Automotive Technology, A.A.S.

Automotive technicians generally begin their careers in service repair shops, with continually expanding industrial and service career advancement opportunities. Technicians work with experienced professionals and have frequent contact with the public. This field requires good mechanical aptitude and manual dexterity skills.

The two-year associate of applied science degree, which is certified by the ASE, covers all major areas, including diagnosis and tune-up, chassis, electrical/electronic and hydraulic systems, automatic transmissions, engines, and emissions. Students work on developing the skills needed to advance to a supervisory position, such as customer relations, estimating materials and labor costs, and managing the work of others.

(Major Code 2420; State CIP Code 47.0604)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

First Semester

AUTO 125Introduction to Automotive Shop Practices3
AUTO 129Brakes I*3
AUTO 131Brakes II*1
AUTO 156Electrical I*3
AUTO 145Automotive Steering and Suspension*4
ENGL 121Composition I*3
Total Hours17

Second Semester

INDT 125Industrial Safety/OSHA 303
AUTO 166Electrical II*2
AUTO 161Engine Performance I*3
AUTO 165Automotive Engine Repair*4
INDT 155Workplace Skills1
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^1
Humanities Elective ^^3
Total Hours17
^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

^^

Humanities Elective

Third Semester

AUTO 208Electrical III*3
AUTO 205Engine Performance II*3
AUTO 209Manual Drive Train and Axles*4
ENGL 123Technical Writing I*3
MATH 120Business Mathematics*3
Total Hours16

Note: Students transferring to 4 year programs should take MATH 171 College Algebra*.

Fourth Semester

Technical/Related Electives (see below)3
AUTO 250Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles*4
AUTO 215Engine Performance III*3
AUTO 221Heating and Air Conditioning*4
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^3
Total Hours17
^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Technical/Related Electives

AUTO 120Basic Automobile Operation and Maintenance3
AUTO 121Small Engine Service3
AUTO 122Introduction to Automotive Glass3
AUTO 123Motorcycle Maintenance and Repair2
AUTO 128Automotive Parts Specialist2
AUTO 130Diesel Fundamentals*2
AUTO 201ASE Certification Seminar1
AUTO 210Advanced Engine Repair*3
AUTO 235Hybrid Alternative Fuels Vehicles Repair Maintenance*3
AUTO 271Automotive Technology Internship*3
AUTO 291Independent Study*1-7
ENTR 142Fast Trac Business Plan3

Total Program Hours: 67

Courses

AUTO 120   Basic Automobile Operation and Maintenance (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This is a beginning level class for non-automotive majors, designed to introduce students to the basic function, operation and care of modern automobiles. Upon completion they should be able to discuss safe operation of a passenger car in everyday circumstances in including emergency situations. Students should be able to locate and understand information regarding repair and maintenance of modern automobiles. Safe practices while using basic hand tools, chemicals and jacks will be included in this course. After determining fair market costs and economic feasibility students will be able to determine whether to repair or replace an automobile. Students should be able to decide whether to attempt repairs themselves or to have them performed by a professional. Also, the basic costs of insuring and operating an automobile will be discussed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

AUTO 121   Small Engine Service (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to compare and contrast operating principles of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engines. The student should be able to describe lubricating, cooling, fuel and governor systems; troubleshoot engine problems; inspect engine components; and service the fuel, cooling and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 122   Introduction to Automotive Glass (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose, service and repair various automotive glass problems, provide professional service to customers, and manage and supervise jobs and employees. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and /or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 1 1/2 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 123   Motorcycle Maintenance and Repair (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate the proper use of tools and equipment used in servicing motorcycles. Two-stroke and four-stroke cycle designs will be studied. Overhaul procedures will be demonstrated. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 125   Introduction to Automotive Shop Practices (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is an introductory course required for all students in the Automotive Technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to develop shop safety habits and become proficient in tire, battery, cooling system, lubrication service and minor electrical diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on learning basic skills needed to enter advanced automotive classes. The student will be required to provide American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z87 safety glasses and is expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 128   Automotive Parts Specialist (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate good communication and basic math skills. Ordering and maintaining correct inventory, as well as displaying and selling automotive parts for a fair profit, will be studied. Lectures will be supported by parts specialists in the industry. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

AUTO 129   Brakes I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 131

Students will perform system pressure and travel calculations utilizing Pascal's Law, complete service work orders, determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, determine brake system concerns and necessary actions, diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses, determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles, determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures, determine how to accomplish caliper piston retractions, diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns, and determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies through a variety of classroom and lab/shop learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 130   Diesel Fundamentals (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify diesel engine components and parts, troubleshoot and service all external components with an emphasis on glow plugs, injectors and injector pumps. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk. This course is taught in the spring semester.

AUTO 131   Brakes II (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 129

Students will determine necessary brake system correction, conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, perform diagnosis and correction for poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, conduct inspection, fabrication and/or replacement of brake lines and hoses, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, perform drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform disc brake repair and replacement procedures, machine rotor according to service specifications, perform caliper piston retraction where applicable, inspect and test power assist systems, determine necessary action on wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses, and perform the removal, inspection and replacement of bearing and hub assemblies. 3 hrs. instruction lab/wk.

AUTO 145   Automotive Steering and Suspension (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Upon successful completion of this course students will document suspension system concerns, perform diagnostics on steering systems, perform repairs on steering systems, perform diagnostics on suspension systems, perform repairs on suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment and adjustment, perform diagnostics on wheel and tire systems, and perform fundamental repairs on wheel and tire systems. 8 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

AUTO 156   Electrical I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Students will complete service work orders; describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage; perform basic electrical circuit repairs; identify electrical system faults; identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information; perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM; describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits through a variety of classroom and shop learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 158   Steering and Suspension I (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 159

In this course students will document fundamental suspension system concerns, perform fundamental diagnostics of steering systems, perform fundamental repairs of steering systems, perform fundamental diagnostics of suspension systems, perform fundamental repairs of suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment and adjustment, perform fundamental diagnostics of wheel and tire systems, and perform fundamental repairs of wheel and tire systems. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 159   Steering and Suspension II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 158

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to perform complex diagnostics and repair on steering and suspension systems. Additionally, students will perform pre-alignment inspection and complex repairs of wheel and tire systems. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

AUTO 161   Engine Performance I (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

In this learning plan students will: complete work order and check history; identify engine mechanical integrity; explore the fundamentals of fuel system theory; identify fuel system concerns; explore the fundamentals of ignition theory; identify ignition system concerns; identify induction system concerns; identify exhaust system concerns; identify engine mechanical integrity through a variety of learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 165   Automotive Engine Repair (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 or department approval

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the four-stroke cycle internal combustion engine. Students should be able to diagnose and repair cylinder heads and cylinder block assemblies to include lubrication and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 166   Electrical II (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to perform battery diagnosis, perform battery service, perform starting system diagnosis, perform starting system repair, perform charging system diagnosis, perform charging system repair, and identify current flow on starting and charging system diagrams. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 201   ASE Certification Seminar (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course will prepare students to take any of the eight basic National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) automotive certification tests. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

AUTO 205   Engine Performance II (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 161 and AUTO 165

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the operation of engine management systems to include: general engine diagnosis, computerized engine controls diagnosis and repair, fuel, air induction, and exhaust diagnosis and repair, and emissions control systems diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 208   Electrical III (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 165 and AUTO 166

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose general electrical system problems, diagnose and repair lighting systems, gauges, warning devices, horns, wiper and washer systems, and accessories. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 209   Manual Drive Train and Axles (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to work safely in the shop; perform manual transmission/transaxle diagnosis and repair; clutch diagnosis and repair; drive shaft, half-shaft, universal and constant velocity joint diagnosis and repair; and four wheel drive/all wheel drive diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab.

AUTO 210   Advanced Engine Repair (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 165

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to plan, design, and build a performance engine. The student will also demonstrate knowledge of the relationships between displacement, horsepower and torque; regulations governing performance engines; and current trends in engine modification. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

AUTO 215   Engine Performance III (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 205

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to service and repair fuels systems, ignition systems, and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab.

AUTO 221   Heating and Air Conditioning (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 156 and AUTO 165

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to operate, service and diagnose automotive heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The course will cover the theory and operation of these systems, major components, testing, recycling and other service procedures. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab.

AUTO 235   Hybrid & Alternative Fuels Vehicles Repair & Maintenance (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 131 and AUTO 205 and AUTO 208 and AUTO 221 and AUTO 250 or Department Approval

This course will cover the technology of hybrid electric, electric, alternative fuel and fuel cell vehicles. Topics covered will include changes in the vehicle engine, drive train, emissions, heating/ventilation/air conditioning (HVAC), brake and computer systems. Variations between manufacturers will be covered. Students will learn to safely diagnose, repair and service these vehicles. 2 hrs. lecture/3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

AUTO 250   Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: AUTO 166 and AUTO 205

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose, service and repair various automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles, both on vehicle and off vehicle, including computer-controlled systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab.

AUTO 271   Automotive Technology Internship (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval required

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, 15 hrs. work min./wk.

AUTO 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

AUTO 120

  • Title: Basic Automobile Operation and Maintenance*
  • Number: AUTO 120
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

This is a beginning level class for non-automotive majors, designed to introduce students to the basic function, operation and care of modern automobiles. Upon completion they should be able to discuss safe operation of a passenger car in everyday circumstances in including emergency situations. Students should be able to locate and understand information regarding repair and maintenance of modern automobiles. Safe practices while using basic hand tools, chemicals and jacks will be included in this course. After determining fair market costs and economic feasibility students will be able to determine whether to repair or replace an automobile. Students should be able to decide whether to attempt repairs themselves or to have them performed by a professional. Also, the basic costs of insuring and operating an automobile will be discussed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss safe operation of a modern passenger car and use an owner’s manual.
  2. Understand basic automobile systems, such as power train, electrical and brakes, through research and locating key components using owner’s manual and repair manuals.
  3. Identify and describe how to use basic automotive hand tools.
  4. Understand the principals of general maintenance and care tasks including listing steps for changing oil/filter, changing spare tire, safe jump starts and checking tire air pressure.
  5. Determine, list and analyze the costs of owning and operating a modern passenger car in order to evaluate feasibility of repair vs. replacement.
  6. Investigate and list the criteria for leasing vs. purchasing and new car vs. used car concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety
   A. Correctly select and list chemicals for repairs and maintenance.
      1. List and discuss precautions for handling hazardous automotive
chemicals.
      2. Research and locate proper disposal sites for hazardous waste in
compliance with EPA standards.
   B.Identify and list dangerous driving conditions and discuss avoidance
techniques.
   C. Analyze inclement weather conditions and list the driving dangers.
   D. Evaluate common road conditions and list the dangers that each
represents.
   E. Locate and illustrate jack lift points and discuss their
importance.
   F. Identify and describe safe use of jacks for emergencies and
maintenance.
   G. Identify and diagram hybrid automobile’s dangerous voltage
sources.
   H. Analyze and discuss the dangers associated with the quietness of an
electric drive automobile.
   I. Research and list the dangers of air bag (Safety Restraint System)
deployment.
   J. Locate and explain procedures for disarming an air bag.

II. Electrical
   A. Define and diagram types of electrical circuits.
      1. Complete
      2. Shorted
      3. Open 
   B. Identify, locate and test circuit protection.
      1. Fuses
      2. Circuit breakers
   C. Describe and illustrate Ohm’s law using mathematical formulas.
      1. Volts
      2. Ohms
      3. Amps
   D. Apply Ohm’s law describing basic microprocessors within automotive
systems.
      1. Input
      2. Output

III. Tools
   A. Identify and organize common automotive tools and list their usage.
   B. Underline potential hazards of common tools.
   C. Outline basic care for common tools.

IV. Engine: Function and Care
   A. Illustrate and analyze the four stroke cycle engine.
      1. Piston movement
      2. Valve opening
      3. Displacement of gases
      4. Temperatures
      5. Pressures
   B. Identify and list the basic engine systems. 
      1. Induction
      2. Exhaust
      3. Cooling
      4. Emission control
      5. Lubrication
   C. Differentiate, list and analyze the importance of the ingredients of
a running four stroke engine.
      1. Air and fuel 
      2. Spark
      3. Compression
   D. Identify and list cooling system components and potential dangers.
      1. Radiator and cap       
      2. Hoses
      3. Belts
      4. Thermostat
   E. Perform safe inspection of cooling system components.
      1. High pressures and temperatures.
      2. Hazardous waste disposal.
      3. Environmental Protection Agency regulations for coolants.
   F. Identify, list and describe basic lubrication system components.
      1. Oil fill cap
      2. Oil filter
      3. Oil dip stick
      4. Oil pan
   G. Discuss various types of motor oil and make proper selection of
motor oils.
      1. Motor oil selection
      2. Proper disposal
   H. Emissions
      1. Locate components and specifications in owner’s manual and shop
manuals.
      2. List common emission control components and their function.
   I. Batteries
      1. Discuss and illustrate safe jump starts.
      2. Perform safe jump start.
      3. List steps for safe handling of batteries.
      4. Research and list proper disposal sites and methods.

V. Transmission: Function and Care
   A. Contrast automatic, manual transmissions and continuously variable
transmissions.
   B. Discern between front wheel drive, rear wheel drive and all wheel
drive.
   C. List and describe basic operation of automatic transmissions
components.
      1. Planetary gears
      2. Hydraulic circuits
      3. Filters and coolers
      4. Torque converters
   D. List and describe basic components of manual transmissions.
      1. Fully synchronized gears
      2. Shifter
      3. Clutch
         a. cable
         b. hydraulic
         c. linkage 
   E. Describe basic operation of a Continuously Variable Transmissions
      1. Computer operation.
      2. Torque multiplication.
   F. Insure timely recommended maintenance by locating and listing
scheduled care.
      1. Proper selection of lubricants and oils.
      2. Proper selection of sealants.
      3. Locating service information.
   G. Describe the purpose and function of a differential.
   H. Discern the differences of a transmission, transaxle and
differential.
   I. Locate recommended maintenance schedules and describe maintenance
and care techniques.
      1. Proper selection of oil.
      2. Maintenance techniques.
      3. Proper disposal of oil.

VI. Steering and Suspension: Function and Care
   A. Discuss basic safety issues and identify potential dangers.
   B. Identify and evaluate condition of wear items.
   C. Lubrication techniques.
   D. Discuss the function and relationship between steering and
suspension.
      1. Principal geometry
      2. Types
   E. Discuss and contrast various types of springs.
      1. Air springs
      2. Coils
      3. Leaf
      4. Torsion bars
      5. Potential danger
   F. Describe the basic types of independent suspension.
      1. Long/Short Arm
      2. McPherson strut
      3. Modified strut
   G. Discuss principal issues regarding chassis alignment.
      1. Toe
      2. Caster
      3. Camber
      4. Set back
      5. Steering axis inclination
      6. Cross camber
      7. Drift vs. pull
      8. Ride height
      9. Tire issues

VII. Tires: Function and Care
   A. Describe  and illustrate various tire wear patterns.
   B. Discuss and outline proper tire selection issues.
      1. Identify and discuss load range.
      2. Locating correct recommended tire size.
      3. Discuss the importance of tire speed rating.
      4. Discuss the importance of  tire date codes.

