Early Childhood Education Certificate

This certificate is for students seeking employment in early childhood care and education programs and for current early childhood care and education teachers/administrators who want to upgrade their skills and increase their knowledge in this area of study. The program does not need to be completed in one year.

Students must be first aid/CPR certified to receive the early childhood education certificate. The first aid/CPR certification may be obtained through your center; you may also enroll in HPER 200 First Aid/CPR at JCCC. Students must meet the requirements for employment in early childhood care and education centers in Kansas (stated in the Kansas Licensing Regulations for Preschool and Child Care Centers).

This program requires a professional liability insurance fee. Students will be notified via their JCCC student e-mail account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. The dollar amount for fees is subject to change.

Suggested/Sample Course Sequence

The sequence taken by the student may vary depending on prerequisites, course availability, and personal/ professional responsibilities.

(Major Code 6600; State CIP Code 19.0708)

First Semester

EDUC 130Foundations of Early Childhood Education*3
EDUC 131Early Childhood Curriculum I*3
EDUC 270Early Childhood Development*3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
SPD 120Interpersonal Communication3
or SPD 121 Public Speaking
Total Hours15

Summer Semester

EDUC 210Creative Experiences for Young Children*3
Total Hours3

Second Semester

EDUC 231Early Childhood Curriculum II*3
EDUC 250Child Health, Safety and Nutrition*3
MATH 120Business Mathematics*3
EDUC 235Parenting*2
EDUC 283Professional Competencies: Early Childhood Education*1
Plus One of the Following EDUC Courses Below:3
Concepts in Early Childhood Education*
School-Age Programs and Curriculum I*
Administration of Early Childhood Program*
Young Children with Special Needs*
Infant and Toddler Education and Care*
Total Hours15

Total Program Hours: 33

Courses

EDUC 121   Introduction to Teaching (3 Hours)

Note: For possible future elementary/secondary educators Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Teaching concepts and practices as they apply to today's elementary and secondary schools will be introduced. Topics will include the roles and responsibilities of the teacher, various modes of instruction, specialized areas in teaching, and professional requirements and concerns. Twenty hours of observation in a school setting are required. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 130   Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This introductory survey course is designed to provide students with current information on topics relevant to employment in early childhood programs. The course explores the historical and philosophical roots of early childhood education, general principles in child development, the teacher's role, values and ethics in early childhood education, curriculum design, and classroom management. Twenty hours of observation in a group childcare setting are required. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 131   Early Childhood Curriculum I (3 Hours)

Prerequisite or corequisite: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C orhigher

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents or others who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for young children. The focus of the course is curriculum areas that deal with language and physical development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 210   Creative Experiences for Young Children (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher and one of the following: PSYC 215 or PSYC 218 or EDUC 270

This course is a study of constructing and maintaining an environment for young children that fosters aesthetic sensitivity and creativity. The course includes the young child's developmental stages in art, music, movement, language, and creative and dramatic play; methods and materials that nourish developmentally appropriate creative experiences and support an inclusive, anti-bias curriculum; integration of creative experiences in the whole curriculum; the use of technology; and helping families understand the creative experience. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 215   Young Children with Special Needs (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is a study of creating and maintaining a developmentally appropriate inclusive environment for young children with special needs. The course includes the history of education and care for young children with special needs, federal and state legislation, types of differing abilities, developmental stages and capabilities of all young children, an inclusive approach to early education, and curriculum development for young children with special needs. Health, safety and nutrition; screening and assessment; interaction techniques; the role of the educator specific to the child's special needs; partnering with the family, other disciplines and community; and advocating for children are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

EDUC 220   Survey of the Exceptional Child (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is an overview of the field of special education geared to those who are preparing to work with students with special needs. The course provides fundamental information on the identification and exceptionality, laws and legal cases affecting the delivery of services to individuals with exceptionalities and the principles of effective educational approaches for each exceptionality. Categories of exceptionality presented include learning disabilities, mental retardation, behavior disorders, gifted and talented, communication disorders, autism, traumatic brain injury, physical disabilities, sensory impairments, other health impairments and multiple and severe disabilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 225   Infant and Toddler Education and Care (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher

This course is a study of creating and maintaining a developmentally appropriate environment for infants and toddlers. The course will include the history of education and care, theories of child development, developmental stages and capabilities of the very young child, and curriculum development for infants and toddlers. Health, safety and nutrition; assessment; interaction techniques; the role of the educator specific to the needs of the infant and toddler; partnering with family and community; and advocating for the very young are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

EDUC 231   Early Childhood Curriculum II (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 131

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents or others who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for young children. The focus of the course is on curriculum areas that deal with the physical and social aspects of the world. Included in this inquiry curriculum are mathematics, science, social studies and nutrition. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 235   Parenting (2 Hours)

Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 215 or PSYC 218 or EDUC 270

This course is a study of effective parenting. The course is designed for teachers of young children and parents and guardians who desire to provide an environment that reflects sensitivity to the unique needs of the individual child and family. Topics covered during the course are the history of child-rearing methods, an overview of child development, types of families, parent/guardian fears and concerns, purposes of child behavior, and effective communication techniques. Problem prevention and resolution, nurturing self-esteem in children and building effective, collaborative relationships between teachers and families are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 240   School-Age Programs and Curriculum I (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents and caregivers who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for school age children. The focus of the course is on curriculum areas for the school-aged child and extended day and summer programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 243   Issues and Skills for Paraeducators (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Students will explore the issues, skills and challenges specific to working as a paraeducator. In particular, students will be introduced to the issues relating to the inclusion of students with special needs into the mainstream educational environment. Students will review and practice those skills necessary to being an effective member of an instructional team, including collaboration, problem solving, decision making, team building and parent outreach. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 245   School-Age Programs and Curriculum II (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 240

The student will study the creation and maintenance of a developmentally appropriate environment for school-age children in extended school day and summer programs. The student will acquire the skills and characteristics of effective educators. The student will explore types of programs and how to plan, implement and evaluate these programs. Also, staff supervision and development, record keeping, relevant state regulations and laws will be discussed. Collaboration with family and community, public relations and contributing to the profession will be studied. The lab will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 1 hrs. lab/wk.

EDUC 246   Multicultural Issues in Education (2 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

In this course students will explore the changing demographics of students in public schools. The course will also explore the ways in which a student's culture can affect the student's learning style, communication skill and behavior. The course will also describe strategies that take into account cultural differences, values and child-rearing practices when educators seek to create a safe and accepting environment for all students. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 250   Child Health, Safety and Nutrition (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is a study of the basic health, nutrition and safety management practices for young children. Information on establishing and maintaining a physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environment appropriate for the needs of young children will be included. The interrelation of health, safety and nutrition is stressed, with emphasis on appraisal procedures, prevention and protection, services and educational experiences for young children and their families. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 260   Observing and Interacting with Young Children (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher and Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 215 or PSYC 218 or EDUC 270

This course is a study of the role of observation to assess and monitor the development and learning of children, birth through age 8, and the appropriate techniques for interacting with young children, considering their individual differences. Included will be the purposes and types of observation procedures, interpretation and use of findings, reporting techniques, and legal and ethical responsibilities. Expected age-related child behavior, fundamental principles of and theoretical approaches to child guidance, guidance techniques, working with families, and issues of diversity are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

EDUC 270   Early Childhood Development (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is a comprehensive account of human development from conception though age 8. The course integrates genetic, biological, physical and social influences with psychological processes affecting the development of young children. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 280   Administration of Early Childhood Program (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: or Corequisite: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is a study of the organization and administration of early childhood programs. The topics include the skills and characteristics of effective administrators; types of programs; planning, implementing and evaluating programs; policy development; staff supervision and development; finances and budget; record keeping; relevant state regulations and laws; developing, equipping and maintaining a facility; organizing a developmentally appropriate environment; collaboration with family and community; public relations; and contributing to the profession. The lab will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

EDUC 283   Professional Competencies: Early Childhood Education (1 Hour)

Prerequisite: Department approval

This course focuses on the conduct and responsibilities of the early childhood professional. Topics include early childhood education codes, laws and regulations; child development; experience planning and curriculum development; observation and guidance of young children; authentic assessment; responsibilities to the young child's family, to the community, and to the teaching profession; employability skills; self-assessment; and job seeking skills. Completion of this course is required to obtain the One Year Post-Secondary Certificate in Early Childhood Education. 1hr. lecture/wk.

EDUC 284   Seminar: Early Childhood Education (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: Department approval and Corequisite: EDUC 285

The course will focus on conduct and responsibilities of the intern; early childhood codes, laws and regulations; child development; activity planning and curriculum development; observation and guidance of young children; authentic assessment; responsibilities to the young child's family and community and to the teaching profession; employability skills; self- assessment; and job-seeking skills. The student's practical application of information in the internship will be discussed, and a portfolio will be developed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 285   Student Teaching: Early Childhood Education (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher, EDUC 250 with a grade of "C" or higher and EDUC 260 with a grade of "C" or higher.

This supervised field experience in early childhood education is designed for students to apply their knowledge of teaching young children. The student will be participating in curriculum design and presentation; observing and interacting with young children; providing for the health, safety and nutrition of young children; managing the program setting; and working with families and the community. A self-assessment and a professional development plan are completed. The student will spend 20 hours a week (320 clock hours total) in at least two different early childhood settings, serving children of two different ages. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee.

EDUC 290   Leadership in Early Childhood Education (3 Hours)

Prerequisite: Program Facilitator Approval

The student will study how early childhood education program directors lead programs and create quality environments for children, families and staff. The leadership topics include: leadership styles; developing mission statements, program philosophies, procedures, manuals and handbooks; assessing and planning for program improvements; recruiting and retaining qualified early childhood teachers; creating professional growth opportunities; developing effective staff meetings; implementing a shared decision making process; utilizing conflict resolution strategies; and developing partnerships with families and community agencies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EDUC 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

EDUC 121

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching*
  • Number: EDUC 121
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Teaching concepts and practices as they apply to today's elementary and secondary schools will be introduced. Topics will include the roles and responsibilities of the teacher, various modes of instruction, specialized areas in teaching, and professional requirements and concerns. Twenty hours of observation in a school setting are required. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Reflect upon and personalize motivations for becoming a teacher and focus on expectations of and for teachers.
  2. Explore the purposes for schools and list the characteristics of those identified as being effective.
  3. Attain an awareness of the wide-range of students having multi-faceted needs within the elementary and secondary school and analyze possible ways to respond to those needs.
  4. Examine the qualities, skills and behaviors of effective teachers, gather specific strategies for developing those for oneself and apply several within demonstration activities.
  5. Observe teachers in action within the school setting and identify, in action, the qualities, skills and behaviors that promote greater learning for students.
  6. Discover practical ways to implement technology as a teaching tool and identify steps to achieve the skills necessary to utilize these tools.
  7. Investigate present day curriculums, approaches to teaching and strategies for learning, and the use of assessment as a teaching tool.
  8. Outline the ways public schools are governed, financed and influenced by the people they serve.
  9. Evaluate major educational philosophies and develop a beginning personal philosophy of education.
  10. Summarize major historical educational contributions of the past and assess effects of these contributions on present day teaching/learning.
  11. Discuss ethical and legal issues confronting educators.
  12. Study present and possible future reforms and controversial issues surrounding education today and weigh the values of each.
  13. Assess career choices and professional organizations and determine how to proceed if a choice fits with the student's personal goals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Beginning Steps to Teaching
   A. Teaching, a "thought-through" choice.
      1. Discuss motives for and against teaching.
      2. Examine realistic expectations of teaching and those of the
public for teachers.
   B. Procedures for observations
      1. Determine guidelines and expectations for observation
experiences.

II. Purpose and Characteristics of Schools
      A. Differentiate between education and schooling.
      B. Explain the purposes for schools.
      C. Identify and list the characteristics of effective schools.

III. Students, the Focus of Schools
   A. Needs of students
      1. Recognize the needs of all students and those affected by a
variety of social problems.
      2. Identify the historical and present-day programs developed for
special needs students: those with cultural/bilingual needs,
academic/emotional needs, physically disabled/gifted needs.
   B. Teacher responses to needs
      1. Describe teacher behaviors that respond to all students' needs.
      2. Explain how the use of multiple intelligences and the use of a
variety of learning styles expands student learning.
      3. Develop possible teacher options for responding to a classroom of
students with differing experiences and needs.

IV. The Teacher, the Means to Student Success
   A. Qualities of effective teachers
      1. Define the areas of teacher competence.
      2. Analyze attitudes needed for teaching and ascertain how well
there is a fit.
      3. Become aware that attitudes affect teacher decisions and that
reflective teaching is essential.
      4. Recognize that teacher expectations influence student learning
and behavior.
   B. Skills and behaviors needed to achieve learning
      1. List and describe effective teaching skills and behaviors.
      2. Analyze the relationship between effective skills and effective
behaviors.
      3. Explore several successful teaching strategies.
      4. Recognize the importance of utilizing questioning skills.
      5. Describe and write different levels of questions.
      6. Identify the major elements of a well-planned lesson.
      7. Design and present a lesson utilizing knowledge and skills
learned.
   C. Behavior management, a skill all its own
      1. Define behavior management and recognize discipline approaches as
a part of this management.
      2. List and explain specific teacher behaviors that increase chances
for an organized and safe learning environment.
      3. Identify individuals who created major behavior management
approaches.
      4. Distinguish between and evaluate present day classroom management
approaches.
      5. Formulate a beginning plan for classroom management.

V. Technology as a Tool
   A. Recognize the historical contributions of technology to education.
   B. List and explain uses of computers in teaching and learning.
   C. Discuss the responsibilities of the teacher in the use of
technology.
   D. Identify ways to prepare for the effective use of computers in
teaching.

VI. What Is Taught
   A. The curriculum
      1. Define "curriculum" and trace major impacts upon it during the
last 40+ years.
      2. Recognize and discuss important present day influences on what
children learn.
   B. Instructional Approaches
      1. Explore the value of several effective instructional approaches
such as cooperative learning, etc.
      2. Create an integrative lesson plan to be built around a specific
subject and objective.
   C. Assessments
      1. Determine the relationship of effective assessment to learning.

VII. The Governing and Financing of Schools
   A. School government
      1. Outline the organizations governing public education.
      2. Identify and discuss the laws, organizations and learning
outcomes that influence the governing of schools.
   B. School finance
      1. Identify the sources of financial support of schools.
      2. Ascertain equity difficulties in determining sources of revenue.

VIII. Philosophy of Education
   A. Explore the major educational philosophies.
   B. Analyze points within these philosophies that coincide with the
potential educator's beliefs.
   C. Write a beginning personal educational philosophy.

IX. History of Education
   A. Trace the history of American elementary and secondary education
from colonial times to the present.
   B. Identify world historical figures whose beliefs influenced
education.
   C. Determine impact of historical happenings upon African-Americans,
Native Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Asian-Americans.

X. Ethical and Legal Issues
   A. Ethics in education
      1. Differentiate between ethical and legal issues.
      2. Identify ethical concepts and everyday ethical behaviors for
educators.
   B. Legal issues
      1. Become aware of a variety of legal issues that directly deal with
practical aspects surrounding a career in education.
      2. Ascertain major legal issues focusing on students.

XI. Reforms and Controversial Issues
   A. Identify and evaluate reform efforts.
   B. Debate controversial topics pressuring education.

XII. Career Choices and Future Steps
   A. Assess career choices in the education field.
   B. Identify major professional educational associations and describe
their purpose.
   C. List the next steps to be taken to pursue a career as a
teacher/educator.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading each of the three areas below by percentages directly or by
cumulative points that are converted to percentages.

   1. Participation in sharing/activity class sessions.
   2. Satisfactory completion of observations.
   3. Satisfactory completion of projects/activities/exams.

Grading scale:
      90 - 100%   = A
      80 -  89%   = B
      70 -  79%   = C
      60 -  69%   = D
      Below 60%   = F

Caveats:

  1. Ten weeks of two-hour observations completed during specific weeks listed.
  2. Students will need to arrange transportation to and from observation site areas for the required 20 hours. (Travel time is not counted as part of the observation sessions.)
  3. No observations can be completed within a relative's classroom or in the classroom of a student's previous teacher.
  4. If area of interest is in such areas as PE/MS/SP Ed/ESL/etc.: Ten hours may be completed within those areas, and Ten hours need be completed within a regular classroom setting.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 130

  • Title: Foundations of Early Childhood Education*
  • Number: EDUC 130
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This introductory survey course is designed to provide students with current information on topics relevant to employment in early childhood programs. The course explores the historical and philosophical roots of early childhood education, general principles in child development, the teacher's role, values and ethics in early childhood education, curriculum design, and classroom management. Twenty hours of observation in a group childcare setting are required. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Objectives


  1. Examine the historical and philosophical roots of present day early childhood programs in the United States.
  2. Analyze the different types of early childhood education theories and practices.
  3. Develop a personal philosophy of early childhood education according to appropriate developmental principles.
  4. Assess the various influences in an early childhood education setting that affect the child's growth and development.
  5. Evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum design and content.
  6. Apply the information acquired to a practical setting and gain some insight into the responsibilities of a care giver in an early childhood setting.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Foundations of Early Childhood Education
   A. Describe historical roots of early childhood education, including:
      1. The move from philosophy to practice
      2. European roots (e.g., Rousseau)
      3. Early American roots (e.g., Peabody)
      4. The Depression
      5. World War II
      6. The War on Poverty
   B. Identify policy makers and policies that affect early childhood
education programs including:
      1. Head Start and economically deprived children
      2. The women's movement and affordable child care
      3. Public laws and programs for children with special needs
      4. Child care policy in the 1980s and 1990s
         a. State
         b. National
   C. Current trends in the profession
      1.  Describe all of the types of child care.
      2.  Discuss parent involvement programs.
      3.  List national and state associations.
      4.  Identify predictions for the future.
   D. Research findings
      1. Discuss outcomes of early childhood education experiences (e.g.,
Head Start).
   E. Training and certification
      1.  Explain Kansas regulations.
      2.  Describe the Child Development Associate Program (1970).

II. The Participants in the Early Childhood School
   A. The early childhood education teacher as a professional
      1. Discuss how the teacher's personality, temperament and biases
affect teaching style.
      2. Identify some ways and means for developing a healthy, positive
outlook.
      3. Describe teacher burnout.
      4. Describe how teacher values and professional decisions affect the
classroom environment.
      5. Describe professional ethics in early childhood education and
standards of behavior.
   B. The child in the early childhood school
      1. Discuss the historical view of children from the 17th century to
the present.
      2. Describe the theoretical approaches to child development
(psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral).
      3. Describe infant development and explain the effects of early
experiences (critical periods, stimuli preferences, enriched environment,
brain development).
      4. Outline the development of attachment, independence and the
self.
      5. Define the socialization process and identify the social agents.
      6. Describe the changing structure of the family.
      7. Identify the special needs of children with disabilities.
      8. Discuss child abuse and neglect (identification, causes, types
and the effect on the children).

III. Establishing a Physically and Psychologically Safe Environment
   A. The physical environment
      1. Describe appropriate arrangement of indoor and outdoor spaces.
      2. Explain how to develop safety checklists, plans and policies.
      3. Identify health problems and epidemics in young children.
      4. Explain how to select equipment and materials in the early
childhood program.
      5. Describe how to aesthetically enhance the environment.
   B. Classroom management
      1. Theoretical approaches (humanistic, democratic, behaviorist.
      2. Selecting management strategies (supporting developmental goals
and your own personal philosophy).
      3. Developing rules and routines.   
      4. Prevention, consequences and positive communication.

IV. Curriculum Development
   A. The developmentally appropriate curriculum
      1. Describe how children learn.
      2. Developing activity plans to meet the child's specific
developmental needs.
      3. Writing behavioral objectives.
      4. Evaluating plans.
      5. The value of play.
      6. The use of computers in early childhood education.
   B. Describe the elements of planning the physical development
curriculum including:
      1. Knowledge of the developmental sequences in fine and gross motor
skills.
      2. Knowledge of locomotor skills (moving from place to place).
      3. Knowledge of non-locomotor skills (moving body parts with the
child stationary).
      4. Knowledge of projection and reception skills (propelling and
catching objects).
      5. Knowledge of sensory development.
      6. Knowledge of proper equipment, space and support.
   C. Describe the elements of planning the creative curriculum
including:
      1. Defining creativity.
      2. Knowledge of developmental stages in children's art, music,
movement and drama.
      3. Knowledge of developmental tasks fostered through creative
activities (perceptual motor, social and emotional).
      4. Classroom space, materials and equipment.
   D. Describe the elements of planning for language and literacy
development including:
      1. Knowledge of the sequence and goals for language development.
      2. How to foster language development (listening and speaking).
      3. Identifying and dealing with language problems.
      4. English as a second language.
   E. Describe the framework for planning an active and stimulating
inquiry curriculum including:
      1. The math curriculum
      2. The science curriculum
      3. The social studies curriculum
      4. The nutrition curriculum

V. Children With Special Needs
   A. The child
      1. Describe how to identify the child with special needs.
      2. List the characteristics of the higher instance disabilities
(e.g., learning disabilities, hearing impairment).
      3. Describe PL94-142 and individual educational plans (includes
children three years and older).
      4. Discuss how to find community resources to provide support .
      5. Discuss how to consult with other child professionals.
   B. Modifying the child's activities
      1. Describe the benefits of letting the child be the teacher.
      2. Explain the time and special equipment needs of children with
disabilities.
      3. Identify available resources to provide guidance to the early
childhood educator.
   C. Working with families
      1. Describe methods for maintaining clear and positive two-way
communication with families.
      2. Understand the parents grieving process.
      3. Explain the rules of confidentiality when working with families.

