Animation-Entertainment and Game Art Design, A.A.S.

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Animation provides instruction for creating animation, 3D modeling and special effects for applications such as animated shorts, movies and games. Fundamental drawing skills, design concepts and the development of entertainment media assets will be covered. New classes in game art assets and level design will give students an employment advantage in the ever-growing game industry. Depending on individual choices and talents, students who complete the Animation program should be prepared for employment as an animator, a game art creator, a 3D visual artist, and/or a special effects artist.

(Major Code 2630; State CIP Code 10.0304)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

Prerequisite for Required Courses

Note: Prior to the beginning of the program, the student must take the following prerequisite, or have taken the equivalent transfer course, or have passed the waiver test (where applicable), or have obtained a waiver from the department.

CDTP 135Desktop Photo Manipulation I: Photoshop1

First Semester

ANI 123Concept Art for Animation3
ANI 125Introduction to 2D Animation*3
ANI 250Game Art Assets*3
ART 130Drawing I3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
Total Hours15

Second Semester

ANI 245Character Animation*3
ENGL 140Writing for Interactive Media*3
ANI 145Introduction to 3D Animation*3
ANI 258Game Level Design*3
ART 231Life Drawing I*3
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours18
^

Humanities Elective

Third Semester

Animation Elective (see below)3
ANI 255Advanced Animation and Effects*3
MUS 156MIDI Music Composition3
BUS 141Principles of Management3
ANI 270Visual Effects and Compositing*3
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Total Hours16
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

Fourth Semester

Animation Elective (see below)3
ANI 260Animation Capstone*3
ANI 273Career Preparation*4
Science and/or Math Elective ^3
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^^3
Total Hours16
^

Science and/or Math Elective

^^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Animation Electives

ENGL 150Digital Narratives*3
ART 129Design Color*3
ART 131Drawing II*3
ART 135Painting I3
ART 138Digital Imaging for Artists I3
ART 145Sculpture I3
ART 232Life Drawing II*3
ARTH 180Art History: Ancient to Renaissance3
ARTH 182Art History: Renaissance to Modern3
ARTH 184Art History: Twentieth Century3
ARTH 186Art History: Introduction to Asian Art3
ARTH 188History of Photography3
CIM 130Interactive Media Concepts*2
CIM 135Digital Imaging and Video*3
CIM 140Interactive Media Assets*4
CIM 235Advanced Digital Video*3

Total Program Hours: 65

Courses

ANI 123   Concept Art for Animation (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This basic concept art course is designed for graphic artists, animators, and game artists. Students will study basic and advanced drawing elements and principles. Students will produce conceptual artwork used in animation, graphic arts and gaming, including realistic and cartoon character design, vehicles, architecture, and landscape environments. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 125   Introduction to 2D Animation (3 Hours)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: ANI 123

In this course students will learn all aspects of traditional 2D animation, including flipbook, cell, puppet and claymation. Students will create a 2D character, write a story, fabricate a simple puppet and take it through a series of exercises. Experimental animation will be integrated into the course using paper cutouts, replacement animation and stop motion. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

ANI 145   Introduction to 3D Animation (3 Hours)

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANI 250

This introductory course will provide a historical background and general design and production issues for 3D animation. The details of modeling dimensional objects and environments and a range of simple to complex rendering techniques will be covered. Issues associated with telling a story through moving pictures such as screenplay writing, storyboarding and techniques for bringing an animated character to life will be explored. Students will also be introduced to motion graphics, and generate basic animation, compositing, and effects. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 245   Character Animation (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: ANI 250

Students will continue to refine their skills in a variety of character animation media. The computer and cutting edge software has become an increasingly important tool in creating character animatics, 2D and 3D character animations. More principles and elements of character animation will be introduced to create more realistic, believable and engaging stories. Continued focus on the importance of plot, character development, key principles of animation and artistic skill will push students into realms of endless creativity and imagination. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 250   Game Art Assets (3 Hours)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: CDTP 135

This course provides an introduction to making game art assets, and animations for next generation games. Students create high polygon, and low polygon gaming models of characters, land and air based vehicles, weapons, ammunition, health items, armor, power-ups and other model assets used in game play. Students create textures, rigging, light assets, animations, and export them into an existing game engine. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 255   Advanced Animation and Effects (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: ANI 245

The Advanced Animation and Effects course exposes students to various Hollywood style effects, from viscous liquid to open ocean effects. Through hands-on tutorials students will simulate and render a variety of visual effects including fire, explosions, smoke, steam, lightning, rain, snow storms and tornados. These are just a few of the many limitless possibilities that are required by today's demanding visual effects companies. The students will also explore compositing, combining CG (computer generated) and live video together to create stunning imagery. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 258   Game Level Design (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: ANI 250

This course provides an introduction to game level design and how to create interior and exterior levels using the same state of the art editing tools that are used in ultra high-end video games. Students learn to build white box levels first and then populate the level with detailed original game artwork. Students will create terrain maps, textures and interactively place static meshes into the game editor to enhance the visual aspects of the level. Students explore how to build a map that is purposeful and exciting to play 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 260   Animation Capstone (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: ANI 255

In this course, the student will use all the knowledge attained in previous core animation courses and develop a finished 1-2 minute independent movie following a predetermined animation production process and schedule. Students will develop a portfolio including an auto-run DVD or VHS tape, and a hard copy portfolio including illustrations of characters, model sheets, storyboards, props, environments, textures and final rendered scenes created for the movie. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 270   Visual Effects and Compositing (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: ANI 145

This course emphasizes the importance of breaking down visual effects shots for effective compositing. Advanced topics will include correct use of garbage mattes, 2D/3D visual effects, blue screen or green screen removal, traveling mattes, image correction, lighting and shading. An introduction to the production pipeline used in professional film and TV work will also be covered. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

ANI 273   Career Preparation (4 Hours)

Prerequisite or corequisite: ANI 260

This course will provide interactive media majors instruction in the presentation of his or her work in a digital portfolio format of professional quality. A printed and written resume will be produced. Self-promotion, networking, job searches and interview skills will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. CIM 273 is the same course as ANI 273; do not enroll in both. This course is taught in the spring semester.