VIII. Brakes: Function and Care
   A. Identify differences between disc brakes and drum brakes.
   B. Identify and select proper brake fluid. 
   C. Outline brake inspection procedures.
   D. Identifying types of power assist systems.
   E. Describe basic antilock brakes system function.
   F. Discern whether a car is equipped with antilock brakes.
   G. Locate procedures and discuss proper maintenance of brakes.
   H. List potential dangers of brake system repairs.
   I. Discuss and outline the difference between lining replacement vs. a
complete brake service.

IX. Climate Control: Function and Care
   A. Describe heater function and identify basic system components.
      1. Potential dangers
      2. Heater core
      3. Control valve
      4. Hoses
   B. Describe and diagram air conditioning basic components and their
function.  
      1. Potential dangers
      2. Compressor
      3. Evaporator
      4. Condenser
      5. Plumbing 
      6. Safety
      7. Types of refrigerant
      8. Environmental Protection Agency

X. Making an Automobile Purchase 
   A. Evaluate financial issues through research and outline market
conditions.
      1. New car values
      2. Used car values
      3. Financing
      4. Sources
      5. Interest rates
      6. Resources 
         a. library
         b. journals
         c. internet

XI. Repair Facility Considerations
   A. Describe and implement methods to determine the reputation for a
repair facility.
   B. Research fair market costs of repair and illustrate findings.
   C. List and prioritize issues regarding location, convenience and
rental cars.

XII. Insurance 
   A. Describe the importance of liability insurance.
   B. Discuss insurance needs and define adequate coverage.
   C. Discuss cost of insurance and contrast basic vs. full coverage.
   D. Describe deductibles and how they affect cost of insurance and
repairs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Reports and worksheets:                    20%-40%
Tests and quizzes:                      20%-40%
Attendance, attitude and work habits:   20%-40%
Not to exceed 100% based on individual instructors Grade Criteria:
Attendance: Five class absences drop semester grade by one letter.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 121

  • Title: Small Engine Service*
  • Number: AUTO 121
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to compare and contrast operating principles of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engines. The student should be able to describe lubricating, cooling, fuel and governor systems; troubleshoot engine problems; inspect engine components; and service the fuel, cooling and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the rules for personal and shop safety.
  2. Perform proper hand tool and equipment usage on small engines.
  3. Measure engine parts using micrometers and calipers.
  4. Identify engine principles and design (both 2- and 4-stroke).
  5. Define ignition, charging and starting systems.
  6. Perform maintenance on the: a) Lubrication and fuel system, b) Cooling and governor system.
  7. Troubleshoot and overhaul one four-stroke and one two-stroke engine.
  8. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules
   A. List and discuss personal safety.
   B. List and discuss shop safety.

II. Hand Tools and Equipment Usage
   A.  Perform work on small engine using proper hand tools.
   B.  Perform work on small engine using shop equipment properly.

III. Measuring Engine Parts
   A.  Use and read a micrometer.
   B.  Measure parts using calipers.
   C.  Operate cylinder micrometer and hole gauges.

IV. Small Engine Design
   A.  Identify a two-stroke engine.
   B.  Identify a four-stroke engine.
   C.  Compare vertical and horizontal shaft engines.

V. Ignition, Charging and Starting Systems
   A.  Explain ignition systems.
   B.  Describe engine charging system.
   C.  Define starting systems.

VI. Engine Maintenance
   A.  Explain lubrication and fuel system.
   B.  Describe cooling and governor systems.

VII. Troubleshooting and Overhaul Engines
   A.  Troubleshooting and overhaul one four-stroke engine.
   B.  Troubleshooting and overhaul one two-stroke engine.

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

<
Competency completion level      50% of grade 
Tests and quizzes                40% of grade 
Participation and work habits    10% of grade 
TOTAL                           100%

Attitude and Work Habits:
Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and
will be a factor in determining grades.  In addition, collaboration and
teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 122

  • Title: Introduction to Automotive Glass*
  • Number: AUTO 122
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose, service and repair various automotive glass problems, provide professional service to customers, and manage and supervise jobs and employees. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and /or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 1 1/2 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the history of glass manufacturing, fabrication, installation, and repair.
  2. Describe the history of the National Glass Association and it’s purpose for testing.
  3. Describe the various types of automotive glass.
  4. Explain auto glass jargon and industry standards.
  5. Describe types and characteristics of glass adhesives and demonstrate their proper usage.
  6. Describe tools of the trade and related safety equipment.
  7. Demonstrate proper procedures for glass installation and windshield repair.
  8. Demonstrate proper method of re-gluing rear view mirrors.
  9. Explain advanced glass installations.
  10. Describe professional customer service techniques.
  11. Describe auto glass management and supervision techniques.
  12. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Glass Industry
   A. Describe processes used in glass manufacturing.
   B. Explain glass fabrication.
   C. Discuss the history of glass installation.
   D. Discuss the history of windshield repair.
   E. Outline the history of the National Glass Association.
   F. Explain the purpose of testing by the NGA.

II. Types of Glass
   A. Describe laminated glass.
   B. Describe tempered glass.
   C. Explain encapsulated glass.
   D. Describe bonded glass.

III. Adhesives and Sealants
   A. List the types and characteristics of adhesives.
   B. Describe the major brands/perceived benefits/features by product.
   C. Demonstrate the proper usage of adhesives and sealants.
   D. Describe the following standards:  FMVSS 208, 212, 216.

IV. Glass Tools and Safety Equipment
   A.  List glass tools and safety equipment.
   B.  Describe the function of various glass tools and safety equipment.
   C.  Demonstrate proper usage of glass tools and safety equipment.

V. Windshield Repair
   A. Compare and contrast competitive systems available, including
benefits and features.
   B. Demonstrate proper windshield repair steps.

VI. Glass Installation
   A. Demonstrate proper method of installing windshields.
   B. Demonstrate proper method of re-gluing the rear view mirror.
   C.  Demonstrate proper method of installing redicut.
   D. Discuss proper method of installing advanced glasses.
   E. Demonstrate proper method of installing door glasses.
   F. Demonstrate proper method of installing quarter glasses.
   G. Demonstrate proper method of installing back glasses.

VII. Customer Service Techniques
   A. Discuss the impact of the truck image on the customer.
   B. Discuss the impact of the technician image on the customer.
   C. Demonstrate examples of the friendly greeting.
   D. Discuss how to conduct a pre-inspection efficiently.
   E. Discuss the steps in doing the installation.
   F. Describe how to do a complete post review.
   G. Explain the importance of accurate paperwork.
   H. Explain cross selling.

VIII. Management and Supervision Techniques
   A. Describe how to plan a productive day.
   B. List methods of scheduling jobs.
   C. Describe how to direct the work of others.
   D. Explain the importance of understanding the needs of employees.
   E. List methods of building a team atmosphere with employees.
   F. Discuss the importance of continual training.
   G. Explain the "leading versus managing" theory.

IX. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab Assignments                 40% of grade 
Test and quizzes                40% of grade 
Participation and work habits   20% of grade 
TOTAL                          100%

Attitude and work habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 123

  • Title: Motorcycle Maintenance and Repair*
  • Number: AUTO 123
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate the proper use of tools and equipment used in servicing motorcycles. Two-stroke and four-stroke cycle designs will be studied. Overhaul procedures will be demonstrated. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify types of motorcycles and components.
  2. Demonstrate safe working habits in the shop.
  3. Identify and demonstrate the use of tools (common and measuring) and equipment.
  4. Find specifications in a shop manual.
  5. Identify and describe different types of fasteners.
  6. Identify and describe engine fundamentals.
  7. Disassemble, service and reassemble the components of the clutch and final drive assemblies.
  8. Service the brakes, tire and wheel assemblies.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Motorcycle and Components
   A. Identify off-road, street bikes, three- and four-wheel cycles.
   B. Identify motorcycle components.

II. Demonstrate Safe Working Habits in the Shop
   A. Demonstrate, list and discuss personal safety habits.
   B. Demonstrate, list and discuss shop safety.

III. Correct Use of Tools (Common and Measuring) and Equipment
   A. Perform work on cycles using proper hand tools.
   B. Perform work on cycles using shop equipment correctly.

IV. Specifications in a Shop Manual
   A. Locate engine tune-up specifications.
   B. Locate engine lubrication and cooling capacities.

V. Identify and Describe Different Types of Fasteners
   A. Threaded and non-threaded
   B. Nuts, bolts and washers
   C. Metric and English
   D. Strength and grade
   E. Thread inserts

VI. Identify and Describe Engine Fundamentals
   A. Basic two-cycle engine
   B. Basic four-cycle engine
   C. Displacement and compression ratios
   D. Horsepower and torque

VII. Disassemble, Service and Reassemble the Components of the Clutch and
Final Drive Assembly
   A. Remove, measure and replace clutch components.
   B. Clean, lubricate and measure chain.
   C. Clean and measure sprockets.
   D. Adjust and align rear wheel.
   E. Discuss shaft drive.

VIII. Service Brakes, Tires and Wheel Assemblies
   A. Service and adjust drum brake.
   B. Service disc brake caliper.
   C. True a wheel by adjusting spokes.
   D. Replace or repair a tire.

IX. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competence completion level       50% of grade 
Test and quizzes                  40% of grade 
Participation and work habits     10% of grade 
TOTAL                            100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades.  In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 125

  • Title: Introduction to Automotive Shop Practices*
  • Number: AUTO 125
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

This course is an introductory course required for all students in the Automotive Technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to develop shop safety habits and become proficient in tire, battery, cooling system, lubrication service and minor electrical diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on learning basic skills needed to enter advanced automotive classes. The student will be required to provide American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z87 safety glasses and is expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete safety training certification on sp2.org.
  2. Acquire general knowledge of the automotive industry, career opportunities, work place skills, and technician certification.
  3. Perform tire and wheel service and diagnosis of tire pressure monitoring systems.
  4. Use shop equipment, hand tools, and power tools.
  5. Demonstrate accurate acquisition of repair, maintenance, and identification information. 
  6. Differentiate under hood, under vehicle, and fasteners component identification.
  7. Perform engine oil and coolant maintenance.
  8. Discuss basic gasoline engine fundamentals and operation. 
  9. Discuss basic electrical fundamentals, automotive wiring, wire repair, and circuit protection.
  10. Perform basic battery, starting, and charging system testing.
  11. Discuss computer fundamentals, on-board diagnostics, scan tools, and engine performance.
  1.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safe Shop Practices
   A. Complete mechanical safety and pollution certification at sp2.org.
   B. Discuss JCCC automotive student lab guidelines.

II. Acquire general knowledge of the automotive industry, career opportunities, 
work place skills, and technician certification
   A. Explain the evolution of the automobile.
   B. Discuss the evolution of engines.
   C. List the eight areas of automotive service according to ASE/NATEF.
   D. Describe technical skills required for the automotive technician.
   E. Explain the hierarchy of positions in the automotive service industry.
   F. Explain the steps and processes for applying for employment.

III. Perform tire and wheel service and diagnosis of tire pressure monitoring systems
   A. Dismount and mount a tire.
   B. Balance a wheel assembly.
   C. Diagnose defective TPMS sensor.
   D. Perform a tire rotation.
   E. Inspect tires.

IV. Use shop equipment, hand tools, and power tools
   A. Raise a vehicle with an automotive lift.
   B. Use hand tools to remove and replace a serpentine belt.
   C. Use power tools to perform a tire rotation.

V. Demonstrate use of information systems to acquire repair, maintenance, and 
identification information  
   A. Complete a work order.
   B. Discover how to check fluid level of an automatic transmission.
   C. Retrieve parameters and diagnostic procedure a DTC [Diagnostic Trouble Code].

VI. Differentiate under hood, under vehicle, and fasteners component identification
   A. Perform an under hood inspection.
   B. Perform an undercarriage inspection.
   C. Visual inspection of an automatic transmission.

VII. Perform engine oil and coolant maintenance
   A. Perform engine oil and filter change.
   B. Remove and replace engine coolant
   C. Perform a cooling system leak test.

VIII. Discuss basic gasoline engine fundamentals and operation
   A. Explain how a four-stroke cycle engine operates.
   B. Discuss how compression ratio is calculated.
   C. Explain how engine displacement is determined.
   D. Identify the internal parts of an engine.
   E. Discuss horse power and torque output of an engine.
   F. Explain valve timing.
   G. Explain engine configurations.
   F. Discuss turbochargers and super chargers.
   G. Describe how the grade of gasoline affects engine performance.

IX. Discuss basic electrical fundamentals, automotive wiring, wire repair, 
and circuit protection
   A. Test fuses.
   B. Define electricity.
   C. Discuss relationship of volts, amperes, and ohms.
   D. Explain the relationship of magnetism and electricity.

X. Perform basic battery, starting, and charging system testing
   A. Discover the procedure for systems re-initialization.
   B. Determine battery specifications.
   C. Perform a starter system test.
   D. Inspect and testing a battery.
   E. Test a charging system.

XI. Discuss computer fundamentals, on-board diagnostics, scan tools, and 
engine performance
   A. Retrieve malfunction codes with a scan tool.
   B. Explain the purpose and function of onboard computers.
   C. List input and output devices.
   D. Explain the purpose and function of onboard diagnosis.
   E. List the steps of the diagnostic process.
   F. Explain troubleshooting procedures.
   G. Discuss the types of scan tools.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab Competencies            40-50% of grade
Test and Home Work        30-40% of grade
Attendance, Attitude and Work Habits   10-20% of grade
TOTAL                                  100%

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications.
    (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1.) 
    Students who wear prescription glasses must:
    a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1
    b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable)
    c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: Students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 128

  • Title: Automotive Parts Specialist*
  • Number: AUTO 128
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate good communication and basic math skills. Ordering and maintaining correct inventory, as well as displaying and selling automotive parts for a fair profit, will be studied. Lectures will be supported by parts specialists in the industry. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List factors necessary for effective communication and ways to achieve it.
  2. Select true statements concerning communicating product information and proper telephone use.
  3. List safety rules.
  4. Complete a safety inspection.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use applied math for parts specialists.
  6. Identify the basic components of various automotive systems.
  7. Identify forms used for shipping and receiving merchandise, check-in and stock parts, fill and pack an order, and define methods of payment.
  8. Identify and use common types of rulers and micrometers.
  9. Identify various tools and service equipment sold in parts stores.
  10. Detail the procedures for taking a physical inventory, interpret inventory coding systems, and personally conduct a physical inventory.
  11. Identify the major catalog indexing systems, list types of information found in catalogs, look up parts in catalogs and price sheets.
  12. Discuss the traits of a successful salesperson and the procedures for waiting on customers.
  13. List the purposes of displays and identify basic display arrangement and discuss their effective placement.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Orientation
   A. Define accountable, requisitions, invoice, free enterprise, and
jobber.
   B. List the responsibilities of a parts specialist, including receiving
and recording, unit inventory and inspection, storage, and counter work.
   C. Compare and contrast different jobs in the parts field, including
jobbers, automotive and truck dealers, mass merchandisers implement and
heavy equipment dealers, and marine and small engine dealers.
   D. List job opportunities in the parts field.
   E. List the types of salaries and benefits available, including hourly,
weekly and monthly, commission, and a combination of salary and
commission.
   F. Describe the working conditions and personal attributes of a good
employee.

II. Communications
   A. Define the following terms:
      1. Communication and feedback
      2. Empathy
      3. Trade association journals
      4. Bulletin board
      5. Memos
      6.  Grapevine
   B. List and describe the factors necessary for effective communication,
including feedback, trust, empathy, listening, and proper timing.
   C. Compare and contrast ways to achieve effective communication.
   D. List the factors necessary for communicating product information.
   E. Describe the general rules for proper telephone use.

