assign initial inputs.
      3. Assign initial outputs.
         a. Set up a sub-mix.
         b. Set up an effects loop.
   C. Assign basic effects.
      1. Use Real Time Audio Suite effects.
         a. Assign and use reverb effectively.
         b. Assign and use standard equalization settings.
         c. Assign various delay settings.
         d. Assign dynamic effects.
         e. Access effects presets.
         f. Modify and save effects settings.
         g. Automate an effect parameter.
      2. Use Audio Suite effects.
         a. Apply effects that are available only in Audio Suite.
         b. Apply a reset effect setting.
         c. Modify and save effects settings.
      3. Set up an effects loop.
   D. Apply basic editing techniques.
      1. Trim an audio region.
         a. Apply a fade.
         b. Be able to delete or modify the fade.
      2. Use basic cut, copy and paste techniques.
      3. Mute and un-mute audio regions as needed.
      4. Lock and un-lock audio regions as needed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20% Attendance
20-30% Participation
25-35% Written exams
25-35% Hands-on quizzes

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 156

  • Title: MIDI Music Composition
  • Number: MUS 156
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

MIDI Music Composition I is designed to create a technical and conceptual foundation for further studies in electronic music. Students will learn and demonstrate basic compositional techniques, including form, melody, rhythm and harmony. Also, the student will demonstrate the ability to use computers and software to create and perform music. Emphasis will be on developing skills appropriate to the beginning student for the purpose of creative and technical expression. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate basic proficiency of the elements of music composition, i.e., form, rhythm, melody and harmony.
  2. Demonstrate basic proficiency of the basic operation of the hardware used to produce music, including a computer and piano keyboard.
  3. Demonstrate basic proficiency of the use of sequencing software to produce music, including basic methods of sequencing note information and using quantization techniques to correct rhythmic errors.
  4. Demonstrate basic proficiency of the use of a software synthesizer to provide musical instrument and other sounds. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Elements of Musical Composition
   A. Rhythm
      1. Identify, by ear, the beat or pulse in a piece of music.
      2. Identify duple, triple and compound meters.
      3. Identify subdivisions of the beat.
      4. Identify the rate of speed or tempo of a piece of music.
      5. Describe the concept of rhythmic density.
   B. Melody
      1. List and describe the general qualities associated with a
musically effective melody.
      2. Identify sequence and imitation in a given melody.
      3. Identify a counter melody in a piece of music.
   C. Harmony
      1. Demonstrate the use of different types of chords in the key of C
Major.
         a. Triads in the key of C: I, ii, iii, IV, V, and vi.
         b. Seventh chords in the key of C Major: IMaj, ii7, IVmaj7, V7,
vi7.
      2. Describe the concept of harmonic rhythm.
      3. Describe the concepts of consonance and dissonance.
      4. Explain the concept of tonality.
   D. Form
      1. Demonstrate the ability to use basic song forms:
         a. Demonstrate the ability to create a song with 2 sections,
i.e., verse and chorus.
         b. Demonstrate the ability to enhance basic song form through the
use of an introduction, coda and/or bridge.
  
II. Technical Aspects of Musical Composition with a Computer
   A. Basic operation of the Macintosh computer.
      1. Start up the computer from sleep or off mode.
      2. Identify desktop items.
         a. Hard drive icon
         b. Trash
         c. Menus
      3. Find and identify FILE menu items.
         a. NEW FOLDER
         b. OPEN
         c. QUIT
         d. CLOSE WINDOW 
      4. Find and identify EDIT menu items.
         a. CUT
         b. COPY
         c. PASTE
         d. SELECT ALL
      5. Find and identify Apple menu items.
         a. RESTART
         b. SHUT DOWN
         c. EMPTY TRASH
      6. Use the mouse to input information.
         a. Click
         b. Double click
         c. Click-hold-drag
         d. Shift-click
      7. Organize file material.
         a. Create, save and store files and folders.
         b. Make duplicate of files.
         c. Save files to the hard drive and to the flash drive (or
removeable media).
   B. Basic MIDI concepts.
      1. Explain briefly the development of MIDI.
      2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of a MIDI based system.
      3. Compare and contrast multi-timbral and polyphony.
   C. Use of a MIDI input device to generate note information.
      1. Identify features of the keyboard controller.
         a. Power on/off
         b. Volume slider
         c. Patch select button
         d. Octave select button
         e. MIDI in/out/thru jacks
         f. Sustain pedal and its jack
   D. The use of sequencing software to produce music.
      1. Demonstrate the basic types of recording note information.
         a. Replace record
         b. Step record
         c. Overdub record
         d. Insert record
         e. Punch record
      2. Demonstrate the basic types of quantization.
         a. Grid quantize
         b. Input quantize
         c. Cursor quantize
         d. Quantize durations
         e. Notation quantize
      3. Perform editing techniques.
         a. Demonstrate how to cut, copy and paste note information.
         b. Paste, insert and merge copied information.
         c. Delete and/or insert blank time.
      4. Create and edit continuous controller events.
         a. Graphically edit, create and save volume and panning
information.
         b. Edit key velocity, pitch bend and sustain pedal information.
   E. Recording finished works to compact disc.
      1. Set and adjust record levels.
      2. Create simple CD labels and jewel cases.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: Attendance at all lectures/discussions is required.
However, a student may have two unexcused absences without affecting
his/her final grade. Unexcused absences beyond these two will result in a
reduction of the final grade.

Written Exams: Two written exams, one focusing on technical aspects of
producing music with a computer, and one focusing on compositional
concepts, are required.

Skills quizzes: "Hands-on" quizzes designed to test the student's ability
to perform basic sequencing and computer related tasks.

Projects: Each student will be graded on three individual projects.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:
 
Attendance:     10-20%
Skills quizzes: 10-20%
Written Exams:  20-30%
Projects:       50-60%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 -  89% = B
70 -  79% = C
60 -  69% = D
Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 157

  • Title: Introduction to Digital Audio*
  • Number: MUS 157
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 155 or MUS 156

Description:

Introduction to Digital Audio is designed to further develop skills acquired in MIDI Music Composition I. Students will practice using ProTools digital audio software, combined with a digital audio interface to record, edit and play back music. Students will be introduced to basic concepts of sound, and common audio effects, including reverb, delay and compression. Students will also further develop their compositional skills through demonstration and practice, and create audio recordings of their music. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an intermediate use of ProTools digital audio software.
  2. Demonstrate an increased knowledge of the basic elements of musical composition, i.e., form, rhythm, melody and harmony.
  3. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of sound production, including the use of common effects.
  4. Create audio recordings of their compositions. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. ProTools digital audio software
   A. Create a new ProTools session. 
      1. Demonstrate the ability to make duplicates of files.
      2. Create back-up copies to removable media.
      3. Describe the difference in sample rate and bit depth options.
   B. Create and use the four basic types of tracks.
      1. Create mono or stereo audio tracks.
      2. Create MIDI tracks.
      3. Create mono or stereo auxiliary input tracks.
      4. Create mono or stereo master fader tracks.
   C. Demonstrate the use of basic editing tools.
      1. Use the primary modes for editing: grid, slip, spot and shuffle.
      2. Use the primary tools: zoom, trimmer, selector, grabber and
scrubber.
      3. Use basic cut, copy and paste techniques.
   D. Use MIDI in ProTools.
      1. Record MIDI information in real time.
      2. Step record note information.
      3. Edit continuous controller event information. 
      4. Convert a MIDI track to an audio track.
      5. Use quantization to correct rhythmic errors.
   E. Use the mixer in ProTools.
      1. Show or hide the miUse the inserts and sends portion of the
mixer.
      2. Set basic pan and volume levels.
      3. Solo or mute tracks.
   F. Demonstrate basic navigation skills.
      1. Show or hide the transport window.
      2. Use the play, pause, record, fast forward and rewind buttons.
      3. Set pre-roll and post-roll times.
      4. Set up and use the metronome.

II. Elements of musical composition
   A. Use triads and seventh chords in the key of C Major. 
   B. Use borrowed dominant chords in the key of C Major. 
   C. Use triads and seventh chords in the key of A minor. 
   D. Use triads and seventh chords in the key of C minor. 
   E. Compose music in duple, triple or uneven meter. 
   F. Demonstrate an increased ability to modify standard song form. 
   G. Use simple and more complex rhythmic material. 
   H. Develop a melodic line through the use of imitation and sequence.
 
III. Use of audio effects
   A. Apply effects to an audio track.
      1. Alter a parameter of an effect over time.
      2. Save a preset that has been altered from the original setting.
      3. Use AudioSuite effects.
      4. Use RTAS effects.
   B. Explain how and when to apply the standard types of audio effects.
      1. Apply delay and chorus effects.
      2. Use reverb effects.
      3. Apply compression and limiting effects.

IV. Audio recordings
   A. Create an audio CD of music. 
   B. Create MP3, .wav, AIFF and SDII files.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance:  Attendance at all lectures/discussions is required. 
However, a student may have two unexcused absences without affecting
his/her final grade.  Unexcused absences beyond these two will result in a
reduction of the final grade.

Performance:  Each student is required to prepare at least one original
work for public (on campus) performance.

Assignments, written and "hands-on" tests:

Projects:  Each student will be graded on three individual projects.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:
  Attendance:             10-20%
  Performance:            10-20%
  Tests and assignments:  40-50%
  Musical Projects:       50-60%

Grading Criteria

90 - 100% = A
80 -  89% = B
70 -  79% = C
60 -  69% = D
Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 158

  • Title: Recording Studio I*
  • Number: MUS 158
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 157

Description:

This course is designed to develop both the creative abilities and technical skills needed to produce music using modern digital recording techniques and equipment. Students will acquire an increased proficiency with the operation of ProTools, the industry standard digital audio software, and the corresponding digital audio hardware. Students will demonstrate knowledge of microphone types and techniques by conducting simple recording sessions, from set-up to final mix. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate increased creative capabilities as applied to creating original music.
  2. Demonstrate increased technical capabilities with digital audio software and hardware.
  3. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of microphone types and techniques.
  4. Conduct a simple recording session from set-up to final mix. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Creative Capabilities
   A. Basic Song Form
      1. Provide original examples of basic song form.
      2. Provide original examples of variations of basic song form.
      3. Create simple chord charts for use in recording sessions.
   B. Lyrics
      1. Recognize instances of metaphor, simile, hyperbole and rhetorical
questions in existing lyrics.
      2. Create examples of metaphor, simile, hyperbole and rhetorical
questions in original lyrics.
      3. Recognize and employ basic rhyming schemes.
      4. Recognize instances of imagery in existing lyrics.
      5. Illustrate the use of imagery in original lyrics.

II. Technical Abilities
   A. Software
      1. Display increased knowledge in the use of standard effects.
         a. Apply compression to enhance the tonal quality of recorded sound.
         b. Apply reverb to enhance the tonal quality of recorded sound.
         c. Apply delay effects to enhance the tonal quality of recorded sound.
         d. Apply equalization effects to enhance the tonal quality of recorded
sound.
         e. Automate effects parameters.
         f. Set up an effects loop.
         g. Apply global effects.
      2. Demonstrate increased knowledge of the editing capabilities of
ProTools digital audio software.
         a. Create fades and crossfades.
         b. Employ real-time automation operations in the mixer.
         c. Loop record, audition and edit multiple takes.
         d. Import audio from an audio CD.
         e. Import audio in other digital formats, including .wav, AIFF,
and .mp3’s.
   B. Hardware
      1. Operate the multi-channel digital audio interface during a
recording session.
         a. Trace the audio signal path from source to destination.
         b. Locate and connect the multiple audio inputs on the digital
audio interface.
      2. Demonstrate the use of the headphone amplifier during a recording
session.
      3. Use active powered speakers to monitor a recorded multi-track
session.
      4. Use active powered speakers to mix a recorded multi-track
session.
         a. Compare the difference in sound between various types of
speakers.
      5. Display operational knowledge of the talk-back system.
      6. Display operational knowledge of the monitor speaker select
option.
      7. Add an external tube pre-amp to the audio signal path.

III. Microphones
   A.  Microphone types
      1. Demonstrate an understanding of the primary characteristics of
condenser microphones.
      2. Demonstrate an understanding of the primary characteristics of
dynamic microphones
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the primary characteristics of
ribbon microphones
   B. Microphone pick-up patterns
      1. Explain and apply a cardioid pattern.
      2. Explain and apply a directional pattern.
      3. Explain and apply an omni –directional pattern.
   C. Appraise and practice single microphone placement techniques for
vocalists.
      1. Use a pop guard to reduce sibilants.
      2. Coach the vocalist in ways to improve the consistency of the
record level.
   D. Appraise and practice single microphone placement techniques for
acoustic instruments.
      1. Record an acoustic guitar using a single microphone.
      2. Record hand percussion instruments using a single microphone.
      3. Record wind instruments using a single microphone.

   E. Employ stereo microphone techniques for acoustic instruments.
      1. Record an acoustic guitar using a stereo set of microphones.
      2. Use a set of stereo microphones as overheads on a drum set.
   F. Demonstrate methods of using microphones to record music from a
guitar or bass amplifier.
   G. Place multiple microphones, both mono and stereo, to record a full
drum set.

IV. Simple recording sessions
   A. Prepare for a recording session.
      1. Practice the physical set-up for recording acoustic instruments.
      2. Practice the physical set-up for recording electronic
instruments.
   B. Conduct a simple multi-track recording session.
   C. Apply effects, and create a final mix of recorded music.
   D. Create a stereo recording of the finished session.
      1. Create an audio CD of the session.
      2. Create a .wav, AIFF, or .mp3 version of the completed session.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance:    10-20%
Exams:         20-40%
Participation: 10-20%
Projects:      40-60%  
  Total         100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F = 59% and below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 159

  • Title: Recording Studio II*
  • Number: MUS 159
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 158

Description:

This course is designed for the student interested in the continued development of the creative abilities and technical skills needed to produce music using modern digital recording techniques and equipment. Students will understand simple copyright types and procedures, and create an itemized budget to establish a digital project studio. Students will demonstrate advanced knowledge of ProTools, and apply final mastering techniques in order to compile a portfolio of original music for personal, academic or professional purposes. 3 lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate increased creative skills with regard to creating original music.
  2. Demonstrate increased competency in the technical skills needed to work in a digital audio environment.
  3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of copyright issues.
  4. Create a budget for a project recording studio.
  5. Demonstrate mastering techniques with completed recordings.
  6. Compile a portfolio of recordings of original music. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Creative Skills
   A. Demonstrate advanced knowledge of basic song form. 
      1. Compose a song that uses more than two basic sections.
      2. Compose a section of music that bridges two different sections
together.
      3. Compose a song that utilizes an extended coda.
   B. Work with lyrics.
      1. Incorporate metaphor, simile and hyperbole into original lyrics.
      2. Incorporate rhetorical questions into original lyrics.
      3. Identify metaphor, simile, hyperbole and rhetorical questions in
existing lyrics.
 
II. Technical Skills
   A. Use various microphone pick-up patterns to alter recorded sound.
   B. Evaluate the audible differences of using different types of
microphones in recording sessions.
   C. Choose microphones based upon tone, frequency emphasis and SPL
characteristics.
 
III. Copyright Issues
   A. Demonstrate knowledge of basic publishing copyright protection.
   B. Demonstrate knowledge of basic sound recording copyright
protection.
   C. Prepare to file a copyright with the United States Library of
Congress.
               
IV. Project Studio Budget
   A. Evaluate personal needs for the project studio.
   B. Create an itemized budget for all software and hardware needs for a
project recording studio.
 
V. Mastering Techniques
   A. Sequence completed songs in a logical and aesthetically pleasing
order.
   B. Use equalization in order to balance frequencies between separate
recordings.
   C. Use compression and limiting in order to make volume levels uniform
between separate recordings.
   D. Create version of mastered recording in other digital formats,
including .wav, AIFF and .mp3 formats.
 
