Graphic Design, A.A.S.

The graphic design field is highly competitive for both salaried and freelance positions. There is a demand for artists with above-average talents and graphic art skills. Opportunities in the field range from entry-level layout and production to art director positions.

Demonstrated abilities are most often the key to obtaining a position in the graphic design field. JCCC has structured its graphic design program to help the student develop a comprehensive portfolio. The student's work will be critiqued by a team of professionals every semester. These professionals working in the field, along with the faculty, will help develop the student's skills in creative problem solving and in the use of materials, processes, tools and equipment. Outstanding studio and computer facilities are available for working on class projects. The two-year curriculum consisting of 71 credit hours leads to an associate of applied science degree.

Some GDES courses are typically offered in the fall semester only, and some courses are typically offered in the spring semester only. This information can be found under the relevant course descriptions.

Important: Please enroll in the CDTP sections identified in the credit class search as a Graphic Design Qualifier section. The content of these CDTP sections places emphasis on the Graphic Design career specific application of the Adobe Creative Suite to industry standards for print production and is reserved for students enrolling in the Qualifier semester courses.

It is recommended that you enroll in these five-week CDTP classes in sequence in the Qualifier semester.

(Major Code 2290; State CIP Code 50.0409)

Associate of Applied Science Degree

Qualifier Semester

ART 124Design 2D*3
GDES 120Introduction to Graphic Design3
CDTP 145Desktop Illustration I: Illustrator1
CDTP 135Desktop Photo Manipulation I: Photoshop1
CDTP 140Desktop Publishing I: InDesign1
Total Hours9

Fall Semester

ART 129Design Color*3
GDES 130Drawing and Media Methods 1*3
GDES 132Typography*3
GDES 140Technical Processes*3
ENGL 121Composition I*3
Total Hours15

Spring Semester

ART 127Design 3D*3
GDES 131Drawing and Media Methods 2*3
GDES 134Layout Design*3
Humanities Electives ^3
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^^3
Total Hours15
^

Humanities Electives

^^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Fall Semester

GDES 230Drawing and Media Methods 3*3
GDES 231Advanced Typography*3
GDES 235Production Methods*3
Humanities Electives ^3
Health and/or Physical Education Elective ^^1
Total Hours13
^

Humanities Electives

^^

Health and/or Physical Education Elective

Spring Semester

Technical/Studio Elective (see below)1
GDES 236Electronic Production*3
GDES 244Communication Systems*3
GDES 245Advanced Design Practice*3
GDES 272Professional Preparation*3
Science and/or Math Elective ^3
Total Hours16
^

Science and/or Math Elective

Technical/Studio Electives

CDTP 160Desktop Publishing II: InDesign*1
CDTP 165Desktop Illustration II: Illustrator*1
CDTP 185Desktop Illustration III: Illustrator*1
CDTP 155Desktop Photo Manipulation II: Photoshop*1
CDTP 175Desktop Photo Manipulation III: Photoshop*1
CWEB 105Introduction to Web Pages: Dreamweaver*1
CWEB 115Intermediate Web Pages: Dreamweaver*1
CWEB 130Introduction to Flash*1
CIM 135Digital Imaging and Video*3
PHOT 121Fundamentals of Photography (Darkroom)3
PHOT 122Advanced Photography (Darkroom)*3
PHOT 123Studio Photography*3
ART 135Painting I3
ART 136Painting II*3
ART 172Watercolor Painting3
ART 231Life Drawing I*3
ART 232Life Drawing II*3
GDES 275Graphic Design Internship*1
Note: A graphic design major may apply to this internship course if the student is also enrolled in or has completed all fourth-semester studio courses.

Total Program Hours: 68

Courses

GDES 120   Introduction to Graphic Design (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various aspects of the graphic design field. Topics include the ways in which visual messages are used in society, the skills needed by a graphic designer and the potential areas of specialization and employment. This class will have guest speakers from the field of graphic design. Emphasis will be on assisting the student to make an informed decision about graphic design as a career. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GDES 130   Drawing and Media Methods 1 (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 120 and ART 124 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

This course will provide instruction in perceptual techniques, perspective theory and drawing process methods that relate to the visual analysis of the three-dimensional forms drawn from life. Focus will be on the application of theory, processes and techniques to attain structural accuracy and the illusion of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional surface. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 131   Drawing and Media Methods 2 (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 130