VI. The World's Children
   A. Multicultural understanding
      1. Discuss the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1959).
      2. Describe child growth and development across cultures.
      3. Describe early childhood education around the world (Asia,
Africa, Latin America, Canada, Soviet Union, Israel).
      4. Identify the world leaders of tomorrow.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four Tests                                50% of grade

Five Guided Observation Reports:
(One is to be completed after every 
four hours in the observation setting.)   30%  of grade

Other                                     20% of grade
                                         100%

A grade of “C” or better is required for satisfactory completion of this course.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 131

  • Title: Early Childhood Curriculum I*
  • Number: EDUC 131
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Transfer
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C orhigher

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents or others who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for young children. The focus of the course is curriculum areas that deal with language and physical development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the ways children learn.
  2. Prepare developmentally appropriate lessons plans.
  3. Describe the stages of language development and language difficulties in young children.
  4. Identify the components of communications skills in an early childhood language arts program.
  5. Describe the goals of a language arts program in early childhood education.
  6. Build a language-rich environment for young children.
  7. Identify the goals for a literature program in early childhood education.
  8. List the criteria for selecting young children's books.
  9. Describe how to prepare to tell a story.
  10. Discuss the value of storytelling, poetry, puppetry, drama and field trips.
  11. Describe the development of young children's written language and offer appropriate opportunities to foster this method of communication.
  12. Identify the sequence of individual differences in the physical development of young children.
  13. Describe classical and dynamic theories of play.
  14. Discuss stages in play development.
  15. Describe safety guidelines for organizing a room, for designing an outdoor play area, and for choosing materials for young children.
  16. Develop activities and choose materials and toys to foster small and large muscle development in young children.
  17. Design an outdoor play area.
  18. Design a week's plan for young children that includes the language and motor areas of development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Curriculum Development
   A. Ways children learn
      1. Design multi-faceted learning experiences.
      2. Describe how children learn through play.
      3. Describe how children learn through interactions with teachers.
      4. Plan and conduct one-to-one experiences with children.
      5. Plan and conduct small group experiences.
      6. Plan and conduct large group experiences.
   B. Curriculum planning (including references to a variety of
curriculum-models)
      1. Explain the purpose of the program--goals and objectives.
      2. Describe assumptions about the learner.
      3. Discuss the use of themes as framework.
      4. Describe the planning process -- observe interests, abilities and
concerns, formulate learning objectives, plan and implement activities.
      5. Design long range plans.
      6. Design weekly plans.
      7. Design lessons plans -- activity information, rationale,
objectives, space and materials needed, procedure and assessment.
      8. Write behavioral objectives.
      9. Evaluate plans.

II. Overview of Language, Literacy, and Literature
   A. Development
      1. Outline predictable sequences.
      2. Identify critical periods.
      3. Describe the teacher's role
      4. Identify the child's needs.
   B. Language and literacy
      1. Define theories -- Chomsky, Vygotsky.
      2. Describe the stages of development.
      3. Identify games-from peek-a-boo to picture books to literacy.
      4. Explain the early use of symbols.
      5. Discuss the value of pretending, invented spelling.
   C. Literature
      1. Explain the use of books with children.

III. Oral Language
   A.  Describe the following types of language:
      1. Informative - used to share facts and opinions with others.
      2. Descriptive - used to describe experience - running commentary,
expansion and modeling
      3. Reasoning - cause and effect, if...then, problem solving
      4. Language of imagination and recall
      5. Language play--nonsense words, rhymes, chants, jokes, tongue
twisters
   B. Language and culture
      1. Describe dialects.
      2. Describe language as an expression of a particular culture's
unique perceptions of the world.
      3. Define bilingualism.
      4. Describe speech appropriate to the setting.
   C. Building language-rich environments
      1. Design small group activities.
      2. Describe the value of the "buzz" of communication.
      3. Discuss the avoidance of teacher monologues and engaging in
dialogues.
      4. Describe how to follow the child's lead -- support/encourage.
      5. Define and explain the value of open-ended questions.
      6. Explain how dramatic play, books, puppets, games, flannel boards,
and trips support language and literacy development.
      7. Design daily routines and activities.
      8. Explain the use of classroom volunteers, storytellers.

IV. Literacy
   A. Reading readiness
      1. Describe reading as a positive experience -- physical closeness,
individual attention, responsive adults.
      2. Explain how the use of illustrations, repetition, alphabet toys
and books, picture stories and memory games is valuable.
      3. Describe the value of signs and symbols in the classroom.
      4. Describe techniques for reading to children.
      5. Define kindergarten readiness.
   B. Writing
      1. Describe stages from scribbles to letters to words.
      2. Identify graphic forms in and outside the classroom.
      3. Discuss the use of art and writing materials.
      4. Define and explain the value of dictated stories.
      5. Explain social uses of writing -- invitations, thank you notes.
      6. Describe skills needed for kindergarten readiness.
   C. Describe adults as models in the following examples:
      1. Reading instructions
      2. Notes home
      3. Adult reading during quiet time
      4. Sharing time

V. Literature
   A. Qualities of good literature
      1. Explain how to select nonsexist materials.
      2. Identify books that represent diverse ethnicities, lifestyles,
cultures, races, ages and activities.
      3. Content and structure
         a. Explain how to determine age appropriateness.
         b. Describe the relationship to vocabulary development.
         c. Describe the sequencing of words, actions, and story.
         d. Describe the value of illustrations.
         e. Explain the value of role models and resolutions.
   B. Types
      1. Fiction
         a. Describe how fiction illustrates life, enchants children,
instills a love of literature, entertains and evokes feelings.
         b. Explain how fiction can be fanciful or realistic.
      2. Information books
         a. Describe the value of factually accurate and well-illustrated
books.
      3. Mood or concept books
         a. Identify books that sensitize children to ideas and feelings.
         b. Identify wordless books.
         c. Identify books that introduce color, shapes, numbers,
letters.
   C. Poetry
      1. Produce examples of rhyming poetry.
      2. Describe Haiku poetry and write some examples.
   D. Integration into the classroom
      1. Describe the value of recorded stories.
      2. Explain how to include creative drama and movement.
      3. Explain the value of field trips.
      4. Identify individual and group activities.
      5. Describe the value of libraries in the classroom.
      6. Explain where to obtain children's books (resources).

VI. Overview of the Physical Development Curriculum
   A. Development
      1. Explain predictable sequences.
      2. Identify critical periods.
      3. Describe the teacher's role.
      4. Identify the child's needs.
      5. Describe appropriate environments and freedom of choice.
   B. The sensory curriculum
      1. Describe the involvement of the senses in development.
      2. Explain how learning depends on sensory input.
      3. Explain how to support the development of kinesthetic sense.
      4. Explain how to support the development of auditory sense.
      5. Explain how to support the development of tactile sense.
      6. Explain how to support the development of visual sense.
      7. Explain how to support the development of gustatory sense.
      8. Explain how to support the development of olfactory sense.
      9. Describe materials and activities that support sensory
development (walks, cooking).
     10. Describe everyday activities and common objects that support
sensory development.
     11. Explain how to encourage sensory exploration and involvement.
   C. The small muscle curriculum
      1. Explain how to support the development of control.
         a. Visually guided reaching, force, direction and speed of
movement
      2. Explain how to support the development of agility.
         a. Moving in precise and intentional ways at the desired speed
      3. Explain how to support the development of strength.
         a. Stamina and force available to apply to and sustain movement
      4. Explain how to support the development of coordination.
         a. Control the interrelationship of hands, fingers and other body
parts, eye-hand coordination
      5. Identify necessary equipment, materials and activities --
construction and manipulative toys, self-help activities, instruments,
finger plays, art activities.
   D. The large muscle curriculum
      1. Explain the support kinesthetic development -- balance, position
in space, control of physical movements.
      2. Explain how to support the development of flexibility -- ease and
range of movement.
      3. Explain how to support the development of coordination - move
different body parts together in relation to one another.
      4. Explain how to support the development of agility - move with
grace, speed and precision.
      5. Identify directed movement activities.
      6. Discuss the value of unstructured play time (playgrounds and
equipment).
      7. Describe creative movement opportunities.
      8. Explain how to incorporate woodworking tables.
      9. Explain the use of circle games.
     10. Explain the value of group games, trips to parks, pools.
     11. Describe the teacher as participant.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests                               30% of grade
Eight directed assignments (lesson plans) 50% of grade
Materials file                            20% of grade

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 210

  • Title: Creative Experiences for Young Children*
  • Number: EDUC 210
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher and one of the following: PSYC 215 or PSYC 218 or EDUC 270

This course is a study of constructing and maintaining an environment for young children that fosters aesthetic sensitivity and creativity. The course includes the young child's developmental stages in art, music, movement, language, and creative and dramatic play; methods and materials that nourish developmentally appropriate creative experiences and support an inclusive, anti-bias curriculum; integration of creative experiences in the whole curriculum; the use of technology; and helping families understand the creative experience. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Enhance the environment to promote aesthetic experience.
  2. Choose materials that have good aesthetic potential.
  3. Develop activities to help children cultivate their aesthetic sensitivity.
  4. Discuss the forms of creative experience, elements, and method for integration across the curriculum.
  5. List the developmental stages in the creative domains.
  6. Describe the characteristics of the creative experience.
  7. Discuss the benefits of a creative environment for the child's cognitive, emotional and social development.
  8. Present methods adults can utilize to encourage creative thinking.
  9. Describe ways to help children express creativity.
  10. Present conditions in the environment that stimulate creative behavior.
  11. Explain the teacher's role as facilitator of children's creative experiences.
  12. Consider the child's developmental level, individual creative style, attention span, social and emotional needs, and context when designing creative experiences.
  13. Discuss the main considerations in devising activity/interest centers.
  14. Describe an appropriate physical environment for creative experiences.
  15. Describe the use of outdoor space to support the creative curriculum.
  16. Use technology to promote creativity.
  17. Plan, present, and evaluate creative experiences.
  18. List sources of resources for creative experiences.
  19. Develop a program to educate families about the creative process.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Aesthetics and Creativity
   A. Aesthetics
      1. Define aesthetics.
      2. Describe the purposes of developing aesthetic sensitivity.
      3. Explain the importance of encouraging aesthetic sensitivity.
      4. Explain how aesthetics affects the quality of learning.
      5. Describe strategies for aesthetic enhancement of the
environment.
      6. Choose and use materials that have good aesthetic potential.
      7. Explain how aesthetics affects sensing, feeling and imagining.
      8. Describe typical aesthetic activities for young children.
   B. Creativity
      1. Define creativity and explain its importance.
      2. Explain how creativity affects thought processes, fostering
divergent thinking.
      3. Describe the relationship of creativity to aesthetics.
      4. Explain how to identify creativity in young children.
      5. Describe the characteristics of the creative experience.
      6. Describe individual creative styles and their importance.
      7. Outline the general developmental characteristics of young
children.
      8. Explain how creativity provides for the young child's
developmental characteristics.

II. The Participants
   A. The child
      1. Explain the importance of the child's needs, including physical,
social and emotional.
      2. Explain the role of attention span and cultural context in
designing instruction.
   B. The teacher
      1. Describe the effects of teacher attitudes on teaching and
learning
      2. Discuss the significance of self-evaluation.
      3. Describe the guidance skills used in teaching young children.
      4. Describe the teacher's role.
      5. Describe specific strategies for success.
      6. Explain how creative questioning helps children express
creativity.

III. The Creative Environment
   A. The physical facility
      1. Describe the general guidelines.
      2. Describe appropriate arrangements of space and equipment.
      3. Explain how selection of equipment affects creative experiences.
   B. Activity/interest centers
      1. List types of centers.
      2. Describe the placement of the center.
      3. Explain how center materials should be organized.
      4. Explain color coding and other time saving tips.
      5. List the criteria for selection of equipment for the center.
      6. List pitfalls to avoid.
   C. Technology
      1. Explain the purpose of utilizing technology
      2. Describe the hardware -- overhead projectors, tape recorders,
VCR's, cameras, computers, etc. -- and their uses.
      3. List the essential criteria for selection of hardware and
software.
      4. Describe the software -- films, tapes, disks, CD's, records, etc.
-- and their uses
      5. Differentiate between action and interaction.
      6. Differentiate between process versus product.
      7. Describe appropriate learning activities involving technology.
   D. The outdoor space
      1. Describe the selection and placement of equipment.
      2. Describe open spaces and their importance.
      3. Explain activities common to outdoor spaces.

IV. Creative Experiences
   A. Describe each of the steps in conducting a creative activity and
their importance including:
      1. Preparation
      2. Presentation
      3. Evaluation
      4. Exhibition
   B. Describe each of the elements of creative learning, the underlying
theory and developmental levels for the following:
      1. Art
      2. Music
      3. Movement
      4. Language
      5. Play
   C. The art experience
      1. Describe the place of art in early childhood education.
      2. Explain the meaning of art appreciation.
      3. List and describe the elements of art.
      4. List and describe types of art experiences including the
materials and methods for two- and three- dimensional activities.
      5. Explain the argument for freedom of expression -- process not
product, originality not conformity.
      6. Explain how art enhances social and emotional development.
      7. Explain how art enhances physical development.
      8. Explain how art enhances cognitive development.
      9. Explain the value of art across the curriculum.
     10. Discuss the use of art from different cultures and ethnic
groups.
     11. List safety considerations.
     12. Explain how to organize and store supplies.
     13. Plan, implement and evaluate an art experience.
   D. The music experience
      1. Explain the goals for young children's music experiences.
      2. Define music appreciation.
      3. List the elements of music.
      4. Outline guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating
music activities.
      5. Define music concepts and terms.
      6. Describe the various activities of songs and singing --
composing, improvising, listening, performing.
      7. List and describe rhythm instruments.
      8. Demonstrate using movement, gestures, and props.
      9. Explain the value of music from different cultures and ethnic
groups.
     10. Discuss expression of emotion through music.
     11. Explain how music enhances the development of social skills.
     12. Explain the value of music across the curriculum.
     13. Plan, implement and evaluate a music experience.
   E. Creative movement
      1. Explain the goals of creative movement.
      2. List and describe the elements of movement.
      3. Outline guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating
movement activities.
      4. Explain safety issues.
      5. Explain how creative movement supports emotional and social
development.
      6. Explain how children's literature can motivate creative
movement.
      7. Explain how creative movement transitions to the next learning
activity.
      8. Explain the value of creative movement across the curriculum.
      9. Plan, implement and evaluate a creative movement experience.
   F. Creative language experiences
      1. List the typical speaking and listening skills of young
children.
      2. Define emerging literacy, and describe the factors affecting
readiness.
      3. Explain the benefits of sound and word play.
      4. Describe pre-writing skills and their role in shaping language.
      5. Describe the elements of story telling.
      6. Describe a variety of poetry experiences and their benefits.
      7. Describe the book corner and its operation.
      8. Design an active, stimulating and diverse linguistic environment
that encourages social interactions and language experimentation.
      9. Explain the importance of the inclusive, anti-bias curriculum --
incorporating culturally responsive experiences for all children.
     10. Explain how creative language experience enhances
bilingual/bicultural young children's language development.
     11. Explain the value of creative language experiences across the
curriculum.
   G. Creative and dramatic play
      1. Describe the characteristics and purpose of play.
      2. List types of play.
      3. Outline the sequence of play.
      4. Describe the stages and evaluation of play behavior.
      5. Describe how play enhances cognitive and language development.
      6. Explain how play enhances the development of a positive
self-concept.
      7. Discuss the effects of play on social growth.
      8. Describe the effects of play on physical development.
      9. Explain how play integrates all developmental dynamics.
     10. Explain the basic elements of dramatics and puppetry.
     11. Explain the use of make-believe and role playing in human
development.
     12. List special play equipment.
     13. Describe materials that encourage use of imagination.
     14. Explain concepts of the home center, describing typical materials
and equipment.
     15. Define the role of the teacher in creative and dramatic play.
     16. Explain the characteristics, dangers and remedies of play
involving violence and gender stereotyping.
     17. Explain the importance of teaching families the value of play.
     18. Plan, implement and evaluate a creative or dramatic play
experience.

V. Family Support
   A. Strategies
      1. Describe methods for presenting information to families about the
creative process.
      2. Explain strategies for involving families in creative
experiences.
      3. Describe how parents/guardians should communicate with their
children -- "Tell me about . . . ", not "What is it?"
      4. Describe strategies for informing families about creative
experiences available in the community.
      5. Explain how to provide an aesthetically pleasing school
environment for the children and their families.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three Tests                            30% of grade
One Interest Center                    15% of grade
One Creative Activity Lesson Plan and
Presentation for Each of Art, Music, 
Movement, Language, and Dramatic Play  30% of grade
Creative Activities File               15% of grade
Other                                  10% of grade

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 215

  • Title: Young Children with Special Needs*
  • Number: EDUC 215
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

This course is a study of creating and maintaining a developmentally appropriate inclusive environment for young children with special needs. The course includes the history of education and care for young children with special needs, federal and state legislation, types of differing abilities, developmental stages and capabilities of all young children, an inclusive approach to early education, and curriculum development for young children with special needs. Health, safety and nutrition; screening and assessment; interaction techniques; the role of the educator specific to the child's special needs; partnering with the family, other disciplines and community; and advocating for children are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Present the historical foundations of educare for young children with special needs.
  2. List and discuss the laws on behalf of young children with special needs.
  3. Describe typical growth and development.
  4. List and describe the causes and classifications of the major disabilities in young children.
  5. Describe the gifted young child.
  6. Define inclusion.
  7. List the benefits of inclusion for all children.
  8. Discuss the implications of inclusion for teachers.
  9. Describe the essential elements of an inclusion program.
  10. Design an inclusive indoor and outdoor physical environment for young children.
  11. Describe the developmental-behavioral approach to educare.
  12. Select appropriate strategies and assess young children with special needs.
  13. Utilize developmental profiles to guide curriculum development.
  14. Describe instructional strategies for young children with different abilities.
  15. Develop and implement a curriculum to nurture physical and motor skills development.
  16. Design and implement a curriculum to facilitate preacademic and cognitive learning.
  17. Design and implement a curriculum to facilitate speech, language, and communication development.
  18. Design and implement a curriculum to facilitate emotional and social growth.
  19. Match instructional aids with the unique abilities of young children.
  20. Facilitate self-care and independence skills in the child with special needs.
  21. Interact appropriately with children with problem behavior.
  22. Discuss the role of the early childhood teacher in the development of the IEP and IFSP.
  23. Develop policies for the health and safety of young children with special needs.
  24. Develop nutrition and feeding plans specific to the needs of the young child.
  25. Recognize and report suspected or known cases of abuse or neglect.
  26. Collaborate with colleagues and other disciplines as part of a transdisciplinary service delivery team.
  27. Identify the stressors and challenges unique to families with a child with a disability.
  28. Effectively communicate and work with families.
  29. Describe methods of providing support to the family.
  30. Identify and participate with community agencies involved in the educare of young children with disabilities.
  31. Advocate for young children with special needs and their families.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Historical and Policy Foundations
   A. History of education for children with special needs
      1. Discuss the early intervention movement.
   B. Public policy: Describe each of the following public laws:
      1. University Affiliated Facilities, 1963 (PL-88-164)
      2. Handicapped Children's Early Education Assistance Act, 1968 (PL
90-538)
      3. Head Start Amendments, 1972 (PL 92-424)
      4. Developmental Disabilities Act, 1973, 1992 (PL 93-112)
      5. Education for All Handicapped Children Act, 1975 (PL 94-142)
      6. Education of the Handicapped Amendments, 1986 (PL 99-457)
      7. Title I and Title II of PL 99-457
      8. Americans with Disabilities Act, 1990 (PL 101-336)
      9. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1990 (PL 101-476)
   C. Inclusion and case law
      1. Describe Sacramento Unified School District v. Holland (1992).
      2. Describe Oberti v. Board of Education of Clementon School
District (1993).
   D. Prevention and federal legislation
      1. Discuss childhood immunization.
      2. Describe early and periodic screening, diagnosis and treatment,
EPSDT (PL 90-248).
      3. Define WIC.
      4. Define Medicaid.
   E. Labeling and the young child
      1. Present arguments for diagnoses and labeling.
      2. Present arguments against diagnoses and labeling.