VI. Portfolio
   A. Compile a portfolio of original music.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance:    10-20%
Exams:         20-40%
Participation: 10-20%
Projects:      40-60%
  Total         100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F = 59% and below   

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 160

  • Title: Recording Studio Lab*
  • Number: MUS 160
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 158

Description:

This course is designed for students interested in learning how to work in a digital recording studio. Students will prepare for and conduct recording sessions and mix down sessions. Students will gain real world, hands-on experience as a studio musician, audio engineer and musical producer. 2 1/2 hrs. integrated lecture lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare a song for a recording session.
  2. Set up the recording studio for a session.
  3. Conduct a recording session.
  4. Conduct a mix-down session and create a final mix. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Chart preparation
   A. Indicate tempo.
   B. Indicate genre.
   C. Indicate straight or swing.
   D. Indicate the chord progression.
   E. Indicate the form of the song.
   F. Supply neatly typed copies of the lyric (if applicable.)

II. Studio Preparation
   A. Prepare the ProTools session.
      1. Set up the necessary tracks.
         a) Set up the click track if needed.
         b) Set up mono and stereo tracks as needed.
      2. Determine input assignments.
   B. Set up the necessary microphones.
      1. Mic the drums.
      2. Mic the electric guitar.
         a) Use stereo microphones.
         b) Record a direct signal if possible.
      3. Mic the acoustic guitar.
         a) Use stereo microphones.
         b) Record a direct signal if possible.
      4. Mic the electric bass.
         a) Record the bass direct if possible.
         b) Use stereo mics on the bass amplifier.
      5. Mic the vocalist.
      6. Record electric keyboards directly.
      7. Mic the acoustic piano.
      8. Mic other instruments as needed.

III. Recording Session
   A. Record basic tracks.
      1. Record the core rhythm, bass and harmony instrumental tracks.
      2. Record a final vocal track if possible.
      3. Record a scratch vocal if needed.
   B. Record overdubs as needed.
      1. Overdub lead vocals.
      2. Overdub background vocals.
      3. Overdub instrumental solos.
      4. Overdub auxiliary percussion.
   C. Evaluate performances and re-record as needed.

IV. Mix-down Session
   A. Update the ProTools session.
      1. Create track groups.
      2. Create sub-mixes.
      3. Set up effects loops.
   B. Evaluate individual track volume levels and adjust accordingly.
   C. Set basic pan amounts.
   D. Edit tracks as needed.
   E. Determine appropriateness of special effects.
      1. Assign equalization to tracks as needed.
      2. Compress tracks as needed.
      3. Apply reverb as needed.
      4. Add short delay as needed.
      5. Determine appropriateness of special effects.
   F. Assign global effects as needed.
   G. Create a stereo audio file for evaluation on other playback
systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25% Attendance and participation
25% Ability as a recording studio musician
25% Ability as an audio engineer
25% Post production skills

Grading criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89% = B
70-79% = C
60-69% = D
59 and below: F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 161

  • Title: Chamber Choir I*
  • Number: MUS 161
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to choral literature of various
historical periods.
B. To provide the college with a representative performing choral
ensemble.
C. To provide the opportunity for talented students to develop knowledge
and an appreciation for music written specifically for chamber choir.
D. To develop vocal technique and skills.
E. To develop musicianship.
F. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of professionalism by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Sing their parts alone with at least 70% accuracy.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Sightread, using solfege or numbers, any diatonic piece in any key with simple rhythms with at least 25% accuracy.
  6. Demonstrate correctly the sounds of most phonetic alphabet symbols.
  7. Demonstrate proper breathing and vowel placement for singing.
  8. Describe at least two stylistic characteristics in each piece studied.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Music Repertoire.
At least one piece from each of the following periods or genres will be
studied: Renaissance; Baroque and Classical; Romantic; 20th century art
music; folk songs and spirituals; lighter 20th century music such as
Broadway, jazz, and pop music; and music from other cultures.  
   A. Describe at least two musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.   
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.

II. Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing
sightreading skills will be given and exercises in sightreading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Perform diatonic musical excerpts in any key at sight, using solfege
or numbers, with at least 25% accuracy.
   C. Perform any simple rhythms at sight with at least 50% accuracy.

III. Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal agility, choral
blend, and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate healthy singing body positions, both standing and
sitting.
   B. Demonstrate good breathing technique and support.
   C. Demonstrate consistent vowel placement.

IV. Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least three languages including Italian, Latin,
Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of most symbols in the International Phonetic
Alphabet.
   C. Name at least two characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
 Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
 Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam: music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information. 10%
 Aural Exam: sightreading, text pronunciation. 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 162

  • Title: Chamber Choir II*
  • Number: MUS 162
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 161 and audition

Description:

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to choral literature of various periods
in music history.
B. To provide the college with a representative performing choral
ensemble.
C. To provide the opportunity for talented students to develop knowledge
and an appreciation for music written specifically for chamber choir.
D. To develop vocal technique and skills.
E. To develop musicianship.
F. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of professionalism by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Sing their parts alone with at least 80% accuracy.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Sightread, using solfege or numbers, any diatonic piece in any key with simple rhythms with at least 50% accuracy.
  6. Demonstrate correctly the sounds of most phonetic alphabet symbols.
  7. Pronounce accurately at least 50% of a new text in one foreign language.
  8. Demonstrate vowel purity and unity, and crisp diction, as well as proper breathing and vowel placement for singing.
  9. Describe at least one stylistic characteristic for each period or genre studied as well as two stylistic characteristics of each piece studied.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Music Repertoire.
At least one piece from each of the following periods or genres will be
studied: Renaissance; Baroque and Classical; Romantic; 20th century art
music; folk songs and spirituals; lighter 20th century music such as
Broadway, jazz, and pop music; and music from other cultures.  
   A. Describe at least two musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.
   B. Describe at least one stylistic characteristic of each period or
genre studied.   
   C. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   D. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.

II. Developing Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing
sightreading skills will be given and exercises in sightreading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   B. Define and perform vocally the expression marks in all the pieces
studied.
   C. Sightsing diatonic musical excerpts in any key at sight, using
solfege or numbers, with at least 50% accuracy.
   D. Perform any simple rhythms at sight with at least 50% accuracy.

III. Developing Vocal Technique
In each class, exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, vocal agility, choral
blend, and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate healthy singing body positions, both standing and
sitting.
   B. Demonstrate good breathing technique and support.
   C. Demonstrate consistent vowel placement.
   D. Demonstrate vowel purity and unity and crisp diction.

IV. Understanding Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least three languages including Italian, Latin,
Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of most symbols in the International Phonetic
Alphabet.
   C. Name at least two characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.
   D. Name at least one characteristic of good musical text setting.
   E. Accurately pronounce at least 50% of a new text in at least one
foreign language.

V. Concerts.
Concert dates will be announced and printed in the syllabus at the
beginning of the semester.  They provide an opportunity to perform what
has been learned in class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
 Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
 Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam: music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information. 10%
 Aural Exam: sightreading, text pronunciation. 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 162H

No information found.

MUS 163

  • Title: Chamber Choir III*
  • Number: MUS 163
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 162 and audition

Description:

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to choral literature of various periods
in music history.
B. To provide the college with a representative performing choral
ensemble.
C. To provide the opportunity for talented students to develop knowledge
and an appreciation for music written specifically for chamber choir.
D. To develop vocal technique and skills.
E. To develop musicianship.
F. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of professionalism by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Sing their parts alone with at least 90% accuracy.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Define and perform vocally all common expression marks.
  6. Sightread, using solfege or numbers, any diatonic piece in any key with simple rhythms with at least 75% accuracy.
  7. Demonstrate correctly the sounds of most phonetic alphabet symbols.
  8. Pronounce accurately at least 50% of a new text in one foreign language.
  9. Demonstrate vowel agility throughout the range of the voice, as well as proper breathing, vowel placement, vowel purity and unity, and crisp diction.
  10. Describe at least two stylistic characteristics for each piece studied.
  11. Describe at least one stylistic characteristic for each period or genre studied as well as two stylistic characteristics of each piece studied.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Music Repertoire.
At least one piece from each of the following periods or genres will be
studied: Renaissance; Baroque and Classical; Romantic; 20th century art
music; folk songs and spirituals; lighter 20th century music such as
Broadway, jazz, and pop music; and music from other cultures.  
   A. Describe at least two musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.  
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Describe at least two stylistic characteristic of each period or
genre studied.
   D. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.

II. Developing Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing
sightreading skills will be given and exercises in sightreading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
   B. Perform vocally any common expression mark.
   C. Perform diatonic musical excerpts in any key at sight, using solfege
or numbers, with at least 75% accuracy.
   D. Perform any simple rhythms at sight with at least 75% accuracy.

III. Developing Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, agility, choral blend,
and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate healthy singing body positions, both standing and
sitting.
   B. Demonstrate good breathing technique and support.
   C. Demonstrate consistent vowel placement.
   D. Demonstrate vowel purity and unity and crisp diction.
   E. Demonstrate vocal agility throughout the vocal range.

IV. Understanding Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least three languages including Italian, Latin,
Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of most symbols in the International Phonetic
Alphabet.
   C. Name at least two characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.
   D. Name at least two characteristics of good musical text setting.
   E. Pronounce accurately at least 50% of new texts in at least two
foreign language.

V. Concerts.
Concert dates will be announced and printed in the syllabus at the
beginning of the semester.  They provide an opportunity to perform what
has been learned in class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
 Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
 Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam: music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information. 10%
 Aural Exam: sightreading, text pronunciation. 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 164

  • Title: Chamber Choir IV*
  • Number: MUS 164
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 163 and audition

Description:

This auditioned choral ensemble is open to participation by the student body. Prior choral experience or a reasonable level of music reading and vocal technique is necessary. The choir will learn a varied body of choral materials from the choral traditions of both past and present, performing at student and community activities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

A. To give students exposure to choral literature of various periods
in music history.
B. To provide the college with a representative performing choral
ensemble.
C. To provide the opportunity for talented students to develop knowledge
and an appreciation for music written specifically for chamber choir.
D. To develop vocal technique and skills.
E. To develop musicianship.
F. To develop the ability to perform choral music skillfully.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of professionalism by their presence and quality of work in rehearsals and concerts.
  2. Pronounce the texts correctly of all pieces studied in the semester.
  3. Sing their parts alone with at least 99% accuracy.
  4. Define and vocally perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
  5. Define and perform vocally all common expression marks.
  6. Sightread, using solfege or numbers, any diatonic piece in any key with simple rhythms with at least 75% accuracy.
  7. Demonstrate correctly the sounds of most phonetic alphabet symbols.
  8. Accurately pronounce at least 75% of one new foreign text 50% of new texts in at least two other foreign languages.
  9. Demonstrate clear consistent balanced vocal tone as well as proper breathing, vowel placement, vowel purity and unity, crisp diction, and agility of the voice throughout the range.
  10. Describe at least two stylistic characteristics for each piece studied.  
  11. Describe at least three stylistic characteristic for each period or genre of music studied.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Music Repertoire.
At least one piece from each of the following periods or genres will be
studied: Renaissance; Baroque and Classical; Romantic; 20th century art
music; folk songs and spirituals; lighter 20th century music such as
Broadway, jazz, and pop music; and music from other cultures.  
   A. Describe at least two musical stylistic characteristics in each
piece studied.  
   B. Match each piece with the period or genre it represents, as well as
the composer.
   C. Describe at least three stylistic characteristic of each period or
genre of music studied.
   D. Accurately perform each piece in concert as rehearsed with the rest
of the choir.

II. Developing Musicianship
In at least two of every three classes, instruction in developing
sightreading skills will be given and exercises in sightreading will be
practiced.  There will also be instruction or review of musical expression
symbols as needed.
   A. Define and perform the expression marks in all the pieces studied.
   B. Perform vocally any common expression mark.
   C. Sightsing musical excerpts in any key that modulates to a related
key or uses altered notes at sight, using solfege or numbers, with at
least 75% accuracy.
   D. Perform any simple rhythms at sight with at least 75% accuracy.

III. Developing Vocal Technique
In each class exercises will be given to develop breath control and
support, vowel shape and placement, tone quality, agility, choral blend,
and intonation. 
   A. Demonstrate healthy singing body positions, both standing and
sitting.
   B. Demonstrate good breathing technique and support.
   C. Demonstrate consistent vowel placement.
   D. Demonstrate vowel purity and unity and crisp diction.
   E. Demonstrate vocal agility throughout the vocal range.
   F. Produce a clear consistent balanced vocal tone throughout the
range.

IV. Understanding Choral Texts
Introductory information will be given throughout the semester about
International Phonetic Alphabet.  Information will be given about the
origins and authors of the texts of the pieces studied.  Pieces will be
sung in English and in at least three languages including Italian, Latin,
Spanish, French, and German.
   A. Pronounce the texts correctly of each piece studied in the
semester.
   B. Demonstrate the sounds of most symbols in the International Phonetic
Alphabet.
   C. Name at least two characteristics about each text and language
studied in the semester.
   D. Name at least two characteristic of good musical text setting.
   E. Pronounce accurately at least 75% on a new text in one foreign
language and 50% of new texts in at least two other foreign languages.

V. Concerts.
Concert dates will be announced and printed in the syllabus at the
beginning of the semester.  They provide an opportunity to perform what
has been learned in class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

ABSENCES (80% of grade)
 Class absences
     1-3  A
     4-5  B
     6-7  C
     8-9  D
  Over 9  F
Missing a dress rehearsal counts as two absences.
Missing a concert lowers the FINAL grade two letters.

*Attendance in class and at concerts.  Accurate performance 
in class of the vocal technique exercises.  Accurate 
performance at concerts of the music studied in the semester. 80%
 Written Exam: music expression marks, stylistic characteristics, and
textual information. 10%
 Aural Exam:  sightreading, text pronunciation. 10%

Grading Criteria:

90 - 100%  = A
80 -  89%  = B
70 -  79%  = C
60 -  69%  = D
Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 165

  • Title: Music Composition I*
  • Number: MUS 165
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 141 or department approval

Description:

This entry-level course provides instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will learn correct notational procedures and compose melodies and short pieces for one or two live performers. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge of basic musical notation.
  2. Compose single line melodies in major and minor keys.
  3. Compose a short piano piece, or a duet for two single voice instruments.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Notation
   A. Produce by hand the basic musical symbols, including notes, rests,
dynamics and performance indications.
   B. Demonstrate the ability to notate rhythms correctly.
   C. Illustrate basic principles of page layout.

II. Melody
   A. Recognize examples of musically effective melodies.
   B. Describe basic characteristics of a good melodic line.
   C. Compose single line melodies in major and minor keys.

III. Composition
   A. Compose a short piano piece, or a duet for two single voice
instruments.
   B. Edit and carefully prepare a final copy of the composition.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance is required for this course.
A minimum of three notation assignments is required.
At least one finished composition is required.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:

  Attendance:        10-20%
  Assignments:       40-50%
  Final Composition: 40-50%

Final grades will be determined using the following scale:

90% - 100%   = A
80% -  89%   = B
70% -  79%   = C
60% -  69%   = D
59% or below = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 166

  • Title: Music Composition II*
  • Number: MUS 166
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 165

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for students seeking instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will learn to use a computer to notate their compositions, will begin to work with tonal harmony, will write music for a trio and/or quartet, and will have a piece performed during a music department recital. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a beginning knowledge of computer-assisted musical notation.
  2. Compose functional and non-functional tonal harmonic progressions.
  3. Compose a trio or quartet for single voiced instruments, or a piece for piano and instrumental soloist.
  4. Prepare at least one piece for public performance. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Computer-assisted musical notation
   A. Input basic musical symbols, including notes, rests, dynamics and
performance indications with the computer and keyboard.
   B. Demonstrate more advanced editing techniques, including note
spacing, copying and pasting, and transpositions.
   C. Create effective scores and parts.

II. Harmony
   A. Recognize examples of musically effective harmonic progressions.
   B. Describe basic practices of tonal harmony.
   C. Compose harmonic progressions in major and minor keys.

III. Composition
   A. Compose a trio or a quartet, or a piece for piano and soloist.
   B. Edit and carefully prepare a final copy of the full score and parts
for the composition.