III. Safety
   A. List rules for general and personal safety, including appropriate
clothing and safety glasses, observing smoking regulations, moving heavy
objects only with help, reporting all accidents, practicing good
housekeeping, and using safety precautions around batteries.
   B. Complete a safety inspection.

IV. Applied Math for Parts Specialists
   A. Define whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, numerator, and
denominator.
   B. Use decimal equivalency charts.
   C. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide simple fractions and decimal
equivalents.
   D. Convert fractions, percentages, and decimals.
   E. Identify certain office machines commonly used in a parts house or
dealership part department.

V. Parts and Systems Identification
   A. Identify the basic systems of the automobile, including:
      1. Engine and transmission
      2. Fuel and cooling
      3. Ignition, starting and charging
      4. exhaust and emission controls
      5. Drive trains
      6. Suspension and steering
      7. Brakes
      8. Air conditioning
      9. Body
   B. Identify parts in the basic systems of the automobile.

VI. Stocking, Shipping and Receiving
   A. Define bins and shelving, orders and back orders, and fast and slow
moving parts.
   B. List forms of transportation used in shipping parts.
   C. List different forms used for shipping parts, including shipping
receipts, packing slips, invoices, and bills of lading.
   D. List different methods of payment used in shipping and receiving
parts, including COD, prepaid, and freight collect.
   E. Describe the procedures for receiving shipments including accepting,
counting packages, and spotting damaged parts.
   F. List the steps for filling and packing an order.

VII. Measuring Instruments
   A. List units of measure, including fractions, decimals, metric, and
standard.
   B. Describe and use different types of measuring instruments, including
the steel rule, flexible tapes, slide calipers, and micrometers.
   C. Describe the rules for use and care of micrometers, including
handling, storage, cleanliness, and lubrication.

VIII. Counter Services
   A. Define the following terms:
      1. Sales tickets or invoices
      2. Credit memos
      3. Discount, wholesale and retail
      4. Open account
      5. Purchase orders and stock orders
      6. Core charges
      7. Warranty
   B. List non-part materials typically sold in a parts store, including
batteries, chemicals, fasteners, hand tools, and special tools.

IX. Inventory Control
   A. Describe the following:
      1. Inventory control
      2. Perpetual and physical inventory
      3. Reserve stock and rotation
      4. Soft parts and hard parts
      5. Turnover
   B. Compare and contrast posting cards and computers.
   C. Describe the advantages of good inventory control.
   D. Compare and contrast the purposes for taking inventory, including
condition of stock, lost sales, and updating.
   E. List methods used for taking physical inventory.
   F.  List the advantages of using computers for inventory control.
   G. Define the National coding system.
   H. Conduct an inventory.

X. Cataloging and Pricing
   A. Define the following:
      1. Footnotes
      2. Supersede
      3. Master parts catalog
      4. Illustrations
      5. Quick reference
   B. Describe major indexing methods used, including alphabetical by
manufacturer, alphabetical by product, alphabetical by trade name, and a
numerical index.
   C. List the types of information in catalogs, including abbreviations,
part numbers and model applications, supersessions, and
interchangeability.
   D. Describe the basic steps for looking up a part.
   E. List the methods used to price parts, including manufacturer price
sheets, jobber price and list price, confidentiality, effective dates, and
sales tax calculation.
   F. Describe the components and function of a microfiche system.

XI. Related Counter Skills
   A. Define:
      1. Trade discount
      2. Cash and quantity discount
      3. Net 30
      4. Post dating
      5.  Mark-up
   B. Compare and contrast procedures for accepting checks, credit cards,
money orders, and travelers checks.
   C. List different office machines used, including electronic print
calculators, display calculators, and cash registers.
   D. Measure bolts and threads.
   E. List ways to handle exchange and defective items.
   F. Complete a sales ticket and a credit memo.

XII. Sales and Merchandising
   A. Define:
      1. Selling
      2. Closing of sale
      3. Promotional displays
   B. List the traits of a successful salesperson.
   C. Describe proper procedure for waiting on customers.
   D. Compare and contrast basic display arrangements.
   E. Define the purposes of displays.
   F. List major types of advertising.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level            40% of grade 
Test and quizzes                       40% of grade 
Attendance, attitude and work habits   20% of grade 
TOTAL                                 100%

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 129

  • Title: Brakes I*
  • Number: AUTO 129
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 131

Description:

Students will perform system pressure and travel calculations utilizing Pascal's Law, complete service work orders, determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, determine brake system concerns and necessary actions, diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses, determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles, determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures, determine how to accomplish caliper piston retractions, diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns, and determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies through a variety of classroom and lab/shop learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete service work orders.
  2. Determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications.
  3. Determine brake system concerns and necessary actions.
  4. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system.
  5. Determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses.
  6. Determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums.
  7. Apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures.
  8. Diagnose poor stopping, noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles.
  9. Determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures.
  10. Determine how to caliper piston retractions.
  11. Diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns.
  12. Determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complete Service Work Orders
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 5.A.1
   B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake
system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and
technical service bulletins. 5.A.3
   C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 5.A.4

II. Appropriate System Pressure Tests Utilizing Service Specifications
   A. Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic
principles (Paschal's Law). 5.B.1
   B. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable);
determine necessary action. 5.B.2
   C. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper
operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3
   D. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4
   E. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by
malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5
   F. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   G. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   H. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   I. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9
   J. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning
(balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10
   K. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light
system. 5.B.11
   L. Bleed and/or flush brake system. 5.B.12
   M. Test brake fluid for contamination. 5.B.13

III. Brake System Concerns and Necessary Actions
   A. Identify and interpret brake system concern; determine necessary
action. 5.A.2
   B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake
system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and
technical service bulletins. 5.A.3
   C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 5.A.4

IV. Poor Stopping, Pulling or Dragging Concerns Caused by Malfunctions in
the Hydraulic System
   A. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable);
determine necessary action. 5.B.2
   B. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper
operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3
   C. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4
   D. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by
malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5
   E. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   F. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   G. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   H. Select, handle, store and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9
   I. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning
(balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10
   J. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light
system. 5.B.11

V. Inspect, Fabricate and/or Replace Brake Lines and Hoses
   A. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear, tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   B. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   C. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   D. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

VI. Service Specifications Pertaining to the Removal, Cleaning and
Refinishing Procedures on Brake Drums
   A. Remove, clean, inspect, and measure brake drums; determine necessary
action. 5.C.2
   B. Refinish brake drum; measure final drum diameter. 5.C.3

VII. Drum Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures
   A. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips,
levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and
backing support plates; lubricate and reassemble. 5.C.4
   B. Inspect, and install wheel cylinders. 5.C.5
   C. Pre-adjust brake shoes and parking brake; install brake drums or
drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings. 5.C.6
   D. Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and
adjustments. 5.C.7

VIII. Poor Stopping, Noise Vibration, Pulling, Grabbing, Dragging, or
Pedal Pulsation Concerns on Disc-Brake Vehicles
   A. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing, dragging or
pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.D.1
   B. Remove caliper assembly; inspect for leaks and damage to caliper
housing; determine necessary action. 5.D.2
   C. Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides/pins for operation,
wear, and damage; determine necessary action. 5.D.3


IX. Disc Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures
   A. Remove, inspect, and replace pads and retaining hardware; determine
necessary action. 5.D.4
   B. Disassemble and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear,
rust, scoring, and damage; replace seal, boot, and damaged or worn parts.
5.D.5
   C. Resssemble, lubricate, and reinstall caliper, pads, and related
hardware; seat pads, and inspect for leaks. 5.D.6
   D. Clean, inspect, and measure rotor thickness, lateral runout, and
thickness variation; determine necessary action. 5.D.7
   E. Remove and reinstall rotor. 5.D.8
   R. Check brake pad wear indicator system operation; determine necessary
action. 5.D.13

X. Caliper Piston Retractions
   A. Retract caliper piston on an integrated parking brake system.
5.D.11

XI. Wheel Bearing Noise, Wheel Shimmy and Vibration Concerns
   A. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns;
determine necessary action. 5.F.1

XII. Remove, Inspect and Replace Bearing and Hub Assemblies
   A. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings and
replace seals; install hub and adjust bearings. 5.F.2
   B. Check parking brake cables and components for wear, binding, and
corrosion; clean, lubricate, adjust or replace as needed. 5.F.3
   C. Check parking brake and indicator light system operation; determine
necessary action. 5.F.4
   D. Check operation of brake stop light system; determine necessary
action. 5.F.5
   E. Replace wheel bearing and race. 5.F.6
   F. Inspect and replace wheel studs. 5.F.7
   G. Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly. 5.F.8

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Saftey glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe adn efficient operation of the automotive lab area. students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 130

  • Title: Diesel Fundamentals*
  • Number: AUTO 130
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify diesel engine components and parts, troubleshoot and service all external components with an emphasis on glow plugs, injectors and injector pumps. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk. This course is taught in the spring semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify parts of diesel engines and describe the operation of the diesel.
  2. Identify components of lubrication systems.
  3. Service the cooling system.
  4. Service the air intake and exhaust systems.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to remove, service, and test fuel system components.
  6. Discuss the electrical circuits on a diesel engine.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Diesel Fundamentals
   A. Orientation
      1. Compare and contrast diesel and gasoline engines.
      2. Describe basic shop safety and tools.
      3. Identify test equipment and service tools used on diesel
engines.
      4. List employment opportunities in the diesel field.
   B. Engine principles and components
      1. Discuss diesel engine operating principles.
      2. Describe diesel cylinder head parts and functions.
      3. Describe diesel piston and connecting rod assembly parts and
functions.
      4. Describe diesel camshaft design.
      5. Describe diesel cylinder block and liner components and
functions.
      6. Describe diesel crankshaft construction and design and bearing
design.
      7. Set diesel timing.
   C. Auxiliary systems
      1. List the components and describe the functions of:
         a. Lubricants and lubrication systems
            1) Check oil pressure.
            2) Change oil filter.
         b. Coolants and coolant systems
            1) Test for combustion leakage in cooling system.
            2) Check for air in cooling system.
            3) Clean the cooling system.
         c. Air intake and exhaust systems
            1) Check for faulty filters.
            2) Change air filters.
   D. Maintenance
      1. List the tasks needed for:
         a. Preventive maintenance
         b. Troubleshooting and testing of engines
         c. Tune-up and adjustment

II. Diesel Fuel Systems
   A. Introduction to fuel injection systems and components
      1. List terms and definitions relating to diesel fuel injection.
      2. Describe the major functions of diesel engine components.
      3. List the common types of diesel fuel injection systems.
      4. List the methods of injecting diesel fuel.
      5. Describe the major parts in a diesel fuel system and list their
purpose.
      6. Describe the design and function of transfer pumps.
      7. List the types of filters and water separators used on diesel
engines and describe their functions.
      8. List the steps in fuel tank and line maintenance.
      9. Remove and replace diesel fuel system components.
   B. Injection nozzles
      1. List and describe the major parts and function of nozzles.
      2. Describe the operation and characteristics of the common types of
injection nozzles.
      3. Remove and service injection nozzles.
         a. Perform opening pressure, leak, pintle sink, and spray pattern
tests.
      4.  Troubleshoot injection systems.
   C. Distributor type injection pumps
      1. List and describe the major parts and functions of distributor
type injection pumps.
      2. Describe the principles of operation of a distributor type
injection pump, including charge and discharge cycles, delivery valve
operation, fuel return circuits.
      3. Remove, disassemble, evaluate components, reassemble, and
reinstall pumps.

III. Diesel Electrical Systems
   A. Introduction to diesel electrical systems
      1. Define safety practices dealing with electrical systems.
   B. Electrical circuits
      1. Define terms used in diesel electrical systems.
      2. Read wiring diagrams.
      3. Troubleshoot a diesel electrical circuit using a volt-ohm meter
to read voltage and resistance.
      4. Remove, test and replace a glow plug.
      5. Test and troubleshoot a glow plug electrical system.
   C. Starting systems and circuits
      1. List and describe types of starting systems.
      2. Identify diesel starting aids, including heat, starting fluids,
and glow plugs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab assignments                  40% of grade 
Test and quizzes                 40% of grade 
Participation and work habits    20% of grade 
TOTAL                           100%

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 131

  • Title: Brakes II*
  • Number: AUTO 131
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 129

Description:

Students will determine necessary brake system correction, conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, perform diagnosis and correction for poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, conduct inspection, fabrication and/or replacement of brake lines and hoses, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, perform drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform disc brake repair and replacement procedures, machine rotor according to service specifications, perform caliper piston retraction where applicable, inspect and test power assist systems, determine necessary action on wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses, and perform the removal, inspection and replacement of bearing and hub assemblies. 3 hrs. instruction lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications.
  2. Diagnose and repair poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system and noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation.
  3. Inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses.
  4. Perform disc and drum brake repair and replacement procedures following service specifications.
  5. Diagnose and repair power assist systems.
  6. Diagnose and repair wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Brake System Correction
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 5.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret brake system concern; determine necessary
action. 5.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake
system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and
technical service bulletins. 5.A.3
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 5.A.4

II. System Pressure Tests Utilizing Service Specifications
   A. Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic
principles (Paschal's Law). 5.B.1
   B. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable);
determine necessary action. 5.B.2
   C. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper
operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3
   D. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4
   E. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by
malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5
   F. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   G. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   H. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   I. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9
   J. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning
(balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10
   K. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light
system. 5.B.11
   L. Bleed and/or flush brake system. 5.B.12
   M. Test brake fluid for contamination. 5.B.13

III. Poor Stopping, Pulling or Dragging Concerns Caused by Malfunctions in
the Hydraulic System
   A. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable);
determine necessary action. 5.B.2
   B. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper
operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3
   C. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4
   D. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by
malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5
   E. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   F. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   G. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   H. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9
   I. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning
(balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10
   J. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light
system. 5.B.11

IV. Inspect, Fabricate and/or Replace Brake Lines and Hoses
   A. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents,
kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports;
determine necessary action. 5.B.6
   B. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7
   C. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures
(double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8
   D. Select, handle, store and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

V. Poor Stopping, Noise Vibration, Pulling, Grabbing, Dragging or Pedal
Pulsation Concerns
   A. Diagnose poor stopping, noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging
or pedal pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.C.1
   B. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing, dragging or
pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.D.1
   C. Remove caliper assembly; inspect for leaks and damage to caliper
housing; determine necessary action. 5.D.2
   D. Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides/pins for operation,
wear, and damage; determine necessary action. 5.D.3

VI. Service Specifications Pertaining to the Removal, Cleaning and
Refinishing Procedures on Brake Drums
   A. Remove, clean, inspect, and measure brake drums; determine necessary
action. 5.C.2
   B. Refinish brake drum; measure final drum diameter. 5.C.3

VII. Drum Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures
   A. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips,
levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and
backing support plates; lubricate and reassemble. 5.C.4
   B. Inspect, and install wheel cylinders. 5.C.5
   C. Pre-adjust brakes shoes and parking brake; install brake drums or
drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings. 5.C.6
   D. Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and
adjustments. 5.C.7