II. Early Childhood Growth and Development
   A. List and describe developmental stages and milestones including the
following domains:
      1. Physical
      2. Cognitive
      3. Speech and language
      4. Emotional
      5. Social
   B. Describe how the following factors affect a child's growth and
development:
      1. Genetics
      2. The prenatal environment
      3. Perinatal trauma
      4. Accidents and illness
      5. Nutrition
      6. Health status
      7. Cognitive and emotional stimulation
      8. Parent/guardian responsiveness
      9. Socioeconomic status
   C. Describe the following disabilities of young children including
classifications, causes, and descriptions:
      1. Specific learning disability
      2. Speech and/or language impairments
      3. Mental retardation
      4. Serious emotional disturbance
      5. Hearing impairments
      6. Visual impairments
      7. Orthopedic impairments
      8. Other health impairments
      9. Multiple disabilities
     10. Autism
     11. Deaf-blind
     12. Traumatic brain injury
   D. List the signs and types of assessment techniques for the major
developmental differences in young children for the following:
      1. Specific learning disability
      2. Speech and/or language impairments
      3. Mental retardation
      4. Serious emotional disturbance
      5. Hearing impairments
      6. Visual impairments
      7. Orthopedic impairments
      8. Other health impairments
      9. Multiple disabilities
     10. Autism
     11. Deaf-blind
     12. Traumatic brain injury
   E. Impact of the child's disability on development
      1. Describe the unique interactions with the physical environment.
      2. Describe the unique interactions with the human environment.
      3. Explain cumulative effects and speed of reaching major
milestones.
      4. Describe effects of a disability on other areas of development.
   F. Gifted and talented
      1. List signs and describe identification procedures.
      2. Describe the ability.
      3. Explain the effects when developmental disabilities are present.

III. The Child's Program
   A. Inclusion
      1. Define inclusion.
      2. Describe the essential elements for children from birth through 2
years of age.
      3. Describe the essential elements for children 3 through 5 years of
age.
      4. Describe the essential elements for children 6 through 8 years of
age.
      5. Explain how to monitor a child's progress.
      6. List the benefits of inclusion for all children.
   B. Planning and implementing the program
      1. Describe procedures used to identify the child's abilities and
needs.
      2. Describe using developmental profiles as guide.
      3. Describe the Developmental-Behavioral approach to education and
care.
      4. Explain how to develop goals and objectives.
      5. Outline how to identify and select effective instructional
methods and materials.
      6. Plan an IEP and IFSP.
      7. Describe how to evaluate the effectiveness of a program.
      8. Describe strategies to involve parents/guardians.
      9. Explain issues related to sensitivity to diversity.
     10. Explain why programs fail.
     11. Outline steps in planning and implementing transitions to other
programs.
   C. The developmental curriculum:  Describe how to design, implement,
and evaluate curriculum for the following:
      1. Physical development
      2. Preacademic and cognitive development
      3. Speech, language and communication development
      4. Emotional and social development

IV. The Learning  Environment
   A. The physical environment
      1. Describe the inclusive environment.
      2. List common environmental barriers for children with assisted
mobility.
      3. Describe required accommodations.
      4. Describe toilet facilities for young children with special
needs.
      5. List safety considerations of special furnishings and equipment.
      6. Describe how to match children and equipment.
      7. Identify materials that encourage engagement, play, social
interaction, and learning.
      8. Explain how to adapt material and equipment for children with
special needs.
      9. Describe environmental arrangements to encourage independence.
     10. Plan an accessible playground.
   B. The human environment
      1. Describe the preparation and role of the educator.
      2. Describe and implement appropriate interaction techniques.
      3. Construct preventive discipline plans.
      4. Design plans to modify problem behaviors.
      5. Outline identification and reporting procedures for known or
suspected abuse or neglect.
      6. Plan a process to successfully integrate the special educator
into the life of the young child.
   C. Health, safety, and nutrition
      1. Describe how to identify illness and injury in young children
with special needs.
      2. Explain first aid procedures.
      3. List ways to prevent injury.
      4. Describe prevention, control, and management of illness.
      5. Describe emergency preparedness and procedures identifying
special instruction for children with special needs.
      6. Describe nutrition and feeding plans specific to the special
needs of the child.
   D. Describe the importance of schedules and routines including the
following:
      1. Accommodating individual differences
      2. Varying activity levels
      3. Order and predictability
      4. Giving advance notice
      5. Smooth transitions

V. Working with Others
   A. Partnership with families
      1. Describe the various types of families.
      2. List the stressors and challenges of families with a child with
special needs.
      3. Explain the stages of family adjustment when a child with a
disability is born.
      4. Identify formal and informal communication procedures.
      5. Use APerson First@ language.
      6. Demonstrate cultural sensitivity of families.
      7. Plan a parent/guardian conference.
      8. Describe the procedures for a home visits.
      9. List sources of support and services to enable and empower
families.
     10. Identify the roles of participants in the development of IEPs and
IFSPs.
     11. Create a plan for family education.
     12. Advocate for and with families.
     13. List the local, state, and national professional and parent
organizations.
   B. The transdisciplinary child study team
      1. List the professionals involved and their roles.
      2. Describe the teacher's role.
   C. The community
      1. Identify local initiatives.
      2. Describe the role of social services.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests            30% of grade
      Three case studies     25% of grade 
      Lab                    35% of grade
      Other                  10% of grade
                            100%

Caveats:

  1. Current physical examination, TB test, and KBI background check are required.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 220

  • Title: Survey of the Exceptional Child*
  • Number: EDUC 220
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is an overview of the field of special education geared to those who are preparing to work with students with special needs. The course provides fundamental information on the identification and exceptionality, laws and legal cases affecting the delivery of services to individuals with exceptionalities and the principles of effective educational approaches for each exceptionality. Categories of exceptionality presented include learning disabilities, mental retardation, behavior disorders, gifted and talented, communication disorders, autism, traumatic brain injury, physical disabilities, sensory impairments, other health impairments and multiple and severe disabilities. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Trace the history of the treatment of individuals with exceptionalities and describe how the various perspectives have changed over time.
  2. Explain how interindividual and intraindividual differences are measured.
  3. Report on the recent trends in the prevalence of exceptionalities in the school-age population.
  4. List the federal and state laws that relate to the education of children and adults with exceptionalities and discuss the provisions within the public school setting, community agencies and institutional settings.
  5. Discuss the prevalence, etiology, identification procedures, role of heredity and the environment, characteristics and academic and social manifestations of each of the eight exceptionalities.
  6. Describe the present educational adaptations, emerging educational trends and curricular and instructional approaches for each of the exceptionalities covered.
  7. Discuss the lifespan issues of each of the exceptionalities.
  8. Identify misconceptions about children with exceptionalities and their families.
  9. Identify and describe the controversial issues in special education.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Special Education and Children and Youth With
Special Needs
   A. Special education and students with special needs
      1. Define exceptionality and the exceptional child.
      2. Discuss the prevalence of exceptional children in schools.
      3. Trace the perspective on treatment of exceptionality over time.
      4. Describe the process of identification of exceptionality.
         a. Explain inter and intra-individual differences.
         b. Describe how inter and intra-individual differences are
measured.
      5. Compare and contrast children with exceptionalities with peers
without exceptionalities.
   B. Families of children with special needs
      1. Identify the various sources of stress among parents of children
with special needs.
      2. Discuss coping strategies utilized by parents of children with
special needs.
      3. Identify sources of support available to parents of children with
special needs.
      4. List community agencies that offer support to parents and
families of children with special needs.
      5. Describe what it means to have parents as members of the special
education team" and identify ways in which this can be encouraged to
occur.
      6. Identify the unique issues, problems and concerns of the siblings
of children with special needs and how they can be addressed.
   C. The environment of children with special needs
      1. Summarize the various reactions of society as a whole to
providing for the needs of exceptional children.
      2. Identify and describe the legislation and court decisions central
to special education.
      3. Summarize the benefits of early identification and intervention
for children with special needs.
      4. Identify and describe the continuum of educational environments
available for children with special needs.
      5. Describe technology available to teachers and students in special
education.
      6. Summarize the controversial issues in use of technology for
students in special education.
      7. Summarize the structure and function of the pre-referral team and
describe how it works.
      8. Trace the steps involved in the referral and assessment process
after a child is formally referred to special education personnel.
      9. Identify the required components of the Individual Education
Program (IEP) and explain how it is developed.
      10. Demonstrate an awareness of the various factors that are
involved in identification, assessment and treatment of children from
different racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds.

II.   Categories of Exceptionality
   A. Gifted and talented
      1. Define giftedness and explain how these students are identified.
      2. State the prevalence of gifted students in schools.   
      3. Trace the developmental profile of the student who is gifted.
      4. Describe the formal and informal measures used to assess
giftedness and explain how each measure highlights the qualities of
students who are gifted.
      5. List and explain the characteristics of gifted students.
      6. Explain how children who are gifted are alike and different from
their peers who have not been identified as gifted.
      7. Discuss the nature/nurture aspects of giftedness with respect to
the following:
         a. Twin studies
         b. Adoption studies
         c. The effects of enriched vs. impoverished environments
         d. The effects of prenatal care, diet and overall health
         e. Early identification and environmental supports
      8. Discuss the special concerns of children who are gifted such as:
         a. Stress
         b. Achievement anxiety
         c. Isolation
         d. Peer group identification
      9. Identify and explain educational considerations, adaptations and
modifications for gifted students.
      10. Discuss enrichment and acceleration and summarize the strengths
and weaknesses of each.
      11. Describe the special concerns around the gifted student who is
an underachiever or who has a learning disability or other
exceptionality.
      12. Describe the transition issues for students who are gifted.
   B. Mental retardation
      1. Define mental retardation and explain how students qualify for
services within this category of special education.
      2. Identify the prevalence of mental retardation.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of students with mental
retardation.
      4. Describe the formal and informal measures designed to identify
students with mental retardation and the strengths and weaknesses of
each.
      5. List and describe the characteristics of students with mental
retardation in relation to the following skills:
         a. Information processing
         b. Self-regulation and self-care skills
         c. Communication skills
         d. Social skills and adaptive behavior
         e. Physical and motor skills
      6. List and describe the various causes of mental retardation.
      7. Differentiate organic and non-organic forms of mental
retardation.
      8. List and describe strategies to prevent mental retardation.
      9. Identify and describe the various educational service-delivery
systems and educational environments for children with mental
retardation.
      10. Differentiate between the academic and functional curriculum for
students with mental retardation and describe the strengths and weaknesses
of both.
      11. Describe early interventions aimed at infants, toddlers and
pre-schoolers with mental retardation.
      12. Discuss the various life-span concerns facing persons with
mental retardation and transition issues for this population
   C. Learning disabilities
      1. Define learning disability and explain how students are
identified with learning disabilities.
      2. State the prevalence of learning disabilities in students in the
schools.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of students with learning
disabilities.
      4. Describe formal and informal measures to assess learning
disabilities and the strengths and weaknesses of each measure.
      5. Differentiate underachievement and learning disabilities.
      6. Explain the aptitude-achievement discrepancy and how it is
measured.
      7. Identify the exclusionary criteria for learning disabilities.
      8. List and describe the characteristics of children with learning
disabilities.
      9. List and explain the possible causes of learning disabilities.
      10. Summarize the educational programming aimed at children with
learning disabilities.
      11. Identify specific strategies used with learning disabled
students at all educational levels.
      12. Describe the various environments in which services to students
with learning disabilities are delivered.
      13. Summarize transition issues for students with learning
disabilities.
      14. Identify lifespan issues for students with learning
disabilities.
   D. Communication disorders
      1. Define communication disorders and explain how students with such
disorders are identified.
      2. State the prevalence of communication disorders and discuss how
they can co-occur with other categories of disability.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of students with communication
disorders.
      4. Identify disorders of speech and differentiate disorders of
language and discuss the possible causes of each.
      5. Describe methods of assessing both speech and language disorders
and list the strengths and weaknesses of each.
      6. Describe the various service-delivery options for students with
communication disorders.
      7. Explain augmentative and alternative communication and the
methods used with each type of communication.
      8. Identify the lifespan issues of people with communication
disorders.
   E. Deaf and hard-of-hearing
      1. Define deafness and hard of hearing and explain how students are
identified in each category.
      2. State the prevalence of students with hearing impairments in
school.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of students with hearing
impairments and discuss the implications of pre vs. post lingual
deafness.
      4. Describe formal and informal measures to assess hearing
impairment and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each.
      5. List and explain the characteristics of children with hearing
impairments with respect to the following issues:
         a. Cognitive development            
         b. English language development
         c. Academic achievement
         d. Social and personal adjustment
      6. Describe what is meant by deaf culture."
      7. Identify the possible causes of hearing impairment.
      8. Describe the various service-delivery options for students with
hearing impairments.
      9. Describe and explain the following communication methods used by
persons who are deaf or hearing-impaired and the pros and cons of each:
         a. Oral
         b. Auditory
         c. Manual
         d. Total communication
      10. Describe each of the following technological aids for persons
who are hearing-impaired and the pros and cons of each:
         a. Hearing aids
         b. Computers
         c. Teletypewriter and printer
         d. Cochlear implants
         e. Close captioning
   F. Blindness and low vision
      1. Define blindness and explain the difference between the legal and
educational definition of blindness and how students are identified as
blind.
      2. State the prevalence of blindness and low vision in the schools.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of children who are blind.
      4. Describe the formal and informal measures of assessing blindness
and low vision and list the strengths and weaknesses of each measure.
      5. List and explain the possible causes of blindness and low
vision.
      6. Identify the characteristics of students who are blind with
respect to the following issues:
         a. Intellectual development
         b. Language development
         c. Sensory compensation
         d. Personal and social adjustment
      7. Describe the education adaptations necessary for students who are
blind.
      8. Describe the various academic environments for students who are
blind.
      9. List and explain the special skills necessary for students with
visual impairments including:
         a. Braille
         b. Orientation and mobility
      10. Identify the various types of technology available for students
with visual impairments including:
         a. Computers
         b. Talking books, calculators
         c. Opti-scan
         d. Laser-cane
      11. Discuss the lifespan issues for persons with blindness and low
vision.
   G. Emotional/behavioral disorders
      1. Define emotional/behavior disorders and explain how students are
identified as such.
      2. State the prevalence of emotional/behavior disorders in the
schools and summarize the reasons why this population may be
under-identified.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of students with behavior
disorders.
      4. Describe informal and formal measures designed to assess
emotional/behavior disorders in children and youth and explain the
strengths and weaknesses of each method.
      5. Identify ways to assess the home and classroom environment of the
student with behavior disorders and explain why this is necessary.
      6. Differentiate the major classifications of behavior disorders
with respect    to:
         a. Conduct disorders
         b. Anxiety/depressive disorders
         c. Socialized vs. under socialized
      7. Describe the possible causes of emotional/behavior disorders
         a. Nature/nurture explanations
      8. Describe the various educational adaptations and curriculum
modifications available for students with emotional/behavior disorders.
      9. Describe the various environments that students with
emotional/behavior disorders may receive services.     
      10. Discuss the transition and lifespan issues for students with
behavior disorders and explain why the prognosis for such students is
grim.
   H. Multiple and severe disabilities
      1. Define multiple and severe disabilities and describe how a child
is identified within this category of exceptionality.
      2. State the prevalence of this category of exceptionality.
      3. Trace the developmental profile of the student with multiple and
severe disabilities.
      4. Apply the principles of PL 99-457 to the very young child with
severe and multiple disabilities and describe why this legislation is so
important to this population of children and their families.
      5. Describe how identification of this population differs from that
of other categories of disability.
      6. Explain the special importance of multidisciplinary teams to
children identified as having multiple and severe disabilities.
      7. Identify the possible causes of severe and multiple
disabilities.
      8. Describe the frequent combination of characteristics of children
in this category.
      9. Summarize the importance of early identification and intervention
with this population of children.
      10. Describe the Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) and explain
its importance to the child with severe and multiple disabilities.
      11. Identify the various environments in which this population
receives services at the different levels of education.
      12. Explain partial participation and demonstrate its effectiveness
in the education of students with severe and multiple disabilities.
      13. Describe the educational curriculum for students with severe and
multiple disabilities.
      14. Summarize the lifespan issues for people with severe and
multiple disabilities with respect to the following:
         a. Community living arrangements
         b. Vocational placements
   I. Physical disabilities and other health impairments
      1. Define the following terms:
         a. Physical disability
         b. Other health impairment
      2. Discuss Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and explain
its importance to children classified as other health impaired."
      3. State the prevalence of children with physical disabilities in
the schools.
      4. State the prevalence of children with other health impairments in
the schools.
      5. Trace the developmental profile of children with physical
impairments or other health impairments.
      6. Identify the role of physicians and therapists in diagnosing and
developing treatment plans for children in this population.
      7. Identify the possible causes of physical and health impairments
in students.
      8. Identify the various separate classifications of children with
physical or other health impairments and differentiate physical
impairments from health impairments.
      9. Describe the learning environment and educational adaptations
necessary for children with physical and other health impairments such
as:
         a. Alternative communication systems
         b. Adaptive physical education
         c. Self-care skills
         d. Motor skills and mobility
         e. Social and emotional support and inclusion
      10. Discuss the concerns of students, educational personnel and
families with respect to the following:
         a. Accessibility
         b. Physical and occupational therapy and related services
         c. The role of the school nurse
         d. Home and hospital-bound instruction
         e. Emergency and other medical procedures
      11. Discuss the special personal and transitional lifespan issues
that face this population of students with respect to the following:
         a. Accessibility of higher education
         b. Vocational-rehabilitation services
         c. Transportation
         d. Career planning and placement 
         e. Accessibility of leisure activities
         f. Discrimination
         g. Public information and advocacy

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three exams.                               70%
A term paper covering one category of exceptionality.   20%
Various individual and group activities assigned by the
instructor.                                             10%
       Total                                           100%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 225

  • Title: Infant and Toddler Education and Care*
  • Number: EDUC 225
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

This course is a study of creating and maintaining a developmentally appropriate environment for infants and toddlers. The course will include the history of education and care, theories of child development, developmental stages and capabilities of the very young child, and curriculum development for infants and toddlers. Health, safety and nutrition; assessment; interaction techniques; the role of the educator specific to the needs of the infant and toddler; partnering with family and community; and advocating for the very young are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Present the historical and current perspectives and trends in infant and toddler education and care.
  2. Differentiate among cultural views of child care and education.
  3. List the required characteristics of a competent educator of very young children.
  4. Compare the theories of early childhood development.
  5. Present the physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional capabilities of the infant.
  6. Present the physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional capabilities of the toddler.
  7. Identify and assess the needs of infants and toddlers.
  8. Describe the process of curriculum development.
  9. Utilize developmental profiles to guide curriculum development.
  10. Develop and implement a curriculum to facilitate physical and motor skills development.
  11. Develop and implement a curriculum to nurture language and cognitive development.
  12. Develop and implement a curriculum to nurture social and emotional development.
  13. Explain the interrelatedness of the areas of development and the concomitant curricular areas.
  14. Discuss how play is curriculum.
  15. Evaluate curriculum for infants and toddlers.
  16. Develop indoor and outdoor physical environments appropriate for, and supportive of, the education and care of infants and toddlers.
  17. Develop health policies for the prevention, control and management of illness in educare settings.
  18. List clues that could indicate illness in very young children.
  19. Describe conditions necessary for safety in an educare setting.
  20. Practice safe and legal transportation procedures for infants and toddlers.
  21. Discuss nutritional needs of infants and toddlers.
  22. Develop nutrition and feeding plans for infants and toddlers.
  23. Identify the feeding problems of, and remedies for, very young children.
  24. Recognize and report known or suspected child abuse or neglect.
  25. Discuss the state regulations for the care of infants and toddlers.
  26. Develop procedures for informal and formal communications with families.
  27. Develop partnerships with families and relevant community organizations.
  28. List sources of professional preparation for educators.
  29. Discuss the characteristics of a quality education and care-setting for infants and toddlers.
  30. Advocate for very young children and their families.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Historic and Current Perspectives of Early Childhood Education
   A. Describe infant and toddler education and care from ancient time to
the twenty-first century including:
      1. Greece
      2. Roman Empire
      3. The Middle Ages
      4. Western Europe: Thirteenth to eighteenth century and eighteenth
and  nineteenth centuries
      5. The United States: Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and
twentieth century
   B. Goals and objectives of contemporary education and care
      1. Define goal setting.
      2. Describe universal goals.
      3. Identify developmental goals.
      4. Describe goals that meet societal purposes.
   C. Contemporary cross-cultural research
      1. Compare world-wide cultural views of infancy.
      2. Discuss cultural differences in caring for very young children.
      3. Describe the different and similar expectations of education and
care programs across cultures.

II. The Educator
   A. Professional preparation
      1. Outline formal education needs.
      2. List continuing education requirements and resources.
      3. Access state regulations.
      4. List core competencies.
      5. Describe the work of the education and care team.
   B. Personal qualities   
      1. Describe how teachers' values, ethics, biases and prejudices
affect the learning environment.
      2. Identify the characteristics of a competent educator.
      3. List and describe the stages of professional development.
      4. Discuss the benefits of good physical and mental health.

III. Infant and Toddler Development
   A. Discuss the theories and child's capabilities in the following
domains:
      1. Physical - A. Gesell
      2. Cognitive - J. Piaget and Lev Vygotsky
      3. Speech and Language - B.F. Skinner and N. Chomsky
      4. Affective - S. Freud, E. Erikson, S. Greenspan, A. Thomas and S.
Chess, J. Bowlby and M. Ainsworth
   B. The whole child
      1. Discuss the nature versus nurture debate.
      2. Describe the benefits of appropriate early learning experiences
on later development.
      3. Discuss how behaviors are interrelated.
      4. Describe the needs of infants and toddlers with disabilities.
      5. Evaluate the issue of ages and stages.