This course is a continuation of Drawing and Media Methods I, with emphasis on the creative application of perspective theory, perceptual skill and drawing methods. Drawing methods and rendering techniques will be applied to visual problem-solving processes and the communication of design concepts. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 131H   HON: Drawing & Media Methods 2 (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GDES 132   Typography (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 124 and GDES 120 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

This course will provide instruction in the basic principles of contemporary typographic design. Information concerning typography, from traditional letterpress through digital type design and typesetting, will be included. The course content will emphasize effective methods of communicating to a mass audience through the printed letter, word, line and page. Working knowledge of QuarkXpress and Adobe InDesign required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 132H   HON: Typography (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GDES 134   Layout Design (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 132

This course will provide a basic study of layout elements. Students will acquire the skills necessary to produce layouts. These skills include photographic indication techniques, comp lettering, advertising and editorial grid systems and electronic page design. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 140   Technical Processes (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PHOT 121 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

This course covers digital prepress applications, scanning, image manipulation and color output devices. The transition from conventional to digital production will be covered. Analysis of output and file management and the understanding of proofing systems will be covered. Proper usage of peripheral equipment will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 230   Drawing and Media Methods 3 (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 131 and GDES 132 and GDES 134

This course will provide an understanding of the application of illustration to graphic design. Visual problem-solving processes acquired in Drawing and Media Methods 2 will be further developed through problems in image composition emphasizing expressive communication. Techniques in traditional and digital media are explored. This course is typically taught in the fall semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 231   Advanced Typography (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 134

This course is a continuation of Layout Design. Emphasis will be on typographic solutions that explore verbal/visual messages. Projects include designs for publication, such as posters, brochures, packaging and graphic campaigns. Typography as a functional and experimental medium will be stressed. Design problem-solving for a diverse range of specifications, including audience, client needs and budget constraints, are included. Traditional and digital tools will be incorporated to produce comprehensives. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only. Working knowledge of Macromedia Dreamweaver is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 231H   HON: Advanced Typography (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GDES 235   Production Methods (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 134 and GDES 140

This course will provide the fundamentals of preparing art for reproduction. Traditional camera-ready art techniques and digital prepress production methods will be emphasized. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 236   Electronic Production (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

This course is a continuation of the Production Methods course, providing experience in digital prepress and electronic production techniques. The student will apply production skills to problems of professional scope and complexity, including specialty processes, trapping and color separation. Preparation of graphic files for screen presentation and for the Web will be explored. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 244   Communication Systems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

This course will explore the scope and potential of graphic design as a vehicle for visual communication in contemporary society. Signs and symbols, as well as communicative power of typographic, hand graphic and photographic modes, will be studied. Traditional and electronic methods will be used to develop projects. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 245   Advanced Design Practice (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

This course will focus on the use of the student's total design capability and technical knowledge in solving graphic design problems of professional scope and complexity. Students will have the opportunity to work with three art directors and produce three professional projects for potential inclusion in their portfolios. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 272   Professional Preparation (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235 Prerequisite: The student must have completed all required studio courses in the graphic design program prior to the semester for which he or she is enrolling in this course or be co-enrolled in all fourth-semester studio courses

This course will provide graphic design majors instruction in the organization and presentation of his or her work in a portfolio format of professional quality. A portfolio, digital portfolio archive, self promo, resume and business ensemble will be produced. Instruction in interviewing techniques and employment searches will also be provided. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

GDES 275   Graphic Design Internship (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Graphic design faculty review committee approval

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the skills learned in the graphic design program. Student interns will complete a minimum of 180 hours on the job and will be compensated with at least the minimum hourly wage.

GDES 291   Independent Study (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