VIII. Disc Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures
   A. Remove, inspect, and replace pads and retaining hardware; determine
necessary action. 5.D.4
   B. Disassemble and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear,
rust, scoring, and damage; replace seal, boot, and damaged or worn parts.
5.D.5
   C. Reassemble, lubricate, and reinstall caliper, pads, and related
hardware; seat pads, and inspect for leaks. 5.D.6
   D. Clean, inspect, and measure rotor thickness, lateral runout, and
thickness variation; determine necessary action. 5.D.7
   E. Remove and reinstall rotor. 5.D.8
   F. Check brake pad wear indicator system operation; determine necessary
action. 5.D.13
   G. Retract caliper piston on an integrated parking brake system.
5.D.11

IX. Machine Rotor According to Service Specifications
   A. Refinish rotor on vehicle; measure final rotor thickness. 5.D.9
   B. Refinish rotor off vehicle; measure final rotor thickness. 5.D.10

X. Power Assist Systems
   A. Test pedal free travel; check power assist operation. 5.E.1
   B. Check vacuum supply to vacuum-type power booster. 5.E.2
   C. Inspect the vacuum-type power booster unit for leaks; inspect the
check valve for proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.E.3
   D. Inspect and test hydraulically assisted power brake system for leaks
and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.E.4

XI. Wheel Bearing Noise, Wheel Shimmy and Vibration Concern Diagnoses
   A. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns;
determine necessary action. 5.F.1

XII. Remove, Inspect and Replace Bearing and Hub Assemblies
   A. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings and
replace seals; install hub and adjust bearings. 5.F.2
   B. Check parking brake cables and components for wear, binding, and
corrosion; clean, lubricate, adjust or replace as needed. 5.F.3
   C. Check parking brake and indicator light system operation; determine
necessary action. 5.F.4
   D. Check operation of brake stop light system; determine necessary
action. 5.F.5
   E. Replace wheel bearing and race. 5.F.6
   F. Inspect and replace wheel studs. 5.F.7
   G. Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly. 5.F.8

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A= 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 145

  • Title: Automotive Steering and Suspension*
  • Number: AUTO 145
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 8

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course students will document suspension system concerns, perform diagnostics on steering systems, perform repairs on steering systems, perform diagnostics on suspension systems, perform repairs on suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment and adjustment, perform diagnostics on wheel and tire systems, and perform fundamental repairs on wheel and tire systems. 8 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify steering and suspension system concerns. 
  2. Diagnose steering systems. 
  3. Repair and test steering systems. 
  4. Diagnose suspension systems. 
  5. Repair and test suspension systems. 
  6. Diagnose, repair, and test wheel alignment problems. 
  7. Diagnose and test wheel and tire systems. 
  8. Repair wheel and tire systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify Steering and Suspension System Concerns
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause and correction. 4.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret suspension and steering system concerns; determine necessary action. 4.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as suspension and steering system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins. 4.A.3
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers. 4.A.4
 
II. Diagnose Steering Systems
   A. Diagnose steering column noises, looseness and binding concerns (including tilt mechanisms); determine necessary action. 4.B.3
   B. Diagnose power steering gear (non-rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering and noise concerns; determine necessary action. 4.B.4
   C. Diagnose power steering gear (rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering and noise concerns; determine necessary action. 4.B.5
   D. Determine proper power steering fluid type; inspect fluid level and condition. 4.B.10
   E. Diagnose power steering fluid leakage; determine necessary action. 4.B.12
   F. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled steering systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.B.19
   G. Inspect and test electric power assist steering. 4.B.20
   H. Identify hybrid vehicle power steering system electrical circuits, service and safety precautions. 4.B.21
   I. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   J. Describe the function of the idle speed compensation switch. 4.D.5

III. Repair and Test Steering Systems
   A. Disable and enable supplemental restraint system (SRS). 4.B.1
   B. Remove and replace steering wheel; center/time supplemental restraint system (SRS) coil (clock spring). 4.B.2
   C. Inspect steering shaft universal joints, flexible couplings, collapsible column, lock cylinder mechanism and steering wheel; perform necessary action. 4.B.6
   D. Adjust non-rack and pinion worm bearing preload and sector lash. 4.B.7
   E. Remove and replace rack and pinion steering gear; inspect mounting bushings and brackets. 4.B.8
   F. Inspect and replace rack and pinion steering gear inner tie rod ends (sockets) and bellows boots. 4.B.9
   G. Flush, fill and bleed power steering system. 4.B.11
   H. Remove, inspect, replace and adjust power steering pump belt. 4.B.13
   I. Remove and reinstall power steering pump. 4.B.14
   J. Remove and reinstall press fit power steering pump pulley; check pulley and belt alignment. 4.B.15
   K. Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings. 4.B.16
   L. Inspect and replace pitman arm, relay (centerlink-intermediate) rod, idler arm and mountings, and steering linkage damper. 4.B.17
   M. Inspect, replace and adjust tie rod ends (sockets), tie rod sleeves and clamps. 4.B.18
   N. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   O. Lubricate suspension and steering systems. 4.D.6

IV. Diagnose Suspension Systems
   A. Diagnose short- and long-arm suspension system noises, body sway and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.1
   B. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.2
   C. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled suspension systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.D.3

V. Repair and Test Suspension Systems
   A. Remove, inspect and install upper and lower control arms, bushings, shafts and rebound bumpers. 4.C.3
   B. Remove, inspect and install strut rods and bushings. 4.C.4
   C. Remove, inspect and install upper and/or lower ball joints. 4.C.5
   D. Remove, inspect and install steering knuckle assemblies. 4.C.6
   E. Remove, inspect and install short- and long-arm suspension system coil springs and spring insulators. 4.C.7
   F. Remove, inspect, install and adjust suspension system torsion bars; inspect mounts. 4.C.8
   G. Remove, inspect and install stabilizer bar bushings, brackets and links. 4.C.9
   H. Remove, inspect and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil spring, insulators (silencers) and upper strut bearing mount. 4.C.10
   I. Remove, inspect and install leaf springs, leaf spring insulators (silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings and mounts. 4.C.11
   J. Inspect, remove and replace shock absorbers. 4.D.1
   K. Remove, inspect and service or replace front and rear wheel bearings. 4.D.2
   L. Lubricate suspension and steering systems. 4.D.6

VI. Diagnose, Repair, and Test Wheel Alignment Problems
   A. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer, memory steer, torque steer and steering return concerns; determine necessary action. 4.E.1
   B. Perform pre-alignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height; perform necessary action. 4.E.2
   C. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on the alignment machine; perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear wheel caster, camber and toe as required; center steering wheel. 4.E.3
   D. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action. 4.E.4
   E. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine necessary action. 4.E.5
   F. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action. 4.E.6
   G. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action. 4.E.7
   H. Check front and/or rear cradle (subframe) alignment; determine necessary action. 4.E.8

VII. Diagnose and Test Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy and noise; determine necessary action. 4.F.2
   B. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange and hub runout; determine necessary action. 4.F.4
   C. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action. 4.F.5
   D. Inspect, diagnose and calibrate tire pressure monitoring system. 4.F.11

VIII. Repair Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Inspect tire condition, identify tire wear patterns, check and adjust air pressure; determine necessary action. 4.F.1
   B. Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations. 4.F.3
   C. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire assembly (static and dynamic). 4.F.6
   D. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire pressure monitoring system sensor. 4.F.7
   E. Reinstall wheel; torque lug nuts. 4.F.8
   F. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary action.       4.F.9
   G. Repair tire using internal patch. 4.F.10
   H. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy and noise; determine necessary action.  4.F.2
   I. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange and hub runout; determine necessary action. 4.F.4
   J. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action. 4.F.5
   K. Inspect, diagnose and calibrate tire pressure monitoring system. 4.F.11

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade competency completion level/lab assignments 
20-50% of grade test and quizzes 
10-20% of grade attendance, attitude and work habits 
Total 100% 

Attitude and Work Habits: 
Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, 
efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in 
determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated. 

Grading Scale: 

A = 90-100% 
B = 80-89% 
C = 70-79% 
D = 60-69% F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one-time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program. 
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 156

  • Title: Electrical I*
  • Number: AUTO 156
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125

Description:

Students will complete service work orders; describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage; perform basic electrical circuit repairs; identify electrical system faults; identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information; perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM; describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits through a variety of classroom and shop learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete service work orders.
  2. Describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage.
  3. Perform basic electrical circuit repairs.
  4. Identify electrical system faults.
  5. Identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information.
  6. Perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM.
  7. Describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complete Service Work Orders
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction., 6.A.1
   B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as
electrical/electronic system operation, vehicle service history, service
precautions, and technical service bulletins. 6.A.3
   C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 6.A.4

II. The Relationship Between Voltage, Ohms and Amperage
   A. Diagnose electrical/electronic integrity for series, parallel and
series-parallel circuits using principles of electricity (Ohm's Law).
6.A.5
   B. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during
diagnosis of electrical circuit problems including: source voltage,
voltage drop, current flow, and resistance. 6.A.7

III. Basic Electrical Circuit Repairs
   A. Remove and replace terminal end from connector; replace connectors
and terminal ends. 6.A.15
   B. Perform solder repair of electrical wiring. 6.A.17

IV. Electrical System Faults
   A. Identify and interpret electrical/electronic system concern;
determine necessary action. 6.A.2
   B. Check electrical circuits with a test light; determine necessary
action. 6.A.8
   C. Check electrical circuits using fused jumper wires; determine
necessary action. 6.A.10
   D. Inspect and test fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses;
determine necessary action. 6.A.13
   E. Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solid state devices,
and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; perform necessary action.
6.A.14

V. Basic Wiring Diagram Symbols, Components, and Legend Information
   A. Use wiring diagrams during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.
6.A.6

VI. Basic Electrical Circuit Measurements Using a DVOM
   A. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during
diagnosis of electrical circuit problems including: source voltage,
voltage drop, current flow, and resistance. 6.A.7
   B. Check electrical circuits with a test light; determine necessary
action. 6.A.8
   C. Check electrical circuits using fused jumper wires; determine
necessary action. 6.A.10
   D. Inspect and test fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses;
determine necessary action. 6.A.13
   E. Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solid state devices,
and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; perform necessary action.
6.A.14

VII. Basic Circuit Characteristics of Series, Parallel and Series Parallel
Circuits
   A. Identify and interpret electrical/electronic system concern;
determine necessary action. 6.A.2
   B. Diagnose electrical/electronic integrity for series, parallel and
series-parallel circuits using principles of electricity (Ohm's Law).
6.A.5

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F - Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are requied to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 158

  • Title: Steering and Suspension I*
  • Number: AUTO 158
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 159

Description:

In this course students will document fundamental suspension system concerns, perform fundamental diagnostics of steering systems, perform fundamental repairs of steering systems, perform fundamental diagnostics of suspension systems, perform fundamental repairs of suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment and adjustment, perform fundamental diagnostics of wheel and tire systems, and perform fundamental repairs of wheel and tire systems. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Diagnose suspension and steering systems.
  2. Diagnose and repair steering systems.
  3. Repair and diagnose suspension systems.
  4. Repair and diagnose related suspension and steering components.
  5. Diagnose and adjust components in wheel alignments.
  6. Diagnose and repair wheels and tires.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Suspension System Concerns
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 4.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret suspension and steering system concerns;
determine necessary action. 4.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as
suspension and steering system operation, vehicle service history, service
precautions, and technical service bulletins. 4.A.3
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 4.A.4

II. Diagnostics of Steering Systems
   A. Diagnose steering column noises, looseness, and binding concerns
(including tilt mechanisms); determine necessary action. 4.B.3
   B. Diagnose power steering gear (non-rack and pinion) binding; uneven
turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and noise concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.B.4
   C. Diagnose power steering gear (rack and pinion) binding, uneven
turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and noise concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.B.5
   D. Determine proper power steering fluid type; inspect fluid level and
condition. 4.B.10
   E. Diagnose power steering fluid leakage; determine necessary action.
4.B.12
   F. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled steering
systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.B.19
   G. Inspect and test electric power assist steering. 4.B.20
   H. Identify hybrid vehicle power steering system electrical circuits,
service and safety precautions. 4.B.21
   I. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of
electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches,
and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   J. Describe the function of the idle speed compensation switch. 4.D.5

III. Repairs of Steering Systems
   A. Disable and enable supplemental restraint system (SRS). 4.B.1
   B. Remove and replace steering wheel; center/time supplemental
restraint system (SRS) coil (clock spring). 4.B.2
   C. Inspect steering shaft universal-joints(s), flexible coupling(s),
collapsible column, lock cylinder mechanism, and steering wheel; perform
necessary action. 4.B.6
   D. Adjust non-rack and pinion worm bearing preload and sector lash.
4.B.7
   E. Remove and replace rack and pinion steering gear; inspect mounting
bushings and brackets. 4.B.8
   F. Inspect and replace rack and pinion steering gear inner tie rod ends
(sockets) and bellows boots. 4.B.9
   G. Flush, fill, and bleed power steering system. 4.B.11
   H. Remove, inspect, replace, and adjust power steering pump belt.
4.B.13
   I. Remove and reinstall power steering pump. 4.B.14
   J. Remove and reinstall press fit power steering pump pulley; check
pulley and belt alignment. 4.B.15
   K. Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings. 4.B.16
   L. Inspect and replace pitman arm, relay (centerlink-intermediate) rod,
idler arm and mountings, and steering linkage damper. 4.B.17
   M. Inspect, replace, and adjust tie rod ends (sockets), tie rod
sleeves, and clamps. 4.B.18
   N. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of
electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches,
and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   O. Lubricate suspension and steering systems. 4.D.6

IV. Diagnostics of Suspension Systems
   A. Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway, and
uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.1
   B. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven ride
height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.2
   C. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled suspension
systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.D.3

V. Repairs of Suspension Systems
   A. Remove, inspect, and install upper and lower control arms, bushings,
shafts, and rebound bumpers. 4.C.3
   B. Remove, inspect, and install strut rods and bushings. 4.C.4
   C. Remove, inspect, and install upper and/or lower ball joints. 4.C.5
   D. Remove, inspect, and install steering knuckle assemblies. 4.C.6
   E. Remove, inspect, and install short and long arm suspension system
coil springs and spring insulators. 4.C.7
   F. Remove, inspect, install, and adjust suspension system torsion bars;
inspect mounts. 4.C.8
   G. Remove, inspect, and install stabilizer bar bushings, brackets, and
links. 4.C.9
   H. Remove, inspect, and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil
spring, insulators (silencers), and upper strut bearing mount. 4.C.10
   I. Remove, inspect, and install leaf springs, leaf spring insulators
(silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings, and mounts. 4.C.11
   J. Inspect, remove, and replace shock absorbers. 4.D.1
   K. Remove, inspect, and service or replace front and rear wheel
bearings. 4.D.2
   L. Lubricate suspension and steering systems. 4.D.6

VI. Need for Wheel Alignment and Adjustment
   A. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer,
memory steer, torque steer, and steering return concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.E.1
   B. Perform prealignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height;
perform necessary action. 4.E.2
   C. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on the alignment machine;
perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear
wheel caster, camber, and toe as required, center steering wheel. 4.E.3
   D. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action.
4.E.4
   E. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine
necessary action. 4.E.5
   F. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action. 4.E.6
   G. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action. 4.E.7
   H. Check front and/or rear cradle (subframe) alignment; determine
necessary action. 4.E.8
   