IV. Developmental Assessment
   A. Techniques and interpretation
      1.    Describe and use the observation process.
      2.    Explain sampling methods.
      3.    Use checklists and rating scales.
      4.    Use developmental profiles.
      5.    Define norms.
      6.    Write descriptions.

V. Curriculum Development
   A. Describe the basic needs of infant and toddlers including:
      1. Physiological survival and well-being
      2. Psychological security
      3. Love and belongingness
      4. Learning - exploration and experimentation
      5. Environmental stimulation
      6. Human stimulation
   B. Describe the role of play in the development of infants and toddlers
including:
      1. Characteristics and purpose
      2. Stages of play
      3. The value of play in all developmental areas
      4. Gender differences
      5. Violence and play
      6. The role of the educator
   C. Process of curriculum development
      1. Describe the goals, values and philosophy used for developing
experiences for the very young.
      2. Use developmental profiles as a guide in curriculum development.
      3. Develop objectives.
      4. Select appropriate methods and materials.
      5. Develop long- and short-term plans.
      6. Explain the importance of considering the child's family, culture
and community in curriculum design.
      7. Identify sources of information.
      8. Explain how to evaluate curriculum and modify goals.
   D. The Developmental Curriculum: Outline guidelines to design,
implement and evaluate early experiences for the following:
      1. Physical development
      2. Cognitive development
      3. Language development
      4. Social development
      5. Emotional development

VI. The Learning Environment
   A. Healthy and safe environments
      1. Describe the elements of a program to prevent, control and manage
illnesses.
      2. List the criteria for identification of illness in very young
children.
      3. List the health requirements of the educator.
      4. Describe injury prevention plans - indoor, outdoor, play
equipment.
      5. Describe emergency preparedness and procedures.
      6. List the safe and legal transportation procedures for infants and
toddlers.
      7. List pedestrian safety rules.
      8. Explain the identification procedures and reporting laws for
known or suspected abuse and neglect.
      9. Outline guidelines for the prevention of abuse and neglect in the
child-care and education setting.
     10. Access the state regulations for infant and toddler education and
care-settings.
     11. Describe basic first aid for infants and toddlers.
     12. Distinguish a responsive from a non-responsive educator - touch,
converse, play.
     13. Describe age-appropriate guidance techniques.
     14. Explain how to build schedules and routines.
   B. The physical and experiential environment
      1. Identify the environmental dimensions supportive of appropriate
experiences.
      2. Differentiate the needs of living and learning spaces.
      3. Describe how to select, place and maintain furnishings and
equipment.
      4. Identify age and developmentally appropriate play materials.
      5. Design an accessible developmentally appropriate playground.
      6. Explain the importance and use of adult spaces in care and
education setting.
   C. The nutrition component
      1. Describe nutrition-related disorders.
      2. List food nutrients, nutritional needs and good nutrition for
infants and toddlers.
      3. Discuss very young children's feeding problems and remedies.

VII. Partnerships with Families and the Community
   A. Family involvement
      1. Identify the family's needs and role in providing care and
education.
      2. Describe skills to use for effective communication with
families.
      3. Discuss daily communication strategies.
      4. Use an open door policy.
      5. Design a program to involve the family in the education process.
      6. Describe strategies for involving volunteers in the care and
education program.
      7. Explain how to provide an environment that welcomes all
families.
   B. The community
      1. Identify local business innovations.
      2. Describe potential cooperative initiatives.
   C. Advocacy for children and families
      1. Advocate for young children at the community, state and national
levels.
      2. Discuss legislative mandates and guidelines.
      3. Describe the benefits of participating in local, state and
national professional organizations.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests                        30% of grade
Three activities                   25% of grade
 1. Assess an infant or toddler
 2. Design indoor and outdoor physical 
    environments appropriate for an 
    infant or toddler
 3. Design a newsletter for 
    parents/guardians
Lab                                35% of grade
Other                              10% of grade
                                  100%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 231

  • Title: Early Childhood Curriculum II*
  • Number: EDUC 231
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Transfer
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: EDUC 131

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents or others who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for young children. The focus of the course is on curriculum areas that deal with the physical and social aspects of the world. Included in this inquiry curriculum are mathematics, science, social studies and nutrition. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the components of an inquiry curriculum.
  2. Describe J. Piaget's cognitive-developmental theory and define physical knowledge, social knowledge and logico-mathematical knowledge.
  3. Describe a developmentally appropriate mathematics program for young children.
  4. Describe a developmentally appropriate science program for young children.
  5. Explain the relationship between cognitive development and the science and mathematics curriculum.
  6. Identify the attributes of a good social studies program for young children.
  7. Identify the difference between content and socialization in a social studies program for young children.
  8. Describe the elements in planning for a field trip.
  9. Identify the goals of nutrition education for young children and describe an appropriate program.
  10. Design a week's plan for young children that includes mathematics, science, social studies and nutrition content.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of the Inquiry Curriculum
   A. Goals
      1. Explain how to enhance awareness of the inquiry curriculum.
      2. Discuss the role of discovery in learning.
      3. Explain the process of developing problem-solving skills and
their importance.
   B. Describe each of the inquiry components, their significance and
sequencing in the curriculum:
      1. Awareness of a problem
      2. Observing
      3. Hypothesizing
      4. Exploring
      5. Experimenting
      6. Identifying
      7. Classifying
      8. Comparing and contrasting
      9. Inferring
     10. Generalizing
     11. Communicating
   C. The developmental perspective
      1. Describe the child's cognitive development, its elements and
stages.
      2. Define constructivist theory and its role in development.
      3. Explain how assessment and evaluation are essential.
      4. Define readiness, describing its characteristics.
      5. Explain the importance of choosing developmentally appropriate
activities.

II. Mathematics
   A. Introduction
      1. Briefly trace the role of mathematics in our daily life.
      2. Explain why teaching mathematics is important.
      3. Explain how concepts develop and are acquired.
      4. Explain how to assess a young child's developmental level.
      5. Define objectives and evaluation, providing examples of each.
   B. Explain Jean Piaget's work and logico-mathematical knowledge,
including:
      1. Classification
      2. Seriation
      3. Ordering
      4. Quantifying
      5. Space and time
   C. Explain the fundamentals of mathematics, including:
      1. One-to-one correspondence
      2. Concept of number
      3. Rote and rational counting
      4. Sets and classifying
      5. Comparing
      6. Ordering
      7. Measurement and quantity
      8. Shapes
      9. Space
     10. Parts and wholes
     11. Language and concept formation
   D. Building math-rich environments
      1. Describe the typical basic math materials.
      2. Discuss the role of math centers and their operation.
      3. Identify small and large group activities involving mathematics.
      4. Explain the value of teacher-made games, listing several.
      5. Explain the importance of utilizing routines and activities of
the school day (i.e., calendars, measurement, store).
      6. Explain how mathematics can be integrated into the curriculum: 
music, art, dance, dramatic play, work benches, computers.
      7. Explain why parent involvement is essential.

III. Science
   A. Introduction
      1. Explain the relative importance of science content, processes and
attitude in teaching young children.
      2. Explain why science should be taught to young children.
      3. Correlate objectives and evaluation.
      4. Discuss how concepts develop and are acquired.
      5. Explain how to assess a young child's developmental level and its
importance.
      6. Describe discovery learning: the educator's role in questioning,
listening and facilitating.
      7. Describe how discovery learning can be applied to science.
      8. Discuss adapting materials for young children with special
needs.
   B. Life Science
      1. Describe the elements of biology, including study of plants and
animals, their structure, origin, growth and reproduction.
      2. Describe the elements of physiology, including study of the
processes and functions of living organisms, i.e., breathing, movement,
sensation, digestion.
      3. Describe the elements of ecology, including study of the
interaction between organisms and their environment, i.e.,
pollution/recycling.
   C. Physical Science
      1. Describe the elements of  physics, including study of matter,
energy, motion and force; use of exploratory play.
      2. Describe the elements of chemistry, including composition,
properties and transformations of substances; use of cooking to observe
chemical transformations.
      3. Describe the elements of geology, including the formation of the
earth, its layers, forms and substances; common features of the earth such
as lakes, rocks, fossils, mountains.
      4. Describe the elements of  astronomy, including the universe
beyond the earth's atmosphere, the sun, moon, planets and stars, cycle of
day and night, waxing and waning of the moon, heat of the sun, stars in
the sky, exploration of space.
   D. Materials and resources for science
      1. Explain how outdoor play area and garden can be used for science
education.
      2. Describe examples of well planned science learning trips--nature
walks, zoo, farm, forest, planetarium.
      3. Design an indoor science area to accommodate active learning,
including observation, exploration, manipulation, questioning,
discussion.
      4. Describe the typical science materials available from suppliers
and homemade ones.
      5. List the process and elements of a well planned experiment.
      6. Describe the use of age-appropriate classroom animals, aquariums,
terrariums.
      7. List reference books designed for young children.
      8. List examples of CD-ROM resources and a few of their features for
active learning.
      9. List science tools (magnets, microscope, etc.).
     10. Explain subject area integration: music, art, dramatic play,
creative movement, imagining, language and literacy.
     11. Explain how parents can be involved in exploring the home as a
science setting.

IV. Social Studies
   A. Introduction
      1. Explain why we teach social studies.
      2. Explain how the teacher is a major role model.
      3. Correlate objectives and evaluation.
      4. Illustrate how social studies connects directly to the lives of
young children.
      5. Assess the young child's developmental level.
      6. Explain how to integrate the curriculum.
      7. Describe the anti-bias curriculum.
   B. Psychology
      1. Describe the key concepts.
      2. Explain the importance of expressing and recognizing feelings.
      3. List common pleasant and unpleasant feelings and describe
positive and negative responses.
      4. Describe alternatives to acting out.
      5. Explain the importance of accepting own and others' feelings.
      6. Describe strategies for developing school-appropriate behavior
including self-control.
      7. Explain how play can be a medium for expressing feelings.
      8. Explain the processes and instruments for testing and evaluating
the self including acceptance, power and control, efficacy and competence,
and virtue.
      9. Discuss the implications for educators: goodness of fit,
authentic feedback.
   C. Anthropology and Sociology
      1. Describe the key concepts.
      2. Describe similarities and differences in families.
      3. List and describe the roles in the family and community.
      4. Assess the values of sociodramatic play.
   D. Economics and Political Science
      1. Describe key concepts.
      2. Describe the different kinds of work.
      3. Explain how money affects the development of a young child.
      4. Explain how the availability of goods and services affects the
development of a young child.
      5. Explain the issues involved with rules and the young child.
      6. Describe behavior consistent with a democracy:  cooperation and
conflict resolution.
   E. Geography and Ecology
      1. Describe how our geophysical location affects the quality of our
life.
      2. Describe transportation modes and how these affect us.
      3. Describe the value of making and using maps in the curriculum.
      4. Explain how lives are connected to the natural features of the
environment.
      5. Describe the Earth's principal resources and individual
responsibility.
   F. History/herstory
      1. Explain how the duration and sequence of events in daily life is
real history.
      2. Explain how to give a child a sense of past, present, future.
      3. Explain the use of timelines.
      4. Discuss the dynamics of change over time.
   G. Social studies materials and meaningful experiences.
        1. Explain cooperative planning and its value.
        2. Describe different types of dramatic play, songs, dances,
games, art, languages and their value.
        3. Explain how to use visits from resource people.
        4. Incorporate celebrations and traditions into the curriculum.
        5. Plan trips in the neighborhood.
        6. Describe family collages and their value.
        7. Discuss books, artifacts, models, films and their correlation
to social studies.
        8. Assess the value of dress-up.
        9. Assess the value of cooking.
       10. Explain how mapping (classroom, house, neighborhood) supports
social studies.
       11. Define high priority concepts (help, share).
       12. Explain the role of the educator/caregiver as strong,
competent, compassionate and active.

V. Nutrition
   A. Introduction
      1. Explain nutrition concepts for young children.
      2. Describe children's nutrient needs.
      3. Describe common expectations and biases.
      3. Explain the significance of the teacher as model.
      4. Describe the social dynamics of mealtime.
   B. Food
      1. Explain how to select nutritious food.
      2. Describe the physical and sensory properties of food (shape,
color, texture, taste, smell).
      3. Explain how to involve young children in shopping, gardening,
cooking.
      4. Describe cultural differences in food choices and preparation.
      5. Explain how food is categorized and compare the principal food
categories.
      6. Explain how hygiene, clean-up and food storage can be
incorporated into the curriculum.
   C. Nutrition activities
      1. Illustrate identification of food via different senses.
      2. Explain the skills involved in following a recipe.
      3. Explain the skills involved in using kitchen tools.
      4. Explain the skills involved in planning, preparing, serving and
clean-up of snacks: child as participant.
      5. List and describe food tasting activities (sour, sweet).
      6. Explain the skills involved in making a cookbook.
      7. Assess the value of visits to the store, restaurant, farm.
      8. Describe resources including books and pictures.
      9. List community resource people and their contribution to the
child's learning.
     10. Integrate other curriculum areas into the food experience, i.e.,
measurement, factors such as climate that shape food habits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests                                 30% of grade
Eight directed assignments (lesson plans)   40% of grade 
Materials file                              20% of grade
Other                                       10% of grade

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 235

  • Title: Parenting*
  • Number: EDUC 235
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course is a study of effective parenting. The course is designed for teachers of young children and parents and guardians who desire to provide an environment that reflects sensitivity to the unique needs of the individual child and family. Topics covered during the course are the history of child-rearing methods, an overview of child development, types of families, parent/guardian fears and concerns, purposes of child behavior, and effective communication techniques. Problem prevention and resolution, nurturing self-esteem in children and building effective, collaborative relationships between teachers and families are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Summarize the history of child-rearing methods.
  2. Distinguish the different types of family constellations.
  3. Identify the significant developmental milestones of young children.
  4. Define the term "parenting."
  5. State the building blocks of parenting.
  6. List and explain the major fears and concerns of parents.
  7. Interpret the purposes of children's appropriate and inappropriate behavior.
  8. Interpret the purposes of appropriate and inappropriate behavior of parents.
  9. Relate the language of acceptance.
  10. Use active listening skills.
  11. Utilize language skills that enhance listening in children.
  12. Identify and demonstrate effective parenting strategies that focus on feelings.
  13. Identify and demonstrate effective parenting strategies that focus on behavior.
  14. Explain and demonstrate the "no-lose" method for resolving conflict.
  15. Design a plan to modify the child's learning environment that will strengthen appropriate behavior.
  16. Design a plan to modify the child's learning environment that will develop and maintain new behavior.
  17. Design a plan to modify the child's learning environment that will prevent unacceptable behavior.
  18. Identify common problems in young children and match these problems with effective parenting behaviors.
  19. Compile a list of special situations which affect young children and their families.
  20. Outline and explain the causes, prevention and treatment for child maltreatment.
  21. Use collaborative skills with others for the child's benefit.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Child Rearing and the Family
   A. Trace the history of child rearing methods.
      1. Summarize the views of childhood from medieval times to the
present. 
      2. Identify the philosophical roots of current parenting practice.
      3. Compare and contrast parenting in the present with parenting in
historical times.
   B. Describe the dynamics of families.
      1. Identify and describe the characteristics of family systems.
      2. List and explain the varieties of family structures and
lifestyles.

II. Growth and Development of Children from Birth to Age 8
   A. Outline the major developmental milestones of infants and toddlers
(birth to age 3) in the following areas:
      1. Physical and motor development.
      2. Speech and language development.
      3. Cognitive development.
      4. Social and emotional development.
   B. Outline the major developmental milestones of preschoolers (age 3 to
5 years) in the following areas:
      1. Physical and motor development.
      2. Speech and language development.
      3. Cognitive development.
      4. Social and emotional development.
   C. Outline the major developmental milestones of school age children
(age 5 to 8) in the following areas:
      1. Physical and motor development.
      2. Speech and language development.
      3. Cognitive development.
      4. Social and emotional development.

III. Parenting as a Process
   A. Identify the components of parenting.
      1. Define parenting.
      2. Identify the building blocks of parenting:
         a. Modeling, trust, respect, love, discipline
         b. Communication, honesty, time, attention, concern
      3. Relate the major fears and concerns of parents.
      4. Explain parental values and needs.
      5. Interpret the role of parenting in context.
      6. Illustrate the role of parents as teachers.
   B. Explain the purposes of child behavior and the effect of such
behavior on adults.
      1. Define and explain the following purposes of child behavior:
         a. Attention
         b. Power
         c. Revenge
         d. Display inadequacy
         e. Feel good
      2. Explain the following purposes of child behavior in terms of the
effect on adults:
         a. Attention
         b. Power
         c. Revenge
         d. Display inadequacy
         e. Feel good
      3. Define and explain the following purposes of parent behavior:
         a. Control
         b. Power
         c. Modify child behavior
         d. Nurture
         e. Feel good
      4. Explain the following purposes of parent behavior in terms of
effects on children:
         a. Control
         b. Power
         c. Modify child behavior
         d. Nurture
         e. Feel good

IV. Effective Communication with Young Children
   A. Identify and describe the language of acceptance.
      1. Define and illustrate the following:
         a. Nonverbal communication
         b. Verbal communication
         c. Nonintervention
         d. Passive listening
         e. Active listening (time, place, technique)
         f. Empathetic listening
         g. Communicating feelings
         h. Door opening statements
         i. Bad messages (put-down, shut-off, solution)
   B. Demonstrate understanding of communicating so children will listen.
      1. Define and demonstrate the following:
         a. I-messages
         b. Stating the positive without evaluation
         c. Cooperative building of positive relations
         d. Problem ownership
         e. Engaging cooperation
         f. Encouraging autonomy
         g. Dealing with feelings
         h. Developing alternatives

V. Parenting Strategies
   A. Identifying feelings
      1. Explain psychological safety with respect to children.
      2. List ways to overcome children's fears and anxieties.
      3. Identify and describe how to utilize the building blocks of
self-esteem:
         a. Respect and encouragement
         b. Caring and sharing
         c. Freedom of choice
         d. Emotional outlets, humor
         e. Natural and logical consequences
         f. Successes and failures
         g. Adult models
      4. Describe and evaluate Ginott's strategy:
         a. Parents as models
         b. Praise and encouragement
         c. Establishing and enforcing limits
      5. Describe and evaluate Gordon's strategy:
         a. No-lose method
         b. Active listening
         c. Appreciative I-messages
         d. Preventative I-messages
         e. Parents as models and consultants
   B. Identifying behaviors
      1. Demonstrate effective strategies to accomplish the following with
children:
         a. Strengthen existing behavior
         b. Development of new behavior
         c. Maintenance of new behavior
         d. Stop inappropriate behavior
      2. Demonstrate effective strategies to change adult behavior.
      3. Describe and evaluate Dreikur's strategy for managing child
behavior.
         a. Define the following terms of Dreikur's:
            1) Democratic- family techniques
            2) General rules
            3) Misbehavior
            4) Mistaken goals
      4. Describe and evaluate the process of behavior modification.
      5. Define the following behavior modification terms:
         a. Reinforcement and punishment
         b. Shaping
         c. Extinction
   C. Identification of common problems in young children and effective
parenting strategies to deal with such problems
      1. List the following common problems in young children.
      2. Identify an appropriate parenting strategy to deal with each
problem.
         a. Separation anxiety
         b. Feeding
         c. Dressing
         d. Crying
         e. Sleeping
         f. Toilet teaching
         g. Temper tantrums
         h. Sibling rivalry
         i. Playing
         j. Aggression
         k. Dependency
         l. Overactivity
         m. Fears
         n. Excessive masturbation
         o. Wetting and soiling
         p. Lying and stealing
         q. Homework
         r. Chores
   D. Identification of special situations in dealing with children
      1. Identify the special circumstances in dealing with children and
parents in the following situations:
         a. Illness and/or death of a family member
         b. Separation/divorce
         c. Reconstituted families
         d. Adoption
         e. Foster care
         f. Child neglect
         g. Child abuse
      2. Identify resources available to parents, children and families at
risk.