ANI 123

  • Title: Concept Art for Animation*
  • Number: ANI 123
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This basic concept art course is designed for graphic artists, animators, and game artists. Students will study basic and advanced drawing elements and principles. Students will produce conceptual artwork used in animation, graphic arts and gaming, including realistic and cartoon character design, vehicles, architecture, and landscape environments. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Express ideas imaginatively.
  2. Communicate ideas visually.
  3. Produce concept art for game design and animation that demonstrates basic knowledge of expository and narrative communication processes and design theory.
  4. Communicate ideas and stories with a variety of conceptual art techniques and media.
  5. Select appropriate conceptual media, techniques and processes for specific purposes.
  6. Produce conceptual and final rendered drawings that demonstrate basic control of a variety of media, techniques and processes in traditional and emerging technologies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concept Art and Design
   A.  Define the digital creative environment.
   B. Discuss the development of the technology.
   C. Identify visual milestones.
   D. Define and use key terms.
 
II. Techniques of Concept Art
   A. Explain conceptual artist design tools.
   B. List the principles of perspective design.
   C. Discuss the importance of drawing strategies.
   D. Discuss the character design process and create model sheets.
   E. Define character history and develop characters.
   F. List conceptual art rendered file formats.
 
III. Digital Production Process
   A. Discuss production strategies.
   B. Identify components of the conceptual art studio.
   C. Participate in creative and production teams.
   D. Define the conceptual art process.
   E. Assemble a rendered portfolio.
 
IV. Perspective Form Drawing
   A. Create 1-point perspective.
   B. Create 2-point perspective.
   C. Create 3-point perspective.
   D. Draw ellipses.
   E. Define foreshortening.
   F. Produce freehand drawing techniques.
   G. Compose a perspective view.
   H. Generate section drawing.
   I. Draw symmetrical forms.
   J. Define and demonstrate clarity, realism, dynamism, and continuity in
basic perspective drawing.

 V. Vehicle Drawing 
   A. Define car drawing strategies.
   B. Establish your view.
   C. Draw basic proportions.
   D. Characterize section drawing.
   E. Create complex form building.
   F. Produce drawings from your imagination.
   G. Generate section drawing.
   H. Discuss methods of perspective construction.
   I. Define freehand drawing techniques.
   J. Build car forms of personal design.

  VI. Environmental Design
   A. Define thumbnail sketching.
   B. Discuss composition.
   C. Identify mood.
   D. Create atmosphere.
   E. Define creative process.
   F. Define design strategy.
   G. Produce sketchbooks.
   H. Generate marker sketching.
   I. Construct final line drawing.
   J. Create a tighter line drawing.
   K. Define layering strategy.
   L. Discuss value planning.
   M. Formulate a color palette.
   N. Create dramatic lighting.
   O. Create a focal point.
   P. Establish depth.
   Q. Add detail.

 VII. Low–Tech Architecture
   A. Define the 2D digital workspace.
   B. Generate shot composition.
   C. Produce sketches with line and tone.
   D. Direct the eye.
   E. Establish a mood.
   F. Create theatrical lighting.
   G. Tell the story.
   H. Illustrate effects.

VIII. Character Development
   A. Define body proportion.
   B. Identify stance.
   C. Discuss circular and rounded forms.
   D. Generate skeleton foundation.
   E. Define construction of the head.
   F. Discuss advanced head construction techniques.
   G. Create facial expressions.
   H. Produce hands.
   I. Add muscles.
   J. Draw different body types.
   K. Generate clothing.
   L. Create model sheets.
   M. Create backgrounds.

IX. Character Design  
   A. Define general physical characteristics.
   B. Define body type.
   C. Discuss proportions.
   D. Define gender.
   E. Define surface.
   F. Define color.
   G. Define facial structure.
   H. Discuss the characters movement.
   
 X. Line of Action
   A. Build the line of action.
   B. Create balance.
   C. Produce foreshortening.
   D. Identify realism versus exaggeration.
   E. Render a figure in action.

XI. Creature Design
   A. Draw abstract shapes.
   B. Develop character traits.
   C. Discuss how personality dictates design.
   D. Employ color pencil sketching.
   E. Recognize alcohol and eraser technique.
   F. Resolve the design.
   G. Prepare drawing cleanup in a paint program.

XII. Use of Color in Picture Making
   A. Discuss the four primary characteristics of color.
   B. Define secondary color characteristics.
   C. Discuss how color acts and reacts.
   D. Define using colors effectively.
   E. Discuss quality, distance and weight.
   F. Define hue, value, chroma, and temperature.
   G. Discuss color contrast.

XIII. Character Lighting
   A. Discuss the main types of lighting.
   B. Define light positioning.
   C. Discuss light color.
   D. Define shadows.

XIV. Components and Principles of the Storyboard
   A. Discuss rule of thirds.
   B. Define foreground, middle ground, and background.
   C. Develop visual skills.
   D. Define shot angles.
   E. Build the storyboard.
   F. Discuss classic film.
   G. Draw humans in action.
   H. Define light and shadow.
   I. Discuss design and composition.
   J. Define light sources.
   K. Discuss depth of field.
   L. Define montage.
   M. Discuss editing.
   N. Define dynamic design.
   O. Define sequencing.
   P. Discuss editing.
   Q. Define special effects.
   R. Create real-world animatic. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams     25% of grade
Minimum of two projects        50% of grade
Final project                  25% of grade
Total                         100%
 
Grade Criteria:
 A =  90 – 100%  
 B =  80 –  89%  
 C =  70 –  79%  
 D =  60 –  69%  
 F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.
  2. Associated Costs: refer to the instructor’s course syllabus for details about any associated costs that may be required.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 125

  • Title: Introduction to 2D Animation*
  • Number: ANI 125
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: ANI 123