IV. Performance
   A. Contact players for the performance, after finishing a composition.
   B. Rehearse with the group.
   C. Perform the piece at a Music Department recital.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance is required for this course.
A minimum of three notation assignments is required.
At least one finished composition is required.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:

 Attendance:        10-20%
 Assignments:       40-50%
 Final Composition: 40-50%
 Performance:       10-20%

Final grades will be determined using the following scale:
90% - 100%   = A
80% -  89%   = B
70% -  79%   = C
60% -  69%   = D
59% or below = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 167

  • Title: Music Composition III*
  • Number: MUS 167
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 166

Description:

This class is an intermediate-level course for the student seeking instruction in the craft of musical composition. Traditional compositional techniques and concepts will be studied through demonstration and practice. Students will enhance their ability to use a computer to notate their compositions, will begin to work with nonfunctional tonal harmony, will write music for SATB choir or for vocal soloist, and will have a piece performed during a music department recital. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of computer-assisted musical notation.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to compose non-functional harmonic progressions.
  3. Compose a piece for SATB choir or piano and vocal soloist.
  4. Prepare at least one piece for public performance. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Computer-assisted musical notation
   A. Improve the speed and accuracy of notation skills.
   B. Demonstrate the ability to work with text and lyrics.
   C. Create effective scores and parts.

II. Harmony
   A. Recognize examples of musically effective non-functional harmonic
progressions.
   B. Employ basic practices of non-functional tonal harmony.
   C. Compose harmonic progressions based on synthetic scales, including
whole tone, chromatic and octatonic scales.

III. Composition
   A. Compose a piece for SATB choir, or for piano and vocal soloist.
   B. Edit and carefully prepare a final copy of the full score and parts
for the composition.

IV. Performance
   A. Contact players for the performance, after finishing a composition.
   B. Rehearse with the group.
   C. Perform the piece at a Music Department recital.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance is required for this course.
A minimum of two notation assignments is required.
At least one finished composition is required.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:

Attendance:        10-20%
Assignments:       40-50%
Final Composition: 40-50%
Performance:       10-20%

Final grades will be determined using the following scale:
90% - 100%   = A
80% -  89%   = B
70% -  79%   = C
60% -  69%   = D
59% or below = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 169

  • Title: Voice Class I
  • Number: MUS 169
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This is an entry level course for voice study in a group setting. No previous voice study or music instruction is required. Students will be introduced to the basic elements of proper vocal production, as well as techniques for practice, performance, and maintaining vocal health. Vocal technique is approached from a classical perspective, however, the class includes discussion on appropriate usage of the voice in different styles. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify their vocal goals and a plan to move towards those goals.
  2. Define and identify the different parts of the vocal anatomy.
  3. Demonstrate implementation of basic vocal technique, including body alignment, costal-diaphragmatic breathing, space and placement for resonance.
  4. Demonstrate understanding and application of IPA diction.
  5. Display competency in presentation through performance.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Assessing the Voice
   A. Determine basic range.
   B. Display current level of ability.
   C. Define strengths, weaknesses, and realistic goals for the semester.
   D. Observe and describe technical elements in singing through
attendance at two vocal recitals.

II. The Vocal Apparatus
   A. Demonstrate proper body alignment.
   B. Identify the four major parts of the vocal instrument.

III. Technique of Practice
   A. Demonstrate the use of warm-ups.
   B. Choose exercises for your voice.
   C. Structure the rehearsal process.
   D. Demonstrate the use of practice journals.

IV. Breathing for Singing
   A. Identify elements of respiration.
   B. Demonstrate proper aspiration and exhalation, expansion of ribcage,
and control of diaphragm.

V. Resonance
   A. Explain areas of open space.
   B. Identify singing with relaxed throat and jaw.
   C. Determine proper placement of voice to maximize use of resonators.

VI. Diction
   A. Identify 10 basic vowel sounds.
   B. Identify and explain diphthongs.
   C. Demonstrate proper production and placement of consonants.

VII. Vocal Health
   A. Identify the elements of a healthy voice.
   B. Identify obstacles to vocal health.
   C. Explain how illness affects vocal production.
   D. Identify elements of vocal misuse, abuse, and injury.

VIII. Singing Performance
   A. Prepare a song for performance.
   B. Display appropriate behaviors in presentation and introduction of
performance.
   C. Identify and overcome the causes of stage fright.
   D. Identify obstacles to memorization.
   E. Demonstrate the emotional affects of the song to the audience.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation - 300 points (15%)
Class performances/Self evaluations - 400 points (20%)
Practice logs - 300 points (15%)
Recital reports - 300 points (15%)
Performance exams - 500 points (25%)
Midterm and Final
Written assignments - 200 points (10%)
Total Points - 2000

Grading Criteria:
90-100% - A
80-89%  - B
70-79%  - C
60-69%  - D
Below 60% - F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 170

  • Title: Voice Class II*
  • Number: MUS 170
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 169

Description:

This course is a continuation of Voice Class I, voice study in a group setting. Students will focus on the reinforcement of basic elements of proper vocal production, as well as techniques for practice, performance, and maintaining vocal health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate implementation of basic vocal technique including body alignment, costal-diaphragmatic breathing, space and placement for resonance.
  2. Demonstrate understanding and application of IPA diction, as applied to literature both in English and Italian or German.
  3. Summarize the basic concepts of vocal health.
  4. Display competency in presentation through performance. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Technique of Practice
   A. Define philosophy of warm-ups.
   B. Choose exercises for your voice.
   C. Structure the rehearsal process.
   D. Demonstrate the use of a practice journal.
   E. Create a library of personal vocalises.

II. Breathing for Singing
   A. Demonstrate proper aspiration and exhalation, expansion of ribcage,
and control of diaphragm.
   B. Demonstrate voice control through proper use of abdominals.

III. Resonance and Placement
   A. Determine proper placement of voice to maximize use of resonators.
   B. Demonstrate proper vocal placement to accommodate different singing
styles.

IV. Diction
   A. Demonstrate proper production and placement of consonants.
   B. Demonstrate use of the International Phonetic Alphabet in more than
one language.

V. Vocal Health
   A. Describe the elements of a healthy voice.
   B. Identify obstacles to vocal health.
   C. Explain how illness affects vocal health.
   D. Identify elements of vocal misuse, abuse, and injury.

VI. Singing Performance
   A. Prepare a song for performance.
   B. Display appropriate behaviors in presentation and introduction of
performance.
   C. Identify and overcome the causes of stage fright.
   D. Identify obstacles to memorization.
   E. Demonstrate the emotional affects of the song to the audience.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation - 300 points (15%)
Class performances/Self evaluation - 400 points (20%)
Practice logs - 300 points (15%)
Recital reports - 300 points (15%)
Performance exams - 500 points (25%)
Mid-term and final
Written assignments - 200 points (10%)
Total points - 2000

Grading Criteria:
90-100% - A
80-80%  - B
70-79%  - C
60-69%  - D
Below 60% - F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 175

  • Title: Songwriting*
  • Number: MUS 175
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2.5
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval

Description:

Songwriting is intended for students that seek instruction in the craft of writing popular songs. Students will learn through demonstration, practice and group critiques, the basic skills of songwriting. These skills include the study of form, lyrics, melodic lines and harmony, and the preparation of charts. Students must be able to play an instrument and/or sing well enough to demonstrate their work. 1 hr. lecture, 1.5 hr. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the form of various types of popular songs.
  2. Use various devices for lyric writing.
  3. Learn to integrate the melodic line and supporting harmony with the lyric.
  4. Create a legible chart.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Song Form 
  A. Identify or write a song using the ABA form.  
  B. Identify or write a song using the 12-bar Blues form.  
  C. Identify or write a song that uses Ballad, or narrative form.  
  D. Identify or write a song that uses a Rhapsodic form.  
II. Lyrics  
  A. Use basic rhyme schemes.  
  B. Use a metaphor effectively in a lyric.  
  C. Use a simile effectively in a song lyric.  
  D. Use hyperbole effectively in a song lyric.  
III. Melodic Lines  
  A. Demonstrate the ability to write a well defined melodic line.  
  B. Demonstrate the use of a sequence in melodic writing.  
  C. Re-harmonize a melodic line.  
IV. Charts  
  A. Create a legible and accurate chart for a popular song.  
     1. Indicate the key, tempo and meter.  
     2. Indicate whether the music is in straight or swing
subdivisions.  
     3. Indicate the chord progression.  
     4. Indicate the form of the song.  
        a) Correctly notate 1st and 2nd endings.  
        b) Correctly use the Coda, D.S. al Coda and D.C. al Coda markings.
        c) Indicate copyright information. 
   B. Create a lyric sheet. 
      1. Indicate the verse, chorus and coda. 
      2. Indicate the chord progression.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance = 10-20%
Participation= 30-40%
Musical projects = 50-60%

Grade criteria:

90-100% = A
80-89% = B
70-79% = C
60-69% = D
59 and below: F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Students must have the ability to play an instrument and /or sing well enough to demonstrate their own work.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 176

  • Title: Jazz Band I*
  • Number: MUS 176
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This is an entry-level course in the jazz band performing format for the student with little or no experience in this course of study. The student will learn, through rehearsal and performance, the basic elements of music and how these are utilized in the jazz band. Topics will include simple rhythms, basic melodic construction and major scale construction. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify aurally and by reading musical notation duple and quadruple rhythm.
  2. Illustrate by musical notation proper swing eighth note patterns.
  3. Demonstrate proper swing eighth note patterns on given instrument.
  4. Recognize by reading and performing musical notation four measure phrases.
  5. Explain orally the interval construction of major scales.
  6. Demonstrate performance ability of major scales beginning on any given pitch. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythm
   A. Explain orally the meaning of duple and quadruple meter signatures.
   B. Aurally differentiate by identifying pulse groupings of duple and
quadruple meter.
   C. Compose using musical notation a definition of swing eighth note
patterns.
   D. Convert the musical notation in "C" above to musical performance on
chosen instrument.

II. Melodic Construction
   A. Graph by using musical notation the construction of four bar phrase
showing the rise and fall of a melodic line.
   B. Generate the composed graph into musical performance on chosen
instrument.
   C. Aurally recognize a four measure phrase.
   D. Perform on instrument a four measure phrase indicating the rise and
fall of the line by utilizing a crescendo and decrescendo.

III. Major Scale
   A. Orally summarize the interval structure of a major scale.
   B. Transform oral summarization into musical performance on chosen
instrument beginning on any given pitch in the tempo range of quarter note
equals 60 to quarter note equals 120.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Definition and illustration of duple and quadruple rhythms, four
measure melodic contours and major scales by:

Written Exam         20% of grade.
Listening Exam       30% of grade.
Performance Exam     50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 177

  • Title: Jazz Band II*
  • Number: MUS 177
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 176 or audition required

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior jazz band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn beginning elements of music as applied to the jazz band performing format. Topics covered will include syncopated rhythm, Dorian minor scales and blues form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze and apply to performance syncopated rhythms.
  2. Construct and perform Dorian minor scales.
  3. Construct, organize, and perform the Blues form. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythm
   A. Identify by reading musical notation basic jazz syncopation.
   B. Graph the rhythmic subdivision and analyze orally how syncopation is
created.
   C. Perform on instrument a basic syncopated rhythm chosen by the
instructor.
   D. After the above performance, orally explain how the syncopation was
created.

II. Dorian Minor Scales
   A. Orally summarize the interval structure of Dorian minor scales.
   B. Recognize by reading musical notation Dorian minor scales in actual
musical compositions.
   C. Perform a Dorian minor scale on chosen instrument on any given
pitch.

III. Blues Form
   A. Express orally the basic structure by identifying the correct number
of measures and associate the correct harmony with each given measure.
   B. Construct an original melody in the Blues form integrating the
correct measures and harmony from A. above.
   C. Perform original melody on chosen instrument.
   D. Identify visually and aurally the Blues form in jazz
compositions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: definition and illustration of syncopated rhythms,
Dorian minor scales, and the Blues form - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 178

  • Title: Jazz Band III*
  • Number: MUS 178
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 177 and audition required

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior jazz band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the intermediate levels of jazz band performance will be learned. Topics covered will include Latin style, Mixolydian scales and the 32-bar song form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Visually and aurally recognize Latin rhythm.
  2. Perform on instrument Latin rhythm.
  3. Construct and perform mixolydian scales.
  4. Construct, compose, and perform 32 bar song form. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Latin Style
   A. Identify by reading musical notation Latin style rhythm.
   B. Construct a written definition of Latin rhythm and style.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument an interpretation of basic Latin rhythm
utilizing the elements of the definition from  B” above.
   D. Aurally recognize Latin rhythm and style in Jazz Band compositions.

II. Mixolydian Scales
   A. Orally summarize the interval structure of a minor scale.
   B. Visually recognize by reading musical notation a mixolydian scale in
any given jazz composition.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument a mixolydian scale on any given pitch.

III. Thirty-Two Bar Song Form
   A. Graph in written form the structure of 32 bar song form indicating
the correct number of measures and associating the correct harmony with
each section of the form.
   B. Compose an original melody in 32 bar song form providing a basic one
chord per measure harmonic accompaniment.
   C. Perform on instrument the melody composed above highlighting each
section of the form with a different dynamic level.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam:  definition and illustration of Latin style, mixolydian
scales and 32 bar song form - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam:  cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam:  same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 179

  • Title: Jazz Band IV*
  • Number: MUS 179
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 178 and audition required

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior jazz band experience. Advanced elements of jazz music will be learned through rehearsal and performance. Topics covered will include Lydian scales and ensemble performance techniques. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize, define, and perform the lydian scale.
  2. Differentiate between ensemble and section tuttis.
  3. Recognize, define, and perform the techniques of break, stop time, and riff.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Lydian Scales
   A. Summarize orally the interval structure of lydian scales.
   B. Graph using musical notation the structure of lydian scales.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument a lydian scale on any given pitch.
   D. Identify visually and aurally a lydian scale in a jazz band
composition.

II. Ensemble and Sectional Tuttis
   A. Define in written form Sectional Tutti.
   B. Define in written form Ensemble Tutti.
   C. Aurally differentiate between a Sectional and Ensemble Tutti.
   D. Perform on instrument a Sectional and Ensemble Tutti.
   E. After performance, orally explain the difference between the two
types of tuttis.

III. Break and Stop Time
   A. Define in written form the technique of Break.
   B. Define in written form the technique of Stop Time.
   C. Aurally differentiate between a Break and Stop Time.
   D. Perform on instrument an example of Break and Stop Time.
   E. After performance, orally explain what techniques were used to
differentiate between the two.

IV. Riff
   A. Define in written form the technique of riff.
   B. Identify aurally a riff in a jazz band composition.
   C. Compose an original riff and perform on chosen instrument.
   D. Instruct the members of the jazz band in the performance of the
original riff from "C" above.
   E. Utilize original riff in the jazz band composition in a rehearsal
setting.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: definition and illustration of Lydian scales, Ensemble
and Section Tutti, Break, Stop Time and Riff - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 185

  • Title: Live Sound Production I
  • Number: MUS 185
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Description:

This course is designed to teach the basic elements of sound, and the equipment and set-ups required to operate sound at live venues, like churches, live theaters or live musical venues. Students will learn techniques through demonstration, lecture and "hands-on" exercises in a professional facility. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the basic elements of sound.