VI. Collaborating with Others
   A. Differentiate the role of parent/guardian and early childhood
teacher.
      1. Define the role of the parent in early childhood education.
      2. Define the role of the teacher in early childhood education.
      3. List the responsibilities of the parent of the child in early
childhood education.
      4.   List the responsibilities of the teacher of the child in early
childhood  education. 
      5. Identify the boundaries between the parent and teacher in early
childhood education.
      6. Identify cultural factors that affect the parent/child in early
childhood education.
      7. Define the social context of the child.
      8. Demonstrate an awareness of how cultural factors affect the
social context of the parents and their child.
      9. List the benefits for the child of continuity and discontinuity
between parent/guardian and teacher with respect to the approach to
learning and to the child on the part of both.
     10. Compare and contrast the role of teachers and parents as both
teachers and learners.
   B. Distinguish sources of support and guidance in the community.
      1. Describe the function of parent support groups.
      2. Illustrate the supportive function of the various adults that
deal with children in the community:
         a. Extended relatives
         b. Coaches, club leaders
         c. Teachers, principals, counselors
      3. List the civil rights of children.
      4. List the civil rights of parents.
      5. Identify various sources of information for parents and
families.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Two Exams                              20% of grade
Self-Awareness Activity                 5% of grade
Four Practice Assignments              20% of grade
   1. Empathetic Responding
   2. Recognizing Feelings
   3. Door Opening Statements
   4. Interpreting Messages

Development of Audiotape Using Effective Communication: 
                                          10% of grade
Analyze a Parent/Guardian-Child Event:    10% of grade
Develop a Behavior Modification Plan:     20% of grade
Other:                                     5% of grade
Total:                                   100%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 240

  • Title: School-Age Programs and Curriculum I*
  • Number: EDUC 240
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This methods course is designed for students who are, or will be, working in an early childhood education setting and parents and caregivers who desire to develop an intellectually challenging environment for school age children. The focus of the course is on curriculum areas for the school-aged child and extended day and summer programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify the specific challenges that educators, families and children face in society.
  2. Describe the physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of the school age child.
  3. Interpret cognitive development theories.
  4. Interpret psychoanalytic and psychosocial developmental theories.
  5. Describe and implement Developmentally Appropriate Practices.
  6. Describe, design, and implement curriculum for the school age children in extended day and summer settings.
  7. Describe ways in which the physical environment impacts learning experiences.
  8. Evaluate school age accreditation and standards for school age problems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Educator, Family, and the Community
   A. Educators
      1. Identify the characteristics, education, and experience
requirements of an effective educator
      2. Describe and discuss the early childhood education professional
code of ethics.
      3. Outline the educator's role in child development.
      4. Discuss and describe the collaborative effort involved in working
with the school age child.
   B. Family
      1. Discuss the changing definition of a family.
      2. Analyze how family composition affects children developmentally.
      3. Describe and discuss the effects of home and community
environments on children.
      4. Discuss the role of the educators in relation to parents.
   C. Community
      1. Discuss the significance of using community resources.
      2. Review the advantages and disadvantages of using community
resources.
      3. Describe the dynamics of planning activities that facilitate both
senior citizens and children.
      4. List ways to use resources outside the early education facility.
      5. Identify ways to make a volunteer program effective.  

II. Overview of the School Age Child's Development
   A. Physical Development
      1. Describe the characteristics of physical development specific to
the school age child.
      2. Identify the causes for childhood eating disorders.
      3. Explain common health challenges of the school age children.
      4. Define and discuss gross motor and fine motor skills.
      5. Differentiate motor skills due to gender, body size, and brain
maturation.
      6. Explain how the environment contributes to differences in
physical development.
   B. Cognitive and Language Development 
      1. Describe Piaget's Cognitive Development Theory, the behaviorists'
learning theory, and Vygotsky's Sociocultural Theory.
      2. Discuss the school age child and intelligence and achievement
testing.
      3. Describe the language development of school age children and of
multi-lingual children. 
   C. Psychosocial Development
      1. Describe Freud's Psychoanalytic Theory, Erikson's Psychosocial
Theory, and Kohlberg's Moral Development Theory.
      2. Define and discuss social competence.
      3. Outline strategies for conflict resolution for the school age
child.
      4. Define and describe ways to enhance self-esteem and self-image.
      5. Explore ways to enhance cooperation and effective ways for
children to communicate.
      6. Identify and discuss challenging behaviors.
   D. Working with Children with Special Needs
      1. Describe and discuss categories of children with special needs.
      2. Interpret the Individuals with Disabilities Act and Individual
Educational Plan (IEP).
      3. Explain the importance of collaboration with other
professionals.
 
III. Curriculum Development
   A. Program Planning
      1. Describe developmentally appropriate practice.
      2. Explain the difference between the holistic and academic
approach.
      3. Discuss the significance of curriculum planning.
      4. List the goals for planning for school age children.
      5. Describe the components of an effective program.
      6. Identify the criterion for selecting equipment and materials for
a school age program.
   B. Learning Environment
      1. Describe the characteristic of a developmentally appropriate
indoor space and outdoor space.
      2. Consider how the learning environment impacts the curriculum.
   C. Games and Play
      1. Discuss how games can enhance development.
      2. Plan and implement games for outdoors and indoors.
      3. Describe guidelines for making games enjoyable for school age
children, including safety guidelines.
      4. Discuss play and the learning process.
   D. Creative Curriculum 
      1. Discuss the significance of art, music, and drama in a school age
program.
      2. Describe how to plan and implement activities for art, music and
drama in a school age program.
      3. Evaluate the significance of aesthetics.
   E. Science and Math
      1. Explain how science and math enhance cognitive development.
      2. Identify the educator's role in facilitating science and math
activities.
      3. Plan and implement appropriate science and math activities using
the process approach.
   F. Communication
      1. Outline strategies to enhance reading and writing for the school
age child.
      2. Identify ways to encourage appropriate and effective verbal
communication.
      3. Discuss ways to integrate technology into the school age
program.
   G. Motor Development
      1. Describe, plan, and implement gross motor and fine motor
activities for the school age child.
      2. Plan and implement age appropriate fitness experiences.
   H. Nutrition   
      1. Explain nutritional guidelines for the school age child.
      2. Plan and implement age-appropriate nutritional activities and
health experiences.

IV. School Age Program Quality 
   A. School Age Programs
      1. Explain the goals for school age care.
      2. Determine methods used to upgrade the quality of the school age
program.
   B. Accreditation
      1. Describe and discuss information about the National School Age
Care Alliance (NSACA) and its standards.
      2. Describe and discuss the National Association for the Education
of Young Children (NAEYC), the National Association for Family Child Care
(NAFCC), and the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST).
   C. Credentials
      1. Describe and discuss the significance of teacher credentials.
      2. Discuss how a credential can enhance the curriculum development,
child's development, and overall learning environment.
      3. Describe and discuss the Child Development Associate (CDA).
   D. Evaluation
      1. Communicate the benefits of program evaluation and how it affects
the overall school age program.
      2. Explain the School Age Care Environmental Rating Scale
(SACERS).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                  30% of grade
Eight directed assignments    40% of grade
Materials File                20% of grade
Applied Activities            10% of grade
            
Grade Criteria:
   A = 100-90%  
   B =  89-80%    
   C =  79-70%    
   D =  69-60%    
   F =  59- 0%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 243

  • Title: Issues and Skills for Paraeducators*
  • Number: EDUC 243
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Transfer
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Students will explore the issues, skills and challenges specific to working as a paraeducator. In particular, students will be introduced to the issues relating to the inclusion of students with special needs into the mainstream educational environment. Students will review and practice those skills necessary to being an effective member of an instructional team, including collaboration, problem solving, decision making, team building and parent outreach. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between traditional schools and those based on an inclusive philosophy.
  2. List and describe the key elements present in inclusive schools.
  3. Define collaboration and explain its importance to inclusive education.
  4. Identify the features of successful inclusion programs.
  5. Describe factors that influence school reform and development of inclusive educational programming.
  6. Explain the importance of effective communication in collaborative activities.
  7. Identify communication barriers that interfere with effective collaboration and list strategies to overcome such barriers.
  8. Demonstrate effective skills in consensus building, problem solving, conflict management and negotiation as a member of the educational team.
  9. Describe the process for establishing and maintaining assistance teams in schools.
  10. Identify the ways in which successful partnerships with parents can be created and maintained.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Issues in Inclusive Education and Collaboration
   A. Inclusive education
      1. Define inclusive education.
      2. List and describe the components of traditional educational
programs.
      3. List the components of inclusive educational programs.
      4. Discuss the rationale for inclusive education.
      5. Identify the values and beliefs that provide the foundation for
inclusive education.
      6. Identify the components of IDEA that support inclusive
education.
      7. Discuss student outcome research that supports the need for
inclusive education.
      8. Discuss the criticisms of inclusive education.
   B. Collaboration
      1. Define collaboration
      2. Identify the characteristics of effective collaborative teams in
education.
      3. Identify the benefits of a collaborative team approach for
students, teachers, and parents.

II. Organizational Change: What, How, and Why
   A. What
      1. Identify the three underlying principles of the change process.
      2. Identify and describe the various types of change that can occur
in organizations.
      3. List the keys to effective change.
   B. How
      1. Describe the concept of “paradigm shift” and why this is an
essential part of moving toward inclusive education.
      2. Describe how organizational structure and culture influence the
change process.
      3. Identify and explain guidelines that facilitate planning in the
change process.
   C. Why
      1. Describe factors that influence school reform and the move toward
inclusive education.
      2. Explain why school personnel, especially teachers and staff need
to be informed about the process of change within the organization.

III. Skill Building for Collaboration
   A. Basics of communication
      1. Sketch and explain a basic communication model.
      2. Define the key components of the communication process.
      3. Explain the importance of establishing common meanings of terms
to facilitate accurate communication.
   B. Barriers to effective communication
      1. Define the concept of “barrier” as it applies to
communication.
      2. Explain how personal, social and cultural influences can prevent
effective communication.
      3. Define the following terms and explain how each can contribute to
communication difficulties: frame of reference; filtering; structure;
information overload; semantics and status differences.
   C. Strategies to overcome barriers to communication:
effective communication skills
   1. Define effective listening
   2. List and describe the following listening skills; attending,
hearing, encouraging and processing.
   3. Explain how repetition, empathy, understanding and feedback
facilitate effective communication

IV. Skill Building for Collaboration: Consensus Building, Conflict
Management and Negotiation
   A. Consensus building
      1. Explain how collaborative planning facilitates consensus
building.
      2. Identify and explain the following consensus building techniques;
polling, nominal group, Delphi, Fishbowl, Telstar.
   B. Conflict management
      1. Define conflict.
      2. Define conflict management.
      3. Identify the causes of conflict.
      4. Identify and explain the various types of conflict.
      5. Identify and explain the various conflict management strategies.
   C. Negotiation
      1. Define negotiation.
      2. Explain the negotiation process.
      3. Identify and discuss the three major questions to be addresses in
the negotiation process.

V. Creating Inclusive Schools and Collaborative Classroom Environments
   A. Inclusive schools
      1. Identify school personnel who are essential in facilitating
inclusive environments and define the role of each.
      2. Explain the importance of effective pre-planning for inclusion.
      3. List and describe strategies for recruiting capable personnel to
implement an inclusive education program.
      4. Explain the importance of on-going professional development in
inclusive environments.
 
   B. Collaborative classroom environments
      1. Explain the necessity of scheduled collaborative planning time
among special and regular education teachers and staff members.
      2. Discuss the importance of balanced classroom populations.
      3. List and discuss the concerns of teachers and staff around the
issue of inclusion and suggest ways to address these concerns.
      4. Identify the issues that can impede successful inclusive
classroom environments and list collaborative ways to address these
issues.
      5. Create a list of”dos” and “don’ts” when planning for
collaborative classroom environments.

VI. Creating and Maintaining Student Assistance Teams in Inclusive
Schools
   A. Creating a student assistance team
      1. Explain the concept of student assistance team and describe its
function.
      2. List and explain the specific duties of the student assistance
team.
      3. Identify the benefits of a student assistance team to students
and educators.
      4. Identify the members of a student assistance team and describe
their various roles.
      5. List the qualifications for membership on a student assistance
team.
      6. Explore the relationship of the student assistance team to other
school based teams.
   B. Maintaining the student assistance team
      1. Discuss the activities of the student assistance team and the
scope of the team’s duties.
      2. Describe the format of a typical team meeting and list the
typical issues that are addressed by the team.
      3. Discuss strategies for problem identification and goal setting in
team meetings.
      4. Describe strategies for team monitoring and evaluation of the
team’s work.
  
VII. Individual Education Plans: Legal Issues, Inclusion and
Collaboration
   A. Legal issues
      1. Explain the legal aspects of the IEP.
      2. Discuss the 1997 IDEA revisions of the IEP process.
      3. Describe how the 1997 changes to IEP development have shifted
focus to a collaborative process.
      4. Describe the IEP and explain its components.
   B. Inclusion and collaboration issues
      1. Discuss the importance of the new IDEA focus on participation in
regular education as it relates to inclusion practices.
      2. Discuss the barriers to family participation in IEP development.
      3. Discuss strategies for facilitating increased family
participation in IEP development
      4. Discuss strategies for regular and special education
participation in IEP development.
      5. Identify the key points of team planning in IEP development.
      6. Identify the advantages of using a collaborative approach to IEP
development.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          50% of grade
Projects/Assignments  50% of grade
  Total              100%

Grade Criteria:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 -  89%
C = 70 -  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 245

  • Title: School-Age Programs and Curriculum II*
  • Number: EDUC 245
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

The student will study the creation and maintenance of a developmentally appropriate environment for school-age children in extended school day and summer programs. The student will acquire the skills and characteristics of effective educators. The student will explore types of programs and how to plan, implement and evaluate these programs. Also, staff supervision and development, record keeping, relevant state regulations and laws will be discussed. Collaboration with family and community, public relations and contributing to the profession will be studied. The lab will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 1 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe the significant skills and characteristics of an effective educator.
  2. Describe the development of the school-age child.
  3. Describe methods for observing and assessing the school-age child.
  4. Present and compare the types of school age programs, including purposes, characteristics, and philosophy.
  5. Define what constitutes a quality program.
  6. Develop program goals and objectives.
  7. Design, schedule and implement developmentally appropriate experiences for school-age children.
  8. Plan for the nutrition, health and safety of school-age children.
  9. Select and arrange appropriate indoor and outdoor equipment and materials.
  10. Describe the characteristics of developmentally appropriate and challenging school-age programs.
  11. Maintain student records.
  12. Partner with community agencies.
  13. Plan family orientation and education programs.
  14. Evaluate program outcomes.
  15. Describe the licensing and accreditation procedures for school-age programs.
  16. Present the restrictions and authorizations of state law, funding agencies, and other regulatory agencies.
  17. Identify ways of advocating for children and contributing to the profession.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Educator
   A.  Professional Preparation
      1. Outline formal education needs.
      2. List continuing education requirements and resources.
      3. Access state regulations.
      4. List core competencies.
      5. Describe the work of the education team.
      6. Discuss the NAEYC Code of Ethics.
   B. Personal Qualities
      1. Describe how teachers’ values, ethics, biases and prejudices
affect the learning environment.
      2. Identify the characteristics of a competent teacher.
      3. List and describe the stages of professional development.
      4. Discuss the benefits of good physical and mental health.
   C. Professional Role
      1. Design, implement and evaluate activities for school-age
children.
      2. Coordinate activities for an extended school day or summer
program.
      3. Assist in developing a staff recruitment program, selection
process and retention program.
      4. Assist in allocating and scheduling staff responsibilities.
      5. Plan for, orient, and supervise volunteers.
      6. Coordinate programs for families and the community.
      7. Assist in accessing funding sources.
      8. Cooperate with other education professionals.

II. School-Age Development
   A. The Whole Child
      1. Discuss the nurture versus nature debate.
      2. Discuss how behaviors are interrelated.
      3. Evaluate the issue of ages and stages.
      4. Describe and discuss issues relevant to children with special
needs (screening, evaluation, IEPs).
      5. Explain the process of collaborating with other professionals and
families on behalf of the child.
      6. Discuss and practice developmentally appropriate guidance.
   B. Developmental Assessment
      1. Discuss authentic assessment.
      2. Describe and use the observation process (anecdotal report,
jottings, photos).
      3. Explain sampling methods.
      4. Use checklists and rating scales.
      5. Use developmental profiles.
      6. Define norms.
      7. Discuss information from standardized, individual and group
tests.
      8. Write descriptions.
      9. Develop portfolios.

III. Curriculum Development
   A. Provide for the basic needs/challenges of a school-age child by
offering experiences that encourage:
      1. Participation in program planning.
      2. Active learning. 
      3. Use of critical thinking skills.
      4. Competency in skill development.
      5. Development of peer relationships.
      6. Contributing to the life of their community.
      7. Decision making, problem solving and conflict resolution.
      8. Non-competitive, team building. 
      9. Physical risk taking.
     10. Both education and recreation.
   B. Describe types of school age programs including:
      1. Home-based programs.
      2. Center-based programs.
      3. School-based programs.
      4. Community-based facilities.
      5. Summer day camps.
      6. Summer residential camps.
   C. Describe the role of play in the development of the school age child
including:
      1. Characteristics and purpose.
      2. Stages of play.
      3. The value of play in all developmental areas.
      4. Gender differences.
      5. Violence and play.
      6. The role of the educator in facilitating and extending play.
   D. Process of Curriculum Development
      1. Describe the goals, values, and philosophy used for developing
experiences for school age children.
      2. Use developmental profiles as guide in curriculum development. 
      3. Develop long- and short-term plans.
      4. Develop objectives.
      5. Select developmentally appropriate methods and materials.
      6. Explain the importance of considering the child’s family,
culture, and community in curriculum design.
      7. Identify sources of information.
      8. Explain how to evaluate curriculum and modify goals.
   E. The Developmental Curriculum: Develop and implement experience plans
for the following:
      1. Physical development
      2. Cognitive development
      3. Language development
      4. Social development
      5. Emotional development

IV. The Learning Environment
   A. Healthy and Safe Environments
      1. Describe the elements of a program to prevent, control, and
manage illnesses.
      2. List the criteria for identification of illness in school age
children.
      3. List the health requirements of the educator.
      4. Describe injury prevention plans- indoor, outdoor, play
equipment.
      5. Describe emergency preparedness and procedures.
      6. List the safe and legal transportation procedures for school age
children.
      7. List pedestrian and bicycle safety rules.
      8. Explain the identification and reporting procedures for known or
suspected abuse and neglect.
      9. Outline guidelines for prevention of abuse and neglect in the
education setting.
     10. Access the state regulations concerning health and safety for
school age programs.
     11. Describe and implement methods for enhancing children’s
self-esteem and self-control.
     12. Describe and implement age-appropriate guidance techniques.
     13. Explain how to build schedules and routines.
     14. Use the School-age Environmental Rating Scale (SACERS).
     15. Maintain student records.
     16. Model safe behavior.
   B. The Physical and Experiential Environment
      1. Identify the environmental dimensions supportive of appropriate
extended school day and summer experiences.
      2. Differentiate the needs of the various learning spaces.
      3. Describe how to select, place, and maintain furnishings and
equipment.
      4. Identify age and developmentally appropriate games and learning
materials.
      5. Present ways to use the outdoor space including school
playgrounds and community and camp facilities.
   C. The Nutrition Component
      1. Describe nutrition-related disorders in school age children.
      2. List food nutrients, nutritional needs and good nutrition for
school age children.
      3. Identify nutritious snacks for school age children. 
      4. Prepare nutritious snacks for school age children.
   D. Accreditation
      1. Describe and discuss information and standards from: The Kansas
Board of Health and Environment, the National School Age Care Alliance
(NSACA), the National Association for the Education of Young Children
(NAEYC), and the National Institute on Out-of-School Time (NIOST).
      2. Discuss the program benefits from accreditation.

V. Partnerships with Families and the Community
   A. Family Involvement
      1. Identify the family’s needs and role in school age programs.
      2. Describe skills to use for effective communication with
families.
      3. Discuss daily communication strategies.
      4. Explain how to design a program that welcomes all families.
   B. The Community
      1. Identify local business and other community supports.
      2. Describe potential cooperative initiatives.
   C. Advocacy for Children and Families
      1. Advocate for children at the local, state and national levels.
      2. Discuss legislative mandates and guidelines.
      3. Describe the benefits of participating in local, state, and
national professional organizations.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests                  30%
Applied activities     25%
Lab                    35%
Other                  10% 
                      100%

100 - 90% = A
 89 – 80% = B
 79 – 70% = C
 69 – 60% = D
 59% or below = F

Caveats:

  1. A standard health assessment for working in early education and a Kansas Bureau of Investigation background check are required. Guidelines for both will be provided by your professor during the first day of class.
  2. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 246

  • Title: Multicultural Issues in Education*
  • Number: EDUC 246
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Transfer
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Prerequisties and Corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

In this course students will explore the changing demographics of students in public schools. The course will also explore the ways in which a student's culture can affect the student's learning style, communication skill and behavior. The course will also describe strategies that take into account cultural differences, values and child-rearing practices when educators seek to create a safe and accepting environment for all students. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explore the various aspects of culture and identify the ways in which culture affects individuals.
  2. Differentiate between assimilation, acculturation and pluralism.
  3. Describe the ways in which cultural differences influence the communication style of students.
  4. Identify and describe cultural differences in parenting style.
  5. Develop guidelines for working successfully with parents of various cultural backgrounds.
  6. Identify the elements of a culturally responsive educational environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Issues in Cultural Diversity
   A. Definitions
      1. Define culture and distinguish between general and dominant
culture.
      2. List and explain the dimensions of culture.
      3. Identify and describe the ways in which culture is demonstrated.
      4. Distinguish between the terms macroculture and microculture
      5. Define individualist cultures and list and describe the values of
such cultures.
      6. Define collectivist cultures and list and describe the values of
such cultures.
      7. Define culture, race, religion and ethnicity.
   B. Dimensions of diversity
      1. Define and distinguish between assimilation and acculturation.
      2. Explain cultural pluralism and explain the process by which it
occurs.
      3. Define ethnocentrism and give examples of how this practice can
lead to bias and racism.
   C. Development of ethnic identity and bias in children
      1. Trace the developmental process of ethnic identification in
children.
      2. Identify the cognitive bases of ethnic identity and prejudice in
children.
      3. List and describe the effects of prejudice on Euro-American
children and minority children
      4. List and describe strategies for preventing the development of
bias and prejudice in children.
      5. List and describe ways to incorporate anti-bias strategies into
the curriculum.
   