In this course students will learn all aspects of traditional 2D animation, including flipbook, cell, puppet and claymation. Students will create a 2D character, write a story, fabricate a simple puppet and take it through a series of exercises. Experimental animation will be integrated into the course using paper cutouts, replacement animation and stop motion. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define traditional animation.
  2. Identify and describe the traditional animation production process.
  3. Discuss and illustrate character design,
  4. Define the business aspects of traditional animation.
  5. Discuss the rules of filmmaking, soundtrack recording and editing.
  6. Demonstrate basic storyboards and animatics.
  7. Describe digital desktop production.
  8. Discuss principles of animation.
  9. Develop step-by-step animation.
  10. Describe an overview of traditional animation.
  11. Define traditional animation basics and traditional animation finessing.
  12. Discuss vector animation.
  13. Employ a basic understanding of stop motion and experimental animation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Traditional Animation
  A. Discuss the history and evolution of animation.
  B. Illustrate timelines in traditional animation.
  C. Identify principles of traditional animation.
  D. Define the traditional production process.
  E. Identify traditiona lanimation terminology.

II. Traditional Animation Production Process
  A. Develop an idea.
  B. Discuss intellectual property and copyrights.
  C. Create a storyline.
  D. Explore scriptwriting.
  E. Produce a script.

III. Character Design
  A. Discuss the evolution of a traditional character design.
  B. Illustrate animation style.
  C. Create concept and environment design.

IV. Business Aspects of Traditional Animation
  A. Identify animation markets.
  B. Discuss scheduling and budgeting.
  C. Explain investment, marketing, and distribution possibilities.
  D. Discuss independent short and independent film development costs.

V. Rules of Filmmaking
  A. Define camera positions.
  B. Identify camera lenses.
  C. Explain lights and filters.
  D. Illustrate camera moves.
  E. Define staging.
  F. Create scene-to-scene transitions.
  G. Discuss screen aspect ratios.

VI. Soundtrack Recording and Editing
  A. Identify talent selection.
  B. Examine the voice recording process.
  C. Demonstrate the non-voice recording process.
  D. Define the music track recording process.
  E. Create the final work track.

VII. Storyboards and Animatics
  A. Explore storyboards and storyboard formats.
  B. Discuss animatics.

VIII. Digital Desktop Production
  A. Examine stages of traditional animation production.
  B. Define production team and workflow.
  C. Demonstrate project management.
 
IX. Principles of Traditional Animation
  A. Define key poses, breakdowns, and in-betweens.      
  B. Discuss and demonstrate the twelve key principles of animation.
  C. Describe extreme poses.
  D. Demonstrate holds.
  E. Develop run and walk cycles.
  F. Discuss dialog and lip-syncing.

X. Step by Step Animation
  A. Create key poses.
  B. Discuss attitude and dynamics.
  C. Generate in-betweens.      
  D. Demonstrate staging and camera moves.
  E. Define drawing terminology.

XI. Traditional Animation Overview
  A. Define script.
  B. Discuss storyboards.
  C. Create a soundtrack.
  D. Explain track breakdown.
  E. Construct animatics.
  F. Produce layouts.
  G. Demonstrate pencil tests.
  H. Discuss cleanup.
  I. Define backgrounds.

XII. Traditional Animation Basics
  A. Identify keys, in-betweens, and timing.
  B. Discuss dope sheets and production folders.
  C. Define flipping and pegboards.
 
XIII. Traditional Animation Finessing
  A. Define trace backs.
  B. Identify eccentric movement and staggers.
  C. Examine panning and camera moves.
  D. Describe pan speed and strobing problems.
  E. Illustrate shadows and effects.
 
XIV. Vector Animation
  A. Explore the value of limited animation.
  B. Describe vector film production.
  C. Explain non-web vector animation.

XV. Stop Motion and Experimental Animation
  A. Demonstrate stop motion and experimental animation.
  B. Discuss camera selection.
  C. Analyze types of lenses needed.
  D. Describe animation software/frame grabbers.
  E. Explain tripods and lighting.
  F. Show editing and demonstrate sound.
  G. Create dope sheets and x-sheets.
  H. Examine ideas, scripts, and treatments.
  I. Create armatures.
  J. Differentiate modeling clays.
  K. Construct a puppet.
  L. Evaluate the professional model making process.
  M. Design and build a set.
  N. Create a voice track.
  O. Pose, light, and stage a model for stop motion animation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams 20 - 30% of grade
Minimum of two projects  40 - 60% of grade
Final project 20 - 30% of grade
Total 100%

Grade Criteria:

A =  90 – 100%
B =  80 –  89%
C =  70 –  79%
D =  60 –  69%
F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.
  2. Associated costs: refer to the instructor’s course syllabus for details about any associated costs that may be required.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 145

  • Title: Introduction to 3D Animation*
  • Number: ANI 145
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: ANI 250

This introductory course will provide a historical background and general design and production issues for 3D animation. The details of modeling dimensional objects and environments and a range of simple to complex rendering techniques will be covered. Issues associated with telling a story through moving pictures such as screenplay writing, storyboarding and techniques for bringing an animated character to life will be explored. Students will also be introduced to motion graphics, and generate basic animation, compositing, and effects. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify animation, visual effects, and technology.
  2. Define the basic concepts of animation.
  3. Describe the digital production process.
  4. Demonstrate basic 3D modeling, motion graphics, rendering, animation, effects, and post-processing techniques.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Animation, Visual Effects, and Technology
  A. Define the digital creative environment.
  B. Discuss the development of the technology.
  C. Identify visual milestones.
  D. Define and use key terms.
 
II. Basic Concepts of Animation
  A. List the types of animation.
  B. List the principles of animation.
  C. Discuss the importance of storytelling.
  D. Discuss the storyboarding process and create storyboards.
  E. Define character development and develop characters.
  F. List animation file formats.