VII. Diagnostics of Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and noise; determine
necessary action. 4.F.2
   B. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange, and hub runout; determine
necessary action. 4.F.4
   C. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action. 4.F.5
   D. Inspect, diagnose, and calibrate tire pressure monitoring system.
4.F.11

VIII. Repairs of Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Inspect tire condition, identify tire wear patterns, check and
adjust air pressure; determine necessary action. 4.F.1
   B. Rotate tires according to manufacturer's recommendations. 4.F.3
   C. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire
assembly (static and dynamic). 4.F.6
   D. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire
pressure monitoring system sensor. 4.F.7
   E. Reinstall wheel; torque lug nuts. 4.F.8
   F. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary
action. 4.F.9
   G. Repair tire using internal patch. 4.F.10

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 159

  • Title: Steering and Suspension II*
  • Number: AUTO 159
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 AND Corequisite: AUTO 158

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to perform complex diagnostics and repair on steering and suspension systems. Additionally, students will perform pre-alignment inspection and complex repairs of wheel and tire systems. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Diagnose complex suspension system concerns.
  2. Diagnose complex steering systems.
  3. Repair complex steering systems.
  4. Test complex suspension systems.
  5. Repair complex suspension systems.
  6. Diagnose vehicle alignment problems.
  7. Repair vehicle alignment problems.
  8. Diagnose and repair complex wheel and tire systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complex Suspension System Concerns
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 4.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret suspension and steering system concerns;
determine necessary action. 4.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as
suspension and steering system operation, vehicle service history, service
precautions, and technical service bulletins. 4.A.3
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 4.A.4

II. Complex Diagnostics of Steering Systems
   A. Diagnose steering column noises, looseness, and binding concerns
(including tilt mechanisms); determine necessary action. 4.B.3
   B. Diagnose power steering gear (non-rack and pinion) binding, uneven
turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and noise concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.B.4
   C. Diagnose power steering gear (rack and pinion) binding, uneven
turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and noise concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.B.5
   D. Determine proper power steering fluid type; inspect fluid level and
condition. 4.B.10
   E. Diagnose power steering fluid leakage; determine necessary action.
4.B.12
   F. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled steering
systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.B.19
   G. Inspect and test electric power assist steering. 4.B.20
   H. Identify hybrid vehicle power steering system electrical circuits,
service and safety precautions. 4.B.21
   I. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of
electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches,
and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   J. Describe the function of the idle speed compensation switch. 4.D.5

III. Complex Repairs of Steering Systems
   A. Disable and enable supplemental restraint system (SRS). 4.B.1
   B. Remove and replace steering wheel; center/time supplemental
restraint system (SRS) coil (clock spring). 4.B.2
   C. Inspect steering shaft universal-joint(s), flexible coupling(s),
collapsible column, lock cylinder mechanism, and steering wheel; perform
necessary action. 4.B.6
   D. Adjust non-rack and pinion worm bearing preload and sector lash.
4.B.7
   E. Remove and replace rack and pinion steering gear; inspect mounting
bushings and brackets. 4.B.8
   F. Inspect and replace rack and pinion steering gear inner toe rod ends
(sockets) and bellows boots. 4.B.9
   G. Flush, fill, and bleed power steering system. 4.B.11
   H. Remove, inspect, replace, and adjust power steering pump belt.
4.B.13
   I. Remove and reinstall power steering pump. 4.B.14
   J. Remove and reinstall press fit power steering pump pulley; check
pulley and belt alignment. 4.B.15
   K. Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings. 4.B.16
   L.  Inspect and replace pitman arm, relay (centerlink/intermediate)
rod, idler arm and mountings, and steering linkage damper. 4.B.17
   M. Inspect, replace, and adjust tie rod ends (sockets), tie rod
sleeves, and clamps. 4.B.18
   N. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of
electronically controlled steering systems (including sensors, switches,
and actuators); initialize system as required. 4.D.4
   O. Lubricate suspension and steering systems. 4.D.6

IV. Complex Diagnostics of Suspension Systems
   A. Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway, and
uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.1
   B. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven ride
height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.2
   C. Test and diagnose components of electronically controlled suspension
systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 4.D.3

V. Complex Repairs of Suspension Systems
   A. Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway, and
uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.1
   B. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven ride
height concerns; determine necessary action. 4.C.2
   C. Remove, inspect, and install upper and lower control arms, bushings,
shafts, and rebound bumpers. 4.C.3
   D. Remove, inspect, and install strut rods and bushings. 4.C.4
   E. Remove, inspect, and install upper and/or lower ball joints. 4.C.5
   F. Remove, inspect, and install steering knuckle assemblies. 4.C.6
   G. Remove, inspect, and install short and long arm suspension system
coil springs and spring insulators. 4.C.7
   H. Remove, inspect, install, and adjust suspension system torsion bars;
inspect mounts. 4.C.8
   I. Remove, inspect, and install stabilizer bar bushings, brackets, and
links. 4.C.9
   J. Remove, inspect, and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil
spring, insulators (silencers), and upper strut bearing mount. 4.C.10
   K. Remove, inspect, and install leaf springs, leaf spring insulators
(silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings, and mounts. 4.C.11

VI. Pre-alignment Inspection and Necessary Actions
   A. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer,
memory steer, torque steer, and steering return concerns; determine
necessary action. 4.E.1
   B. Perform pre-alignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height;
perform necessary action. 4.E.2
   C. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on the alignment machine;
perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear
wheel caster, camber, and toe as required, center steering wheel. 4.E.3
   D. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action.
4.E.4
   E. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine
necessary action. 4.E.5
   F. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action. 4.E.6
   G. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action. 4.E.7
   H. Check front and/or rear cradle (subframe) alignment; determine
necessary action. 4.E.8

VII. Complex Repairs of Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Inspect tire condition; identify tire wear patterns, check and
adjust air pressure; determine necessary action. 4.F.1
   B. Rotate tires according to manufacturer's recommendations. 4.F.3
   C. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire
assembly (static and dynamic). 4.F.6
   D. Dismount, inspect, and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire
pressure monitoring system sensor. 4.F.7
   E. Reinstall wheel; torque lug nuts. 4.F.8
   F. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary
action. 4.F.9
   G. Repair tire using internal patch. 4.F.10

VIII. Complex Diagnostics of Wheel and Tire Systems
   A. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and noise; determine
necessary action. 4.F.2
   B. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange, and hub runout; determine
necessary action. 4.F.4
   C. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action. 4.F.5
   D. Inspect, diagnose, and calibrate tire pressure monitoring system.
4.F.11

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and Quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 161

  • Title: Engine Performance I*
  • Number: AUTO 161
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

Description:

In this learning plan students will: complete work order and check history; identify engine mechanical integrity; explore the fundamentals of fuel system theory; identify fuel system concerns; explore the fundamentals of ignition theory; identify ignition system concerns; identify induction system concerns; identify exhaust system concerns; identify engine mechanical integrity through a variety of learning and assessment activities. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete work order and check history.
  2. Identify engine mechnical integrity.
  3. Describe the fundamentals of fuel system theory.
  4. Identify fuel system concerns.
  5. Describe the fundamentals of ignition theory.
  6. Identify ignition system concerns.
  7. Identify induction system concerns.
  8. Identify exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complete Work Order and Check History
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 8.A.1
   B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as engine
management system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions,
and technical service bulletins. 8.A.3
   C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 8.A.4

II. Engine Mechanical Integrity
   A. Identify and interpret engine performance concern; determine
necessary action. 8.A.2
   B. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks;
determine necessary action. 8.A.5
   C. Diagnose abnormal engine noise or vibration concerns; determine
necessary action. 8.A.6
   D. Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine
necessary action. 8.A.7
   E. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   F. Perform cylinder power balance test; determine necessary action.
8.A.9
   G. Perform cylinder cranking and running compression tests; determine
necessary action. 8.A.10
   H. Perform cylinder leakage test; determine necessary action. 8.A.11
   I. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   J. Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition;
inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, and hoses;
perform necessary action. 8.A.15
   K. Verify correct camshaft timing. 8.A.16
   L. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   M. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   N. Inspect and test crankshaft and camshaft position sensor(s); perform
necessary action. 8.C.3

III. Fuel System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   C. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   D. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   E. Check fuel for contaminants and quality; determine necessary action.
8.D.2
   F. Inspect and test fuel pumps and pump control systems for pressure,
regulation, and volume; perform necessary action. 8.D.3
   G. Replace fuel filters. 8.D.4
   H. Inspect throttle body, air induction system, intake manifold and
gaskets for vacuum leaks and/or unmetered air. 8.D.5
   I. Inspect and test fuel injectors. 8.D.6
   J. Verify idle control operation. 8.D.7

IV. Ignition System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   C. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   D. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool, determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   E. Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard
starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor
mileage, and emissions concerns; determine necessary action. 8.C.1
   F. Inspect and test ignition primary and secondary circuit wiring and
solid state components; test ignition coil(s); perform necessary action.
8.C.2
   G. Inspect and test crankshaft and camshaft position sensor(s); perform
necessary action. 8.C.3
   H. Inspect, test, and/or replace ignition control module,
powertrain/engine control module; reprogram as necessary. 8.C.4

V. Induction System Concerns
   A. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   B. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   C. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   D. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   E. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   F. Inspect throttle body, air induction system, intake manifold and
gaskets for vacuum leaks and/or unmetered air. 8.D.5
   G. Verify idle control operation. 8.D.7

VI. Exhaust System Concerns
   A. Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine
necessary action. 8.A.7
   B. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 165

  • Title: Automotive Engine Repair*
  • Number: AUTO 165
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 125 or department approval

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the four-stroke cycle internal combustion engine. Students should be able to diagnose and repair cylinder heads and cylinder block assemblies to include lubrication and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform general engine diagnosis.
  2. Diagnose and repair cylinder heads and valve trains.
  3. Diagnose and repair engine block assemblies.
  4. Diagnose and repair lubrication and cooling systems.
  5. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

For every task in Engine Repair, the following safety requirement must
be strictly enforced:

Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with
clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation;
and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in
accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental
regulations.

I. General Engine Diagnosis; Removal and Reinstallation (R & R)
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction.
   B. Identify and interpret engine concern; determine necessary action.
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as
internal engine operation, vehicle service history, service precautions,
and technical service bulletins.
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers (VIN, vehicle certification labels, and calibration decals).
   E. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks;
determine necessary action.
   F. Diagnose engine noises and vibrations; determine necessary action.
   G. Diagnose the cause of excessive oil consumption, unusual engine
exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine necessary action.
   H. Perform engine vacuum tests; determine necessary action.
   I. Perform cylinder power balance tests; determine necessary action.
   J. Perform cylinder cranking compression tests; determine necessary
action.
   K. Perform cylinder leakage tests; determine necessary action.
   L. Remove and reinstall engine in a front-wheel or rear wheel drive
vehicle (OBDII or newer); reconnect all attaching components and restore
the vehicle to running condition.
   M. Install engine covers using gaskets, seals and sealers as required.

II. Cylinder Head and Valve Train Diagnosis and Repair
   A. Remove and reinstall cylinder heads and gaskets; tighten according
to manufacturer’s specifications and procedures.
   B. isually inspect cylinder head(s) for cracks;check gasket surface
areas for warpage and leakage; check passage condition.
   C. Inspect valve springs for squareness and free height comparison;
determine necessary action.
   D. Replace valve stem seals on an assembled engine; inspect valve
spring retainers, locks, and valve grooves; determine necessary action.
   E. Inspect valve guides for wear; check valve stem-to-guide clearance;
determine necessary action.
   F. Inspect valves and valve seats; determine necessary action.
   G. Check valve face-to-seat contact and valve seat concentricity
(runout); determine necessary action.
   H. Check valve spring assembled height and valve stem height; determine
necessary action.
   I. Inspect pushrods, rocker arms, rocker arm pivots and shafts for
wear, bending, cracks, looseness, and blocked oil passages (orifices);
determine necessary action.
   J. Inspect hydraulic or mechanical lifters; determine necessary
action.
   K. Adjust valves (mechanical or hydraulic lifters). 
   L. Inspect camshaft drives (including gear wear and backlash, sprocket
and chain wear); determine necessary action.
   M. Inspect and replace timing belts (chains), overhead camdrive
sprockets, and tensioners; check belt/chain tension; adjust as necessary.
   N. Inspect camshaft for runout, journal wear and lobe wear.
   O. Inspect camshaft bearing surface for wear, damage, out-of-round, and
alignment; determine necessary action.
   P. Establish camshaft(s) timing and cam sensor indexing according to
manufacturer’s specifications and procedures.

III. Engine Block Assembly Diagnosis and Repair
   A. Disassemble engine block; clean and prepare components for
inspection and reassembly.
   B. Inspect engine block for visible cracks, passage condition, core and
gallery plug condition, and surface warpage; determine necessary action.
   C. Perform common fastener and thread repair to include, remove broken
bolt, restore internal and external threads, and repair internal threads
with thread insert.
   D. Inspect and measure cylinder walls/sleeves for damage, wear, and
ridges; determine necessary action.
   E. Deglaze and clean cylinder walls. 
   F. Inspect and measure camshaft bearings for wear, damage,
out-of-round, and alignment; determine necessary action.
   G. Inspect crankshaft for end play, straightness, journal damage,
keyway damage, thrust flange and sealing surface condition, and visual
surface cracks; check oil passage condition; measure journal wear; check
crankshaft sensor reluctor ring (where applicable); determine necessary
action.
   H. Inspect main and connecting rod bearings for damage and wear;
determine necessary action. 
   I. Identify piston and bearing wear patterns that indicate connecting
rod alignment and main bearing bore problems;  determine necessary
action.
   J. Inspect and measure pistons; determine necessary action.
   K. Remove and replace piston pin.
   L. Inspect, measure, and install piston rings.
   M. Inspect auxiliary (balance, intermediate, idler, counterbalance or
silencer) shaft(s); inspect shaft(s) and support bearings for damage and
wear; determine necessary action; reinstall and time.
   N. Inspect or replace crankshaft vibration damper (harmonic balancer).