   II. Cultural Influences on Students: Behavior, Social Skills, Learning
Style and Communication
   A. Behavior
      1. List the ways in which cultural background can affect a child’s
behavior in the classroom and in social settings.
      2. Explain the importance of an understanding and accepting attitude
toward the behavior of children from different cultural backgrounds.
   B. Social skills
      1. Identify the various adult-child interaction patterns among
children from various cultural backgrounds.
      2. Explain the importance of emotion as a function of social
interaction among students of various cultural backgrounds.
      3. Identify the various forms of nonverbal communication practiced
by people of various cultures and discuss the importance of understanding
these communication patterns.
      4. Explain the difference between cooperative, competitive and
individualistic social orientations in children’s interactions.
      5. Describe the ways in which social orientation can influence a
child’s self-esteem.
      6. Explain the ways in which children’s play is influenced by
culture.
      7. Discuss various strategies for dealing with differences in
children’s social skills.
   C. Readiness to learn / learning style
      1. List the components of a culturally sensitive approach in
bridging the gap between home and school expectations of school
readiness.
      2. Describe the communication skills valued by the majority culture
and explain how they differ from communication patterns in minority
cultures.
      3. List the sequence of early emergent literacy skills in children.
      4. Describe the ways in which culture influences early literacy
skills.
      5. Identify strategies that can assist school personnel in bridging
the gap between children’s early experiences and school expectations

III. Cross-Cultural Parenting Practices
   A. Socioeconomic and environmental differences in parenting style
      1. Describe the ways in which a lack of financial resources affects
parenting style.
      2. Describe the way in which life in disadvantaged neighborhoods
affects parent-child interaction and child management.
      3. Explain the value of obedience in minority culture families.
      4. Describe how social isolation of minority families contributes to
their difficulty in teaching their children the “rules and tools”
necessary for success in the mainstream culture.
   B. Other factors that contribute to parenting practices
      1. Explain the role of religion and its influence on parenting
style.
      2. Describe the ways in which family structure and the presence or
absence of extended family affect child-rearing and parenting behaviors.
      3. Discuss the influence of a collectivist perspective on parenting
practices.
      4. Identify and describe the various beliefs parents hold about the
nature of childhood and how children learn.
   C. Parenting practices in various cultural groups
      1. Identify and discuss characteristic parenting behaviors in
mainstream American middle class families.
      2. Identify and discuss characteristic parenting behaviors in
traditional Asian-American families.
      3. Identify and discuss characteristic parenting behaviors in
traditional African-American families.
      4. Identify and discuss characteristics parenting behaviors in
traditional Latino families.
      5. Identify and discuss characteristic parenting behaviors in
traditional Native American families.
      6. List and describe the dangers in generalizing about the
characteristics of any cultural group.

IV. Culturally Responsive Educational Environments
   A. Goals of multicultural education.
      1. Identify the goals of multicultural education.
      2. Discuss the strategies for development of an educational program
that addresses the diverse needs of all families and children.
      3. Develop a plan for discussing similarities and differences in
students.
   B. Awareness of one’s own culture
      1. Conduct a self-analysis with regard to awareness of one’s own
culture and values.
      2. Recognize and explain the ways in which one’s own experience
influences our beliefs about other cultures.
   C. Building successful relationships with families
      1. Develop a method for explaining goals and expectations for
students that addresses the concerns of all parents.
      2. Identify strategies to facilitate communication with families
from diverse backgrounds.
      3. Create a plan to obtain information about students and their
families as a way to build a sense of community and belonging.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                              50% of grade
In-Class Activities                       25% of grade
Writing Projects and Directed Assignments 25% of grade
  Total                                  100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 — 100%
B = 80 —  89%
C = 70 —  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F = Below 60%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 250

  • Title: Child Health, Safety and Nutrition*
  • Number: EDUC 250
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is a study of the basic health, nutrition and safety management practices for young children. Information on establishing and maintaining a physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environment appropriate for the needs of young children will be included. The interrelation of health, safety and nutrition is stressed, with emphasis on appraisal procedures, prevention and protection, services and educational experiences for young children and their families. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Report on the typical physical and emotional development of young children.
  2. Assess a young child's physical health status.
  3. Manage common disorders of early childhood.
  4. Implement appropriate procedures in case of illness.
  5. Provide and maintain sanitary conditions.
  6. Utilize universal precautions.
  7. Identify the emotional health needs of young children.
  8. Apply positive and supportive guidance techniques.
  9. Recognize and report known or suspected child abuse and neglect.
  10. Assess the safety of the program's indoor and outdoor environments.
  11. Select equipment appropriate for the child's age and size.
  12. Arrange physical space and equipment to ensure safety.
  13. Practice safe and legal transportation procedures.
  14. Implement appropriate procedures in case of accident or emergency.
  15. Educate children and families about healthy and safe practices.
  16. Discuss the nutritional needs of young children.
  17. List the six basic food nutrients with their functions and food examples.
  18. Discuss cultural and geographic dietary variations and the implications for children's health.
  19. Use the basic food groups to develop meal plans for young children.
  20. Demonstrate knowledge and application of snack and meal planning principles, including buying, storing, sanitation, safety, and preparation.
  21. Identify the feeding problems and remedies for young children.
  22. Demonstrate the ability to appropriately converse and socialize with young children during mealtime.
  23. Recommend referral of the family to appropriate community and social services when necessary.
  24. Assist families in locating educational programs on children's health, safety and nutrition.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Healthy Practices for Children and Families
   A. The interrelationship of health, safety and nutrition
      1. Describe the environmental factors that have a positive effect on
development.
      2. Describe the environmental factors that have a negative effect on
development.
      3. Discuss preventive health care.
      4. Explain the formation of lifelong health, dental, and nutrition
habits.
      5. Present the role of optimum health status in children as a
component in facilitating cognitive development.
      6. Discuss how teachers and parents/guardians can serve as good
models of healthy behavior.
      7. Discuss the importance of working with and supporting families.

II. Early Childhood Growth and Development
   A. Factors that affect growth and development
      1. Describe the role of genetics in growth and development.
      2. Explain how cultural influences affect growth and development.
      3. Discuss the role of nutrition.
      4. Discuss how health status affects growth and development.
      5. Describe the role of cognitive and emotional stimulation.
      6. Explain how socioeconomic status can affect growth and
development.
      7. Discuss the role of parent/guardian responsiveness.
   B. Physical development and characteristics
      1. List and describe the physical development and characteristics of
infants.
      2. List and describe the physical development and characteristics of
toddlers.
      3. List and describe the physical development and characteristics of
preschoolers.
      4. List and describe the physical development and characteristics of
early school-age children.
   C. Emotional development and characteristics
      1. List and describe the emotional development and characteristics
of infants.
      2. List and describe the emotional development and characteristics
of toddlers.
      3. List and describe the emotional development and characteristics
of preschoolers.
      4. List and describe the emotional development and characteristics
of early school-age children.

III. Health Appraisals
   A. Describe various sources of health information, including:
      1. Health histories
      2. Teacher inspections
      3. Parent/guardian interviews
      4. Vision and hearing screening
      5. Medical and dental evaluations
      6. Psychological testing
      7. Developmental evaluations
      8. Dietary assessment
   B. Methods for obtaining information
      1. Discuss the legal aspects of reviewing children's records.
      2. Describe the use observations.
      3. Explain the use of developmental checklists.
      4. Describe the use of inspection checklists.
      5. Discuss the use of parent/guardian interview.
   C. Interpretation and feedback
      1. Discuss the use of norms.
      2. Explain the parameters of confidentiality.
      3. Describe the function of parent/guardian conferences.
      4. Explain the use of written reports.
   D. Parent/guardian education
      1. Discuss the role of informal discussions in parent education.
      2. Describe the function of support groups.
      3. Discuss the sources of health and safety pamphlets.
      4. Describe professional resources and education programs.

IV. Characteristics, Assessment, and Management of Common Conditions
   A. Vision; describe the characteristics, assessment, and management
of:
      1. Amblyopia
      2. Strabismus
      3. Myopia
   B. Hearing; describe the characteristics, assessment, and management
of:
      1. Allergies
      2. Colds
      3. Ear infections
      4. Birth defects
      5. Head injuries or trauma
   C. Speech and language; describe the characteristics, assessment, and
management of:
      1. Stuttering
      2. Delayed or unintelligent speech
      3. Word substitution
      4. Monotone voice
      5. Speed
   D. Nutrition; describe the characteristics, assessment, and management
of:
      1. Malnourishment
      2. Obesity
   E. Other chronic conditions; describe the characteristics, assessment,
and management of:
      1. Fatigue
      2. Posture
      3. Diabetes
      4. Seizures
      5. Allergies
      6. Asthma
      7. Eczema
      8. Attention Deficit Disorder
      9. Sickle Cell Anemia
   F. Dental health
      1. List and describe healthy foods for teeth.
      2. Explain the importance of fluoride.
      3. Describe the importance of brushing teeth.
      4. Discuss dental care.
      5. Describe special dental problems.
      6. Discuss dental health education.

V. Symptoms of and Protection from Common Communicable Illnesses
   A. Transmission
      1. Discuss the nature of pathogens.
      2. Describe the role of the host.
      3. Describe the method of spread.
      4. Explain the stages of illness.
   B. Illnesses; describe the symptoms of and protection from:
      1. Colds
      2. Fever
      3. Diarrhea
      4. Headaches
      5. Strep throat
      6. Stomach flu
      7. Hepatitis A
      8. Chickenpox
      9. Measles
     10. Mumps
     11. Mononucleosis
     12. Roseola
     13. Conjunctivitis
     14. Impetigo
     15. Salmonellosis
     16. AIDS
   C. Parasites; describe the symptoms of and protection from:
      1. Scabies
      2. Pinworms
      3. Lice
      4. Giardiasis
   D. Vaccine-preventable diseases
      1. List and describe the various vaccine-preventable diseases.
      2. Discuss child vaccinations.
      3. Discuss adult vaccinations.
   E. Prevention and protection
      1. Discuss the importance of rest and exercise.
      2. Describe the role of nutrition in health.
      3. Explain exclusion guidelines.
      4. Describe guidelines for sick teachers.
      5. Discuss the importance of immunizations.
      6. Explain the purpose of environmental control.
      7. Describe appropriate hand washing procedures.
      8. Discuss procedures for informing parents/guardians.
   F. Medication
      1. Describe policies and procedures for prescription and
nonprescription drugs.
   G. Medical neglect
      1. Explain parent/guardian responsibility.
      2. Discuss teacher responsibility.
      3. Describe universal precautions.

VI. Stress and Young Children
   A. Discuss possible sources of stress in young children, including:
      1. Family
      2. School
      3. Community
      4. Physical health
      5. Disability
   B. Describe the symptoms and identification of stress in the following
areas:
      1. Physical
      2. Social
      3. Emotional
   C. Strategies to reduce stress
      1. Describe positive guidance techniques.
      2. Discuss parent/guardian education.
      3. Explain bibliotherapy.
   D. Abuse and neglect
      1. Describe the incidence, types and possible causes of abuse and
neglect.
      2. Explain procedures for identifying and documenting child abuse or
neglect.
      3. Describe the characteristics of abused or neglected children.
      4. Describe the characteristics of abusive or neglectful adults.
      5. Discuss sources of support and assistance for abusive or
neglectful adults.
      6. Explain reporting laws.
      7. Describe strategies to help children learn socially acceptable
behavior.
      8. Discuss prevention programming.
      9. Present referral resources for families.
VII.  Creating a Safe Environment
   A. Licensing requirements
      1. Describe state guidelines.
      2. Explain the assessment of indoor and outdoor environments.
      3. Describe the use of safety checklists.
      4. Discuss ways to make the child's environment safe.
   B. Selection and arrangement of furniture and equipment
      1. Discuss the importance of developmentally and size appropriate
furniture and equipment.
      2. Describe the use of assessment of safety - equipment checklists.
      3. Discuss the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
   C. Conducting fire and tornado drills
      1. Present a plan for fire and weather emergencies.
      2. Discuss the practice of an emergency plan.
   D. Indoor air quality
      1. Discuss air pollutants and their health effects.
      2. Describe control measures.
   E. Common poisonous vegetation
      1. List and describe types of poisonous plants and their poisonous
parts.
      2. Describe complications resulting from exposure to these plants.
   F. Pets
      1. Describe children's allergies to pets.
      2. Discuss carriers of communicable illness.
      3. Discuss diseases and current immunizations.
   G. Emergency preparedness
      1. Differentiate between emergency care versus first aid.
      2. Present the ABC's for assessing emergencies.
      3. Explain the importance of emergency contact information.
      4. Describe the use of health forms, notarized permission forms,
accident report forms.
      5. Present provisions for first aid and emergency care.
      6. Explain the eight life-threatening conditions and emergency
treatment.
      7. Describe 10 non life-threatening conditions and recommended first
aid treatment.
      8. Present plans to protect the children in the event of fire,
severe storms or major disasters.
   H. Transportation and field trips
      1. Describe the laws regarding transportation of children.
      2. Discuss the need for written permission.
      3. Describe the importance and use of safety seats and restraints.
      4. Discuss motor vehicles and their drivers in relation to early
childhood centers.
      5. Explain liability issues in this regard.
   I. Safety management
      1. Discuss developmental characteristics of accident prevention.
      2. Explain the four basic safety principles - advanced planning,
establishing rules, careful supervision, safety education.
      3. Describe substitutes for hazardous play materials.
      4. Discuss negligence and legal implications.
   J. Safety education
      1. Describe safety topics appropriate for young children.
      2. Present educational experiences for young children.
      3. Discuss the role of parent/guardians in safety education.

VIII. Foods and Nutrients
   A. Nutritional guidelines
      1. Discuss the food groups.
      2. Present the Food Pyramid.
      3. Describe the Canadian Food Guide.
      4. Explain the Recommended Daily Dietary Allowance.
      5. Present U. S. Dietary Guidelines.
      6. Explain nutrient contributions of foods.
      7. Describe nutritional labeling.
      8. Discuss cultural and geographic dietary variations.
   B. Nutrients that provide energy
      1. Explain individual energy requirements.
      2. Describe the role of carbohydrates in nutrition.
      3. Discuss the role of fats.
      4. Explain the role of proteins.
      5. Discuss various food sources.
      6. Describe menu planning.
   C. Nutrients that promote growth of body tissues
      1. Describe how growth occurs.
      2. Discuss the role of proteins - complete and incomplete in
growth.
      3. Describe the role of minerals.
      4. Present the role of water in healthy growth.
      5. Explain the role of vitamins.
      6. Discuss various food sources.
      7. Describe menu planning.
   D. Nutrients that regulate body functions
      1. Discuss the types of body functions regulated by nutrients.
      2. Describe the function, deficiency symptoms, toxicity symptoms of
proteins, minerals, water and vitamins.
      3. Discuss various food sources.
      4. Discuss vegetarianism.
      5. Describe menu planning.
   E. Nutritional needs
      1. Describe the nutritional needs of the infant.
      2. Describe the nutritional needs of the toddler.
      3. Describe the nutritional needs of the preschooler.
      4. Describe the nutritional needs of school age children.
   F. Infant feeding
      1. Discuss bottle feeding infants.
      2. Discuss breast feeding of infants.
      3. Discuss feeding schedules.
      4. Discuss a child's readiness for semi-solid food.
      5. Present the recommended types of semi-solid foods.
      6. Discuss commercial versus home-prepared semi-solid food.
      7. Present common infant feeding concerns and remedies.
   G. Feeding the toddler and preschool child
      1. Describe which foods and how much is appropriate for this age.
      2. Discuss the timing of meals and snacks.
      3. Describe various eating behaviors of children.
      4. Explain how to make eating time pleasant and safe.
      5. Discuss the introduction of new foods.
      6. Present common feeding concerns and remedies.
   H. After school snacks for the school-aged child
      1. Discuss issues of quantity and quality of after school snacks for
school-aged children.
   I. The dining area
      1. Discuss furniture appropriate for dining areas in early childhood
centers.
      2. Describe appropriate eating utensils.
      3. Discuss socialization - making mealtimes happy times.

IX. Planning and Serving Nutritious Meals
   A. Licensing requirements
      1. Present how to meet nutritional needs of young children.
      2. Discuss issues of personal cleanliness.
      3. Describe methods of sanitation in food handling.
      4. Describe the cleaning and care of equipment.
      5. Present methods of insect and rodent control.
      6. Describe food-borne illness and its prevention.
      7. Discuss record keeping.
   B. Meal planning
      1. Discuss the introduction of familiar and new foods.
      2. Discuss the inclusion of ethnic foods.
      3. Present the steps in menu planning.
      4. Discuss the buying and storing food.
      5. Describe the preparation of budgets.
      6. Describe food preparation.
      7. Present nutritious snacks.
      8. Discuss the serving of meals.
      9. Explain sources of funding.
   C. Nutrition education
      1. Describe nutrition education goals for young children.
      2. Present methods and nutrition education activities.
      3. Explain safety considerations.
      4. Discuss the involving parents.

X. Resources for Parents/Guardians About Health, Safety, and Nutrition
   A. List and describe books for parents.
   B. List and discuss community programs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four Tests                                50%-60% of grade

Five Guided Observation Reports:
(One is to be completed after every 
four hours in the observation setting.)   20%-30%  of grade

Classroom activities                      20%-30% of grade
Total                                     100%

A grade of “C” or better is required for satisfactory completion of this course.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 260

  • Title: Observing and Interacting with Young Children*
  • Number: EDUC 260
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

Prerequisites: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher
Prerequisties and Corequisites: PSYC 215 or PSYC 218 or EDUC 270

This course is a study of the role of observation to assess and monitor the development and learning of children, birth through age 8, and the appropriate techniques for interacting with young children, considering their individual differences. Included will be the purposes and types of observation procedures, interpretation and use of findings, reporting techniques, and legal and ethical responsibilities. Expected age-related child behavior, fundamental principles of and theoretical approaches to child guidance, guidance techniques, working with families, and issues of diversity are presented. The laboratory will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe age appropriate development.
  2. Present the purposes of observation.
  3. Describe and utilize effective methods for observing.
  4. Articulate the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of methods to document the observations.
  5. Select and use appropriate methods for recording observation.
  6. Analyze the observation results for clues about the learning process unique to the individual child's development and context.
  7. Generate multiple hypotheses about the meaning of the observation and consider these with respect to other assessment information.
  8. Describe how the observation information can be utilized to identify areas of concern for the child and child's family, and for the early childhood program.
  9. Describe how the observation information can be utilized to guide instruction and classroom modification strategies.
  10. Effectively communicate the observations in written and oral form.
  11. Work with specialists from other disciplines.
  12. Present and compare five theoretical approaches to child guidance.
  13. Describe the differences and effects of discipline versus punishment.
  14. Recognize the cultural differences that affect child guidance.
  15. List historical changes in child guidance and the rights of children.
  16. Identify the relationship between maturation and guidance strategies.
  17. Identify personal biases that affect interactions with young children.
  18. Identify components of a nurturing and democratic social environment.
  19. Structure a physical environment to influence children's social development.
  20. Outline strategies for supporting positive behavior in children.
  21. Describe and use positive verbal and nonverbal communication skills.
  22. Foster self-discipline in children.
  23. Recognize children's behavioral limitations.
  24. Identify what constitutes extreme behavior and why it occurs.
  25. Select, implement, and evaluate a strategy or strategies to interact with a child displaying extreme behaviors.
  26. Collaborate effectively with parents/guardians to plan and implement a guidance process that will support children's development of a positive sense of self, self-control, and self-motivation, and encourage positive social interactions.
  27. Utilize individual and group guidance and problem solving techniques to develop positive and supportive relationships with children.
  28. Demonstrate the ability to function as a member of an instructional team.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Early Childhood Development
   A. Infants (birth to 12 months)
      1. Present infant communication abilities.
      2. Describe the process of socialization and individuation during
infancy.
      3. List and describe infant competencies.
   B. Toddlers (12 months to 3 years)
      1. Describe the verbal communication abilities of toddlers.
      2. Discuss the issues of separation and stranger anxieties.
      3. Discus the toddler's quest for independence.
      4. Explain egocentrism and possessiveness in toddlers.
      5. List and describe toddler competencies.
   C. Preschoolers (3-5 years)
      1. Describe the preschooler's growing use and comprehension of
language.
      2. Discuss preschooler's acceptance of responsibility and
rule-following.
      3. Present how preschoolers develop a clear self-concept.
      4. Present how preschoolers learn friendship skills.
      5. List and describe the competencies of preschoolers.
   D. School age (5-8 years)
      1. Present how school-age children might become capable listeners.
      2. Discuss how children analyze and create rules.
      3. Explain how children learn to deal with authority figures.
      4. Describe how children learn to controlling impulses.
      5. Present ways in which teachers might help become productive.
      6. Discuss various methods to maintain children's self-esteem.
      7. List and describe the competencies of school-age children.