III. Digital Production Process
  A. Discuss production strategies.
  B. Identify components of the digital computer animation studio.
  C. Participate in creative and production teams.
  D. Define the computer animation process.
  E. Assemble a Demo Reel.

IV. Modeling
  A. Demonstrate basic modeling concepts.
  B. Define basic modeling techniques.

V. Motion Graphics Technology
  A. Explore basic workflow and interface.
  B. Create compositions and layers.
  C. Explain importing, interpreting, and managing footage.
  D. Explore basic animation in motion graphics.

VI. Rendering
  A. Discuss basic rendering concepts.
  B. Define the camera.
  C. Discuss lighting.
  D. Explore shading and surface characteristics.

VII. Animation and Effects
  A. Discuss basic computer animation techniques.
  B. Define basic visual effects techniques.

VIII. Post-Processing
  A. Demonstrate retouching, compositing and color grading.
  B. Manipulate image resolution and output.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams 20-30% of grade
Minimum of two projects    40-60% of grade
Final project              20-30% of grade
   Total                  100%
 
Grade Criteria:
   A =  90 - 100%  
   B =  80 - 89%  
   C =  70 - 79%  
   D =  60 - 69%  
   F =  59% and below 

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 245

  • Title: Character Animation*
  • Number: ANI 245
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisites: ANI 250

Students will continue to refine their skills in a variety of character animation media. The computer and cutting edge software has become an increasingly important tool in creating character animatics, 2D and 3D character animations. More principles and elements of character animation will be introduced to create more realistic, believable and engaging stories. Continued focus on the importance of plot, character development, key principles of animation and artistic skill will push students into realms of endless creativity and imagination. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define character animation, digital production process, key principles of animation and cartoon animation.
  2. Discuss character polygon modeling, character UV layout and surface mapping.
  3. Create facial expressions and bind a character.
  4. Discuss character setup and advanced character setup.
  5. Analyze and develop nonlinear animation, and discuss the trax editor.
  6. Discuss render utility and mapping techniques.
  7. Develop character animation, character lip sync, and expression fundamentals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Character Animation
  A. Define animation terminology.
  B. Identify visual milestones.

II. Digital Production Process Production Strategies
  A. Identify character animation tools.
  B. Discuss character animation process.

III. Key Principles of Animation
  A. Compare straight-ahead action vs. pose-to-pose action.
  B. Explain slow-in and slow-out.
  C. Describe squash and stretch.
  D. Identify arcs.
  E. Define anticipation.
  F. Explain staging.
  G. Describe secondary actions.
  H. Define timing.
  I. Discuss follow-through and overlapping action.

IV. Cartoon Animation
  A. Identify cartoon form.
  B. Discuss exposure sheet.
  C. Define line of action.
  D. Illustrate line of action in animation.
  E. Establish rhythm and design.
  F. Discuss movement of body masses.
  G. Identify movements of the two-legged figure.
  H. Explain movements of the four legged figure.

V. Character Polygon Modeling
  A. Define character pre-production,  character design, and polygon modeling tools.
  B. Discuss character anatomy.

VI. Character UV Layout and Surface Mapping
  A. Define polygon mapping.
  B. Assign shader to each projection.
  C. Create UVs.
  D. Edit UVs.
  E. Identify planner mapping.
  F. Discuss automatic mapping.
  G.Define layout UVs.
  H Describe the UV texture editor.
  I. Define UV snapshot.

VII. Facial Expressions
  A. Use skeletons
  B. Model blended shapes

VIII. Process of Binding a Character
  A. Create a rigid bind.
  B. Create a smooth bind.

IX. Character Setup
  A. Define and discuss forward kinematics and inverse kinematics.
  B. Explain switching forward and inverse kinematics.

X. Advanced Character Setup
  A. Utilize extra joint.
  B. Discuss leg and arm control.
  C. Utilize IK spline handle.
  D. Incorporate constraint and cluster.
  E. Setup facial expressions.

XI. Nonlinear Animation
  A. Create character and sub-character sets.
  B. Discuss the attribute editor.

XII. Trax Editor
  A. Make the clip.
  B. Manipulate the clip.
  C. Edit clip attributes.
  D. Cut, copy, and paste clips.

XIII. Render Utility and Mapping Techniques
  A. Define node and shading networks.
  B. Describe hyper shade.
  C. Explain shader attributes.
  D. Define bump 2D and bump 3D.

XIV. Character Animation
  A. Demonstrate knowledge of character animation fundamentals
     1. Define animation principles.
     2. Explain the use of keyframes.
     3. Discuss timing and spacing.
     4. Identify graph editor.
     5. Define key tangents, breakdown keys, offset keys and hidden keys.
     6. Cut, copy and paste keys.
     7. Apply weight to objects.
     8. Create run, walk, and jump animations.
  B. Animate Bipeds
     1. Give the definition of cycles.
     2. Adjust weight on f-curves.
     3. Discuss the use of layering.
     4. Copy and paste keys.
     5. Describe the use of breakdown keys.
     6. Apply weight to movement.
  C. Animate your first scene
     1. Focus on story.
     2. Set-up poses.
     3. Hide keys.
     4. Move holds.
     5. Contact positions.
     6. Adjust timing and spacing.
     7. Overlap action and weight.
     8. Use the graph editor.
     9. Describe F-curve tangent weights.

XV. Character Lip Sync and Expressions 
  A. Describe dialogue expressions.
  B. Dialogue character acting.
  C. Define Vowels.
  D. Define Consonants. 
  E. Explain lip sync.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Exercises, papers or exams   20-30%
 Minimum of two projects      40-60%
 Final project                20-30%
   Total                     100%

Grade Criteria:
  A =  90 – 100%  
  B =  80 –  89%  
  C =  70 –  79%  
  D =  60 –  69%  
  F =   0 –  59% 

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 250

  • Title: Game Art Assets*
  • Number: ANI 250
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: CDTP 135

This course provides an introduction to making game art assets, and animations for next generation games. Students create high polygon, and low polygon gaming models of characters, land and air based vehicles, weapons, ammunition, health items, armor, power-ups and other model assets used in game play. Students create textures, rigging, light assets, animations, and export them into an existing game engine. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the game art production pipeline.
  2. Develop and create pre-production game art assets.
  3. Develop and create game models for production.
  4. Develop and produce post production assets.
  5. Produce a portfolio.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Game Art Production Pipeline
  A. Define the type of production.
  B. Discuss technical complexity and delivery media.
  C. Identify production workflow and shots.
  D. Define creative goals.
  E. Define teams.
  F. Discuss budget, schedule, and resources.
  G. Discuss genre. 