GDES 120

  • Title: Introduction to Graphic Design*
  • Number: GDES 120
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various aspects of the graphic design field. Topics include the ways in which visual messages are used in society, the skills needed by a graphic designer and the potential areas of specialization and employment. This class will have guest speakers from the field of graphic design. Emphasis will be on assisting the student to make an informed decision about graphic design as a career. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the meaning of graphic design including types of images and visual messages.
  2. List examples of graphic design products in use in our society including: print, video, signage, and film.
  3. Describe educational needs of a graphic designer including: perceptual, visual, theoretical, organizational, technical knowledge and skills.
  4. List related disciplines within the graphic design field including: Graphic Design, Typography, Photography, Illustration, Digital Design and Technology.
  5. List significant historical developments that influenced the disciplines of graphic design including: major periods, world events, technology and contemporary developments.
  6. List specialties in the graphic design field including: advertising, illustration, publication, exhibit, package, information, multimedia and environmental design.
  7. Identify entry level through upper level employment positions in the graphic design career field.
  8. Describe expectations for a typical entry-level job in the Midwest including: job description and qualifications, salary range, working conditions and promotion opportunities.
  9. Describe projections for job opportunity for the next three to five years including: types of jobs, locale and source of information.
  10. Define business issues of importance to the designer including: ethical standards, technologies, pricing and marketing, salaries, contracts and freelance vs. salaried issues.
  11. Describe resources for professional growth available for the graphic designer including: organizations, publications, seminars and conferences, internet and job placement centers.
  12. Use vocabulary, through discussion and written reports, that demonstrates an understanding of the graphic design field including terms relating to design disciplines, history, specialties, job descriptions, business issues and resources.
  13. Describe the essential requirements for successful completion of the Graphic Design Program including: admissions requirements, recommended course sequence and prerequisites, Portfolio Review and requirements for admission into the Graphic Design Internship course. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. An Overview of the Field of Graphic Design
   A. Describe the meaning of graphic design.
      1. Types of images (type, drawing, graphics, photography)
      2. Visual messages (sender, message, receiver)
   B. Describe graphic design in our society.
      1. Examples of usage (print, video, signage)
   C. Describe educational needs for graphic designers.
      1. Perception
      2. Visual organization
      3. Design methodologies
      4. Aesthetics
      5. Visualizing techniques
      6. Materials, tools, processes, technology
      7. Production techniques
      8. Message and content
      9. Design theory
      10. Historical perspective
   D. List related disciplines within the graphic design field.
      1. Graphic design
      2. Typography
      3. Photography
      4. Illustration
      5. Digital design
      6. Design technology
   E. List significant historical developments that influenced graphic
design.
      1. Major trends in design history
      2. Influence of world events on style
      3. Influence of technology on style
      4. Contemporary developments in design
   F. List career specialties in the graphic design field.
      1. Advertising
      2. Publication design
      3. Illustration
      4. Type design
      5. Exhibit design
      6. Digital design
      7. Multimedia design
      8. Package design
      9. Environmental design
      10. Information design
      11. Educational design 
      12. Corporate graphics
      13. Identity design
      14. Photography
   G. Identify entry level through upper level job positions in the
graphic design field.
      1. Production artist
      2. Digital prepress artist
      3. Layout artist
      4. Designer/illustrator
      5. Art director
   H. Describe expectations for a typical entry level job in graphic
design.
      1. Sample job description
      2. Salary range/benefits profile for average 
      3. Average working conditions (hours, environment, demands, etc.)
      4. Promotion opportunities
      5. General employment qualifications
         a. Personal attributes
         b. Skills
         c. Portfolio
   I. Describe projections for economic growth and job opportunity for
next 3-5 years.
      1. Types of jobs forecasted
      2. Geographic locale identified
      3. Available information on salaries
      4. Source(s) of information
   J. Define business issues of importance to the graphic designer.
      1. Ethical standards
      2. New technologies
      3. Pricing and marketing
      4. Salaries/benefits
      5. Contracts/legal considerations
      6. Freelance vs. salaried
   K. Describe available professional resources for the graphic designer.
      1. Professional organizations
      2. Networking
      3. Seminars, conferences, workshops
      4. Professional publications
      5. Internet
      6. Video or CD
      7. Job placement centers
   L. Use vocabulary relating to the graphic design field including terms
related to the following:
      1. Disciplines within the field of graphic design
      2. Design history
      3. Design specialties within the field
      4. Job descriptions in graphic design
      5. Business issues relating to graphic design
      6. Resources for the designer

II. JCCC Graphic Design Program
   A. Career program profile
      1. List the sequences of courses/prerequisites for the full and part
time tracks.
   B. Identify admission requirements for the JCCC Graphic Design
Program.
      1. Testing
      2. Required courses
      3. Application
   C. Describe portfolio review and explain its importance to the graphic
design student major. 
   D. Describe the internship component of the Graphic Design Program and
explain its importance to the graphic design major.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class participation/performance (including attendance, punctuality,
speakers series reports, acceptable completion of assigned projects,
meeting deadlines, individual and group discussion, involvement in
directed activities and group collaboration) 60% of grade

Exams or Midterm/Final project(s)            40% of grade
(no more than two)
Total                                       100%   
                      
Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade Scale:
      4.0  = A
      3.75 = A-
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D, or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 130

  • Title: Drawing and Media Methods 1*
  • Number: GDES 130
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 120 and ART 124 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