   O. Assemble engine block assembly.

IV. Lubrication and Cooling Systems Diagnosis and Repair
   A. Perform oil pressure tests; determine necessary action.
   B. Inspect oil pump gears or rotors, housing, pressure relief devices,
and pump drive; perform necessary action.
   C. Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition;
inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, and hoses;
determine necessary action.
   D. Inspect, replace, and adjust drive belts, tensioners, and pulleys;
check pulley and belt alignment.
   E. Inspect and replace engine cooling and heater system hoses.
   F. Inspect, test, and replace thermostat and gasket.
   G. Test coolant; drain and recover coolant; flush and refill cooling
system with recommended coolant; bleed air as required.
   H. Inspect, test, remove, and replace water pump.
   I. Remove and replace radiator.
   J. Inspect, and test fans(s) (electrical or mechanical), fan clutch,
fan shroud, and air dams.
   K. Inspect auxiliary oil coolers; determine necessary action.
   L. Inspect, test, and replace oil temperature and pressure switches and
sensors.
   M. Perform oil and filter change.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/ teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/ Lab Assignments       30-60% of grade 
Test and quizzes                                20-50% of grade 
Attendance, attitude and work habits            10-20% of grade 
TOTAL                                           100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades.  In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 166

  • Title: Electrical II*
  • Number: AUTO 166
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

Description:

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to perform battery diagnosis, perform battery service, perform starting system diagnosis, perform starting system repair, perform charging system diagnosis, perform charging system repair, and identify current flow on starting and charging system diagrams. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform battery diagnosis and service.
  2. Perform starting system diagnosis and repair.
  3. Perform charging system diagnosis and repair.
  4. Identify current flow on starting and charging system diagrams.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Battery Diagnosis and Service
   A. Perform battery state-of-charge test; determine necessary action.
6.B.1
   B. Perform battery capacity test; confirm proper battery capacity for
vehicle application; determine necessary action. 6.B.2
   C. Maintain or restore electronic memory functions. 6.B.3
   D. Inspect, clean, fill, and/or replace battery, battery cables,
connectors, clamps, and hold-downs. 6.B.4
   E. Perform battery charge. 6.B.5
   F. Start a vehicle using jumper cables or an auxiliary power supply.
6.B.6
   G. Measure and diagnose the cause(s) of excessive parasitic draw;
determine necessary action. 6.A.12

II. Starting System Diagnosis and Repair
   A. Perform starter current draw tests; determine necessary action.
6.C.1
   B. Perform starter circuit voltage drop tests; determine necessary
action. 6.C.2
   C. Inspect and test starter relays and solenoids; determine necessary
action. 6.C.3
   D. Remove and install starter in a vehicle. 6.C.4
   E. Inspect and test switches, connectors, and wires of starter control
circuits; perform necessary action. 6.C.5
   F. Differentiate between electrical and engine mechanical problems that
cause a slow-crank or non-crank condition. 6.C.6

III. Charging System Diagnosis and Repair
   A. Perform charging system output test; determine necessary action.
6.D.1
   B. Diagnose charging system for the cause of undercharge, no-charge,
and overcharge conditions. 6.D.2
   C. Inspect, adjust, or replace generator (alternator) drive belts,
pulleys, and tensioners; check pulley and belt alignment. 6.D.3
   D. Remove, inspect, and install generator (alternator). 6.D.4
   E. Perform charging circuit voltage drop tests; determine necessary
action. 6.D.5

IV. Current Flow on Starting and Charging System Diagrams
   A. Use wiring diagrams during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.
6.A.6

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades.  In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a)Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 201

  • Title: ASE Certification Seminar*
  • Number: AUTO 201
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

This course will prepare students to take any of the eight basic National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) automotive certification tests. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the ASE certification process.
  2. Describe ASE test construction, its question format, the range and variety of questions, and the level of specificity.
  3. Identify key components of automotive systems.
  4. Describe diagnostic methods used in automotive repair.
  5. Identify repair procedures used in automotive repair.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic ASE Certification
   A. ASE testing process
      1. Describe the ASE certification process.
      2. Describe ASE test construction, its question format, the range
and variety of questions, and the level of specificity.
   B. ASE test topics
      1. List the 8 basic ASE certification tests.
      2. Identify key components of automotive systems.
      3. Describe diagnostic methods used in automotive repair.
      4. Identify repair procedures used in automotive repair.

II. Automotive Machinist
   A. ASE testing process
      1. Describe the ASE certification process.
      2. Describe ASE test construction, its question format, the range
and variety of questions, and the level of specificity.
   B. Automotive Machinist test topics
      1. List the 3 ASE Engine Machinist tests.
      2. Identify key components of automotive engines.
      3.  Identify repair procedures used in automotive engine repair.

III. Advanced Engine Performance Specialist
   A. ASE testing process
      1. Describe the ASE certification process.
      2. Describe ASE test construction, its question format, the range
and variety of questions, and the level of specificity.
   B. Advanced Engine Performance Specialist test
      1. Identify key components and tools used in testing automotive
fuel, ignition, and emissions systems.
      2. Describe diagnostic methods used to test and evaluate vehicle
emissions.
      3. Identify repair procedures used to bring vehicles within legal
emissions limits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Participation       50% of grade 
Tests               50% of grade 
TOTAL              100%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 205

  • Title: Engine Performance II*
  • Number: AUTO 205
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 161 and AUTO 165

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the operation of engine management systems to include: general engine diagnosis, computerized engine controls diagnosis and repair, fuel, air induction, and exhaust diagnosis and repair, and emissions control systems diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze engine mechanical integrity.
  2. Analyze ignition system concerns.
  3. Analyze induction and exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Engine Mechanical Integrity
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   G. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   H. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring
of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5
   I. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and
circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8

II. Ignition System
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   G. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   H. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring
of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5
   I. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary
air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action.
8.E.6
   J. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection
systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7
   K. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and
circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8

III. Induction and Exhaust System
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   G. Diagnose oil leaks, emissions, and driveability concerns caused by
the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system; determine necessary
action. 8.E.1
   H. Inspect, test, and service positive crankcase ventilation (PCV)
filter/breather cap, valve, tubes, orifices, and hoses; perform necessary
action. 8.E.2
   I. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the exhaust
gas recirculation (EGR) system; determine action. 8.E.3
   J. Inspect, test, service, and replace components of the EGR system,
including EGR tubing, exhaust passages, vacuum/pressure controls, filters
and hoses; perform necessary action. 8.E.4
   K. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring
of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5
   L. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary
air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action.
8.E.6
   M. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection
systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7
   N. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and
circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8
   O. Inspect and test catalytic converter efficiency. 8.E.9

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 208

  • Title: Electrical III*
  • Number: AUTO 208
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 165 and AUTO 166

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose general electrical system problems, diagnose and repair lighting systems, gauges, warning devices, horns, wiper and washer systems, and accessories. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Diagnose open, short, and grounded circuit problems.
  2. Diagnose high resistance problems.
  3. Identify computer circuit problems using various test equipment.
  4. Identify current flow on lighting, gauges, warning devices, driver information systems, horns, wiper/washer and accessory circuits on wiring diagrams.
  5. Diagnose and repair computer circuit problems using test equipment.
  6. Diagnose and repair CAN/BUS (Controller Area Network bus) systems.
  7. Identify high/low voltage circuits and disconnects on hybrid vehicles.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Open Circuit Problems
   A. Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in
electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action. 6.A.11
   B. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no
light operation; determine necessary action. 6.E.1
   C. Inspect, replace, and aim headlights and bulbs. 6.E.2
   D. Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light
operation; perform necessary action. 6.E.3
   E. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of
abnormal gauge readings; determine necessary action. 6.F.1
   F. Inspect and test connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of
gauge circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.2
   G. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other driver information systems; determine necessary action. 6.F.3
   H. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   I. Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action. 6.G.1
   J. Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and
park problems; perform necessary action. 6.G.2
   K. Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necessary action.
6.G.3
   L. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   M. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   N. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   O. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4
   P. Remove and reinstall door panel. 6.H.8

II. Short Circuit Problems
   A. Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in
electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action. 6.A.11
   B. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no
light operation; determine necessary action. 6.E.1
   C. Inspect, replace and aim headlights and bulbs. 6.E.2
   D. Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light
operation; perform necessary action. 6.E.3
   E. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of
abnormal gauge readings; determine necessary action. 6.F.1
   F. Inspect and test connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of
gauge circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.2
   G. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other drive information systems; determine necessary action. 6.F.3
   H. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   I. Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action. 6.G.1
   J. Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and
park problems; perform necessary action. 6.G.2
   K. Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necessary action.
6.G.3
   L. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   M. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   N. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   O. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4
   P. Remove and reinstall door panel. 6.H.8

III. Grounded Circuit Problems
   A. Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in
electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action. 6.A.11
   B. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no
light operation; determine necessary action. 6.E.1
   C. Inspect, replace, and aim headlights and bulbs. 6.E.2
   D. Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light
operation; perform necessary action. 6.E.3
   E. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of
abnormal gauge readings; determine necessary action. 6.F.1
   F. Inspect and test connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of
gauge circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.2
   G. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other driver information systems; determine necessary action. 6.F.3
   H. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   I. Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action. 6.G.1
   J. Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and
park problems; perform necessary action. 6.G.2
   K. Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necessary action.
6.G.3
   L. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   M. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   N. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   O. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4
   P. Remove and reinstall door panel. 6.H.8

IV. High Resistance Problems
   A. Locate shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in
electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action. 6.A.11
   B. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no
light operation; determine necessary action. 6.E.1
   C. Inspect, replace, and aim headlights and bulbs. 6.E.2
   D. Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light
operation; perform necessary action. 6.E.3
   E. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of
abnormal gauge readings; determine necessary action. 6.F.1
   F. Inspect and test connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of
gauge circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.2
   G. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other driver information systems; determine necessary action. 6.F.3
   H. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   I. Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action. 6.G.1
   J. Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and
park problems; perform necessary action. 6.G.2
   K. Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necesssary action.
6.G.3
   L. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   M. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   N. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   O. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4
   P. Remove and reinstall door panel. 6.H.8

V. Computer Circuit Problems Using Various Test Equipment
   A. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   B. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   C. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   D. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   E. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4

VI. Current Flow on Lighting, Gauges, Warning Devices, Driver Information
Systems, Horns, Wiper/Washer and Accessory Circuits on Wiring Diagrams
   A. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no
light operation; determine necessary action. 6.E.1
   B. Inspect and diagnose incorrect turn signal or hazard light
operation; perform necessary action. 6.E.3
   C. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for cause of
abnormal gauge readings; determine necessary action. 6.F.1
   D. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other driver information systems; determine necessary action. 6.F.3
   E. Diagnose incorrect horn operation; perform necessary action. 6.G.1
   F. Diagnose incorrect wiper operation; diagnose wiper speed control and
park problems; perform necessary action. 6.G.2
   G. Diagnose incorrect washer operation; perform necessary action.
6.G.3
   H. Diagnose incorrect operation of motor-driven accessory circuits;
determine necessary action. 6.H.1
   I. Diagnose incorrect heated glass, mirror, or seat operation;
determine necessary action. 6.H.2
   J. Diagnose incorrect electric lock operation (including remote keyless
entry); determine necessary action. 6.H.3
   K. Diagnose incorrect operation of cruise control systems; determine
necessary action. 6.H.4

VII. Computer Circuit Problems Using Test Equipment
   A. Check electrical/electronic circuit waveforms; interpret readings
and determine needed repairs. 6.A.9
   B. Repair wiring harness (including CAN/BUS systems). 6.A.16
   C. Identify electronic modules, security systems, radios, and other
accessories that require reinitialization or code entry following battery
disconnect. 6.B.8
   D. Diagnose the cause of incorrect operation of warning devices and
other driver information systems; determine necessary action, 6.F.3
   E. Inspect and test sensors, connectors, and wires of electronic
(digital) instrument circuits; determine necessary action. 6.F.4
   F. Diagnose supplemental restraint system (SRS) concerns, determine
necessary action. 6.H.5
   G. Disarm and enable the airbag system for vehicle service. 6.H.6
   H. Diagnose radio static and weak, intermittent, or no radio reception;
determine necessary action. 6.H.7
   I. Diagnose body electronic system circuits using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 6.H.9
   J. Diagnose the cause of false, intermittent, or no operation of
anti-theft system. 6.H.11
   K. Describe the operation of keyless entry/remote-start systems.
6.H.12
   L. Perform software transfers, software update, or flash reprogramming
on electronic modules. 6.H.13
   M. Identify location of hybrid vehicle high voltage circuit disconnect
(service plug) location and safety procedures. 6.A.18

VIII. CAN/BUS Systems
   A. Identify high voltage circuits of electric or hybrid electric
vehicle and related safety precautions. 6.B.7
   B. Identify hybrid vehicle auxiliary (12v) battery service, repair and
test procedures. 6.B.9
   C. Repair wiring harness (including CAN/BUS systems). 6.A.16
   D. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 6.H.10

XI. Low/High Voltage Circuits and Disconnects on Hybrid Vehicles
   A. Identify location of hybrid vehicle high voltage circuit disconnect
(service plug) location and safety procedures. 6.A.18
   B. Identify hybrid vehicle auxiliary (12v) battery service, repair and
test procedures. 6.B.9


Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Tests and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specification. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 209

  • Title: Manual Drive Train and Axles*
  • Number: AUTO 209
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to work safely in the shop; perform manual transmission/transaxle diagnosis and repair; clutch diagnosis and repair; drive shaft, half-shaft, universal and constant velocity joint diagnosis and repair; and four wheel drive/all wheel drive diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Diagnose drive train issues.
  2. Perform the removal, inspection and/or repair of the clutch and its components.
  3. Conduct a transmission and transaxle inspection and repair according to service specifications.
  4. Conduct a differential inspection and repair according to service specifications.
  5. Conduct the diagnosis, inspection and replacement of drive axle shafts and supporting components.
  6. Conduct the diagnosis, inspection, adjustment and repair of four and all wheel drive components.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Drive Train Diagnosis
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 3.A.1
   B. Remove and reinstall transmission/transaxle. 3.C.1
   C. Disassemble, clean, and reassemble transmission/transaxle
components. 3.C.2
   D. Inspect transmission/transaxle case, extension housing, case mating
surfaces, bores, bushings, and vents; perform necessary action. 3.C.3
   E. Diagnose noise concerns using transmission/transaxle powerflow
principles. 3.C.4
   F. Diagnose hard shifting and jumping out of gear concerns; determine
necessary action. 3.C.5
   G. Inspect, adjust, and reinstall shift linkages, brackets, bushings,
cables, pivots, and levers. 3.C.6
   H. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 3.C.7
   I. Inspect and replace gaskets, seals, and sealants; inspect sealing
surfaces. 3.C.8
   J. Remove and replace transaxle final drive. 3.C.9
   K. Inspect, adjust, and reinstall shift cover, forks, levers, grommets,
shafts, sleeves, detent mechanism, interlocks, and springs. 3.C.10
   L. Measure end play or preload (shim or spacer selection procedure) on
transmission/transaxle shafts; perform necessary action. 3.C.11
   M. Inspect and reinstall synchronizer hub, sleeve, keys (inserts),
springs, and blocking rings. 3.C.12
   N. Diagnose transaxle final drive assembly noise and vibration
concerns; determine necessary action. 3.C.13
   O. Remove, inspect, measure, adjust, and reinstall transaxle final
drive pinion gears (spiders), shaft, side gears, side bearings, thrust
washers, and case assembly. 3.C.14
   P. Inspect lubrication devices (oil pump or slingers); perform
necessary action. 3.C.15
   Q. Inspect, test, and replace transmission/transaxle sensors and
switches. 3.C.l6
   R. Describe the operational characteristics of an electronically
controlled manual transmission/transaxle. 3.C.17
   S. Identify and interpret drive train concern; determine necessary
action. 3.A.2
   T. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as drive
train system operation, fluid type, vehicle service history, service
precautions, and technical service bulletins. 3.A.3
   U. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 3.A.4
   V. Diagnose fluid loss, level, and condition concerns; determine
necessary action. 3.A.5
   W. Drain and fill manual transmission/transaxle and final drive unit.
3.A.6