II. Observation
   A. The role of observation
      1. Present what observation is.
      2. Discuss the purposes of observation.
      3. Explain the role of ethics in children's privacy and
observations.
      4. Discuss the role of observation as part of an assessment plan.
      5. Describe how the behavior to be assessed is identified.
      6. Discuss issues surrounding the fidelity or trustworthiness of
data.
   B. Methods of systematic observation
      1. Describe the use of anecdotal records in observation.
      2. Describe the use of sociometric techniques.
      3. Describe and demonstrate the use of event sampling techniques.
      4. Describe and demonstrate the use of time sampling techniques.
      5. Describe the use rating scales.
      6. Describe the use of checklists.
      7. Discuss the use of case studies.
      8. Discuss the use of child studies.
      9. Discuss the use of portfolios.   
   C. Methods for recording observations
      1. Discuss the advantages and limitations of audio recording.
      2. Discuss the advantages and limitations of videotaping.
      3. Discuss the use of multiple observers.
   D. Interpreting the observation
      1. Identify observer biases.
      2. Infer meaning while considering the unique development of the
child and the child's context.
      3. Identify patterns of children's behavior.
      4. Generate multiple hypotheses about the meaning.
      5. Test the hypotheses one has about a child's behavior.    
   E. Formulating a plan
      1. Explain the translation of observation information into action.
      2. Discuss strategies to modify the child's school and home
environments.
      3. Explain the importance of assessing the plan.
   F. Communicating the observation information
      1. Demonstrate skills for communicating with children.
      2. Demonstrate skills for communicating with and reporting to
parents.
      3. Demonstrate skills for communicating with other professionals.
      4. Describe the types of reporting techniques.

III. Interacting with Young Children and Families
   A. Historical perspectives
      1. Present the history of the child in society, with an emphasis on
the evolution of rights and protection.
      2. Describe changing disciplinary traditions through history.
      3. Discuss cultural influences on child rearing.
      4. Demonstrate developmentally appropriate guidance.
   B. Theoretical approaches to child guidance
      1. Describe the behavioral approach to child guidance.
      2. Explain the ecological approach.
      3. Discuss the humanistic.
      4. Describe the cognitive-developmental approach.
      5. Present the democratic (Adler) approach to child guidance.
   C. Points to consider 
      1. Discuss the importance of understanding personal biases.
      2. Differentiate between discipline versus punishment.
      3. Describe how maturation of the child and behavioral limitations
can influence interactions with the child.
      4. Explain the role of the adult as model.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to function as a member of a teaching
team.
   D. The nurturing and democratic social environment
      1. Describe the role of the physical environment.
      2. Discuss scheduling.
      3. Demonstrate developmentally appropriate activities, materials,
and routines.
      4. Explain the importance of cooperative not competitive settings.
      5. Demonstrate the ability to be a nurturing adult.
   E. Positive communication
      1. Demonstrate skills that address underlying feelings.
      2. Demonstrate effective listening.
      3. Demonstrate the use of positive instructions versus negative
commands.
      4. Present the characteristics of assertive communication.
      5. Discuss the characteristics of non-productive communication.
   F. Positive action
      1. Describe the function of nonverbal cues, body language.
      2. Explain expectations and ground rules.
      3. Demonstrate the provision of assistance and encouragement.
      4. Demonstrate redirecting behavior.
      5. Demonstrate the use of logical and natural consequences.
      6. Discuss the importance of objectivity and consistency.
      7. Describe how a teacher would recognize and encourage internal
control.
      8. Discuss child to child communication.
      9. Describe how children can be taught how to appropriately express
feelings.
     10. Explain the importance of unconditional caring.
     11. Describe how a teacher might remove possible causes of
inappropriate behavior.
     12. Describe the appropriate use of behavior modification.
     13. Explain the importance of maintaining the child's dignity and
privacy.
   G. Managing persistent and extreme behavior
      1. Present what constitutes extreme behavior.
      2. Describe factors that contribute to extreme behavior.
      3. Describe adult actions that increase extreme behavior.
      4. Describe adult actions that decrease extreme behavior.
      5. Discuss conflict resolution methods.
   H. Working with families
      1. Explain the role of families as the primary decision makers.
      2. Present the rationale for forging an effective partnership.
      3. Describe the goals of home-school linkages.
      4. Demonstrate skills for working with parents/guardians.
      5. Present pitfalls to avoid.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests                                  30% of grade
Weekly journals and verbal presentations     30% of grade
Working with young children (lab)            30% of grade
Other                                        10% of grade
                                            100%

Caveats:

  1. A TB test is required before attending the lab.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 270

  • Title: Early Childhood Development*
  • Number: EDUC 270
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a comprehensive account of human development from conception though age 8. The course integrates genetic, biological, physical and social influences with psychological processes affecting the development of young children. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe the changing views of the child through history from medieval times through the present and be able to discuss the history of the field of child development.
  2. Describe and critique research methods used in the study of early child development.
  3. Critically discuss the metatheoretical issues in child development.
  4. Describe, compare and critique traditional and contemporary theories of child development.
  5. Discuss prenatal influences that affect a child's growth and development.
  6. Present the physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional capabilities of infants, toddlers, and young children.
  7. Describe how physical, cognitive, social and emotional factors contribute and interact to effect change from birth through age 8.
  8. Discuss the impact of context and culture on children's development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Theories and Research in Child Development
   A. History of child development
      1. Describe the historical view of children from medieval times to
present.
      2. Discuss the history of the field of child development.
      3. Critically discuss the metatheoretical issues in child
development, including nature vs. nurture, continuity vs. discontinuity,
active vs. passive role of the child, and stability vs. instability of
characteristics over time.
   B. Research methods in child development
      1. Describe the scientific method.
      2. Explain the various research methodologies in psychology and
human development, including descriptive, correlational, and
experimental.
      3. Describe and explain developmental research designs, including
longitudinal, cross-sectional, and sequential.
      4. Evaluate research in terms of validity and reliability.
      5. Describe cross-cultural research.
      6. Discuss ethical issues in human development research.

II. Biological and Environmental Foundations
   A. Genetic process
      1. Discuss the role of the genetic code in human development.
      2. Describe meiosis.
      3. Describe mitosis.
      4. Explain the process of genetic transmission.
      5. List and describe chromosomal abnormalities.
   B. Environmental contexts
      1. Discuss traditional family functions and how these have changed
through history.
      2. Describe the family system.
      3. Present Baumrind's parenting styles.
      4. Explain the factors that influence parenting and child
development, including family size, extended family differences, maternal
employment and poverty.
      5. Discuss the origins of child maltreatment and the prevention of
abuse and neglect.
   C. The transactional nature of heredity and the environment
      1. Explain the role of the environment in modifying developmental
outcome.

III. Prenatal Development and Birth
   A. Prenatal development
      1. Describe the period of the zygote.
      2. Describe the period of the embryo.
      3. Describe the period of the fetus.
   B. Prenatal environmental influences
      1. List and describe teratogens.
      2. Discuss other maternal prenatal factors.
      3. Describe and explain important factors in prenatal health care.
   C. The birth process
      1. List and describe the stages of childbirth.
      2. Describe the various birthing methods.
      3. Discuss possible prenatal complications.
   4. Present information on infant mortality rates.

IV. Infancy and Toddlerhood
   A. The organized neonate
      1. List and describe infant reflexes.
      2. Discuss infant physiological states.
      3. Explain infant learning and conditioning.
   B. Physical growth
      1. Describe changes in body size and proportion.
      2. Describe early skeletal growth.
      3. Discuss the appearance of teeth.
      4. Explain neural development and development of the cerebral
cortex.
      5. Present factors affecting early physical growth.
   C. Motor development
      1. Describe the sequence of motor development.
      2. Explain the role of maturation and experience in motor
development.
      3. Discuss motor skills as complex systems of action.
      4. Describe the factors involved in bowel and bladder control.
   D. Perceptual development
      1. Discuss the development of infant auditory capabilities.
      2. Present the development of infant visual capabilities.
      3. Explain intermodal perception.
   E. Cognitive development
      1. Present Piaget's Sensorimotor stage of cognitive development.
      2. Discuss the information processing model.
      3. Describe language development in infants and toddlers.
   F. Emotional
      1. Explain Erikson's stages of Trust vs. Mistrust and Autonomy vs.
Shame/Doubt.
      2. Describe the development of basic emotions.
      3. Discuss issues surrounding temperament in young children.
      4. Describe the process of attachment.

V. Early Childhood
   A. Physical development
      1. Describe changes in body size and proportion.
      2. Discuss skeletal growth in children.
      3. Describe brain development occurring at this stage.
      4. Present factors affecting growth.
   B. Motor development
      1. Describe gross motor development during early childhood.
      2. Describe fine motor development during early childhood.
      3. Explain factors affecting early childhood motor development.
   C. Cognitive development
      1. Present Piaget's Preoperational stage of development.
      2. Explain Vygotsky's theory of cognitive development.
      3. Discuss information processing theory.
      4. Describe language development during early childhood.
   D. Emotional and social development
      1. Explain Erikson's stage of Initiative vs. Guilt.
      2. Discuss the formation of self-concept in young children.
      3. Describe emotional development in early childhood.
      4. Discuss peer relations.
      5. Explain the foundations of moral development.
      6. Describe the process of sex-role typing and gender identity
development.

VI. Middle Childhood to Age 8
   A.  Physical development
      1. Describe changes in body size and proportion during middle
childhood.
      2. Describe skeletal growth during middle childhood.
      3. Discuss brain development during this period.
      4. Discuss health problems of middle childhood.
   B. Motor development
      1. Describe gross motor development during middle childhood.
      2. Describe fine motor development during this period.
      3. Explain individual differences in motor development.
   C. Cognitive development
      1. Present Piaget's Period of Concrete Operations.
      2. Discuss information processing theory.
      3. Critically discuss the development of intelligence and its
measurement.
      4. Describe language development during this period.
      5. Discuss the influence of the learning experience and school on
development.
   D. Social and emotional development
      1. Explain Erikson's stage of Industry vs. Inferiority.
      2. Describe the development of self-concept and self-esteem during
middle childhood.
      3. Discuss factors affecting emotional development.
      4. Critically discuss theories of moral development during this
period.
      5. Explain the role of peer relations in middle childhood
development.
      6. Describe the process of sex-role typing and gender identity
development.
      7. Discuss the role of family influences during middle childhood
development.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four exams                   40% of grade
  Comprehensive final exam     20% of grade
  Research paper               20% of grade
  Other                        20% of grade
                              100%

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 280

  • Title: Administration of Early Childhood Program*
  • Number: EDUC 280
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type:
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 1

Description:

This course is a study of the organization and administration of early childhood programs. The topics include the skills and characteristics of effective administrators; types of programs; planning, implementing and evaluating programs; policy development; staff supervision and development; finances and budget; record keeping; relevant state regulations and laws; developing, equipping and maintaining a facility; organizing a developmentally appropriate environment; collaboration with family and community; public relations; and contributing to the profession. The lab will include demonstration of the subject matter. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe the significant skills and characteristics of an effective administrator.
  2. Present and compare the types of early childhood programs, including purposes, characteristics, and philosophy.
  3. Define what constitutes a quality program.
  4. Present and compare curricular models.
  5. Describe the characteristics of developmentally appropriate and challenging programs.
  6. Develop program goals and objectives.
  7. Describe the licensing and accreditation procedures for early childhood programs.
  8. Write and establish policies in keeping with the restrictions and authorizations of state law, funding agencies, and other regulatory agencies.
  9. Develop job descriptions.
  10. Develop a staff recruitment program, selection process and retention program.
  11. Allocate and schedule staff responsibilities.
  12. Evaluate staff.
  13. Plan staff development opportunities.
  14. Plan for, recruit, orient, and supervise volunteers and student teachers.
  15. Develop and analyze a budget.
  16. Maintain personnel and student records.
  17. Plan for the nutrition, health and safety of young children.
  18. Plan and schedule developmentally appropriate experiences for children.
  19. Select and arrange appropriate indoor and outdoor equipment and materials.
  20. Plan parent/guardian orientation and education programs.
  21. Develop a public relations program to establish the program in the community.
  22. Evaluate program outcomes.
  23. Identify ways of contributing to the profession.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview
   A. The Director
      1. Describe the director as manager.
      2. Describe the director as organizer.
      3. Describe the director as communicator.
      4. Describe the director as evaluator.
      5. Describe the director as facilitator.
      6. Describe the necessary skills and characteristics to be a
director.
   B. Program basics
      1. Identify and describe the types and characteristics of programs.
      2. Describe the characteristics of a quality program.
      3. Write a philosophy of education.
      4. Describe the characteristics of a developmentally appropriate and
challenging curriculum.
      5. Describe curricular models.
      6. Differentiate between profit and non profit programs.
      7. Describe how to establish and work with a board.
      8. Explain the licensing process.
      9. Explain the accreditation process.
     10. Outline policy categories - program service, administrative,
staff, child, health and safety, business, records, parents, public
relations.
     11. Identify characteristics of viable policies.

II. The Program
   A. Planning
      1. Explain how to choose a philosophy.
      2. Describe how to formulate a mission statement and goals.
      3. Write objectives.
      4. Describe how to plan for infants and toddlers.
      5. Describe how to plan for preschoolers.
      6. Describe how to plan for school age children.
      7. Explain how to address issues of diversity.
      8. Describe scheduling options for families.
   B. Implementation
      1. List the criteria for selecting and arranging appropriate indoor
equipment and materials.
      2. List the criteria for selecting and arranging appropriate outdoor
equipment and materials.
      3. Describe adaptations for children with special needs.
      4. Describe teacher responsibilities.
   C. Evaluation
      1. Describe the purpose of evaluation.
      2. Outline the principles of evaluation.
      3. List director's resources.

III.  The Staff
   A. Qualifications
      1. List state guidelines.
      2. Describe necessary characteristics.
   B. Recruitment, selection and retention
      1. Collect job descriptions.
      2. Collect job advertisements.
      3. Collect application information.
      4. Describe the selection process and appointment.
      5. Outline personnel policy and practices - tenure, promotion,
termination, etc.
      6. List items contained in personnel records.
   C. Supervision and staff development
      1. Describe the process of allocating and scheduling staff
responsibilities.
      2. Describe methods of evaluation - peer, supervisor, self,
parent/guardian.
      3. Explain the use of evaluations - summative and formative.
      4. Explain the purpose, planning, and methods of staff development.
      5. Discuss facilitation versus supervision.
      6. Describe purposes, timing, preparation, and procedures for staff
meetings.
   D. Student teachers and volunteers
      1. Describe how to integrate student teachers and volunteers into
the classroom.
      2. Identify recruitment methods.
      3. Outline the selection process.
      4. Describe methods of orientation.
      5. Describe methods of supervision.
      6. Describe the responsibilities of the supervising teacher.

IV. Program Management
   A. The budget
      1. List and define estimated expenses - personnel, controllable,
fixed.
      2. Describe sources of income.
      3. Outline budget cycles.
      4. Outline a budget analysis.
      5. Describe tax requirements.
      6. Describe insurance expenses.
      7. Outline salary categories.
      8. Describe processes of ordering and paying for goods and
services.
      9. Explain the use of petty cash.
     10. Describe how to keep budget records - recording transactions.
   B. Health and safety maintenance
      1. List goals.
      2. Discuss regulations and policies.
      3. Describe inventories needed.
      4. Identify staff training necessary.
      5. Describe the importance of health records for students and
staff.
      6. Outline procedures for emergencies and non emergencies.
      7. Discuss the importance of checking and maintaining equipment.
      8. Explain the use of safety checklists.
      9. Explain the use of disaster plans.
   C. Food and nutrition services
      1. Describe the menu planning process, develop a menu, and collect
examples.
      2. Explain the process of buying food.
      3. Describe methods of food storage.
      4. Describe food preparation processes.

V. Public Relations
   A. Publicity
      1. Explain where and how to publicize.
      2. Develop advertising materials.
   B. Selecting the children
      1. Discuss the readiness of children and families.
      2. Identify considerations for enrollment of children with
disabilities and/or chronic illness.
   C. Parent/guardian involvement
      1. Discuss the importance of preparing a handbook and collect
examples.
      2. Discuss the legal rights of parents.
      3. Discuss methods of collaboration with families.
      4. Discuss the importance of and a plan for family education.
      5. Describe volunteer programs.
      6. Identify family resources and support programs.
   D. Contributing to the community and the profession
      1. Identify professional organizations.
      2. Describe methods of influencing public policy.
      3. Describe opportunities for participating in research.
      4. Describe opportunities for working in referral agencies.
      5. Explain methods of collaboration with community resources.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three tests                         30% of grade
Five relevant student activities    30% of grade
Lab assignments                     30% of grade
Other                               10% of grade

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 283

  • Title: Professional Competencies: Early Childhood Education*
  • Number: EDUC 283
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

Prerequisites: Department approval

This course focuses on the conduct and responsibilities of the early childhood professional. Topics include early childhood education codes, laws and regulations; child development; experience planning and curriculum development; observation and guidance of young children; authentic assessment; responsibilities to the young child's family, to the community, and to the teaching profession; employability skills; self-assessment; and job seeking skills. Completion of this course is required to obtain the One Year Post-Secondary Certificate in Early Childhood Education. 1hr. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Comply with the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethics for early childhood professionals.
  2. Identify and discuss the methods of authentic assessment.
  3. Discuss typical observation and guidance techniques.
  4. Recognize and describe productive teaching methodologies.
  5. Create a wide range of teaching activities.
  6. Identify ancillary duties associated with teaching.
  7. Locate and use resources for families and colleagues.
  8. Display employability skills.
  9. Develop a portfolio including a self-assessment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Conduct
   A. List professional standards of conduct for early childhood
educators.
   B. Apply the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct to a variety of ethical
dilemmas.
   C. Explain how personal values and the teacher’s philosophy of
education guide curriculum and teaching style.
   D. Display professional behaviors.
   E. Identify Kansas Licensing Regulations for Preschools and Child Care
Centers.
   F. Discuss the NAEYC accreditation criteria and process.

II. Authentic assessment 
   A. List various observation techniques
   B. Express ways of assessing children’s interests.
   C. Discuss how assessment is applied to developing curriculum.

III. Guidance Techniques
   A. Define principal elements in classroom management.
   B. Examine what guidance techniques work and why.
   C. Use effective communication techniques.
    
IV. Methodology
   A. Discuss knowledge of developmentally appropriate practice inclusive
of: 
      1. Education models
      2. Child Development 
      3. Knowledge of the individual child
      4. The cultural context in which they live
   B. Explain elements that maximize use of learning environments.
   C. Identify developmentally appropriate classroom equipment and
materials.
 
V. Activity Planning
   A. Identify a variety of learning experiences for young children.
   B. Demonstrate methods to encourage creativity and appreciation for
aesthetic experiences.
   C. Provide for anti-bias, inclusive learning experiences.
   D. Write behavioral learning objectives.
   E. Describe modes of activity evaluation.

VI. Ancillary Duties
   A. Describe safe and healthy indoor and outdoor environments for young
children.
   B. Draft plans for feeding experiences, nutritional snacks and meals
for young children.
   C. Design plans for diapering or toileting of young children. 
   D. Develop plans for field trips, routines, transitions and schedules.
   E. Develop plans for effectively communication with families.


VII. Professional Resources 
   A. Access professional literature, organizations, resources and
networking opportunities that support early childhood education.
   B. Record and discuss strategies for cooperative community and family
initiatives.
   C. Identify family information resources.
   D. Discuss opportunities for child and family advocacy.

VIII. Professional Employment
   A. Locate resources available for identifying employment
opportunities.
   B. Develop a professional portfolio.
   C. Develop a resume with references.
   D. Create a professional development plan.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examination          40% of grade        200 points
Portfolio            40% of grade        200 points
Class Participation  20% of grade        100 points
  Total              100%                500 points

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100% 450-500 points
  B = 80 – 89%  400-449 points 
  C = 70 – 79%  350-399 points 
  D = 60 - 69%  300-349 points 
  F =  0 – 59%    0-299 points

Caveats:

  1. Students must be authorized for placement in an early childhood setting based on the requirements of the Kansas Regulations for Licensing Preschools and Child Care Centers and/or the Kansas State Board of Education.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 284

  • Title: Seminar: Early Childhood Education*
  • Number: EDUC 284
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: Department approval
Corequisities: EDUC 285

The course will focus on conduct and responsibilities of the intern; early childhood codes, laws and regulations; child development; activity planning and curriculum development; observation and guidance of young children; authentic assessment; responsibilities to the young child's family and community and to the teaching profession; employability skills; self- assessment; and job-seeking skills. The student's practical application of information in the internship will be discussed, and a portfolio will be developed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify goals of the student teaching experience.
  2. Describe the relationship and responsibility of the student teacher, cooperating teachers and supervisors.
  3. Discuss the NAEYC Code of Ethics for early childhood teachers.
  4. List professional conduct issues for student teachers.
  5. Comply with Kansas Licensing Regulations for Preschools and Child Care Centers.
  6. Discuss the NAEYC accreditation criteria and process.
  7. Define the role of personal values in teaching.
  8. Describe how personal values and the teacher's philosophy of education guide curriculum and teaching style.
  9. Identify four major developmental theories that influence early childhood education.
  10. Describe how children learn.
  11. Discuss how the child's self-esteem, temperament and context affect learning.
  12. Describe ways of assessing child interest.
  13. List criteria for child activity planning.
  14. Collaborate in the planning and coordination of an individualized education and care plan for a child with special needs.
  15. Identify factors to consider in planning settings for individual, small and large group experiences.
  16. Describe the benefits and limitations of theme-centered curriculum.
  17. Select appropriate classroom and playground materials and equipment.
  18. Describe authentic assessment and common observation and guidance techniques.
  19. Analyze what guidance techniques work best and why.
  20. Work well as a member of a team.
  21. Develop a plan for recruiting children and for communicating to the community.
  22. Locate and use professional literature, organizations, resources and networking opportunities and family information sources.
  23. Demonstrate employability skills.
  24. Complete a self-assessment, including portfolio development.
  25. Develop a plan for professional growth.
  26. Discuss job-seeking techniques (resume, applications, reference letters, interviewing).
  27. Discuss current topics relevant to Early Childhood Education (legislation, finding sources, etc.).