II. Game Art Pre-Production
  A. Develop ideas: brainstorming.
  B. Develop plot and characters through story and scriptwriting.
  C. Create storyboard: translate the script into images.
  D. Develop character/creature, vehicle and weapon design sheets.
  E. Define game asset visual development.
     1. Discuss visual direction and style.
     2. Creation of characters and vehicles.
     3. Discuss types of weapons and props.
     4. Define overall styling.
     5. Discuss atmosphere and visual look.
     6. Establish color schemes.

III. Game Art Production
  A. Model and texture characters.
  B. Model and texture vehicles.
  C. Model and texture weapons.
  D. Model and texture ammunition.
  E. Model and texture health items.
  F. Model and texture armor.
  G. Model and texture power-ups.
  H. Paint and Scan Textures.
     1. Create base textures and color maps.
     2. Build UV maps.
     3. Generate tiling textures.
     4. Create advanced tiling.
     5. Manipulate digital photo reference images.
     6. Create hand painted textures.
     7. Build normal maps.
     8. Generate specular maps.
     9. Create transparency maps.
  I. Create blendshapes for characters/objects.
     1. Define vowels.
     2. Define consonants.
     3. Create expressions.
  J. Build skeletons for characters/objects.
     1. Build joint foundation.
     2. Generate clusters and deformers.
     3. Create controllers and locators.
  K. Skin character/object to skeleton.
     1. Create rigid bind.
     2. Discuss paint set memberships.
     3. Generate lattice deformers.
  L. Animate characters/objects.
     1. Discuss key frame interpolation.
     2. Define principles of animation.
  M. Layout scene and setup camera.
     1. Define scene integration.
     2. Create motion paths.
     3. Setup camera attributes.
  N. Conduct rendering tests.
  O. Facial/lip synch animation.
     1. Dialog integration.
     2. Create phoneme exposure sheet.
     3. Generate blendshape attributes set.
  P. Asset management.
     1. Define object management.
     2. Discuss environment and level management.
     3. Define character management.
     4. Discuss weapon and vehicle management.
  Q. Light scene.
     1. Define lighting strategies and moods.
     2. Discuss types of light sources.
     3. Define lighting the scene.
     4. Define positions of light sources.
  R. Apply UV texture and normal maps to models: UV coordinate system.

IV. Game Art Post-Production
  A. Discuss final rendering: define lights, cameras and materials.
  B. Export game art assets: export coding.
  C. Work through quality control: reviews, previews, fixes and changes.
  D. Create final output: CD, DVD, web site.
  E. Edit the animation: audio, color correction, video transitions and f/x.
  F. Test the game: testing game art assets in game.

V. Portfolio
  A. Showcase models, textures lighting, and animation in a game engine.
  B. Showcase high and low polygon wireframe and solid shaded models.
  C. Demonstrate the use of UV textures.
  D. Include final rendered images that demonstrate basic control of a variety of game art techniques and processes used in traditional and emerging technologies.
  E. Output to DVD, CD or website.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams     20-30% of grade
Minimum of two projects        40-60% of grade
Final project                  20-30% of grade
Total                          100%

Grade Criteria:
 A =  90 – 100%  
 B =  80 –  89%  
 C =  70 –  79%  
 D =  60 –  69%  
 F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 255

  • Title: Advanced Animation and Effects*
  • Number: ANI 255
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisites: ANI 245

The Advanced Animation and Effects course exposes students to various Hollywood style effects, from viscous liquid to open ocean effects. Through hands-on tutorials students will simulate and render a variety of visual effects including fire, explosions, smoke, steam, lightning, rain, snow storms and tornados. These are just a few of the many limitless possibilities that are required by today's demanding visual effects companies. The students will also explore compositing, combining CG (computer generated) and live video together to create stunning imagery. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply visual communication knowledge and skills to express ideas imaginatively
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving by communicating ideas visually
  3. Produce visual effects animation for shorts, commercials, and film that demonstrate basic knowledge of expository and narrative communication processes and design theory
  4. Communicate ideas and stories with a variety of visual effects techniques and media
  5. Select appropriate visual effects media, techniques and processes for specific purposes
  6. Produce visual and dynamic effects that demonstrate basic control of a variety of media, techniques and processes in traditional and emerging technologies

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Visual Effects
   A. Define visual effects terminology
   B. Discuss visual effects technology/development
   C. Establish visual milestones
   D. Define compositing and integrating visual effects 

II. Digital Production Process
   A. Define production strategies
   B. Discuss visual effects tools
   C. Establish creative and production teams
   D. Identify visual effects process
   E. Discuss visual effects/animation integration 

III. Dynamics
   A. Define particle tool and create emitter
   B. Define and discuss vertex, point and curve emission
   C. Define surface emission
   D. Define rigid bodies
   E. Define fields
   F. Define goals and add attribute
   G. Discuss instancer and duplicate group
   H. Create soft bodies 
   I. Create skeletons, lattices and curves
   J. Create softbody effects and define animated textures
   K. Create spring effects
   L. Define and discuss sprite rendering
   M. Define and discuss advanced sprites

IV. Fluid Effects
   A. Define fluids
   B. Discuss basic fluid concepts
   C. Discuss methods for defining the contents of a fluid container
   D. Create fluid examples
   E. Discuss dynamic fluid effects
   F. Define non-dynamic fluid effects
   G. Define fluid containers
   H. Define fluid properties