2. Demonstrate the ability to operate sound equipment commonly used in live venues.

3. Evaluate common setups for live venues.

4. Prepare for a technical rehearsal.

5. Apply special effects in live venues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Elements Of Sound

A. Explain the physics of audio.

1. Explain the basic elements of acoustics.

2. Explain how sound amplification functions.

B. Work with sound production in real time.

1. Explain gain structure.

2. Execute a signal chain flow chart.

II. Sound Equipment For Live Venues

A. Operate common speaker types.

1. Demonstrate how passive speakers operate.

2. Demonstrate how active speakers operate.

3. Demonstrate how surround sound speakers operate.

B. Operate common types of amplifiers.

1. Demonstrate how a power amplifier operates.

2. Demonstrate how an operational amplifier functions.

C. Operate common types of mixers.

1. Demonstrate how an analog mixer operates.

2. Demonstrate how a digital mixer operates.

3. Demonstrate how a digital, automated mixer operates.

III. Common Live Sound Practices

A. Differentiate how sound is perceived in various venues.

1. Identify changes in reflectivity.

2. Identify changes in room size.

3. Identify different types of coverage.

B. Use specific sound equipment for live performances.

1. Evaluate the flexibility of speakers, amplifiers and mixers.

2. Deploy available resources.

IV. Elements of Technical Rehearsal for Live Performances

A. Read common documentation used in live sound venues.

1. Execute a stage plot.

2. Read a patch list or “front of hall” monitor.

B. Set up equipment needed for a live sound performance.

1. Execute cable paths.

2. Execute snake runs.

3. Prioritize the order of set-up.

4. Strike the set.

V. Special Effects

A. Use signal processing to create special effects.

B. Use localization of sound as a special effect.

C. Use frequency response to create a special effect.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

10-20% Attendance

10-20% Participation in classroom projects, labs & activities

25-35% Written exams

25-35% Hands-on quizzes

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 186

  • Title: Live Sound Production II*
  • Number: MUS 186
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 185

Description:

This course is designed to build upon and put into practice concepts learned in Live Sound Production I. Students will study "front of house" methods, monitoring practices, communication systems and troubleshooting. Students will also apply learned concepts to alternate sound systems through "hands-on" practicums. 4 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

Supplies:

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Perform professional level live sound services.
  2. Operate major types of live monitoring systems.
  3. Set up communication systems in live sound venues.
  4. Solve unexpected problems.
  5. Evaluate and utilize less than ideal sound systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Sound Services

A. Execute live sound system designs.

1. Evaluate the stage plot for a live performance.

2. Document the final set up.

3. Supply appropriate power needs.

4. Deploy communication systems.

B. Tune the Sound System for a Live Venue.

1. Check for coverage.

2. Integrate multiple speaker elements.

3. Equalize the speaker array.

4. Customize a speaker set up for a specific show.

C. Set Up a Sound System for a Live Venue.

1. Set up rigging.

2. Execute the stage plot and the microphone list.

3. Format the mixing console.

4. Meet specified deadlines.

II. Monitoring and Communication Systems

A. Use various monitoring systems in live sound venues.

1. Use characteristics of inner ear monitors.

2. Set up wedge monitors.

3. Demonstrate different methods of monitoring from mixing consoles.

4. Program changes in monitor settings.

B. Operate typical communication systems used in live sound venues.

1. Operate the intercom system.

2. Operate dressing room monitors.

3. Operate all call systems.

4. Integrate wireless communications.

III. Troubleshooting and Practicum

A. Evaluate unexpected results and ascertain methods of correction.

1. Test the cables.

2. Check the metering.

3. Manipulate the acoustic environment.

4. Correct for proximity issues.

B. Satisfy client technical riders.

1. Evaluate sound system requirements.

2. Evaluate monitor system requirements.

3. Determine the communications systems needed.

4. Set up the backline of instruments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

10-20% Attendance
10-20% Participation in classroom projects, labs and activities
25-35% Written exams
25-35% Hands-on quizzes

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 187

  • Title: Jazz Improvisation I*
  • Number: MUS 187
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no jazz improvisation experience. Through written work and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic elements of jazz improvisation. Topics to be covered will include identification and performance of basic intervals, major scales, Dorian modes, Mixolydian modes, major seventh chords, minor seventh chords, dominant seventh chords and the basic blues form. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify aurally and in written form simple and compound intervals.
  2. Identify aurally and in written form the structure of major scales.
  3. Construct and perform a major scale from any given pitch.
  4. Complete steps #2 and #3 from above for Dorian mode, Mixolydian mode, major seventh chords, minor seventh chords, and dominant seventh chords.
  5. Identify, construct, and perform a basic 12 bar Blues. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Intervals
   A. Aurally identify the simple intervals from minor second through
perfect octave both in harmonic and melodic sequence.
   B. Construct in written form all simple intervals from any given
pitch.
   C. Aurally identify the compound intervals of the 9th, 11th, and 13th.
   D. Construct in written form the compound intervals from any given
pitch.

II. Major Scales
   A. Construct a written blueprint of the interval structure of a major
scale.
   B. Construct in written form a major scale from any given pitch.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument a major scale from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of a major scale.

III. Dorian Mode
   A. Construct a written blueprint for the interval structure of a Dorian
mode.
   B. Construct in written form a Dorian mode from a given pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a Dorian mode from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of a Dorian mode.

IV. Mixolydian Mode
   A. Construct a written blueprint of the interval structure of a
Mixolydian mode.
   B. Construct in written form a Mixolydian mode from any given pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a Mixolydian mode from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of a Mixolydian mode.

V. Major 7th Chord
   A. Construct a written blueprint of the interval structure of a major
7th chord.
   B. Construct in written form a major 7th chord from any given pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a major 7th chord from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of the chord.

VI. Minor 7th Chord
   A. Construct a written blueprint of the interval structure of the minor
7th chord.
   B. Construct in written form a minor 7th chord from any given pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a minor 7th chord from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of the chord.

VII. Dominant 7th Chord
   A. Construct a written blueprint of the interval structure of a
dominant 7th chord.
   B. Construct in written form a dominant 7th chord from any given
pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a dominant 7th chord from any given pitch.
   D. Aurally identify the sound of the chord.

VIII. Blues Form
   A. Construct in written form a blueprint of the blues form showing the
proper number of measures and the correct placement of the scales and
chords.
   B. Aurally identify the basic 12 bar Blues form indicating orally where
the scale/chord changes occur.
   C. Perform on instrument the scales and chords of a 12 bar Blues in the
key of Concert F.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: intervals, scales, modes, chords, and Blues form - 20%
of grade.

Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 188

  • Title: Jazz Improvisation II*
  • Number: MUS 188
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 187 and audition required

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least one semester of jazz improvisation. Through performance on the chosen instrument and written studies, the student will learn advanced concepts of jazz improvisation. Topics to be covered include jazz performance style, construction of the improvised solo and 32-bar song form. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, construct, and perform off-beat tonguing.
  2. Perform written melodies from lead sheets.
  3. Embellish in performance format the rhythm and notes of the given melody from the lead sheet.
  4. Identify and perform color tones from the harmony of the given melody.
  5. Identify, construct, and perform sequences in an improvised line.
  6. Identify, construct, and perform a song in 32 bar song form. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Style
   A. Identify aurally and by reading music notation notes performed in
the style of off-beat tonguing.
   B. Interpret and perform a jazz etude utilizing off-beat tonguing.

II. Construction of Improvised Solo
   A. Perform on instrument of choice a written melody from a lead sheet.
   B. Perform same melody with embellishments of additional and different
rhythms and notes.
   C. Orally identify potential color notes from the harmony of the
melody.
   D. Orally identify possible music motives to be used in a sequencing
manner that corresponds to the given melody and harmony.
   E. Create an original improvisation based on the previous melody and
harmony utilizing color notes and music motives in sequence.
   F. Reconstruct the series of events from A-E above for any given lead
sheet melody.

III. Thirty-Two Bar Song Form
   A. Construct in written form a blueprint for 32 bar song form.
   B. Identify aurally and by reading music notation a song in this form.
   C. Perform the written melody in this form, and then orally identify
the scales, chords, color tones, and where each occurs.
   D. Create an original improvisation using the form, scales, and chords
from the original melody.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: off-beat tonguing, color tones, sequencing, 32 bar song
form - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 191

  • Title: Concert Band I*
  • Number: MUS 191
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This is an entry-level course in the concert band format for the student with little or no concert band experience. Students will learn the basic elements of music as related to the concert band through rehearsal and performance. Topics include counting and subdividing motifs into melodies; and differentiating between major and minor tonalities. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by reading the meter signature and note values duple, triple, and quadruple rhythm.
  2. Count orally the subdivision of duple, triple, and quadruple rhythm.
  3. Identify and perform antecedent and consequent phrases in a melody.
  4. Differentiate aurally and by instrument performance major and minor tonalities. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythmic Identification
   A. Identify by reading musical symbols two-four, three-four, and
four-four meters.
   B. Derive and classify aurally these three meters from "A" above.
   C. Perform in a rehearsal setting compositions in each of the three
meters above, and demonstrate a working knowledge of the meters by
accenting the downbeat of every measure in each meter.
   D. Orally count the subdivision of half, quarter, and eighth notes in
each of the three meters.

II. Rhythmic Values
   A. Describe by reading musical notation the subdivisions of note values
in two-four, three-four, and four-four meters.
   B. Illustrate through instrumental performance in a rehearsal setting
the subdivisions of whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes in the three
meters from  A” above.

III. Melodic Identification
   A. Describe and identify by reading musical notation the antecedent and
consequent phrases of a melody.
   B. Identify aurally the two phrases of a melody.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument in a rehearsal setting the two phrases
of a melody chosen by the instructor.
   D. Describe orally the range and contour of the melody performed on the
chosen instrument.

IV. Tonalities
   A. Classify by reading musical notation a melody in a major and in a
minor tonality.
   B. Classify by aural identification a melody in a major and in a minor
tonality.
   C. Perform before the instructor a melody in a major tonality.
   D. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major tonality in the melody
above by placing a different dynamic level on each half step interval to
differentiate from the whole step intervals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Rhythmic value and subdivisions, melodic construction using antecedent
and consequent phrases by:

Written Exam        20% of grade.
Listening Exam      30% of grade.
Performance Exam    50% of grade.

Grading Criteria
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 192

  • Title: Concert Band II*
  • Number: MUS 192
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 191 and audition required

Description:

This is a beginning-level course in the concert band format for the student with at least one semester of prior concert band experience. Students will learn the beginning-level elements of music as related to the concert band through rehearsal and performance. Topics to be covered include odd meters, minor scales and homophonic texture. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by musical notation compositions written in odd meters.
  2. Distinguish aurally between compositions written in common meters and those written in odd meters.
  3. Perform on instrument compositions in odd meters chosen by the instructor.
  4. Diagram and perform the three forms of the minor scale.
  5. Identify homophonic texture. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Odd Meter Compositions
   A. Recognize and calculate by reading musical notation odd meter time
signatures.
   B. Locate the pulse in music and aurally differentiate between common
and odd meter music by integrating the pulses into measures and meter.
   C. Perform on instrument melodies chosen by the instructor that are
composed in odd meters in the tempo range of quarter note equals 40 to
quarter note equals 120.

II. Minor Scales
   A. Graph in written form the interval structure of each form of the
minor scale.  These three forms are the natural, harmonic and melodic
forms.
   B. Construct in written form a minor scale on any given pitch by
connecting the notes in the proper whole step-half step relationships.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument any form of the minor scale on any
given pitch in the tempo range of quarter note equals 60 to quarter note
equals 120.

III. Homophonic Texture
   A. Define in written form and orally the musical definition of
homophonic texture.
   B. Aurally identify homophonic texture in a given musical example.
   C. Perform on instrument a composition chosen by the instructor and
highlight the aspect of the homophonic texture by using varying degrees of
dynamic levels.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Identification of odd meters, minor scales, and homophonic texture
by:

Written Exam         20%of grade.
Listening Exam       30% of grade.
Performance Exam     50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 193

  • Title: Concert Band III*
  • Number: MUS 193
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 192 or audition required

Description:

This is an intermediate course for the student with at least two semesters of prior concert band experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn intermediate levels of the elements of music in the concert band format. Topics will include parade march style, concert march style and concert overture style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, define and perform a work in parade march style.
  2. Identify, define and perform a work in concert march style.
  3. Distinguish aurally between parade and concert march styles.
  4. Identify, define, and perform a work in concert overture style. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Parade Style Marches
   A. Meter – Identify aurally and by reading musical notation the meter
of a parade style march (two-four or alla breve).
   B. Determine the tempo of the march and estimate the approximate
metronomic marking.
   C. Describe orally and by reading musical notation the differences in
staccato and legato articulations.
   D. Categorize the instruments that create dynamic contrast.
   E. Calculate by hearing and reading the musical notation the form of a
parade style march:
      1. Intro
      2. First Strain
      3. Second Strain
      4. Trio
      5. Break Strain
      6. Coda
   F. Perform on instrument a parade style march in the tempo of quarter
note equals 120.

II. Concert Style March
   A. Meter – Identify aurally and by reading musical notation the meter
of a concert style march (two-four, alla breve, triple, and duple).
   B. Determine the tempo of the march and estimate the approximate
metronomic marking.
   C. Describe orally and by reading musical notation the differences in
staccato and legato articulations.
   D. Categorize the instruments that create dynamic contrast.
   E. Calculate by hearing and reading musical notation the form of a
concert style march.
   F. Perform on instrument a concert style march in the tempo range of
quarter note equals 90 to quarter note equals 144 utilizing the proper
dynamics and rhythm.

III. Concert Overture
   A. Meter – Identify aurally and by reading musical notation the meter
of a concert overture (simple and odd meters).
   B. Determine the tempo of the overture and estimate the approximate
metronomic marking.
   C. Describe orally and by reading musical notation the differences in
staccato and legato articulations.
   D. Categorize the instruments that create dynamic contrast.
   E. Calculate by hearing and by reading the musical notation the form of
a concert overture:
      1. ABA
      2. Rondo
      3. Theme and Variations
   F. Perform on instrument a concert overture in the tempo range of
quarter note equals 90 to quarter note equals 144 utilizing the proper
articulations, dynamics, and rhythm.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Identification of parade style march, concert style march and concert
overture by:

Written Exam         20% of grade.
Listening Exam       30% of grade.
Performance Exam     50% of grade.

Grading Criteria
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 194

  • Title: Concert Band IV*
  • Number: MUS 194
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 193 or audition required

Description:

This is an advanced course for the student with at least three semesters of prior concert band performing experience. Through rehearsal and performance, the student will learn the advanced concepts of concert band performance. Topics will include polyphonic texture, concert suite style and medley style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define in written form polyphonic texture.
  2. Identify aurally and by reading musical notation polyphonic texture.
  3. Perform a composition in polyphonic texture.
  4. Define in written form the term concert suite.
  5. Compare and contrast in both written and aural forms the movements of a concert suite.
  6. Perform a concert suite composition.
  7. Define in written form the term medley.
  8. Identify aurally a medley.
  9. Perform a medley composition. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Polyphonic Texture
   A. Create a definition of polyphonic texture using the terms melody,
counterpoint, and imitation.
   B. Analyze a composition in polyphonic texture by reading the musical
notation and by aural identification.
   C. Perform a composition in polyphonic texture.
   D. After the above performance, be able to identify which instruments
were playing what parts of the polyphonic texture.

II. Concert Suite
   A. Compose a written definition of concert suite.
   B. Identify by ear ONLY the meter of each individual movement.
   C. Determine the pulse of each movement and estimate an approximate
metronomic marking for each movement.
   D. Compare and contrast by ear only the articulation of the movement.
   E. Diagnose by ear only the form of each movement:
      1. Ternary
      2. Theme and Variations
      3. Binary
      4. Rondo
   F. Analyze by ear only the texture of each movement.
   G. Perform a composition that is written in the concert suite style.
   H. After the above performance, compose a written log describing all
the elements of A through F above.
  
III. Medley
   A. Compose a written definition of medley.
   B. Detect each melody within the entire medley structure.
   C. Diagnose the range and contour of each melody.
   D. Describe orally how the melodies are connected to create the
medley.
   E. Perform a composition written in the medley format.
   F. After the above performance, compose a written log describing the
elements of A through D above.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Identification of polyphonic texture, concert suite style and medley
style by:

Written Exam          20% of grade.
Listening Exam        30% of grade.
Performance Exam      50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 195

  • Title: Vocal Jazz Ensemble I*
  • Number: MUS 195
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This is an entry-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include 8th note swing, jazz syncopation and 32-bar song form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by reading musical notation and aurally the basic Jazz Swing 8th note patterns.
  2. Recognize by sight and sound Jazz syncopation in four-four time.
  3. Recognize by sight and sound 32 bar song form.
  4. Vocally perform these elements both in a rehearsal and public performance venue. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythm
   A. Compose a graph illustrating the methods of articulating Jazz 8th
note swing patterns.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation 8th note swing patterns.
   C. Aurally identify by reading musical notation 8th note swing
patterns.
   D. Perform in a rehearsal swing 8th notes in the tempo range of quarter
note equals 60 to quarter note equals 120.
   E. Demonstrate a working knowledge of swing 8th notes by correctly
interpreting these patterns during the course of a public performance.