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Student Teaching
   A. Responsibilities
      1. List and describe the responsibilities of all persons involved
including:
         a. Student
         b. Cooperating teachers
         c. Center director
         d. JCCC professor
      2. Explain universal precautions.
      3. Define liability.
      4. Describe student portfolios.
      5. Explain common student problems and how to resolve them.
      6. Explain the importance of knowing one's competencies.
      7. Assess teaching styles and techniques.
   B. Codes/laws/regulations
      1. List the main features of the NAEYC Code of Ethics.
      2. List the main features of the Kansas State Licensing
regulations.
      3. Define and describe NAEYC accreditation.
      4. Define and describe IDEA.
      5. Explain the importance and legalities of abuse and neglect
reporting.
   C. Explain the goals of student teaching, including:
      1. Planning and providing quality curricula.
      2. Acquiring technical teaching skills.
      3. Understanding children and their development.
      4. Establishing and maintaining working relationships with others.
      5. Developing a personal philosophy of early childhood education.
      6. Participating in advocacy efforts.
      7. Integrating all former education and experience.

II. Professionalism
   A. Personal values
      1. Discuss how learning and growth in personal values are related.
      2. Explain how sensitivity to diversity contributes to personal
growth.
      3. Explain how moral and ethical dilemmas are at the center of
learning.
      4. Explain the role of personal values in teaching.
   B. Describe the professional standards of conduct, including:
      1. Communicating with clarity and respect
      2. Confidentiality
      3. Appropriate attire and grooming
      4. Working as a supportive and caring team member
      5. Being observed

III. Child Development and Learning
   A. Explain the principal elements of the theories of.
      1. J. Piaget
      2. L. Vygotsky
      3. E. Erikson
      4. L. Kohlberg
   B. Describe how children learn, including:
      1. Attention and memory
      2. Using the five senses
      3. Learning styles
      4. Experience and exploration
      5. Imitation
      6. Questions and discussion
      7. Using knowledge and problem solving
      8. Temperament and learning
      9. Context and reinforcement

IV. Curriculum Development
   A. Assessment
      1. Define authentic assessment.
      2. Describe the various observation techniques.
      3. Explain how assessment is applied in developing curriculum.
   B. Activity pl i g
      1. Describe behavioral objectives and provide examples.
      2. Explain how curriculum models are applied to planning
activities.
      3. List and describe a variety of methods and materials.
      4. Describe modes of evaluation.
      5. Explain extensions.
      6. Define anti-bias curriculum, providing examples.
      7. Define constructivism. and developmentally challenging.
      8. Explain how themes integrate and connect learning.
      9. Explain the benefits of using the child's interests.
     10. List and describe resources commonly used to develop activities.
     11. Define inclusive curriculum.
     12. Explain individual family service plans.
   C. List and explain the elements of a conducive learning environment,
including:
      1. Room arrangement
      2. Equipment
      3. Accessibility
      4. Physical and psychological safety
      5. Healthy

IV. Guidance
   A. Describe principal elements of classroom management, including:
      1. Planning and with-it-ness
      2. Group size
      3. Feedback
      4. Transitions
      5. Time management
      6. Consistency, considerateness, confidence and candor
      7. Child empowerment
      8. Establishing classroom rules
      9. Setting limits
     10. Logical consequences
     11. Conflict resolution
     12. Common strategies: proximity, modeling, factual statements,
redirection, direct communication, think time

V. Families and the Community
   A. Working with families
      1. Describe how the American family has changed in the last few
generations.
      2. Describe various strategies for using families, including:
         a. Parents as volunteers
         b. Family supports and resources
         c. Partnering with families
         d. Families as resources
         e. Families and student teachers
      3. Explain the importance of advocacy for children and families.
   B. The community
      1. Assess the value of communication with the community.
      2. Describe recruitment strategies.
      3. List and describe community resources readily available to
support early childhood education.
      4. Explain how field trips enrich learning.
      5. Explain the importance of providing a quality program.
      6. List and describe strategies for cooperative initiatives.

VI. Employment
   A. Describe the skills necessary to gain employment in the field,
including:
      1. Self-assessment
      2. Job-seeking techniques (resume, application, references,
interviewing)
      3. Professional development plan
   B. Describe the resources available for identifying employment
opportunities, including:
      1. Professional organizations
      2. Continuing education
      3. Networking
      4. Information sources
   C. Describe the range of career opportunities in early childhood
education, including:
      1. Planning and opening a center
      2. Early childhood care and education centers
      3. Public and private schools
      4. Education consultants
      5. Hospitals
      6. Family services
      7. Other options

VI. Current Topics in Early Childhood Education
   A. Describe relevant legislation, regulations and funding, including:
      1. Local
      2. State
      3. Federal
   B. Describe recent advances in research in early childhood education,
including:
      1. Brain development
      2. Learning styles
      3. Curriculum models
      4. Guidance techniques

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Portfolio including the NAEYC Code of Ethics, lesson plans and one
example of each of the following: observation and behavior plan for a
child, teaching theme, discovery center design, written plan for child
with special needs, computer-based experience plan, creative and aesthetic
experiences plan, multicultural learning experience plan, written
communique to families and/or the community, videotape of teaching,
audiotape of participation in a parent/guardian conference and a record of
attendance and summary of an inservice presentation, workshop or
conference.

Lists of professional organizations, resources, professional journals and
sources of information for families must be included.

A professional self-assessment, resume and career
  development plan must also be included            50% of grade

Four presentations                                  20% of grade
Attendance and in-class assignments                 30% of grade
                                                   100%

Caveats:

  1. Students must be authorized for placement in an early childhood setting based on the requirements of the Kansas Regulations for Licensing Preschools and Child Care Centers and/or the Kansas State Board of Education.
  2. Student must have transportation to the education setting.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 285

  • Title: Student Teaching: Early Childhood Education*
  • Number: EDUC 285
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours:
  • Lecture Hours:

Description:

Prerequisites: EDUC 130 with a grade of "C" or higher, EDUC 250 with a grade of "C" or higher and EDUC 260 with a grade of "C" or higher

This supervised field experience in early childhood education is designed for students to apply their knowledge of teaching young children. The student will be participating in curriculum design and presentation; observing and interacting with young children; providing for the health, safety and nutrition of young children; managing the program setting; and working with families and the community. A self-assessment and a professional development plan are completed. The student will spend 20 hours a week (320 clock hours total) in at least two different early childhood settings, serving children of two different ages. Enrollment in this course requires that you be current in payment of a professional liability fee of $16.00. This fee is required once per calendar year based on enrollment in selected courses and must be in place prior to the start of classes. Students will be notified via their JCCC student email account if they are required to pay a $16 fee.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare for the student teaching internship.
  2. Discuss and comply with professional standards of conduct for teachers.
  3. Discuss the principal theories underlying effective teaching.
  4. Identify and describe productive teaching methodologies.
  5. Prepare for and effectively perform a wide range of teaching activities.
  6. Prepare for and effectively perform a variety of ancillary duties associated with teaching.
  7. Locate and use professional resources.
  8. Prepare for professional employment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Preparing for the Teaching Internship
   A. Identify goals of the student teaching experience.
   B. Describe the relationship and responsibility of the student teacher,
cooperating teachers and supervisors.

II. Professional Conduct
   A. Describe the relationship and responsibility of the student teacher,
cooperating teachers and supervisors.
   B. Discuss the NAEYC Code of Ethics for early childhood teachers.
   C. List professional conduct issues for student teachers.
   D. Comply with Kansas Licensing Regulations for Preschools and Child
Care Centers.
   E. Discuss the NAEYC accreditation criteria and process.
   F. Define the role of personal values in teaching.
   G. Establish and maintain schedules and routines.
   H. Display effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills with
children, parents, colleagues and supervisors.
   I. Work well as a member of a team.
   J. Establish and/or follow procedures related to reporting or
communicating to families, other agencies and the community.

III. Theory
   A. Describe how personal values and the teacher's philosophy of
education guide curriculum and teaching style.
   B. Identify four major developmental theories that influence early
childhood education.
   C. Describe how children learn.
   D. Discuss how the child's self-esteem, temperament and context affect
learning.

IV. Methodology
   A. Describe ways of assessing child interest.
   B. List criteria for child activity planning.
   C. Identify factors to consider in planning settings for individual,
small and large group experiences.
   D. Describe the benefits and limitations of theme-centered curriculum.
   E. Describe authentic assessment and common observation and guidance
techniques.
   F. Analyze what guidance techniques work best and why.

V. Teaching Performance
   A. Plan, organize and implement learning experiences in speech and
language, cognition, motor and physical development, and the social and
emotional domains.  Developmentally appropriate practice and antibias
curriculum, and the process of play must be considered.
   B. Collaborate in the planning and coordination of an individualized
education and care plan for a child with special needs.
   C. Write and present a teaching unit (theme).
   D. Design and build a discovery center.
   E. Plan a computer-based experience and support children's use of
computers and other technology.
   F. Display and encourage creativity and an appreciation for aesthetic
experiences.
   G. Provide for multicultural learning experiences.
   H. Effective guide transition.
   I. Utilize appropriate observation and guidance techniques.
   J. Adapt and/or modify teaching and guidance strategies relevant to the
abilities of the child and the diverse cultural and/or linguistics of the
family.

VI. Ancillary Duties
   A. Provide a safe and healthy environment for young children.
   B. Provide nutritional snacks and meals for young children.
   C. Perform administrative and clerical functions.
   D. Plan and implement a parent/guardian-teacher conference.
   E. Design a plan for parent/guardian or other volunteers' participation
in the education setting.
   F. Develop a plan for recruiting children and for communicating to the
community.

VII. Professional Resources
   A. Select appropriate classroom and playground materials and
equipment.
   B. Locate and use professional literature, organizations, resources and
networking opportunities and family information sources.

VIII. Preparing for Professional Employment
   A. Demonstrate employability skills.
   B. Complete a self-assessment, including portfolio development.
   C. Develop a plan for professional growth.
   D. Discuss job-seeking techniques (resume, applications, reference
letters, interviewing).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Portfolio including the NAEYC Code of Ethics, lesson plans and one
example of each of the following: observation and behavior plan for a
child, teaching theme, discovery center design, written plan for child
with special needs, computer-based experience plan, creative and aesthetic
experiences plan, multicultural learning experience plan, written
communiqué to families and/or the community, audiotape of participation
in a parent/guardian conference and a record of attendance and summary of
an inservice presentation, workshop or conference.  

Lists of professional organizations, resources, professional journals and
sources of information for families must be included.
 
A professional self-assessment, on-site coordinating teacher evaluation,
college supervising teacher evaluation, resume and career development plan
must also be included.

Portfolio                                    300
On-site cooperating teacher evaluation  480
Professor evaluation                         480
Self-evaluation (evaluation checklist)       100
  Total:                                    1360 - pts

A grade of “C” or better is required for satisfactory completion of this course.

A= 1224-1360
B= 1088-1223
C= 952-1087
D= 816-951
F= 0-815

Caveats:

  1. Students must be authorized for placement in an early childhood setting based on the requirements of the Kansas Regulations for Licensing Preschools and Child Care Centers and/or the Kansas State Board of Education.
  2. Student must have transportation to the education setting.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 290

  • Title: Leadership in Early Childhood Education*
  • Number: EDUC 290
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Course Type: Career
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Prerequisites: Program Facilitator Approval

The student will study how early childhood education program directors lead programs and create quality environments for children, families and staff. The leadership topics include: leadership styles; developing mission statements, program philosophies, procedures, manuals and handbooks; assessing and planning for program improvements; recruiting and retaining qualified early childhood teachers; creating professional growth opportunities; developing effective staff meetings; implementing a shared decision making process; utilizing conflict resolution strategies; and developing partnerships with families and community agencies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the components of effective leadership in Early Childhood Education Programs.
  2. Design program elements consistent with participative management.
  3. Develop an employee recruitment and selection plan.
  4. Design an orientation and mentoring plan that supports teachers through different stages of professional growth.
  5. Discuss effective staff meeting procedures and process.
  6. Outline the use of shared decision making and effective communication techniques.
  7. Develop strategies that strengthen, support, and engage families.
  8. Plan strategies for building partnerships with community agencies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Leadership
   A. The Administrator as Leader
      1. Define leadership versus management.
      2. Identify values and beliefs that shape leadership behavior.
      3. Identify styles of leadership and assess your own.
      4. Explain the principles of participative management noting how
facilitative managers are different than those who have a top-down
management style.
      5. Explain the difference between managing and coaching.
      6. Identify stakeholders to whom an early childhood education
program administrator is accountable.
      7. Discuss the three kinds of organizational power and identify the
one most useful for a transactional administrator. 
      8. Discuss the two kinds of personal power and identify the type
most desired in a transactional administrator.
      9. Identify the three major tasks of early childhood education
program administrators and discuss how they relate to one another.
     10. Discuss how and why to form staff into an active learning
community.
     11. Explain the difference between the reality and perceptions in
managing a program.
     12. Summarize the ten lessons for effective leadership.
     13. Explain how early childhood education program administrators set
and maintain an ethical climate and use it to solve ethical dilemmas. 
   B. Program Design 
      1. Design vision and mission statements for a program.
      2. Plan ways to involve staff and families in creating vision and
mission statements for a program.
      3. Write a program philosophy that outlines beliefs about how
children learn, values of your program, and beliefs about the role of
early childhood education.
      4. Identify characteristics of program work positions that are
consistent with program goals. 
      5. Identify elements of parent and staff handbooks that communicate
a program’s vision & goals.

II. Recruiting, Selecting, Orienting, & Mentoring Staff
   A. Recruitment as a Program Strategy
      1. Explain the infrastructure issues that make recruiting and
maintaining qualified, experienced teachers so difficult.
      2. Calculate the annual turnover rate for any early childhood
program.
      3. Explain continuous recruitment.
      4. List recruitment strategies for reducing turnover of staff.
      5. Design a recruitment advertisement that reflects the unique needs
and characteristics of a program.
      6. Design and implement a continuous recruitment action plan.
   B. Selecting and Maintaining Qualified, Competent Staff
      1. Explain the two kinds of “fit” that a program must ascertain
about a teaching candidate.
      2. Develop “fit criteria” that a program could use to choose a
teaching candidate.
      3. Develop an interview plan and interview schedule to use in
selecting teaching candidates.
      4. Revise job descriptions to reflect “fit criteria”.
      5. Design an application process to use in screening teaching
candidates for employment.
      6. Design a salary/benefits package that rewards teacher education
and experience.
   C. Orienting and Mentoring New Staff and Helping Teachers Grow
Professionally
      1. Explain the rationale for phasing in staff orientation over the
first three months of employment.
      2. Outline a phased-in approach to employee orientation, including
the topics, activities, and experiences for each phase of orientation. 
      3. Develop a training plan for new staff that will be used in each
phase of orientation. 
      4. Discuss how to evaluate a new employee’s performance during
each phase of orientation.  
      5. Discuss the three basic needs of teachers and the implications
for program administrators.
      6. Describe teacher levels of professional growth, explaining what
characterizes each stage, as well as what kind of support teachers need
during each phase of development.
      7. Outline concept areas for staff development for each of the
teacher stages of professional growth.
      8. Outline a plan for evaluating teachers, including the specifics
of how it will be done and how teachers will be involved in
self-evaluation.
      9. Explain how the NAEYC code of ethics addresses an
administrator’s relationship with an employee who needs to improve
performance.
     10. Design a professional development plan for all teachers. 
     11. Write a plan for working with teachers who are not growing
professionally or who are not performing to the program standards.

III. Meetings
   A. Staff Meetings
      1. Summarize the essential elements of a successful staff meeting.
      2. Explain why meetings are often unproductive.
      3. Explain how meetings can foster greater commitment to shared
goals.
      4. Delineate the different roles that are essential to a good staff
meeting.
      5. Define how to know if a staff meeting accomplished its purpose.
      6. Outline the steps for creating an effective staff meeting
agenda.
      7. Explain how room set-up affects the effectiveness of a meeting.
   B. Meeting Facilitator Role
      1. Assess one’s own work style. 
      2. Discuss how work style affects facilitation skills.
      3. Assess personal communication style and delineate the advantages
and drawbacks of this style.
      4. Explain how a facilitator of a meeting balances the task
functions of a meeting with the more reflective processes of group
functioning.
      5. Describe unproductive facilitator behaviors, and present
strategies for dealing with them.
      6. Explain the steps for dealing with conflict within a meeting. 
      7. Outline what facilitators can do to encourage brainstorming.
      8. Outline several strategies for achieving consensus during a
meeting.

IV. Shared Decision Making & Participative Management
   A. Decision Making
      1. Assess preferred decision-making style.
      2. Explain the principles of collaboration and outline the
director’s role in establishing norms for collaboration.
      3. Describe what synergy means for early childhood programs.
      4. Assess your beliefs about power and influence.
      5. Describe the beliefs that program directors must embrace when
they incorporate participative management into the life of their
programs.
      6. Outline the major kinds of decisions that must be made in an
early childhood program.
      7. Define the four levels of staff participation in program decision
making and give examples of when each style is most appropriate.
      8. Explain how a program director decides who should make decisions
in an early childhood program.
      9. Assess staff perception of their decision-making influence.
     10. Explain the steps involved in making a decision.
     11. Develop a decision-making blueprint.
     12. Denote several consensus-building strategies.
     13. Explain the concept of “Groupthink” and tell how it can be
avoided. 
   B. Effective Communication
      1. Assess personal listening skills.
      2. Explain and demonstrate the principles of active listening.
      3. Explain and demonstrate the principles of using “I” instead
of “You” statements.
      4. Define the principle of descriptive praise and give examples of
when to use it.
      5. Define the principle of one-minute reprimands and give examples
of when to use it.
   C. Conflict Resolution
      1. Assess personal conflict management style.
      2. Outline a conflict resolution process for program staff or for
families.
      3. Discuss types of challenging people and delineate strategies for
dealing with each type.
      4. Design a conflict resolution agreement.
      5. Identify ways that staff can negotiate cultural conflicts.
   D. Building Reciprocal Relationships with Families
      1. Identify messages, that quality programs focused on forming
reciprocal relationships with families, should give families.
      2. Explain how the family support approach to working with parents
is different than the traditional parent involvement approach.
      3. Explain how parent partnerships with staff benefit the child and
the family.
      4. Identify the principles by which staff should plan experiences
for children and establish partnerships with families.
      5. Plan specific ways to showcase program families and give them a
true identity in program life.
      6. Outline strategies for establishing open communication with
families.
      7. Plan ways to make the program environment inviting and welcoming
to families.
      8. Define cultural sensitivity.
      9. Assess one’s own cultural responses to children’s behavior.
     10. Identify how cultural values are embedded in everyday routines in
early education programs.
     11. Outline what program staff can do to become aware of cultural
differences in their classrooms and become more attuned to family values
and beliefs as they relate to their culture.
     12. Plan ways to involve families in children’s education.
     13. Identify how & why family involvement enhances a child’s growth
& development.
   E. Building Partnerships with Community Agencies
      1. Identify agencies that are sources of funding and resources.
      2. Outline a procedure for cooperating with agencies to advocate for
services for children and families.
      3. Explain the benefits of participating in research about Early
Childhood Education.
      4. Design a plan to share knowledge with others about careers in
Early Childhood Education.
      5. Plan a program for involving student teachers and others in the
program.
      6. Identify professional organizations and the benefits of
participating in them.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Assignments           40% of grade
Resource File         10% of grade
Implementation Plan   40% of grade
Presentations         10% of grade

GRADING SCALE:
100 - 90% = A
 89 – 80% = B
 79 – 70% = C
 69 – 60% = D
 59% or below = F

Caveats:

  1. Student must be an early childhood education program owner, director, assistant director, manager or curriculum coordinator. Student must have some management / supervisory functions with program teachers.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EDUC 291

No information found.