V. Modify Fluids
   A. Change the size of a fluid container
   B. Change the resolution of a fluid
   C. Change dynamic fluid behavior
   D. Change fluid behavior at the container boundaries
   E. Convert fluids to polygons
   F. Modify fluid attributes
   G. Use fluid attribute presets

VI. Make objects interact with dynamic fluids
   A. Make fluids collide with geometry
   B. Move geometry with the force of a fluid
   C. Move cloth with the force of a fluid
   D. Move particles with the force of a fluid
   E. Modify geometry with the force of a fluid

VII. Cloth Simulation
   A. Load cloth
   B. Create a garment
   C. Model the character
   D. Pose the character
   E. Build a pattern for the garment
   F. Create panels
   G. Seam the garment
   H. Tailor with darts
   I. Adjust the garment
   J. Move the garment
   K. Set resolution
   L. Adjust the seams
   M. Model parts of a garment
   N. Set display options
   O. Create cloth objects
   P. Create cloth collision objects
   Q. Adjust the collision object
   R. Simulate cloth

VIII. Fur/Hair
   A. Define and discuss fur
   B. Load Fur
   C. Lay out UV coordinates
   D. Create fur
   E. Attach and detach fur
   F. Select which UV set to use
   G. Preview fur using fur feedback
   H. Reverse fur normals
   I. Offset the direction fur grows
   J. Change fur attributes

IX. Artisan Brush Tools
   A. Define paint strokes
   B. Define flood paint
   C. Define paint reflected
   D. Restrict an area for painting
   E. Define map attributes
   F. Set stylus pressure
   G. Change the brush outline color
   H. Create an artisan tool shelf
   I. Define artisan hotkeys
   J. Use artisan marking menus

X. Intro to Digital Compositing
   A. Define visual Information
   B. Discuss basic image manipulation
   C. Define basic image compositing
   D. Define matte creation and manipulation
   E. Define time and temporal manipulations
   F. Define image tracking and stabilization
   G. Define formats: media, resolution, and aspect ratios
   H. Define quality and efficiency
   I. Create elements
   J. Discuss integration techniques
   K. Discuss case studies

XI. Compositing Plug-in
   A. Setting up shots
   B. Discuss shot strategy
   C. Define tracking
   D. Define solving

XII. Compositing
   A. Define basics
   B. Discuss the brief
   C. Define preferences
   D. Discuss importing
   E. Create masks
   F. Define nesting
   G. Define animation
   H. Define timing 
   I. Define keying
   J. Define effects
   K. Define tracking
   L. Define parenting
   M. Define expressions
   N. Define 3D
   O. Define type

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams  25% of grade
Minimum of two projects     50% of grade
Final project               25% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:
  A =  90 – 100%  
  B =  80 –  89%  
  C =  70 –  79%  
  D =  60 –  69%  
  F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 258

  • Title: Game Level Design*
  • Number: ANI 258
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisites: ANI 250

This course provides an introduction to game level design and how to create interior and exterior levels using the same state of the art editing tools that are used in ultra high-end video games. Students learn to build white box levels first and then populate the level with detailed original game artwork. Students will create terrain maps, textures and interactively place static meshes into the game editor to enhance the visual aspects of the level. Students explore how to build a map that is purposeful and exciting to play 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the level design production pipeline, pre-production process, design production and post-production processes.
  2. Create terrain, level and environment visual art assets.
  3. Develop game levels following the game design document.
  4. Design levels using static meshes, textures and lighting to convey mood and atmosphere.
  5. Create architectural models that follow key principles of form, structure, scale and shape.
  6. Develop levels that are exciting and challenging that follow the level design production pipeline.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Level Design Production Pipeline
  A. Create a game planner.
  B. Discuss the game design document.
  C. Discuss game specifications.
  D. Define the job of a 2D game designer. 
  E. Define the job of a 3D game designer.
  F. Define the job of a game programmer.
  G. Define the job of a game audio designer. 

II. Pre-Production Process
  A. Develop ideas using a game planner.
  B. Summarize the game using a game design document.
  C. Write game specifications.
  D. Apply textures to levels.
  E. Develop terrain, level and environment.
  F. Create white box level, and test. 

III. Design Production
  A. Build environment and terrain models.
  B. Create static meshes and textures in a level editor.
  C. Create foliage models.
  D. Texture levels.
  E. Incorporate lighting in level design.
  F. Use level design editor 

IV. Post-Production
  A. Test levels.
  B. Finish levels.
  C. Use screen capture.
  D. Produce final output.
  E. Edit image and sound.
  F. Test the game.
  G. Produce documentation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams     20-30% of grade
Minimum of two projects        40-60% of grade
Final project                  20-30% of grade
Total                         100%
 

Grade Criteria:
 A =  90 – 100%  
 B =  80 –  89%  
 C =  70 –  79%  
 D =  60 –  69%  
 F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.
  2. Associated costs: refer to the instructor’s course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 260

  • Title: Animation Capstone*
  • Number: ANI 260
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisites: ANI 255

In this course, the student will use all the knowledge attained in previous core animation courses and develop a finished 1-2 minute independent movie following a predetermined animation production process and schedule. Students will develop a portfolio including an auto-run DVD or VHS tape, and a hard copy portfolio including illustrations of characters, model sheets, storyboards, props, environments, textures and final rendered scenes created for the movie. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply visual communication knowledge and skills to express ideas imaginatively
  2. Think critically and solve problems to communicate ideas visually
  3. Produce an independent movie that demonstrate basic knowledge of expository and narrative communication processes and design theory
  4. Communicate ideas and stories with a variety of animation techniques and media
  5. Select appropriate animation media, techniques and processes for specific purposes
  6. Produce a portfolio including an independent animated movie and final rendered drawings that demonstrate basic control of a variety of media, techniques and processes in traditional and emerging technologies