II. Syncopation
   A. Diagram in musical notation the basic structure of quarter and 8th
note rhythmic syncopation.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a basic syncopated pattern.
   C. Aurally recognize a basic syncopation.
   D. Demonstrate a vocal knowledge of syncopation by singing in syllables
a basic syncopated pattern.

III. 32 Bar Song Form
   A. Compose a written graph defining the structure of 32 bar song form.
   B. Recognize by reading musical notation 32 bar song form.
   C. Aurally recognize 32 bar song form.
   D. In a rehearsal setting, perform a tune in 32 bar song form
highlighting each section of the form with a different dynamic level.
   E. Correctly interpret a 32 bar song form tune during the course of
public performance.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: swing rhythm, syncopation, 32 bar song form - 20% of
grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 196

  • Title: Vocal Jazz Ensemble II*
  • Number: MUS 196
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 195 and audition required

Description:

This is a beginning-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include Dorian minor scales, Mixolydian scales and 12-bar blues form. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct and perform a Dorian minor scale.
  2. Construct and perform a Mixolydian scale.
  3. Construct, organize and perform a 12 bar blues. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dorian Scale
   A. Orally define the structure of a Dorian scale.
   B. Recognize aurally and by reading musical notation a Dorian minor
scale.
   C. Vocally perform a Dorian scale in a rehearsal setting in the tempo
range of quarter note equals 60 to quarter note equals 90 from any given
pitch.

II. Mixolydian Scale
   A. Orally define the structure of a Mixolydian scale.
   B. Recognize aurally and by reading musical notation a Mixolydian
scale.
   C. Vocally perform a Mixolydian scale in the tempo range of quarter
note equals 60 to quarter note equals 90 from any given pitch.
   D. Derive from the Mixolydian scale by reading musical notation the
dominant 7th chord.
   E. Identify aurally and in written form the interval structure of a
dominant 7th chord.
   F. Vocally perform a dominant 7th chord from any given pitch.

III. 12 Bar Blues
   A. Express orally the basic Blues form identifying the correct number
of measures and associate the correct harmony with each measure.
   B. Construct an original melody in the Blues form.
   C. Compose lyrics to original melody.
   D. Vocally perform above composition in both a rehearsal and public
performance venue.
   E. Identify aurally a Blues form.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: Dorian scale, Mixolydian scale, Blues form - 20% of
grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas as above - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam - same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 197

  • Title: Vocal Jazz Ensemble III*
  • Number: MUS 197
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 196 and audition required

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include beginning improvisation, Latin rhythm and major scales. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform basic Swing rhythm in scat improvisation.
  2. Identify, construct, and perform Latin rhythm.
  3. Identify, construct, and perform major scales.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Improvisation
   A. Construct a written blueprint of major, minor and dominant chords.
   B. Identify aurally the chords from above.
   C. Vocally perform the above chords using the scat syllables of  ba,
da, dooh and doot.”
   D. Create a basic vocal improvisation from above using syllables over a
12 bar blues in both a rehearsal and public performance venue.

II. Latin Rhythm
   A. Identify by reading musical notation Latin rhythm.
   B. Aurally identify Latin rhythm.
   C. Construct a blueprint comparing and contrasting Swing and Latin
rhythm.
   D. Vocally perform an eight measure improvisation using Latin rhythm
during the course of a rehearsal.
   E. Create an entirely new improvisation of eight measures of Latin
rhythm during a public performance.

III. Major Scale
   A. Orally summarize the interval structure of a major scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a Jazz composition based on a
major scale.
   C. Aurally identify major scales in Jazz compositions.
   D. Vocally perform major scales from any given pitch in the tempo range
of quarter note equals 60 to quarter note equals 120.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: Improvisation, Latin rhythm, major scales - 20% of
grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas as above - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 198

  • Title: Vocal Jazz Ensemble IV*
  • Number: MUS 198
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 197 and audition required

Description:

This is an advanced-level course in the vocal jazz performing format. Through rehearsal and public performance, the student will learn the basic elements of music as applied to vocal jazz. Topics will include scat, improvisation in 32-bar song form, Lydian scales and ballad style. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform a vocal scat in 32 bar song form.
  2. Identify, construct and perform lydian scales.
  3. Identify and perform ballad style. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Improvisation
   A. Identify by reading musical notation the harmonic structure of 32
bar song form.
   B. Aurally identify the harmonic structure of 32 bar form.
   C. Create a vocal improvisation over the harmonic structure of a
composition based on this form using the basic scat syllables of “da”
and “ba.”
   D. Transcribe the above improvisation into written musical notation.
   E. Perform this improvisation in both a rehearsal and public
performance.

II. Lydian Scales
   A. Orally summarize the interval structure of a lydian scale.
   B. Recognize aurally and by reading musical notation a Jazz composition
based on a lydian scale.
   C. Vocally perform a lydian scale from any given pitch in the tempo
range of quarter note equals 60 to quarter note equals 120.
   D. Create an eight measure vocal improvisation based on a lydian
scale.
   E. Perform the above improvisation in both a rehearsal and public
performance.

III. Ballad Style
   A. Construct a written definition of ballad style indicating proper
tempo, phrase groupings, and rhythmic interpretation.
   B. Identify aurally and by reading musical notation a composition
written in ballad style.
   C. Vocally perform a ballad style in a public performance rendering the
proper interpretation of tempo, phrase groupings and rhythm.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: Scat improvisation in 32 bar form - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 201

  • Title: Chamber Ensemble I*
  • Number: MUS 201
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience in the chamber ensemble performing format. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn the basic fundamentals of this performing medium. Topics to be covered will include tone quality, intervals and rhythmic patterns. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the physical properties necessary for tone production and perform these on chosen instrument.
  2. Identify aurally and in written form the basic musical intervals and perform these intervals on chosen instrument.
  3. Construct, identify and perform a major scale from any given pitch.
  4. Recognize duple and triple rhythmic patterns and perform example of each on chosen instrument.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Tone Quality
   A. Identify through performance of breathing exercises the proper
physical method of breathing.
   B. Identify through long tone performance on instrument the proper
coordination of the breath and the embouchure.
   C. Orally characterize how breathing and embouchure affect tone quality
within the chamber ensemble.
   D. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the breath and embouchure to
produce acceptable tone quality in the performance of a slow vocalize.

II. Intervals
   A. Identify aurally and by reading music notation the basic intervals
of a minor 2nd through the perfect octave.
   B. Perform on instrument the basic intervals from any given pitch.
   C. Orally and in written form explain how the intervals of music affect
the timbre of the chamber ensemble.

III. Major Scale
   A. Construct a written diagram illustrating the interval structure of a
major scale.
   B. Identify aurally and by reading music notation melody patterns in
the chamber ensemble music that utilize major scales.
   C. Perform on instrument a major scale from any given pitch.

IV. Rhythm
   A. Identify aurally and by reading music notation rhythms that are in
duple and triple patterns.
   B. Construct a written blueprint for the proper subdivision of both
duple and triple rhythms.
   C. Orally and on instrument perform the subdivisions from above.
   D. Orally explain how knowing these proper subdivisions of the rhythm
can affect the sound of the chamber ensemble.
   E. Identify aurally duple and triple rhythms as performed by the
chamber ensemble.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: tone quality, intervals, major scales, and rhythm - 20%
of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 202

  • Title: Chamber Ensemble II*
  • Number: MUS 202
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 201 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of experience in the chamber ensemble performing format. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument the student will learn the basic fundamental of this performing medium. Topics to be covered will include minor scales, chord construction and compound rhythms. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, construct, and perform minor scales.
  2. Identify, construct, and perform basic music chords.
  3. Identify and perform compound rhythms. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Minor Scales
   A. Construct a written blueprint illustrating the interval structure of
a minor scale.
   B. Identify aurally and by reading music notation minor scales.
   C. Perform on instrument a minor scale from any given pitch.
   D. Orally characterize the sound that a minor scale gives to the
chamber ensemble.

II. Chord Construction
   A. Compose a written plan that identifies the interval structure of the
music chord labeled “triad.”
   B. Build a triad in root position, first inversion, and second
inversion from any given pitch in written form.
   C. Perform on instrument the triads from “B” above from any given
pitch.
   D. Aurally identify triads as they are played by the chamber ensemble.
   E. Orally characterize the sound that triads evoke from the chamber
ensemble.

III. Compound Rhythm
   A. Compose a written plan that identifies the structure and
characteristics of compound rhythm.
   B. Identify by reading music notation those melodies from the chamber
ensemble that are composed using some compound rhythm.
   C. Aurally identify compound rhythms as they occur in the chamber
ensemble.
   D. Perform on instrument compound rhythms as given by the instructor,
and be able to orally justify manner of performance.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: major scales, chord construction, and compound rhythm -
20% of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 203

  • Title: Chamber Ensemble III*
  • Number: MUS 203
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 202 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of chamber ensemble experience. Through written work and performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn intermediate-advanced concepts of chamber ensemble performance. Topics to be covered include sight reading, intonation and style. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and perform contours and accompaniment patterns.
  2. Recognize intervals being performed and during course of performance make the necessary adjustments to create the proper timbre with other ensemble members.
  3. Recognize and render proper stylistic characteristics of the music being performed.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sight Reading
   A. Identify by reading musical notation at first sight whether the
individual part represents a melodic or an accompaniment pattern.
   B. Upon first playing, aurally differentiate between melodic contours
and accompaniment patterns and make necessary adjustments to create the
proper ensemble blend.
   C. Orally justify why decisions in “A” and “B” above were
made.

II. Style
   A. Identify by reading the musical notation of the part of the meter,
tonality, tempo, and articulations of the music.
   B. Based on the above observations, orally articulate what style the
music is to be performed in.
   C. Orally justify this determination comparing what is known about this
style and how that relates to the music being read.
   D. Perform on instrument the music giving the proper stylistic
rendition from the previously made observations.
   E. Compose a written log describing the treatment of the musical
elements in each stylistic period of music history. The elements to be
included are:
      1. Melody
      2. Rhythm
      3. Harmony
      4. Texture
      5. Form

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: balance and cooperative expression - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 204

  • Title: Chamber Ensemble IV*
  • Number: MUS 204
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 203 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior ensemble experience. Through performance on the chosen instrument, the student will learn the advanced concepts of chamber ensemble performance. Topics to be covered will include balance and cooperative expression. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and perform proper levels of dynamics and timbre to create a balanced sound that matches other ensemble members.
  2. Aurally assess the emotional content of the music and communicate through performance this assessment to the other ensemble members. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Balance
   A. Aurally identify the style of the composition.
   B. Determine the proper dynamic level to match the stylistic
characteristics and interpretations of the other ensemble members.
   C. Determine the proper timbre to be used to create the same effect as
in “A” above.
   D. Perform on instruments the judgments made above.
   E. Orally justify these decisions to the other ensemble members.

II. Cooperative Expression
   A. Mentally and silently assess what the emotional content of the music
might be.
   B. Communicate through performance on instrument the judgment from
“A” above to the other ensemble members.
   C. Orally explain reasons for this determination to other ensemble
members.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Exam: balance and cooperative expression - 20% of grade.

Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.

Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 211

  • Title: Orchestra I*
  • Number: MUS 211
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Audition required

Description:

This is an entry-level course in the orchestra format for the student with little or no orchestra experience. Students will learn the basic elements of music as related to the orchestra through rehearsal and performance. Topics include counting and subdividing duple, triple and quadruple rhythm; assembling melodic motifs into melodies; and differentiating between major and minor tonalities. Students will rehearse and perform with the Overland Park Civic Orchestra. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.(1 evening/wk.).

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by reading the meter signature and note values duple, triple, and quadruple rhythm.
  2. Count orally the subdivision of duple, triple, and quadruple rhythm.
  3. Identify and perform antecedent and consequent phrases in a melody.
  4. Differentiate aurally and by instrument performance major and minor tonalities. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rhythmic Identification
   A. Identify by reading musical symbols two-four, three-four, and
four-four meters.
   B. Derive and classify aurally these three meters from  A” above.
   C. Perform in a rehearsal setting compositions in each of the three
meters above, and demonstrate a working knowledge of the meters by
accenting the downbeat of every measure in each meter.
   D. Orally count the subdivision of half, quarter, eighth notes in each
of the three meters.

II. Rhythmic Values
   A. Describe by reading musical notation the subdivisions of note values
in two-four, three-four, and four-four meters.
   B. Illustrate through instrumental performance in a rehearsal setting
the subdivisions of whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes in the three
meters from  A” above.

III. Melodic Identification
   A. Describe and identify by reading musical notation the antecedent and
consequent phrases of a melody. 
   B. Identify aurally the two phrases of a melody.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument in a rehearsal setting the two phrases
of a melody chosen by the instructor.
   D. Describe orally the range and contour of the melody performed on the
chosen instrument.

IV. Tonalities
   A. Classify by reading musical notation a melody in a major and in a
minor tonality.
   B. Classify by aural identification a melody in a major and in a minor
tonality.
   C. Perform before the instructor a melody in a major tonality.
   D. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major tonality in the melody
above by placing a different dynamic level on each half step interval to
differentiate from the whole step intervals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: rhythmic value and subdivisions, melodic
construction using antecedent and consequent phrases - 20% of grade.
 2. Listening Exam: cover same areas - 30% of grade.
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 212

  • Title: Orchestra II*
  • Number: MUS 212
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 211 and audition required

Description:

This is a beginning-level course in the orchestra format for the student with at least one semester of prior orchestra experience. Students will learn the beginning-level elements of music as related to the orchestra through rehearsal and performance. Topics to be covered include odd meters, minor scales and homophonic texture. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.(1 evening/wk.).

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by musical notation compositions written in odd meters.
  2. Distinguish aurally between compositions written in common meters and those written in odd meters.
  3. Perform on instrument compositions in odd meters chosen by the instructor.
  4. Diagram and perform the three forms of the minor scale.
  5. Identify homophonic texture. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Odd Meter Compositions
   A. Recognize and calculate by reading musical notation odd meter time
signatures.
   B. Locate the pulse in music and aurally differentiate between common
and odd meter music by integrating the pulses into measures and meter.
   C. Perform on instrument melodies chosen by the instructor that are
composed in odd meters in the tempo range of quarter note equals 40 to
quarter note equals 120.

II. Minor Scales
   A. Graph in written form the interval structure of each form of the
minor scale. These three forms are the natural, harmonic and melodic
forms.
   B. Construct in written form a minor scale on any given pitch by
connecting the notes in the proper whole step-half step relationships.
   C. Perform on chosen instrument any form of the minor scale on any
given pitch in the tempo range of quarter note equals 60 to quarter note
equals 120.

III. Homophonic Texture
   A. Define in written form and orally the musical definition of
homophonic texture.
   B. Aurally identify homophonic texture in a given music example.
   C. Perform on instrument a composition chosen by the instructor and
highlight the aspect of the homophonic texture by using varying degrees of
dynamic levels.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: identification of odd meters, minor scales, and
homophonic texture - 20% of grade.
 2. Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade.
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 221

  • Title: Piano Class I
  • Number: MUS 221
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides a basic knowledge of music and the essential techniques required to play the piano. Students will learn essential musical terminology, including musical notation and symbols, major and minor key signatures, and the harmonization of melodies using tonic and dominant triads. Specific piano-related terminology will include finger exercises, basic keyboard repertoire using major and minor five-finger patterns, major and minor scales, major and minor triads in root position, ensemble playing of two to four parts, and the formation of good practice habits. Group Piano II should follow the successful completion of this course. Private piano lessons are encouraged for students who successfully complete both courses. 2 hrs./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and demonstrate through playing the basics of musical notation, including treble clef, bass clef, whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes and rests, dotted notes, sharps, flats, and naturals.
  2. Play and notate both major and minor keys.
  3. Describe related concepts, including key signatures and relative and parallel relationships.
  4. Correctly identify and play music written in basic time signatures, including, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and 6/8.
  5. Correctly identify tempo/character indications and words.
  6. Play major and minor five-finger patterns beginning on any key.
  7. Play basic repertoire with proper fingering.
  8. Establish effective practice methods. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Musical Notation
   A. Correctly read notes on the treble and bass clefs.
   B. Describe proportional notation and demonstrate this concept through
performance of rhythmic exercises and repertoire.
   C. Correctly identify and play pitches that are altered by use of
accidentals, including sharps, flats and naturals.