II. Fundamentals of Clutch Operation, Removal, Inspection and Repair
   A. Inspect clutch pedal linkage, cables, automatic adjuster mechanisms,
brackets, bushings, pivots, and springs; perform necessary action. 3.B.2
   B. Inspect hydraulic clutch slave and master cylinders, lines, and
hoses; determine necessary action. 3.B.3
   C. Inspect and replace clutch pressure plate assembly, clutch disc,
release (throw-out) bearing and linkage, and pilot bearings/bushing (as
applicable). 3.B.4
   D. Bleed clutch hydraulic system. 3.B.5
   E. Inspect flywheel and ring gear for wear and cracks; determine
necessary action. 3.B.6
   F. Inspect engine block, core plugs, rear main engine oil seal, clutch
(bell) housing, transmission/transaxle case mating surfaces, and alignment
dowels; determine necessary action. 3.B.7
   G. Measure flywheel runout and crankshaft end play; determine necessary
action. 3.B.8
   H. Diagnose clutch noise, binding, slippage, pulsation, and chatter;
determine necessary action. 3.B.1

III. Powerflow, Inspection, and Repair of Manual Transmissions and
Transaxles Using Service Specifications
   A. Remove and reinstall transmission/transaxle. 3.C.1
   B. Disassemble, clean, and reassemble transmission/transaxle
components. 3.C.2
   C. Inspect transmission/transaxle case, extension housing, case mating
surfaces, bores, bushings, and vents; perform necessary action. 3.C.3
   D. Diagnose noise concerns using transmission/transaxle powerflow
principles. 3.C.4
   E. Diagnose hard shifting and jumping out of gear concerns; determine
necessary action. 3.C.5 
   F. Inspect, adjust, and reinstall shift linkages, brackets, bushings,
cables, pivots, and levers. 3.C.6
   G. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 3.C.7
   H. Inspect and replace gaskets, seals, and sealants; inspect sealing
surfaces. 3.C.8
   I. Remove and replace transaxle final drive. 3.C.9
   J. Inspect, adjust, and reinstall shift cover, forks, levers, grommets,
shafts, sleeves, detent mechanism, interlocks, and springs. 3.C.10
   K. Measure end play or preload (shim or spacer selection procedure) on
transmission/transaxle shafts; perform necessary action. 3.C.11
   L. Inspect and reinstall synchronizer hub, sleeve, keys (inserts),
springs, and blocking rings. 3.C.12
   M. Diagnose transaxle final drive assembly noise and vibration
concerns; determine necessary action. 3.C.13
   N. Remove, inspect, measure, adjust, and reinstall transaxle final
drive pinion gears (spiders), shaft, side gears, side bearings, thrust
washers, and case assembly. 3.C.14
   O. Inspect lubrication devices (oil pump or slingers); perform
necessary action. 3.C.15
   P. Inspect, test, and replace transmission/transaxle sensors and
switches. 3.C.16
   Q. Describe the operational characteristics of an electronically
controlled manual transmission/transaxle. 3.C.17

IV. Differential Inspection and Repair According to Service
Specifications
   A. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
3.E.1.1
   B. Diagnose fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.
3.E.1.2
   C. Inspect and replace companion flange and pinion seal; measure
companion flange runout. 3.E.1.3
   D. Inspect ring gear and measure runout; determine necessary action.
3.E.1.4
   E. Remove, inspect, and reinstall drive pinion and ring grear, spacers,
sleeves, and bearings. 3.E.1.5
   F. Measure and adjust drive pinion depth. 3.E.1.6
   G. Measure and adjust drive pinion bearing preload. 3.E.1.7
   H. Measure and adjust side bearing preload and ring and pinion gear
total backlash and backlash variation on a differential carrier assembly
(threaded cup or shim types). 3.E.1.8
   I. Check ring and pinion tooth contact patterns; perform necessary
action. 3.E.1.9
   J. Disassemble, inspect, measure, and adjust or replace differential
pinion gears (spiders), shaft, side gears, side bearings. thrust washers,
and case. 3.E.1.10
   K. Reassemble and reinstall differential case assembly; measure runout;
determine necessary action. 3.E.1.11
   L. Diagnose noise, slippage, and chatter concerns; determine necessary
action. 3.E.2.1
   M. Clean and inspect differential housing; refill with correct
lubricant and/or additive. 3.E.2.2
   N. Inspect and reinstall limited slip differential components. 3.E.2.3
   O. Measure rotating torque; determine necessary action. 3.E.2.4

V. Diagnosis, Inspection and Replacement of Drive Axle Shafts and
Supporting Components
   A. Diagnose drive axle shafts, bearings, and seals for noise,
vibration, and fluid leakage concerns; determine necessary action.
3.E.3.1
   B. Diagnose constant-velocity (CV) joint noise and vibration concerns;
determine necessary action. 3.D.1
   C. Diagnose universal joint noise and vibration concerns; perform
necessary action. 3.D.2
   D. Remove and replace front wheel drive (FWD) front wheel bearing.
3.D.3
   E. Inspect, service, and replace shafts, yokes, boots, and CV joints.
3.D.4
   F. Inspect, service, and replace shaft center support bearings. 3.D.5
   G. Check shaft balance and phasing; measure shaft runout; measure and
adjust driveline angles. 3.D.6
   H. Inspect and replace drive axle shaft wheel studs. 3.E.3.2
   I. Remove and replace drive axle shafts. 3.E.3.3
   J. Inspect and replace drive axle shaft seals, bearings, and retainers.
3.E.3.4
   K. Measure drive axle flange runout and shaft end play; determine
necessary action. 3.E.3.5

VI. Diagnosis, Inspection, Adjustment and Repair of Four- and All-Wheel
Drive Components
   A. Diagnose noise, vibration, and unusual steering concerns; determine
necessary action. 3.F.1
   B. Inspect, adjust, and repair shifting controls (mechanical,
electrical, and vacuum), bushings, mounts, levers, and brackets. 3.F.2
   C. Remove and reinstall transfer case. 3.F.3
   D. Disassemble, service, and reassemble transfer case and components.
3.F.4
   E. Inspect front-wheel bearings and locking hubs; perform necessary
action. 3.F.5
   F. Check drive assembly seals and vents; check lube level. 3.F.6
   G. Diagnose, test, adjust, and replace electrical/electronic components
of four-wheel drive systems. 3.F.7

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/Lab Assignments 30-60% of grade
Test and quizzes 20-50% of grade
Attendance, attitude and work habits 10-20% of grade
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades.  In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 210

  • Title: Advanced Engine Repair*
  • Number: AUTO 210
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 165

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to plan, design, and build a performance engine. The student will also demonstrate knowledge of the relationships between displacement, horsepower and torque; regulations governing performance engines; and current trends in engine modification. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk. This course is taught in the fall semester.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe types of engine modifications that are used to increase horsepower, torque, and/or displacement.
  2. Describe the relationship between horsepower, torque, displacement, airflow, and fuel monitoring.
  3. Describe how camshaft lift and duration affect horsepower and torque output.
  4. Identify methods used to reduce friction in an engine.
  5. Identify engine parts necessary for designing an engine.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to safely use hand and power tools.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to perform a performance engine rebuild.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Terms
   A. Define displacement.
   B. Define torque.
   C. Define horsepower.
   D. Define compression ratio.
   E. Describe cylinder compression.
   F. Describe volumetric efficiency.
   G. List and describe the types of friction.

II. Why a performance engine?
   A. Compare and contrast the needs for increased performance.
   B. Compare and contrast the needs for increased torque.
   C. Compare and contrast the needs for increased horsepower.
   D. Describe the relationships between horsepower, torque, and
displacement.
 
III. Planning an Engine
   A. Identify the desired results.
   B. List and describe Federal/State Regulations, Restrictions, and
Controls.
   C. List and describe the functions of the following "bolt-on"
modifications:
      1. Carburetor/Fuel Injection
      2. Exhaust
      3. Computer PROM
      4. Rocker Arms
      5. Harmonic Balancer/Pulleys
      6. Distributor
      7. Spark Plugs
      8. Plug Wires
   D. Compare and contrast turbocharger and supercharger installations.
   E. List and describe the functions of the following bottom end
modifications.
      1. Crankshaft
      2. Connecting Rods
      3. Pistons
      4. Oil Pump
      5. Sump
      6. Dry Sump Oiling
      7. Clearancing
      8. Friction Modifications
   F. List and describe the functions of the following top end
modifications.
      1. Camshaft
      2. Lifters
      3. Push Rods
      4. Rocker Arms
      5. Valves
      6. Valve Seats
      7. Valve Springs
      8. Heads
      9. Intake Manifold

IV. Designing An Engine
   A. List sources for parts.
   B. Describe component compatibility.
   C. Identify the costs of modifications.
   D. Describe the durability of modifications.
   E. Describe current applications for different engine types.

V. Building a Performance Engine
   A. Describe basic shop safety and tools.
   B. Describe cleaning techniques.
   C. Describe balancing.
   D. Perform measuring of engine parts.
   E. List and describe machining methods.
   F. Describe assembly techniques.

VI. Break-in and running a Performance Engine
   A. List strategies for engine break-in.
   B. Describe techniques for engine break-in.
   C. List the requirements for engine running.
   D. List the limitations of engine running.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab Assignments                    40% of grade 
Test and quizzes                   40% of grade 
Participation and work habits      20% of grade 
TOTAL                             100%

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 215

  • Title: Engine Performance III*
  • Number: AUTO 215
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 205

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to service and repair fuels systems, ignition systems, and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Service fuel system concerns.
  2. Repair fuel system concerns.
  3. Service ignition system concerns.
  4. Repair ignition system concerns.
  5. Service induction and exhaust system concerns.
  6. Repair induction and exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fuel System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   I. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   J. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   K. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   L. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   M. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   N. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7

II. Ignition System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   I. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   J. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle
speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power
loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine
necessary action. 8.D.1
   K. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   L. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   M. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   N. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7

III. Induction and Exhaust System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Diagnose driveability and emissions problems resulting from
malfunctions of interrelated systems (cruise control, security alarms,
suspension controls, traction controls, A/C, automatic transmissions,
non-OEM-installed accessories, or similar systems); determine necessary
action. 8.B.7
   I. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action 8.B.8
   J. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   K. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   L. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary
air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action.
8.E.6
   M. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection
systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7
   N. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and
circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8
   O. Inspect and test catalytic converter efficiency. 8.E.9
   P. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   Q. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   R. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   S. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7 
 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/Lab Assignments 30-60% of grade
Test and quizzes 20-50% of grade
Attendance, attitude and work habits 10-20% of grade
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Students Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 221

  • Title: Heating and Air Conditioning*
  • Number: AUTO 221
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156 and AUTO 165

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to operate, service and diagnose automotive heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The course will cover the theory and operation of these systems, major components, testing, recycling and other service procedures. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. instructional lab.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Document heating and air conditioning system concerns.
  2. Identify appropriate guidelines and service refrigerant, recycling and handing systems.
  3. Perform diagnostics of A/C systems.
  4. Perform diagnostics and repair of refrigeration systems components.
  5. Perform diagnostics and repair of heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems.
  6. Perform diagnostics and repair of operating systems and related controls.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Heating and Air Conditioning System Concerns
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 7.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret heating and air conditioning concern;
determine necessary action. 7.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as heating
and air conditioning system operation, vehicle service history, service
precautions, and technical service bulletins. 7.A.3
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 7.A.4

II. Appropriate Guidelines and Service of Refrigerant, Recycling and
Handling Systems
   A. Perform correct use and maintenance of refrigerant handling
equipment according to equipment manufacturer's standards. 7.E.1
   B. Identify and recover A/C system refrigerant. 7.E.2
   C. Recycle, label, and store refrigerant. 7.E.3
   E. Evacuate and charge A/C system; add refrigerant oil as required.
7.E.4
   
III. Diagnostics of A/C Systems
   A. Performance test A/C system; identify A/C system malfunctions.
7.A.5
   B. Identify abnormal operating noises in the A/C system; determine
necessary action. 7.A.6
   C. Identify refrigerant type; select and connect proper gauge set;
record temperature and pressure readings. 7.A.7
   D. Leak test A/C system; determine necessary action. 7.A.8
   E. Inspect the condition of refrigerant oil removed from the system;
determine necessary action. 7.A.9
   F. Determine recommended oil and oil capacity for system application.
7.A.10
   G. Using scan tool, observe and record related HVAC data and trouble
codes. 7.A.11

IV. Diagnostics and Service of Refrigeration Systems Components
   A. Diagnose A/C system conditions that cause the protection devices
(pressure, thermal, and PCM) to interrupt system operation; determine
necessary action. 7.B.1
   B. Inspect and replace A/C compressor drive belts, pulleys, and
tensioners; determine necessary action. 7.B.2
   C. Inspect, test, and replace A/C compressor clutch components and/or
assembly; check compressor clutch air gap and adjust as needed. 7.B.3
   D. Remove, inspect, and reinstall A/C compressor and mountings;
determine required oil quality. 7.B.4
   E. Identify hybrid vehicle A/C system electrical circuits, service and
safety precautions. 7.B.5
   F. Determine the need for an additional A/C system filter; perform
necessary action. 7.B.6
   G. Remove and inspect A/C system mufflers, hoses, lines, fittings,
O-rings, seals, and service valves; perform necessary action. 7.B.7
   H. Inspect A/C condenser for airflow restrictions; perform necessary
action. 7.B.8
   I. Remove, inspect, and install receiver/drier or accumulator/drier;
determine required oil quantity. 7.B.9
   J. Remove, inspect, and install expansion valve or orifice (expansion)
tube. 7.B.10
   K. Inspect evaporator housing water drain; perform necessary action.
7.B.11
   L. Remove, inspect, and reinstall evaporator; determine required oil
quantity. 7.B.12
   M. Remove, inspect, and reinstall condenser; determine required oil
quantity. 7.B.13

V. Diagnostics and Repair of Heating, Ventilation, and Engine Cooling
Systems
   A. Diagnose temperature control problems in the heater/ventilation
system; determine necessary action. 7.C.1
   B. Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition,
inspect and test radiator, cap (pressure/vacuum), coolant recovery tank,
and hoses; perform necessary action. 7.C.2
   C. Inspect engine cooling and heater system hoses and belts; perform
necessary action. 7.C.3
   D. Inspect, test, and replace thermostat and gasket/seal. 7.C.4
   E. Determine coolant condition and coolant type for vehicle
application; drain and recover coolant. 7.C.5
   F. Flush system; refill system with recommended coolant; bleed system.
7.C.6
   G. Inspect and test cooling fan, fan clutch, fan shroud, and air dams;
perform necessary action. 7.C.7
   H. Inspect and test electric cooling fan, fan control system and
circuits; determine necessary action. 7.C.8
   I. Inspect and test heater control valve(s); perform necessary action.
7.C.9
   J. Remove and reinstall heater core. 7.C.10

VI. Diagnostics and Repair of Operating Systems and Related Controls
   A. Diagnose malfunctions in the electrical controls of heating,
ventilation, and A/C (HVAC) systems; determine necessary action. 7.D.1
   B. Inspect and test A/C-heater blower, motors, resistors, switches,
relays, wiring, and protection devices; perform necessary action. 7.D.2
   C. Test and diagnose A/C compressor clutch control systems; determine
necessary action. 7.D.3
   D. Diagnose malfunctions in the vacuum, mechanical, and electrical
components and controls of the heating, ventilation, and A/C (HVAC)
system; determine necessary action. 7.D.4
   E. Inspect and test A/C-heater control panel assembly; determine
necessary action. 7.D.5
   F. Inspect and test A/C-heater control cables, motors, and linkages;
perform necessary action. 7.D.6
   G. Inspect A/C-heater ducts, doors, hoses, cabin filters and outlets;
perform necessary action. 7.D.7
   H. Identify the source of A/C system odors. 7.D.8
   I. Check operation of automatic or semi-automatic heating, ventilation,
and air-conditioning (HVAC) control systems; determine necessary action.
7.D.9
   J. Determine recommended oil and oil capacity for system application.
7.A.10
   K. Using scan tool, observe and record related HVAC data and trouble
codes. 7.A.11

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/Lab Assignments 30-60% of grade
Test and quizzes 20-50% of grade
Attendance, attitude and work habits 10-20% of grade
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 235

  • Title: Hybrid & Alternative Fuels Vehicles Repair & Maintenance*
  • Number: AUTO 235
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 131 and AUTO 205 and AUTO 208 and AUTO 221 and AUTO 250 or Department Approval

Description:

This course will cover the technology of hybrid electric, electric, alternative fuel and fuel cell vehicles. Topics covered will include changes in the vehicle engine, drive train, emissions, heating/ventilation/air conditioning (HVAC), brake and computer systems. Variations between manufacturers will be covered. Students will learn to safely diagnose, repair and service these vehicles. 2 hrs. lecture/3 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the effects of carbon-based fuels on the environment.
  2. Describe hybrid electric vehicles.
  3. Describe internal combustion engine systems.
  4. Describe gasoline, alternative fuels, diesel and biodiesel fuels.
  5. Describe the various types of batteries used in hybrid vehicles.
  6. Analyze electric motors, generators and controls.
  7. Describe regenerative braking systems.
  8. Describe transmissions and transaxles.
  9. Describe the heating/ventilation/air conditioning (HVAC) systems.
  10. Explain hybrid safety, service and first responder procedures.
  11. Describe operating, maintenance and service procedures.
  12. Describe fuel cell and other advanced technologies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Environmental Effects of Carbon-Based Fuels
   A. Explain chemical fundamentals of carbon-based society.
   B. Describe emission standards for the United States and Europe.
   C. Describe health effects of pollution.
   D. Discuss global warming.