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Planning Production Strategies
   A. Define the type of production
   B. Discuss technical complexity and delivery media
   C. Identify production workflow and shots
   D. Define creative goals
   E. Discuss budget, schedule and resources

II. Pre-Production Strategies
   A. Develop ideas
      1. Discuss brain storming
      2. Discuss revisions/creative cycles
   B. Prepare scriptwriting/story
      1. Define plot
      2. Developing characters
   C. Plan storyboarding
      1. Translate the script into images
      2. Discuss technical breakdown of each shot
      3. Define storytelling
      4. Discuss general composition
      5. Identify actions
      6. Define camera moves
   D. Create character design
      1. Develop look and personality
      2. Discuss cartoons, stylized or realistic
      3. Develop drawings
      4. Create character sheets/model sheets
      5. Generate character turnarounds       
   E. Define visual development
      1. Discuss visual direction and style
      2. Create characters
      3. Discuss types of environments and props
      4. Define overall styling 
      5. Discuss atmosphere and visual look
      6. Establish color schemes
   F. Formulate breakdown of scenes and task assignments
      1. Define animatics
      2. Discuss previsualization
      3. Create story reels

III. Production Strategies
   A. Model characters
      1. Generate polygon modeling
      2. Produce NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) modeling
      3. Create subdivisional surface modeling
   B. Model sets and props
      1. Create polygon modeling
      2. Generate NURBS modeling
      3. Produce subdivisional surface modeling
   C. Paint and scan textures
      1. Create base textures
      2. Manipulate digital photographs
      3. Create hand painted
   D. Write and Create Shaders
      1. Create 2D and 3D procedural maps
      2. Generate 2D and 3D projection maps
      3. Build displacement maps
      4. Construct bump maps
      5. Create transparency
      6. Create specular maps
      7. Create diffuse maps
      8. Create reflection maps
      9. Create color maps
      10. Create ambient maps
      11. Generate environment maps
      12. Produce glow and incandescence maps
   E. Create blendshapes for characters and objects
      1. Define vowels
      2. Define consonants
      3. Create expressions
      4. Define shapes
      5. Discuss morphing
   F. Build skeletons for characters and objects
      1. Create IK (inverse kinetics) controls
      2. Generate FK (forward kinetics) controls
   G. Skin character and object to skeleton
      1. Create rigid bind
      2. Discuss paint set memberships
      3. Generate lattice deformers
      4. Create joint deformers
      5. Create smooth bind
      6. Define paint weights
   H. Animate characters and objects
      1. Discuss key frame interpolation
      2. Define principles of animation
      3. Model animation
      4. Create camera animation
      5. Generate light animation
      6. Create hierarchical animation
      7. Define two-and three-dimensional integration
   I. Layout scene and setup camera
      1. Define scene integration
      2. Create motion paths
      3. Setup camera attributes
   J. Generate rendering tests
      1. Define software render
      2. Discuss hardware render
      3. Define mental ray render
      4. Discuss vector render
   K. Create facial and lip synch animation
      2. Discuss timeline setup
      3. Define FPS (frames per second) setup
      4. Dialog Integration
      5. Create phoneme exposure sheet
      6. Generate blendshape attributes set
      7. Create expression exposure sheet
   L. Animate special effects
      1. Define camera tracking
      2. Discuss rotoscoping
      3. Create blue and green screens and chroma key
      4. Define set and character extensions
      5. Create crowd replications
      6. Generate particle simulation
      7. Create fluid simulation
      8. Create cloth Simulation
      9. Generate hair Simulation
     10. Define 3-D morphing
     11. Discuss motion control
   M. Light scenes
      1. Define lighting strategies and moods
      2. Discuss types of light sources
      3. Define lighting the scene
      4. Define positions of light sources
 
IV. Post-Production Strategies
   A. Discuss final rendering (entire scene or layers)
      1. Define lights, cameras and materials
      2. Define color
      3. Discuss rendering process
      4. Define hidden surface removal
      5. Define Z-buffer (image depth coordinates)
      6. Define ray tracing
      7. Discuss global illumination and radiosity
      8. Define image-based rendering
      9. Discuss non-photorealistic rendering
     10. Discuss hardware rendering
     11. Define file formats
   B. Assemble compositing
      1. Discuss image manipulation
      2. Define image retouching
      3. Discuss image compositing and blending
      4. Define image sequencing
      5. Define color grading
   C. Manage reviews, previews, fixes and changes
   D. Generate final output
      1. Generate DVD chapter design
      2. Create VHS tape
      3. Create CD
      4. Generate hard copies 
   E. Edit image and sound
      1. Discuss sound sweetening
      2. Define image colorization
   F. Prepare quality control and release

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams   25% of grade
Minimum of two projects      50% of grade
Final project                25% of grade
  Total                     100%

Grade Criteria:
  A =  90 – 100%  
  B =  80 –  89%  
  C =  70 –  79%  
  D =  60 –  69%  
  F =  59% and below 

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 270

  • Title: Visual Effects and Compositing*
  • Number: ANI 270
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Prerequisites: ANI 145

This course emphasizes the importance of breaking down visual effects shots for effective compositing. Advanced topics will include correct use of garbage mattes, 2D/3D visual effects, blue screen or green screen removal, traveling mattes, image correction, lighting and shading. An introduction to the production pipeline used in professional film and TV work will also be covered. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-studio/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the Visual Effects production pipeline.
  2. Define digital representation of visual information.
  3. Create and manipulate mattes using procedural matte extraction.
  4. Demonstrate basic image and color manipulation.
  5. Demonstrate basic image compositing, matte creation and manipulation.
  6. Demonstrate time and temporal manipulation, and image tracking and stabilization.
  7. Identify formats: media, resolution, and aspect ratios for a particular project.
  8. Produce motion graphics, editing, morphing, digital painting and integration of 2D and 3D elements.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Visual Effects and Digital Compositing  
   A. Define the digital creative environment.
   B. Discuss the development of the technology.
   C. Identify visual milestones.
   D. Define and use key terms.