II. Key Signatures
   A. Correctly identify all 12 major key signatures.
   B. Correctly identify all 12 minor key signatures.
   C. Correctly identify the relationship of major and minor key
signatures, including relative and parallel relationships.

III. Time Signatures
   A. Describe the proportional nature of time signatures, and its effect
on the rhythmic character of a composition.
   B. Correctly play music written in basic time signatures, including
2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and 6/8.

IV. Tempo
   A. Demonstrate, by playing, the meaning of basic Italian tempo words,
including adagio, andante and allegro.
   B. Correctly place tempo markings in order of speed, including adagio,
andante and allegro

V. Five-Finger Patterns
   A. Correctly play all 12 major and minor five-finger patterns.
   B. Correctly identify by sight the relationship of major to minor
pattern.

VI. Fingering
   A. Apply basic fingering patterns to required repertoire.
   B. Identify non-standard fingering patterns, and discover alternate
methods of fingering.

VII. Practice Methods
   A. Develop effective practice habits, including pattern recognition as
well as personal consistency, patience and discipline.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

<pre>Attendance: Attendance at all class periods is required. However, a
student may have two unexcused absences without affecting his/her final
grade. Unexcused absences beyond these two will result in a reduction of
the final grade.

Performance: Each student is required to prepare at least four pieces for
in-class performance.

Written Exams: Four written exams, focusing on musical concepts, are
required.

Points will be awarded for each requirement as follows:
  Attendance      20-25%
  Written Exams   30-40%
  Performance     50-60%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 222

  • Title: Piano Class II*
  • Number: MUS 222
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 221 and department approval required

Description:

This is a beginning-level course that provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn and review musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales; exercises and repertoire using major, minor, diminished and augmented triads in root position and inversions; chord progressions; ensemble playing of two to four parts; and use of the damper pedal. This course is the continuation of MUS 221. Completion of this course should precede Applied Piano I. This course is for beginners able to progress at a fast pace, students with minimal previous experience or students who have completed MUS 221. 2 hrs./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by reading musical notation the basic musical symbols of: treble clef, bass clef, whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes and rests; dotted notes; sharps, flats, and naturals; slur, staccato, accent.
  2. Identify by reading musical notation both major and minor key signatures and define orally appropriate terms relating to key signatures such as relative and parallel; natural, harmonic, and melodic minor.
  3. Identify by reading musical notation time signatures.
  4. Define in written form tempo/character indications and words.
  5. Perform on the piano major and minor scales beginning on any key.
  6. Perform on the piano basic fingering concepts and patterns.
  7. Define orally and in written form effective practice methods.
  8. Perform on piano basic chord progressions such as I IV I V I.
  9. Perform on the piano the proper use of the damper pedal. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Musical Notation
   A. Orally and in written form explain the origins of treble and bass
clef and its practical relevance.
   B. Orally define the proportional notation including double-dotted
rhythms and syncopations.
   C. Identify by reading musical notation the alteration of pitches by
use of accidentals:  sharps, double-sharps, flats, double-flats, and
naturals.

II. Key Signatures
   A. On musical staff paper draw major key signatures.
   B. On musical staff paper draw minor key signatures.
   C. Orally explain the relationship of major and minor key signatures.

III. Time Signatures
   A. Orally define the proportional nature of time signatures.
   B. Orally define the application of time signatures.
   C. Orally define the structure of compound meter.

IV. Tempo
   A. Define in written form the meaning of basic Italian tempo words and
modifiers.
   B. Orally define the relationship of tempo words to each other
(hierarchy).
   C. Orally define the relationship of tempo and character words to
speed.

V. Scales
   A. Perform on the piano major scales, two octaves, hands together,
parallel motion.
   B. Perform on the piano harmonic minor scales, one octave, hands
together, parallel motion.
   C. Orally define the relationship of major to minor pattern.
   D. Orally and in written form identify the formation of natural,
harmonic, and melodic minor scales.

VI. Fingering
   A. Orally define the relationship and application of pattern fingerings
to repertoire.
   B. Orally define the basic concepts and principles of fingering
determination.

VII. Practice Methods
   A. Orally define the basic concepts.
   B. Orally define the methods of consistency in practice.
   C. Orally define the methods of pattern recognition.
   D. Orally define the methods of discipline in practice.
   E. Demonstrate through keeping a practice record the concept of
patience.
   F. Demonstrate through performance the practice in rhythms.

VIII. Chords
   A. Perform on the piano major and minor chords in root position and
inversions.
   B. Perform on the piano basic progressions.
   C. Perform on the piano seventh chords in root position and
inversions.
   D. Perform on the piano block chords, broken (arpeggiated) chords and
related terminology.
   E. Perform on the piano pop chord symbols.
   F. Perform on the piano triads of the major scale.
 
IX. Pedal
   A. Demonstrate on the piano the proper use of damper pedal.
   B. Demonstrate at the piano proper foot position and proper seating.
   C. Demonstrate at the piano the traditions in marking damper pedal
usage.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  15-25%   Attendance
  50-60%   Performance
  20-30%   Written

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 223

  • Title: Piano Class III*
  • Number: MUS 223
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 222 or department approval

Description:

This is an intermediate course that provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn and review musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales and modes; exercises and repertoire using major, minor, diminished and augmented triads in root position and inversions; chord progressions; ensemble playing of two to four parts; and use of the damper pedal. This course is the continuation of MUS 222. Completion of this course should precede Applied Piano I. This course is designed for students who have completed one year of study or who have completed MUS 222. 2 hrs./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify by reading musical notation: treble clef, bass clef, whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes and rests; dotted notes; sharps, flats, and naturals; slur, staccato, accent.
  2. Identify by reading musical notation and piano performance both major and minor key signatures and appropriate terms relating to key signatures such as relative and parallel; natural, harmonic, and melodic minor.
  3. Identify by reading musical notation time signatures.
  4. Define in written form tempo/character indications and words.
  5. Perform on the piano major and minor scales beginning on any key.
  6. Perform on the piano basic fingering concepts and patterns.
  7. Define orally and in written form effective practice methods.
  8. Perform on piano basic chord progressions and accompaniment patterns.
  9. Perform on the piano the proper use of the damper pedal. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Musical Notation
   A. Orally and in written form explain the origins of treble and bass
clef and its practical relevance.
   B. Orally define the proportional notation including double-dotted
rhythms and syncopations.
   C. Identify by reading musical notation the alteration of pitches by
use of accidentals: sharps, double-sharps, flats, double-flats, and
naturals.
   D. Identify by reading musical notation and orally explain the meanings
of Da Capo and Dal Segno designations.

II. Key Signatures
   A. On musical staff paper draw major key signatures.
   B. On musical staff paper draw minor key signatures.
   C. Orally explain the relationship of major and minor key signatures.
   D. Orally define and identify by reading musical notation modal key
signatures.

III. Time Signatures
   A. Orally define the proportional nature of time signatures.
   B. Orally define the application of time signatures.
   C. Orally define the structure of compound meter.

IV. Tempo
   A. Define in written form the meaning of basic Italian tempo words and
modifiers.
   B. Orally define the relationship of tempo words to each other
(hierarchy).
   C. Orally define the relationship of tempo and character words to
speed.

V. Scales
   A. Perform on the piano major scales, two octaves, hands together,
parallel motion.
   B. Perform on the piano harmonic minor scales, two octaves, hands
together, parallel motion.
   C. Orally define the relationship of major to minor pattern.
   D. Orally and in written form identify the formation of natural,
harmonic, and melodic minor scales.
   E. Perform on the piano major and harmonic scales beginning on black
keys.
   F. Perform on the piano Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian and Mixolydian modes.

VI. Fingering
   A. Orally define the relationship and application of pattern fingerings
to repertoire.
   B. Orally define the basic concepts and principles of fingering
determination.

VII. Practice Methods
   A. Orally define the basic concepts.
   B. Orally define the methods of consistency.
   C. Orally define the methods of pattern recognition.
   D. Orally define the methods of discipline in practice.
   E. Demonstrate through keeping a practice record the concept of
patience in practicing.
   F. Demonstrate through performance the practice in rhythms.

VIII. Chords
   A. Perform on the piano major and minor chords in root position and
inversions.
   B. Perform on the piano progressions: I-ii6-I64-V7-I;
Ivi-IV-ii6-I64-V7-I.
   C. Perform on the piano seventh chords in root position and
inversions.
   D. Perform on the piano block chords, broken (arpeggiated) chords and
related terminology.
   E. Perform on the piano pop chord symbols.
   F. Perform on the piano triads of the major scale and harmonic minor
scales.
   G. Perform on the piano accompaniment patterns.
 
IX. Pedal
   A. Demonstrate on the piano the proper use of damper pedal.
   B. Demonstrate on the piano proper foot position and proper seating.
   C. Demonstrate on the piano the traditions in marking damper pedal
usage.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  15-25%   Attendance
  50-60%   Performance
  20-30%   Written

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 226

  • Title: Applied Guitar I (Class)
  • Number: MUS 226
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

Students will be provided with a foundation in guitar technique upon which to base further study of the instrument. The course consists of an introduction to the use of the guitar as a solo, accompaniment and ensemble instrument. 1 hr./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define in written form basic music terms and symbols.
  2. Describe verbally and in written form standard notation.
  3. Recognize aurally proper playing technique and tone.
  4. Perform common accompaniment patterns, both strumming and finger-picking.
  5. Demonstrate through performance basic chords in first position.
  6. Demonstrate though performance natural notes in first position. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Elements of Music and Forms of Guitar Notation
   A. Define in written form basic musical and notational terms and
symbols.
   B. Play on the guitar basic rhythm patterns that involve half notes,
quarter notes, eighth notes and their corresponding rests.
   C. Play on the guitar basic chords from reading chord symbols.
   D. Play on the guitar basic chords from reading guitar tablature.
   E. Play on the guitar basic chords from reading standard music
notation.
   F. Demonstrate on the guitar single notes in open or first position.

II. Proper Playing Technique
   A. Demonstrate the proper left hand position by playing the guitar.
   B. Demonstrate the proper right hand position by playing the guitar.

III. Chordal Accompaniment
   A. Demonstrate on the guitar the following strum patterns: down,
down-up, syncopated strum, and bass chord strum.
   B. Demonstrate on the guitar three of the picking patterns presented in
class. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance/Weekly Class Performance/Preparation  50-90% of grade
Midterm Exam                                      0-35% of grade
Final Exam                                       10-35% of grade
Listening Assignment                              0-10% of grade
  Total                                            100%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 227

  • Title: Applied Guitar II (Class)*
  • Number: MUS 227
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 226 or department approval

Description:

This continuation of MUS 226 builds a foundation in guitar technique upon which to base further study of the instrument. The course continues to teach techniques that enable students to use the guitar as a solo, accompaniment and ensemble instrument. 1 hr./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an increased skill level of competencies learned in MUS 226.
  2. Describe verbally and in written form guitar tablature.
  3. Play on the guitar basic chords from reading guitar tablature.
  4. Demonstrate through performance all notes in first position, including sharps and flats.
  5. Perform chords and accompaniment patterns in pieces that use compound meters and rhythms that include sixteenth notes.
  6. Play at least two pieces of simple guitar music at a performance level.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Elements of Music and Forms of Guitar Notation
   A. Define verbally and in written form guitar tablature.
   B. Play on the guitar basic rhythm patterns that involve half notes,
quarter notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes and their corresponding
rests.

II.  Performance Ability
   A. Play on the guitar basic chords from reading guitar tablature.
   B. Demonstrate on the guitar all notes, including sharps and flats, in
open or first position.
   C. Demonstrate a more accurate and quicker response time in performing
the competencies learned in MUS 226.
   D. Play at least one piece from chord diagrams using common strum
patterns.
   E. Play at least one piece from other notation using rhythms that
involve half notes, quarter notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, and
their corresponding rests.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance/Weekly Class Performance/Preparation   50-90% of grade
Midterm Exam                                       0-35% of grade
Final Exam                                        10-35% of grade
Listening Assignment                               0-10% of grade

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 231

  • Title: Applied Voice I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 231
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

This course is designed to introduce the student to beginning vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize vocal goals.
  2. Describe proper body position and breathing for singing.
  3. Demonstrate proper body position and diaphragmatic breathing for singing.
  4. Accurately demonstrate most vowel shapes for singing.
  5. Properly execute at least five vocal technique exercises.
  6. Accurately perform at least two songs in English, one from memory with clear texts.
  7. Demonstrate improvement in their vocal technique in the areas covered in the semester.
  8. Present a journal that logs vocal assessments, assignments, lesson tape evaluations, process and progress in vocal study for the semester. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Assessment
   A. Assess vocal skills and background.
   B. Determine realistic goals and expectations for the semester’s
work.
   C. Keep a log or journal of assessment, goals, assignments, lesson
topics, practice time, tape evaluations and progress throughout the
semester.

II. Vocal Technique
   A. Describe good body position and proper breathing for singing.
   B. Demonstrate good body position and proper breathing.
   C. Demonstrate good basic vowel shapes.
   D. Properly execute at least five vocal technique exercises assigned by
the teacher and designed to improve the student’s vocal skill.
   E. Accurately sing at least two pieces with the vocal technique
specified above.
   F. Demonstrate improvement in the areas covered in the semester’s
work.

III. Repertoire and Performance
   A. Properly execute at least five vocal technique exercises.
   B. Be able to accurately sing at least two songs, one from memory.
   C. Prepare assigned songs using the principles covered in
lessons.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

*Attendance, preparation for lessons   30-50%
 Journal                               10-15%
 Performance of literature             35-50%

Each teacher will specify in their syllabus how grading is done in that
studio.

* Attendance is very important because of the participatory nature of this
class. Consistent vocal improvement is difficult unless students attend
class regularly and remain in good vocal health. This is the student’s
responsibility.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 232

  • Title: Applied Voice II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 232
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 231

Description:

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in beginning vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire. Note: An honors contract is available. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize vocal goals and progress.
  2. Consistently demonstrate proper posture and diaphragmatic breathing when singing assigned literature.
  3. Demonstrate clear phonation or tonal focus while singing most vowels.
  4. Demonstrate a clear and clean phonatory onset of most common vowels.
  5. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
  6. Accurately perform at least three songs, two from memory, with clear texts and beginning vocal skills.
  7. Sing at least one song in Latin or Italian with proper pronunciation.
  8. Demonstrate improvement in vocal technique in the areas covered in the semester.
  9. Present a journal that logs vocal assessments, assignments, lesson tape evaluations, process and progress in vocal study for the semester. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Assessment
   A. Determine realistic goals and expectations for the semester’s
work.
   B. Keep a log or journal of assessment, goals, assignments, lesson
topics, practice time, tape evaluations and progress throughout the
semester.

II. Vocal Technique
   A. Consistently demonstrate good body position and proper breathing for
singing while singing assigned repertoire.
   B. Demonstrate good phonation while singing most vowels.
   C. Demonstrate a clear and clean (pitch) phonatory onset of most
vowels.
   D. Properly execute at least three vocal technique exercises assigned
by the teacher and designed to improve the student’s vocal skill.
   E. Sing at least three pieces with the vocal technique specified
above.
   F. Demonstrate improvement in the areas covered in the semester’s
work.