II. Hybrid Vehicles
   A. Discuss classifications for hybrid vehicles.
   B. Explain levels of hybridization.

III. Hybrid Vehicles Internal Combustion Engine Systems
   A. Discuss hybrid engine design features.
   B. Discuss hybrid engine ignition system.
   C. Discuss hybrid engine lubrication systems.

IV. Gasoline, Alternative Fuels, Diesel and Biodiesel Fuels
   A. Discuss the gasoline engine.
   B. Discuss alternative fuels.
   C. Discuss diesel and biodiesel fuels.

V. Batteries in Hybrid Vehicles
   A. Discuss batteries in the hybrid vehicle.
   B. Discuss high voltage (HV) battery construction.
   C. Explain HV battery cooling.
   D. Describe HV battery service.

VI. Electric Motors, Generators and Controllers
   A. Discuss the fundamentals of magnetism.
   B. Describe electromagnetism.
   C. Describe electromagnetism induction.

VII. Regenerative Braking System
   A. Explain principles of regenerative braking.
   B. Discuss types of regenerative braking.
   C. Explain how the regenerative braking system works.

VIII. Transmissions and Transaxles in Hybrid Vehicles
   A. Discuss manual vs. automatic transmissions.
   B. Describe servicing transaxles.

IX. HVAC
   A. Explain coolant heat storage systems.
   B. Explain cabin heating systems.
   C. Explain hybrid air conditioning systems.

X. Hybrid Safety, Service and First Responder Procedures
   A. Describe hybrid safety and service.
   B. Explore first responder procedures.

XI. Operation, Maintenance and Service
   A. Maintain Honda hybrid vehicles.
   B. Maintain Toyota and Lexus hybrid vehicles.
   C. Maintain Ford and Mercury hybrid vehicles.
   D. Maintain General Motors hybrid vehicles.

XII. Fuel Cell and Other Advanced Technologies
   A. Discuss fuel cell hybrid vehicles.
   B. Discuss plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.
   C. Discuss the future of electric vehicles.
   D. Discuss hydrogen power.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion:
Lab assignments 30-60% of grade
Test and quizzes 20-50% of grade
Attendance, attitude, and work habits 10-20% of grade
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits:
1. Productive attitude.
2. Efficient work habits.
3. Accurate workmanship.
4. Safety minded work skills.
5. Collaborative teamwork.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course.
This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207).
Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications.
NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1.

Students who wear prescription glasses must do one of the following:

  1. Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1. 
  2. Wear cover goggles (if allowable). 
  3. Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Lab Guidelines:
Students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 250

  • Title: Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles*
  • Number: AUTO 250
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 166 and AUTO 205

Description:

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to diagnose, service and repair various automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles, both on vehicle and off vehicle, including computer-controlled systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. instructional lab.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explore the concept of theory and operation of automatic transmissions/transaxles.
  2. Perform maintenance on an automatic transmission/transaxle.
  3. Perform service on an automatic transmission/transaxle.
  4. Diagnose automatic transmission/transaxles.
  5. Inspect automatic transmission/transaxles.
  6. Remove and reinstall automatic transmission.
  7. Remove and reinstall automatic transaxles.
  8. Disassemble automatic transmission and components.
  9. Disassemble automatic transaxles and components.
  10. Inspect automatic transmission components.
  11. Inspect automatic transaxles and components.
  12. Repair automatic transmission and components.
  13. Repair automatic transaxles and components.
  14. Reassemble automatic transmission and components.
  15. Reassemble automatic transaxles and components.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Transmission and Transaxle Diagnosis
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 2.A.1
   B. Identify and interpret transmission/transaxle concern; differentiate
between engine performance and transmission/transaxle concerns; determine
necessary action. 2.A.2
   C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as
transmission/transaxle system operation, fluid type, vehicle service
history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. 2.A.3.
   D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 2.A.4
   E. Diagnose transmission/transaxle gear reduction/multiplication
concerns using driving, driven, and held member (power flow) principles.
2.A.10
   F. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   G. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   H. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   I. Inspect, leak test, and flush or replace transmission/transaxle oil
cooler, lines, and fittings. 2.C.6
   J. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   K. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   L. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   M. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   N. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   O. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   P. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   Q. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   R. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   S. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   T. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   U. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   V. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   W. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20
   X. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   Y. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22
   Z. Describe the operational characteristics of a continuously variable
transmission (CVT). 2.C.23
   AA. Describe the operational characteristics of a hybrid vehicle drive
train. 2.C.24

II. Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Maintenance
   A. Diagnose fluid loss and condition concerns; check fluid level in
transmissions with and without dip-stick; determine necessary action.
2.A.5
   B. Inspect, adjust and replace manual valve shift linkage, transmission
range sensor/switch, and park/neutral position switch. 2.B.1
   C. Inspect and replace external seals, gaskets, and bushings. 2.B.2
   D. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, or replace electrical/electronic
components and circuits, including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays,
terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses. 2.B.3
   E. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   F. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 2.B.5
   G. Service transmission; perform visual inspection; replace fluids and
filters. 2.B.6 

III. Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Service
   A. Diagnose fluid loss and condition concerns; check fluid level in
transmissions with and without dip-stick; determine necessary action.
2.A.5
   B. Inspect, adjust and replace manual valve shift linkage, transmission
range sensor/switch, and park/neutral position switch. 2.B.1
   C. Inspect and replace external seals, gaskets, and bushings. 2.B.2
   D. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, or replace electrical/electronic
components and circuits, including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays,
terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses. 2.B.3
   E. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   F. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 2.B.5
   G. Service transmission; perform visual inspection; replace fluids and
filters. 2.B.6
   H. Inspect, leak test, and flush or replace transmission/transaxle oil
cooler, lines, and fittings. 2.C.6

IV. Automatic Transmission/Transaxles Diagnosis
   A. Perform pressure tests (including transmission//transaxles equipped
with electronic pressure control); determine necessary action. 2.A.6
   B. Perform stall test; determine necessary action. 2.A.7
   C. Perform lock-up converter system tests; determine necessary action.
2.A.8
   D. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
2.A.9
   E. Diagnose transmission/transaxle gear reduction/multiplication
concerns using driving, driven, and held member (power flow) principles.
2.A.10
   F. Diagnose pressure concerns in a transmission using hydraulic
principles (Pascal’s Law). 2.A.11
   G. Diagnose electronic transmission/transaxle control systems using
appropriate test equipment and service information. 2.A.12
   H. Inspect, adjust and replace manual valve shift linkage, transmission
range sensor/switch, and park/neutral position switch. 2.B.1
   I. Inspect and replace external seals, gaskets, and bushings. 2.B.2
   J. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, or replace electrical/electronic
components and circuits, including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays,
terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses. 2.B.3

V. Automatic Transmission/Transaxles Inspection
   A. Perform pressure tests (including transmission//transaxles equipped
with electronic pressure control); determine necessary action. 2.A.6
   B. Perform stall test; determine necessary action. 2.A.7
   C. Perform lock-up converter system tests; determine necessary action.
2.A.8
   D. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine necessary action.
2.A.9
   E. Diagnose transmission/transaxle gear reduction/multiplication
concerns using driving, driven, and held member (power flow) principles.
2.A.10
   F. Diagnose pressure concerns in a transmission using hydraulic
principles (Pascal’s Law). 2.A.11
   G. Diagnose electronic transmission/transaxle control systems using
appropriate test equipment and service information. 2.A.12
   H. Inspect, adjust and replace manual valve shift linkage, transmission
range sensor/switch, and park/neutral position switch. 2.B.1
   I. Inspect and replace external seals, gaskets, and bushings. 2.B.2
   J. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, or replace electrical/electronic
components and circuits, including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays,
terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses. 2.B.3

VI. Automatic Transmission Removal and Reinstallation
   A. Remove and reinstall transmission/transaxle and torque converter;
inspect engine core plugs, rear crankshaft seal, dowel pins, dowel pin
holes, and mating surfaces. 2.C.1
   B. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 2.B.5

VII. Automatic Transaxles Removal and Reinstallation
   A. Remove and reinstall transmission/transaxle and torque converter;
inspect engine core plugs, rear crankshaft seal, dowel pins, dowel pin
holes, and mating surfaces. 2.C.1
   B. Inspect, replace, and align powertrain mounts. 2.B.5

VIII. Automatic Transmission and Components Disassembly
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, checkvalves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

IX. Automatic Transaxles and Components Disassembly
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, checkvalves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

X. Automatic Transmission Components Inspection
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, checkvalves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 20 
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

XI. Automatic Transaxles and Components Inspection
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

XII. Automatic Transmission and Components Repair
   A. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   B. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   C. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   D. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   E. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   F. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   G. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   H. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   I. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   J. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   K. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   L. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   M. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   N. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   O. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   P. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   Q. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   R. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 
   S. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   T. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

XIII. Automatic Transaxles and Components Repair
   A. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   B. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   C. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   D. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   E. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   F. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   G. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   H. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   I. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   J. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   K. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   L. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   M. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   N. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   O. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   P. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   Q. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   R. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 
   S. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   T. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

XIV. Automatic Transmission and Components Reassembly
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

XV. Automatic transaxles and components reassembly
   A. Diagnose electronic transmission control systems using a scan tool;
determine necessary action. 2.B.4
   B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle. 2.C.2
   C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces,
bores, springs, valves, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls,
screens, spacers, and gaskets). 2.C.3
   D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs,
and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.4
   E. Assemble transmission/transaxle. 2.C.5
   F. Inspect converter flex (drive) plate, converter attaching bolts,
converter pilot, converter pump drive surfaces, converter end play, and
crankshaft pilot bore. 2.C.7
   G. Install and seat torque converter to engage drive/splines. 2.C.8
   H. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.
2.C.9
   I. Measure transmission/transaxle end play or preload; determine
necessary action. 2.C.10
   J. Inspect, measure, and replace thrust washers and bearings. 2.C.11
   K. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves,
and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.
2.C.12
   L. Inspect bushings; determine necessary action. 2.C.13
   M. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine
necessary action. 2.C.14
   N. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces;
determine necessary action. 2.C.15
   O. Inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings,
and bushings; perform necessary action. 2.C.16
   P. Inspect, measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive
components. 2.C.17
   Q. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls springs, retainers, seals,
and friction and pressure plates; determine necessary action. 2.C.18
   R. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine necessary action. 2.C.19
   S. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies. 2.C.20 
   T. Inspect roller and sprag clutch, races, rollers, sprags, springs,
cages, and retainers; determine necessary action. 2.C.21
   U. Inspect bands and drums; determine necessary action. 2.C.22

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/ Lab Assignments  30-60% of grade 
Tests and quizzes   20-50% of grade 
Attendance, attitude and work habits 10-20% of grade 
TOTAL   100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated. 

Grading scale:               A = 90-100%         
                             B = 80- 89%           
                             C = 70- 79%           
                             D = 60- 69%           
                             F = Below 60%

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 271

  • Title: Automotive Technology Internship*
  • Number: AUTO 271
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval required

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 1 hr. lecture, 15 hrs. work min./wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe work activities which have been accomplished on the jo B.
  2. Prepare a resume.
  3. Complete a job application.
  4. Identify the steps in the job search process.
  5. List sources of job opportunities using local newspapers, job postings, and other available media.
  6. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training position.
  7. Keep accurate records of hours worked, job activities, and salary earned.
  8. Utilize classroom/lab knowledge to the work situation.
  9. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment and work.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to work with immediate supervisor, customers (if applicable), and fellow employees.
  11. Apply technical and human relations skills to the employment setting.
  12. Identify the major components of a job interview.
  13. Demonstrate proper conduct during a job interview.
  14. Identify ways to deal with termination of employment.
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of industrial applications and procedures that may have not encountered in other course work.
  16. Describe components of organizational structure including: labor relations, work standards, quality and production control, and work flow patterns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Internship
   A. Interpret program requirements.
   B. Complete the required forms from the handbook.
   C. Discuss the procedures set forth by the Career Program Facilitator.

II. The Job Search Process
   A. Find three sources of job information.
   B. Identify three job postings in your career program field.

III. Obtaining Employment
   A. Write a letter of inquiry.
   B. Write a resume.
   C. Complete a job application.
   D. Describe a job interview.

IV. Employer/Employee Relationships
   A. Define labor relations.
   B. Explain human relations.
   C. Write examples of conflict and resolution.

V. Employee Growth and Development
   A. Define employment advancement.
   B. Examine personal assessment of your job performance.
   C. Depict management opportunities in your career area.

VI. Leadership in the Work Place
   A. Describe qualities of leadership.
   B. Define fellowship.

VII. Dealing with Termination
   A. Define termination with cause.
   B. Define termination without cause.
   C. Describe how to deal with employment termination.

 VIII. The Structure of Business and Industry
   A. Explain organizational theory.
   B. Describe work flow patterns.

IX. Conclusion 
   A. Summarize your employer evaluation.
   B. Write a self evaluation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Employer work assignments: This includes working not less than 15
hours per week for the semester, report to work regularly and adhere to
the employer’s work rules and standards; notify the Career Program
Facilitator immediately on any changes in employment status - 50% of grade


Classroom assignments, turned in on time and complete.
The assignments will be graded on content, spelling and punctuation - 30%
of grade
 
Employer Evaluations (2), turned in on time and complete - 5% of grade

Student self-evaluation, turned in on time and complete - 5% of grade
 
Attend all assigned Internship meetings with the Facilitator - 10% of
grade
 
TOTAL = 100%

Caveats:

  1. A minimum average of 15 hours per week on-the-job training is required. Students are expected to keep the instructor informed about progress and any job changes.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

AUTO 291

No information found.