II. Visual Effects Production Pipeline
   A. Create script
   B. Define visual development.
   C. Create storyboards.
   D. Define scene breakdown.
   E. Discuss motion capture.
   F. Demonstrate visual effects. 
   G. Shoot live action and/or use CG elements.
   H. Illustrate rotoscope and match camera move.
   I. Evaluate final render.
   J.  Explain compositing.
   K. Discuss post-processing.
   L. Construct final output files.

III. Introduction to Digital Compositing
   A. Define compositing.   
   B. Explain historical perspective.
   C. Review terminology.
   D. Illustrate compositing workflow.

IV. Digital Representation of Visual Information 
   A. Define image generation.
   B. Discuss image input devices.
   C. Describe digital image file format.

V. Basic Image Manipulation
   A. Show color manipulations.
   B. Utilize spatial filters. 
   C. Define geometric transformations.
 
VI. Basic Image Compositing
   A. Illustrate a matte image.
   B. Integrate matte channel.
   C. Demonstrate multisource operators.
   D. Explore masks.
   E.  Prepare a composite with premultiple images.

VII. Matte Creation and Manipulation
   A. Manipulate procedural matte extraction.
   B. Demonstrate matting techniques.

VIII. Time and Temporal Manipulation
   A. Define apparent motion.
   B. Discuss temporal resolution.
   C. Identify temporal artifacts.
   D. Practice changing the length or timing of a sequence.
   E. Create key framing.

IX. Image Tracking and Stabilization
   A. Demonstrate tracking an element onto a plate.
   B. Discuss human intervention.
   C. Practice stabilizing a plate.
   D. Illustrate tracking multiple points.

X. Interface Interactions
   A. Examine workflow. 
   B. Analyze online versus batch.
   C. Illustrate methods of representing the compositing process.
   D. Demonstrate curve editors.
   E. Work with proxy images.

XI. Image Viewing and Analysis Tools
   A. Discuss image viewers.
   B. Identify flipbooks.
   C. Define image statistics.

XII. Formats: Media, Resolution, and Aspect Ratio
   A. Define aspect ratio.
   B. Discuss format conversion pipeline.
   C. Describe film formats.
   D. Differentiate video formats.
   E. Distinguish between other formats.
   F. Work with non-square pixels.
   G. Convert between film and video.

XIII. Quality and Efficiency
   A. Define quality.
   B. Discuss efficiency.

XIV. Learning to See
   A. Evaluate color, brightness, and contrast.
   B. Define a camera.
   C. Explain distance and perspective.
   D. Demonstrate lens flares.
   E. Describe focus.
   F. Illustrate motion blur.

XV. Creating Elements
   A. Demonstrate lighting.
   B. Define matched cameras.
   C. Discuss reference stand-in.
   D. Employ clean plates.
   E. Compare film stock.
   F. Produce filters.
   G. Choose a format.
   H. Illustrate how to light and shoot a greenscreen or bluescreen.
 
XVI. Integrating Techniques
   A. Explain scene continuity.
   B. Define lighting.
   C. Construct shadows.
   D. Illustrate atmosphere.
   E. Discuss camera mismatches.
   F. Demonstrate camera movements.
   G. Analyze focus.
   H. Discuss motion blur.
   I. Define film grain.
   J. Demonstrate greenscreen or bluescreen integration.

XVII. Advanced Topics
   A. Go beyond black and  white.
   B. Discuss nonlinear color spaces.
   C. Work with 3D elements.
   D. Define related 2D disciplines.

XVIII. Case Studies
   A. Analyze other visual effects processes.
   B. Critique other visual effects shots.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exercises, papers or exams     25% of grade
Minimum of two projects        50% of grade
Final project                  25% of grade
Total                         100%
 

Grade Criteria:

 A =  90 – 100%  
 B =  80 –  89%  
 C =  70 –  79%  
 D =  60 –  69%  
 F =  59% and below

Caveats:

  1. Because of the need for high-end hardware and software, students need to be prepared to schedule significant open lab hours in order to complete the projects in this course.
  2. Refer to the instructor’s course syllabus for details about any associated costs that may be required.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

ANI 273

  • Title: Career Preparation*
  • Number: ANI 273
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: ANI 260

This course will provide interactive media majors instruction in the presentation of his or her work in a digital portfolio format of professional quality. A printed and written resume will be produced. Self-promotion, networking, job searches and interview skills will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk. CIM 273 is the same course as ANI 273; do not enroll in both. This course is taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the types of interactive media projects appropriate for inclusion in a professional portfolio
  2. Select from his/her body of work those projects that meet his/her professional goals
  3. Evaluate and select the best digital media for presentation
  4. Design an effective digital presentation form
  5. Describe and list the basic components and structure of a professional resume
  6. Design and produce a professional resume in both digital and printed forms
  7. Describe effective job search skills and interviewing techniques
  8. Demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Digital Portfolio
   A. Select appropriate level of work and determine the total number of
pieces
   B. Research and select the appropriate digital media for presentation
   C. Prepare projects for the selected type of digital media
   D. Rework projects as necessary for the final portfolio
   E. Sequence the work for greatest narrative  impact
 
II. Professional Resume
   A. Collect resume information
   B. Select an appropriate type of resume
   C. Write the resume copy
   D. Design the resume for both digital and print forms
   E. Produce the resume for both digital and print forms
 
III. Professional Considerations
   A. Establish personal and professional goals
   B. List professional organizations and contacts
   C. List professional publications
   D. Demonstrate interview techniques
   E. Describe how to conduct a job search
   F. Describe how to evaluate a job offer

IV. Attitudes and Work Habit
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits 
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Digital portfolio  50% 
Printed resume     20% 
Electronic resume  10% 
Performance        20% 
                  100%
 Grade Criteria:
    A =   90 - 100%     
    B =   80 -  89%     
    C =   70 -  79%     
    D =   60 -  69%     
    F =   below 60%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.