III. Repertoire and Performance
   A. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
   B. Be able to sing at least three songs, two from memory.
   C. Prepare assigned songs using the principles covered in lessons.
   D. Prepare at least one Italian or Latin song with the correct
diction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

*Attendance, preparation for lessons   30-50%
 Journal                               10-15%
 Performance of literature             35-50%

Each teacher will specify in their syllabus how grading is done in that
studio.

* Attendance is very important because of the participatory nature of this
class. Consistent vocal improvement is difficult unless students attend
class regularly and remain in good vocal health. This is the student’s
responsibility.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 233

  • Title: Applied Voice III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 233
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 232

Description:

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in beginning intermediate vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize vocal goals and progress.
  2. Consistently demonstrate clear phonation or tonal focus while singing assigned repertoire.
  3. Consistently demonstrate a clear and clean phonatory onset of common vowels.
  4. Demonstrate a resonant tone that achieves some balance with clear phonation.
  5. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
  6. Perform accurately at least four songs, three from memory, with the principle covered in MUS 231, 232 and 233.
  7. Sing at least two songs in Latin or Italian or another language with proper pronunciation.
  8. Perform at least one repertoire piece on a student recital.
  9. Demonstrate improvement in vocal technique in the areas covered in the semester.
  10. Present a journal that logs vocal assessments, assignments, lesson tape evaluations, process and progress in vocal study for the semester. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Assessment
   A. Determine realistic goals and expectations for the semester’s
work.
   B. Keep a log or journal of assessment, goals, assignments, lesson
topics, practice time, tape evaluations and progress throughout the
semester.

II. Vocal Technique
   A. Consistently demonstrate clear phonation or tonal focus while
singing assigned repertoire.
   B. Consistently demonstrate a clear and clean phonatory onset of common
vowels.
   C. Demonstrate a resonant tone that achieves some balance with clear
phonation.
   D. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises
assigned by the teacher and designed to improve the student’s vocal
skill.
   E. Sing at least four pieces with the vocal technique specified above.
   F. Demonstrate improvement in the areas covered in the semester’s
work.

III. Repertoire and Performance
   A. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
   B. Be able to sing at least four songs, three from memory.
   C. Prepare assigned songs using the principles covered in lessons.
   D. Prepare at least two songs in foreign languages with the correct
diction.
   E. Perform one piece from memory on a student recital.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

*Attendance, preparation for lessons   30-50%
 Journal                               10-15%
 Performance of literature             35-50%

Each teacher will specify in their syllabus how grading is done in that
studio.

* Attendance is very important because of the participatory nature of this
class. Consistent vocal improvement is difficult unless students attend
class regularly and remain in good vocal health. This is the student’s
responsibility.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 234

  • Title: Applied Voice IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 234
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 233

Description:

This course uses private lessons to continue instruction in intermediate vocal technique, vocal vocabulary, performance experience and solo vocal repertoire.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize vocal goals and progress.
  2. Consistently demonstrate good basic vocal technique in the following areas: body position, breathing, support, vowel shape, vowel unity, resonance, clear phonation, and clean vocal onsets.
  3. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
  4. Accurately perform at least five intermediate level songs, four from memory, with consistent basic vocal technique.
  5. Sing at least two memorized songs in Latin or Italian or another language with proper pronunciation.
  6. Perform at least one repertoire piece on at least one student recital.
  7. Demonstrate improvement in vocal technique in the areas covered in the semester.
  8. Present a journal that logs vocal assessments, assignments, lesson tape evaluations, process and progress in vocal study for the semester. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocal Assessment
   A. Determine realistic goals and expectations for the semester’s
work.
   B. Keep a log or journal of assessment, goals, assignments, lesson
topics, practice time, tape evaluations and progress throughout the
semester.

II. Vocal Technique
   A. Consistently demonstrate basic vocal technique when singing.
   B. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises
assigned by the teacher and designed to improve the student’s vocal
skill.
   C. Demonstrate improvement in the areas covered in the semester’s
work.

III. Repertoire and Performance
   A. Properly execute at least three more vocal technique exercises.
   B. Be able to accurately sing at least five songs, four from memory.
   C. Prepare assigned songs using the principles covered in lessons.
   D. Prepare at least two of the memorized songs in foreign languages
with the correct pronunciation.
   E. Perform one piece from memory on a student recital.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

*Attendance, preparation for lessons   30-50%
 Journal                               10-15%
 Performance of literature             35-50%

Each teacher will specify in their syllabus how grading is done in that
studio.

* Attendance is very important because of the participatory nature of this
class. Consistent vocal improvement is difficult unless students attend
class regularly and remain in good vocal health. This is the student’s
responsibility.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 236

  • Title: Applied Piano I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 236
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no prior piano training. This course provides a basic knowledge of keyboard instruments. Students will learn essential musical terminology, musical notation and symbols, and specific piano-related terminology. Topics covered will include major and minor key signatures; exercises and repertoire using major and minor five-finger patterns; and exercises and repertoire using major and minor scales.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify and define basic musical notation: treble clef; bass clef; whole, half, quarter, eighth and sixteenth notes and rests; dotted notes; sharps; flats; and naturals.
  2. Identify and perform both major and minor key signatures and appropriate terms relating to key signatures such as relative and parallel.
  3. Identify and define time signatures.
  4. Identify and perform major and minor five-finger patterns beginning on any key.
  5. Fingering concepts and patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Musical Notation
   A. Define in written form the origins of treble and bass clef and its
practical relevance
   B. Define in written form proportional notation
   C. Identify by reading musical notation alteration of pitches by use of
accidentals: sharps, flats and naturals

II. Key Signatures
   A. Define orally and perform on the piano major key signatures
   B. Define orally and perform on the piano minor key signatures
   C. Define in written form the relationship of major and minor key
signatures

III. Time Signatures
   A. Orally define the proportional nature of time signatures.
   B. Define in written form and orally the application of time
signatures

IV. Five-Finger Patterns
   A. Perform on the piano major and minor five-finger patterns
   B. Define orally the relationship of major to minor pattern

V. Fingering
   A. Define in written form the relationship and application of pattern
fingering to repertoire
   B. Perform on the piano the basic concepts and principles of fingering
determination

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance       15-25%
Performance      50-60%
Written          20-30%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 237

  • Title: Applied Piano II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 237
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 236

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate-level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include major scales and the natural and harmonic forms of the minor scales, rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of duple and triple meter and the basic keyboard literature of the intermediate level.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify and perform the major scales and the natural and harmonic forms of the minor scale.
  2. Identify and perform basic rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of duple and triple meter.
  3. Perform on the piano a prelude and fugue from the literature of J.S. Bach.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Major Scales and Minor Scales
   A. Define in written form the intervallic structure of a major scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a major scale pattern from the
literature.
   C. Perform a major scale from any given pitch with two hands in two
octaves.
   D. Define in written form the intervallic structure of a natural and
harmonic minor scale.
   E. Identify by reading musical notation a natural and harmonic pattern
from the literature.
   F. Perform on the piano a natural and harmonic minor scale from any
given pitch with two hands in two octaves.

II. Rhythmic Patterns and Duple and Triple Meter
   A. Define in written form the note value relationship in both duple and
triple meter.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation patterns from the literature
that are composed in duple and triple meter.
   C. Define orally the subdivision of duple and triple meter.
   D. Perform on the piano duple and triple meter patterns utilizing the
proper subdivision.

III. Prelude and Fugue
   A. Compose in written form a log defining the structure of a prelude
and fugue from the literature of J.S. Bach.
   B. Define orally the performance requirements of the prelude and
fugue.
   C. Perform on the piano a prelude and fugue from the literature of J.S.
Bach.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance       15-25%
Performance      50-60%
Written          20-30%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 238

  • Title: Applied Piano III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 238
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 237

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate-level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include scale, the melodic form of the minor scale, rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of compound meter, and the basic keyboard literature of the intermediate level.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify and perform the melodic minor scale.
  2. Identify and perform basic rhythmic patterns and subdivisions of compound meter.
  3. Perform on the piano a sonata from the works of Beethoven. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Melodic Minor Scales
   A. Define in written form the intervallic structure of a melodic minor
scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a melodic minor pattern from
the literature.
   C. Perform a melodic minor scale from any given pitch with two hands in
two octaves.

II. Rhythmic Patterns of Compound Meter
   A. Define in written form the note value relationship in compound
meter.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation patterns from the literature
that are composed in duple and triple meter.
   C. Define orally the subdivision of compound meter.
   D. Perform on the piano compound meter patterns utilizing the proper
subdivision.

III. Sonata
   A. Compose in written form a log defining the structure of sonata from
the literature of Beethoven.
   B. Define orally the performance requirements of the sonata.
   C. Perform on the piano a sonata from the literature of
Beethoven.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance       15-25%
Performance      50-60%
Written          20-30%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F –  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 239

  • Title: Applied Piano IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 239
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 238

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior applied piano study. Students will learn the intermediate level concepts of piano performance. Topics to be covered will include Dorian and Mixolydian modes, pentatonic scales and performance of a Chopin etude.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify and perform the Dorian and Mixolydian modes.
  2. Identify and perform a pentatonic scale.
  3. Perform on the piano an etude from the literature of Chopin. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dorian and Mixolydian Modes
   A. Define in written form the intervallic structure of Dorian and
Mixolydian modes.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a Dorian and Mixolydian pattern
from the literature.
   C. Perform a Dorian and Mixolydian modes from any given pitch with two
hands in two octaves.

II. Pentatonic Scales
   A. Define in written form the intervallic structure of a Pentatonic
scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation patterns from the literature
that are composed with pentatonic scales.
   C. Perform on the piano pentatonic scales from any given pitch with two
hands in two octaves.

III. Etude
   A. Compose in written form a log defining the structure of an etude
from the literature of Chopin.
   B. Define orally the performance requirements of the etude.
   C. Perform on the piano an etude from the literature of Chopin.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance       15-25%
Performance      50-60%
Written          20-30%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%
  B = 80 -  89%
  C = 70 -  79%
  D = 60 -  69%
  F –  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 241

  • Title: Applied Guitar I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 241
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

In this private study in basic guitar technique, emphasis will be upon playing position, posture, tone production and basic music reading skills. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read all natural notes in first position with the proper right and left hand positions.
  2. Read and play all basic chords in first position with the proper right and left hand positions.
  3. Read and play, at beginning levels, from guitar tablature, chord diagrams, and standard notation.
  4. Play common chords in music with simple meters and rhythms.
  5. Play basic accompaniment patterns, both strumming and finger-picking.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic elements of music and notation
   A. Read and play all natural notes in first position.
   B. Read and play all basic chords in first position.
   C. Play common chords in music with simple meters and rhythms that   use
half, quarter and eighth notes.
   D. Name pitches and chords from guitar tablature.
   E. Spell basic chords from chord diagrams.
   F. Name pitches and chords from standard notation.
        
II. Performing skills
   A. Demonstrate proper right and left hand technique.
   B. Perform the skills listed in I: A, B, and C above by reading from
guitar tablature, chord diagrams, and standard notation.
   C. Demonstrate basic accompaniment patterns, both strumming and
fingerpicking.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation     90-100%
Final performance and exam             0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 242

  • Title: Applied Guitar II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 242
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 241 or department approval

Description:

This is a continuation of private study in basic guitar technique. Emphasis will be upon playing position, posture, tone production and basic music-reading skills. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Increasing skill level of competencies learned in MUS 241 Applied Guitar I.
  2. Read all notes in first position, including sharps and flats.
  3. Play all minor pentatonic scales.
  4. Play chords and accompaniment patterns in pieces that use compound meters and rhythms that include sixteenth notes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic elements of music and notation
   A. Read all notes in first position, including sharps and flats, from
tablature, chord diagrams and standard notation.
   B. Spell all minor pentatonic scales.

II. Performing skills
   A. Demonstrate increased skill at performing the competencies learned
in MUS 241 Applied Guitar I.
   B. Play all minor pentatonic scales.
   C. Play all notes in first position, including sharps and flats.
   D. Play chords and accompaniment patterns in pieces using compound
meters and rhythms that include sixteenth notes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 243

  • Title: Applied Guitar III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 243
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 242 or department approval

Description:

In this private study in intermediate guitar technique, emphasis will be on playing position, posture, tone production and intermediate music reading skills. Students will progress toward playing literature requiring intermediate skill levels.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Spell and play all major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads.
  2. Play all chords and chord inversions on four string sets.
  3. Notate and play two octave major scales.
  4. Notate and play triad scales.
  5. Play minor pentatonic scales in multiple positions.
  6. Perform at least two pieces as assigned by the instructor. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic elements of music and notation
   A. Spell all major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads.
   B. Spell all chords and chord inversions.
   C. Notate all major scales.
   D. Notate triad scales. 

II. Performing skills
   A. Play all major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads.
   B. Play all chords and chord inversions on four string sets.
   C. Perform all two octave major scales.
   D. Play triad scales.
   E. Play minor pentatonic scales in multiple positions.
   F. Perform at least two pieces requiring intermediate playing skills as
assigned by the instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 244

  • Title: Applied Guitar IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 244
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 243 or department approval

Description:

In this continuation of private study in intermediate guitar technique, emphasis will be on playing position, posture, tone production and intermediate music reading skills. Students will progress toward playing literature requiring intermediate skill levels.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Spell and play scales in the Dorian mode.
  2. Spell and play scales in the Mixolydian mode.
  3. Spell and play major pentatonic scales.
  4. Complete one of the following: a) Play all seventh chords and their inversions on three string sets; b) Complete and play three guitar solo transcriptions from tablature. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic elements of music and notation
   A. Spell all major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads.
   B. Spell all chords and chord inversions.
   C. Notate all major scales.
   D. Notate triad scales. 

II. Performing skills
   A. Play all major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads.
   B. Play all chords and chord inversions on four string sets.
   C. Perform all two octave major scales.
   D. Play triad scales.
   E. Play minor pentatonic scales in multiple positions.
   F. Perform at least two pieces requiring intermediate playing skills as
assigned by the instructor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 246

  • Title: Applied Classical Guitar I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 246
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

Private study in basic classical guitar technique and repertoire. Emphasis will be upon classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will begin with studies and short pieces.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete half of all exercises and pieces in the method book.
  2. Sight read all natural notes in first position.
  3. Read all first position chords in notation.
  4. Read rhythm up through eighth notes, including dotted rhythms in simple time. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Perform all of the exercises up to halfway in the texts.

II.  Perform all of the pieces in the texts up to halfway in a steady
tempo that is stylistically accurate.

III. Play all notes in first position  from both verbal direction and
music notation.

IV. Sightread and play all chords in first position. 

V. Sight read and perform any rhythms in simple time, up through dotted 
eighth notes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 247

  • Title: Applied Classical Guitar II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 247
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 246 or department approval

Description:

This continuation of private study in basic classical guitar technique and repertoire will emphasize classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will continue with studies and short pieces, then progress toward longer pieces with the intent of performing these in a recital situation.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Completion of all exercises and pieces in the method book.
  2. Sightread all notes including sharps and flats in first position.
  3. Master playing all notated chords in positions two through four.
  4. Sightread all simple and compound rhythms up through sixteenth notes.
  5. Perform simple two part guitar music.
  6. Perform on one student recital. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Perform all of the exercises in the method book.

II. Perform all of the pieces in the method book.

III. Play from sightreading music notation all notes in first position.

IV. Play from sightreading music notation all chords in positions one
through four.

V. Play from sightreading all simple and compound rhythms up through
sixteenth notes.

VI. Perform beginning level two part guitar music.

VII. Perform a piece for guitar on one student recital.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 248

  • Title: Applied Classical Guitar III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 248
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 247 or department approval

Description:

In this private study in intermediate classical guitar technique and repertoire, emphasis will be on classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will progress toward playing and performing more advanced pieces and guitar studies.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Play an intermediate level piece on a student recital.
  2. Develop the skill to play a study from Fernando Sor’s 20 études, Mateo Carcasi’s 25 melodic études, or comparable literature.
  3. Sightread and play pieces that use the fifth through eighth positions.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Perform an intermediate level piece on one student recital.

II. Perform a guitar study from Fernando Sor’s 20 études, Mateo
Carcasi’s 25 melodic études, or comparable literature.

III. Play pieces from music notation that use fifth through eighth
positions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 249

  • Title: Applied Classical Guitar IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 249
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 248 or department approval

Description:

This continuation of private study in intermediate classical guitar technique and repertoire will emphasize classical left- and right-hand technique, playing position, posture, tone production and standard classical guitar literature. Students will progress toward playing and performing more advanced pieces and guitar studies.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read pieces that include 10th to 12th positions.
  2. Play on two student recitals.
  3. Play at least two pieces of a suite by Wiess or DeVisée, an étude by Villa-Lobos or comparable literature.
  4. Completion of one scale study by Segovia. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Read from notation and play pieces that include 10th to 12th
positions.

II. Perform intermediate level literature on two student recitals.

III. Perform at least two pieces of a suite by Wiese or DeVisée, an
étude by Villa Lobos or comparable literature.

IV. Complete and perform one scale study by Segovia.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance and weekly preparation    90-100%
Final performance and exam            0-10%

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100%  = A
  80 -  89%  = B
  70 -  79%  = C
  60 -  69%  = D
  Below 60%  = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 251

  • Title: Applied Brass I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 251
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience in performing on a brass instrument. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic concepts of brass performance. Topics to be covered include tone production, basic musical intervals and major scales.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and produce the physical elements of tone production.
  2. Identify and perform the basic intervals of music.
  3. Construct and perform major scales. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Tone Production
   A. Demonstrate basic breathing exercises to gain control of the air
stream.
   B. Identify the facial muscles involved in performance.
   C. Perform on instrument basic exercises to gain control of the muscles
described above.
   D. After listening to performers on the chosen instrument, compose a
written log describing the tone of these performers.

II. Intervals
   A. Identify by reading musical notation the basic intervals of music
from the minor 2nd through the perfect octave.
   B. Construct a written blueprint for each interval illustrating the
whole step construction of each interval.
   C. Perform on instrument these intervals from any given pitch.

III. Major Scales
   A. Compose a diagram illustrating the interval construction of a major
scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a major scale pattern.
   C. Aurally identify a major scale pattern.
   D. Perform on instrument a major scale from any given pitch.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written exam: tone production, basic intervals, and major scales
– 20% of grade.
 2. Listening exam: cover same areas – 30% of grade.
 3. Performance exam: same areas – 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 252

  • Title: Applied Brass II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 252
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 251 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior brass instrument study. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the beginning concepts of brass performance. Topics to be covered include embouchure development, minor scales and duple and triple rhythmic patterns.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the elements required for proper embouchure development.
  2. Construct and perform minor scales.
  3. Identify and perform duple and triple rhythmic patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Embrouchure Development
   A. Compose a written log describing the formation and function of a
proper embouchure.
   B. Identify the required exercises for the development and functioning
of the embouchure and transcribe these exercises into written form.
   C. Perform the above exercises on instrument to gain embouchure
strength.
   D. Maintain a written log describing the progress attained by
practicing the above exercises.

II. Minor Scales
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating the interval construction of
a minor scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a minor scale pattern.
   C. Aurally identify a minor scale pattern.
   D. Perform on instrument a minor scale from any given pitch.

III. Duple and Triple Rhythm
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating the time relationship of
notes from the whole note through the sixteenth note.
   B. Orally articulate the proper subdivision of the notes from above.
   C. Orally explain how duple and triple patterns are formed from these
subdivisions.
   D. Identify by reading musical notation duple and triple patterns.
   E. Aurally identify duple and triple patterns.
   F. Perform on instrument duple and triple patterns chosen by the
instructor from the current study repertoire.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written exam: embouchure development, minor scales, and duple and
triple rhythmic patterns – 20% of grade.
 2. Listening exam: cover same areas – 30% of grade.
 3. Performance exam: same areas – 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 256

  • Title: Applied Percussion I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 256
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no training in percussion instruments. The student will learn the beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include basic duple and triple rhythm, snare drum rudiments and basic snare drum performance patterns.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify, and perform basic duple and triple rhythms.
  2. Identify and perform a three stroke, five stroke, and seven stroke roll.
  3. Perform a basic snare rhythm pattern from a march.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Duple and Triple Rhythm
   A. Define orally and in written form the note value relationships in
duple and triple meter.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation patterns written in duple and
triple meter.
   C. Perform by the clapping of hands rhythmic patterns in duple and
triple meter.

II. Rudiments
   A. Define orally and in written form the physical process involved in
performing a three, five, and seven stroke roll.
   B. Perform on the snare drum a three, five, and seven stroke roll
utilizing the proper physical process.

III. Snare Rhythmic Pattern
   A. Identify by reading musical notation a snare drum pattern from a
John P. Sousa march.
   B. Perform on the snare drum the above pattern at a tempo of quarter
note equals 60.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Attendance at Lessons   20-30% of grade
 2. Written Work            20-30% of grade
 3. Performance             70-80% of grade

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 257

  • Title: Applied Percussion II(Private)*
  • Number: MUS 257
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 256 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include compound rhythm, snare drum rudiments and basic timpani skills.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify, and perform compound rhythms.
  2. Identify and perform a multiple bounce stroke, open double stroke, and single stroke.
  3. Identify, define, and perform basic timpani rhythmic patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Compound Rhythm
   A. Define orally and in written form the note value relationships in
compound meter.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation patterns written in compound
meter.
   C. Perform by the clapping of hands rhythmic patterns in compound
meter.

II. Rudiments
   A. Define orally and in written form the physical process involved in
performing a multiple bounce stroke, open double stroke, and single stroke
pattern.
   B. Perform on the snare drum a multiple bounce, open double, and single
stroke utilizing the proper physical process.

III. Timpani
   A. Identify by reading musical notation a basic timpani pattern from
the percussion literature.
   B. Orally define which pitch will be performed on which timpani.
   C. Perform the pattern on the timpani utilizing the proper sticking
technique.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Attendance at Lessons    20-30% of grade.
 2. Written Work             20-30% of grade.
 3. Performance              70-80% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 258

  • Title: Applied Percussion III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 258
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 257 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn beginning concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include snare drum rudiments, basic mallet percussion skills and suspended cymbal skills.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify, and perform the snare rudiments of single paradiddle, double paraddidle, and triple paradiddle.
  2. Identify and perform basic mallet percussion skills on the bells.
  3. Identify, define, and perform basic suspended cymbal patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rudiments
   A. Define orally and in written form the physical process involved in
performing single paradiddle, double paradiddle, and triple paradiddle on
the snare drum.
   B. Perform on the snare drum a single paradiddle, double paradiddle,
and triple paradiddle utilizing the proper sticking technique.

II. Bells
   A. Identify by reading musical notation a basic bell mallet part
pattern from the percussion literature.
   B. Orally identify the pitches represented on the bell set.
   C. Orally identify the proper sticking motion for the mallets when
performing on the bell set.
   D. Perform the pattern on the bell set utilizing the proper sticking
technique.

III.  Suspended Cymbal
   A. Orally define the proper set-up of the suspended cymbal.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a suspended part from the
percussion literature.
   C. Orally define the proper sticking technique utilized in performing
on the suspended cymbal.
   D. Perform on the suspended cymbal the part from the literature
utilizing the proper technique.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Attendance at Lessons     20-30% of grade.
 2. Written Work              20-30% of grade.
 3. Performance               70-80% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 259

  • Title: Applied Percussion IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 259
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 258 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior instruction in percussion instruments. The student will learn advanced concepts of percussion performance. Topics to be covered include snare drum rudiments, crash cymbal techniques and drum set skills.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, identify, and perform the snare rudiments of right hand flam, left hand flam, right and left drags, and ruffs.
  2. Identify and perform crash cymbal skills.
  3. Identify, define, and perform basic drum set patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rudiments
   A. Define orally and in written form the physical process involved in
performing left hand flams, right hand flams, right and left drags, and
ruffs.
   B. Perform on the snare drum the rudiments from"A" above utilizing the
proper sticking technique.

II. Crash Cymbal
   A. Orally define the proper set-up of the crash cymbals.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation a crash cymbal part from the
percussion literature.
   C. Orally define the proper arm and wrist technique utilized in
performing on the crash cymbal.
   D. Perform on the crash cymbals the part from the literature utilizing
the proper technique.

III. Drum Set
   A. Orally identify the main parts of the drum set including the bass
drum, snare drum, hi-hat cymbal, ride cymbal, and tom-tom drums.
   B. Orally define the proper techniques involved in the performance of
each of the instruments of the drum set.
   C. Orally define the coordination techniques involved in performing on
all of the instruments of the drum set.
   D. Identify by reading musical notation a basic swing pattern written
for the drum set.
   E. Perform on the drum set the basic swing pattern identified utilizing
the proper technique for each instrument and the proper coordination of all
the instruments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Attendance at Lessons     20-30% of grade.
 2. Written Work              20-30% of grade.
 3. Performance               70-80% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90 - 100% = A
  80 -  89% = B
  70 -  79% = C
  60 -  69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 261

  • Title: Applied Woodwind I (Private)
  • Number: MUS 261
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

This is an entry-level course for the student with little or no experience performing on a woodwind instrument. Through written exercises and performance on the instrument of choice, the student will learn the basic elements of woodwind performance. Topics to be covered include tone production, basic intervals and major scales.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and produce the physical elements of tone production.
  2. Identify and perform the basic intervals of music.
  3. Construct and perform major scales. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Tone Production
   A. Construct a diagram illustrating the proper use of the human
abdominal muscles in the breathing process.
   B. Practice basic breathing exercises to gain control of the muscles
described above.
   C. Identify the proper placement of the facial muscles in the formation
of the correct embouchure.
   D. Practice on chosen instrument exercises to develop the above muscles
for proper tone production.
   E. Listen to at least five performers on the chosen instrument and
compose a log describing the tone of each performer.

II. Intervals
   A. Identify by reading musical notation the basic intervals of music
from the minor 2nd through the perfect octave.
   B. Construct a written blueprint for each interval showing the
whole/half step construction of the interval.
   C. Perform on instrument these basic intervals from any given pitch.

III. Major Scales
   A. Compose a diagram illustrating the interval structure of a major
scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation major scale patterns.
   C. Aurally identify major scale patterns.
   D. Perform on chosen instrument major scales from any given
pitch.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: tone production, intervals, major scales - 20% of
grade
 2. Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade

Grading Criteria:
 90% - 100% = A 
 80% -  89% = B 
 70% -  79% = C 
 60% -  69% = D
 Below  60% = F 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 262

  • Title: Applied Woodwind II (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 262
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 261 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is a beginning-level course for the student with at least one semester of prior woodwind study. The student will learn beginning concepts of woodwind performance on the chosen instrument through written exercises and performance. Topics to be covered include embouchure development, minor scales and duple and triple meters.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the elements required for embouchure development.
  2. Construct and perform minor scales.
  3. Identify and perform duple and triple rhythmic patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Embouchure Development
   A. Compose a written log describing the formation and function of the
correct embouchure.
   B. Identify the required exercises for the development and functioning
of the embouchure and transcribe these exercises into written form using
musical notation.
   C. Practice the above exercises on the chosen instrument to acquire
embouchure strength.
   D. Maintain a written log describing the noted progress and results of
practicing these exercises.

II. Minor Scales
   A. Compose a diagram illustrating the interval structure of a major
scale.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation major scale patterns.
   C. Aurally identify major scale patterns.
   D. Perform on chosen instrument major scales from any given pitch.

III. Duple and Triple Rhythm Patterns
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating time relationship of notes
from the whole note to the sixteenth note.
   B. Orally articulate the proper subdivision of the notes from above.
   C. Orally explain how duple and triple rhythm patterns are formed from
the subdivisions described above.
   D. Identify by reading musical notation duple and triple patterns.
   E. Aurally identify duple and triple patterns.
   F. Perform on instrument duple and triple patterns chosen from the
current study repertoire.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: embouchure development, minor scales, duple and
triple rhythmic patterns - 20% of grade
 2. Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade

Grading Criteria:
 90% - 100% = A 
 80% -  89% = B 
 70% -  79% = C 
 60% -  69% = D
 Below  60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 263

  • Title: Applied Woodwind III (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 263
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 262 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an intermediate-level course for the student with at least two semesters of prior woodwind study. The student will learn the intermediate concepts of woodwind performance through written exercises and performance. Topics to be covered include chromatic scale, quadruple rhythmic patterns and chord construction.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct and perform a chromatic scale.
  2. Identify and perform quadruple rhythmic patterns.
  3. Identify, construct and perform basic musical chords. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Chromatic Scale
   A. Compose a chromatic scale using musical notation from any given
pitch illustrating all the half steps with the proper sharp and flat
signs.
   B. Orally identify the name of each pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument BY MEMORY a chromatic scale from any given
pitch.

II. Quadruple Rhythmic Patterns
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating time relationship of notes
from the whole note to the sixteenth note.
   B. Orally articulate the proper subdivision of the notes from above.
   C. Orally explain how quadruple rhythmic patterns are formed from the
subdivisions described above.
   D. Identify by reading musical notation quadruple patterns.
   E. Aurally identify quadruple patterns.
   F. Perform on instrument quadruple patterns chosen from the current
study repertoire.

III. Chords
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating the interval structure of a
major triad and a minor triad.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation major and minor triads.
   C. Aurally identify major and minor triads.
   D. Perform on instrument major and minor triads from any given
pitch.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: embouchure development, minor scales, duple and
triple rhythmic patterns - 20% of grade
 2. Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade

Grading Criteria:
90% - 100% = A 
80% -  89% = B 
70% -  79% = C 
60% -  69% = D 
Below  60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 264

  • Title: Applied Woodwind IV (Private)*
  • Number: MUS 264
  • Effective Term: Fall 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MUS 263 or placement by instructor

Description:

This is an advanced-level course for the student with at least three semesters of prior woodwind study. Through written exercises and performance, the student will learn the advanced concepts of woodwind performance. Topics to be covered include pentatonic scale, whole tone scale and melodic contour.

Course Fees:

Course Fees - Music: $150.00

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct and perform a pentatonic scale
  2. Construct and perform a whole tone scale.
  3. Identify, construct, and perform basic melodic contours.
  4. Compound rhythmic patterns. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Pentatonic Scale
   A. Compose a pentatonic scale using musical notation from any given
pitch illustrating all the half steps with the proper sharp and flat
signs.
   B. Orally identify the name of each pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a pentatonic scale from any given pitch.
   D. Orally articulate the use of the pentatonic scale in both classical
music and in jazz.

II. Whole Tone Scale
   A. Compose a whole tone scale using musical notation from any given
pitch using the proper sharp and flat signs.
   B. Orally identify the name of each pitch.
   C. Perform on instrument a whole tone scale from any given pitch.
   D. Orally articulate the use of the whole tone scale in both classical
and jazz music.

III. Melodic Contours
   A. Compose a written statement identifying the components of a melody. 
This must include:
      1. Range
      2. Shape
      3. Conjunct/disjunct
   B. Identify by reading musical notation the three melody components
from the literature of the chosen instrument.
   C. Aurally identify the three melody components from any given
recording and/or live performance.
   D. Perform on instrument a melody from the chosen instrument
repertoire.
   E. Compose a graph illustrating the three components from the melody
performed above.

IV. Compound Rhythmic Patterns
   A. Compose a written diagram illustrating the construction of compound
rhythms.
   B. Identify by reading musical notation compound rhythmic patterns.
   C. Aurally identify compound patterns.
   D. Perform on instrument compound patterns from the chosen instrument
repertoire.
   E. Orally articulate the difference between duple/triple simple
patterns and compound patterns.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. Written Exam: pentatonic scale, whole tone scale, melodic contour,
compound rhythmic patterns - 20% of grade.
 2. Listening Exam: same areas - 30% of grade.
 3. Performance Exam: same areas - 50% of grade.

Grading Criteria:
  90% - 100% = A 
  80% -  89% = B 
  70% -  79% = C 
  60% -  69% = D 
  Below  60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

MUS 291

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