Description:

This course will provide instruction in perceptual techniques, perspective theory and drawing process methods that relate to the visual analysis of the three-dimensional forms drawn from life. Focus will be on the application of theory, processes and techniques to attain structural accuracy and the illusion of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional surface. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in the use of the tools, materials and drawing techniques introduced in the course.
  2. Accurately draw 3-dimensional forms, applying basic theoretical principles of linear perspective.
  3. Demonstrate accuracy of proportion and scale when drawing objects from life through the effective use of a systematic, analytic approach to drawing.
  4. Demonstrate perceptual discrimination of gross and subtle variations in structural accuracy when drawing objects from life.
  5. Apply the vocabulary specific to drawing theory and design principles in class discussion
  6. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Drawing Tools and Materials
   A. Select and use drawing media applicable to design practice.
      1. Graphite pencils
      2. Color pencils
      3. Design markers
   B. Identify and utilize drawing and presentation surfaces applicable to
design practice.
      1. Tracing papers
      2. Marker papers
      3. Mounting boards
   C.    Identify and utilize drawing tools applicable to design practice.
     
      1. T-squares
      2. Rulers
      3. Triangles
      4. Other

II. Drawing Techniques     
   A. Employ variations in line weight.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate quality and finesse of line for specific
drawing medium.

III. Drawing Theory and Methods       
   A. Demonstrate the ability to draw objects based on fundamental
geometric forms; cubes, cylinders, cones, spheres and prisms, utilizing
the principles of linear perspective.
      1. Emphasis: Two-point perspective
      2. Review:  One-point and three-point perspective
   B. Define and employ the following perceptual devices to describe
three-dimensional form.
      1. Scale          
      2. Overlap
      3. Line weight 
      4. Line continuity
      5. Texture           
      6. Figure/Ground relationships   
      7. Transitions between light and shade
   C. Apply the vocabulary specific to drawing theory and design
principles. 

IV. Visual Analysis 
   A. Properly utilize a grid system.
   B. Accurately analyze the proportion and structure of a single object.
   C. Accurately analyze proportional and spatial relationships between
multiple objects.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Demonstrate productive work habits.
      1. Record data
      2. Attend to detail
      3. Complete tasks on schedule
      4. Maintain the work setting
   B. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
      1. Problem-solve in groups
      2. Respond to supervision
      3. Collaborate with peers and build consensus
      4. Maintain a positive attitude toward tasks and peers
      5. Give and accept constructive criticism and praise

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Drawing projects      50% of grade
Exercises             25% of grade
Studio performance    25% of grade
Total                100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 131

  • Title: Drawing and Media Methods 2*
  • Number: GDES 131
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 130

Description:

This course is a continuation of Drawing and Media Methods I, with emphasis on the creative application of perspective theory, perceptual skill and drawing methods. Drawing methods and rendering techniques will be applied to visual problem-solving processes and the communication of design concepts. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Accurately render objects, applying the basic principles relating to light, shade, cast shadows and value and color relationships.
  2. Demonstrate perceptual discrimination of gross and subtle variations in structure and in the value ranges of light, shade and cast shadows when rendering objects.
  3. Effectively apply perceptual skill and drawing methods to the sequential steps of visual problem-solving processes.
  4. Effectively apply perspective theory, drawing methods and media techniques to develop and communicate design concepts.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of form and content relationships through the effective application of drawing methods and techniques and the design principles of visual language.
  6. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Form and Content Relationships
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of point of view.
   B. Employ visual balance: symmetry vs. asymmetry.
   C. Utilize relative scale and position in space.
   D. Employ positive and negative shape relationships.
   E. Demonstrate an understanding of emphasis and contrast. 
   F. Appropriately utilize color, value, and texture. 

II. Rendering Design Concepts
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the location of
light source to the light, shade and cast shadow of three-dimensional
forms.
   B. Employ the range of values describing light, shade and shadow when
rendering three-dimensional forms. 
   C. Apply perspective theory to attain structural accuracy.
   D. Identify and employ appropriate media and stylistic techniques.
   E. Utilize value and color relationships to communicate concepts.

III. Visual Problem-Solving Methods
   A. Draw thumbnails.
   B. Draw roughs.
   C. Render color studies.
   D. Render comprehensives.
   E. Render finished art.

IV. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Demonstrate productive work habits.
      1. Record data
      2. Attend to detail
      3. Complete tasks on schedule
      4. Maintain the work setting
   B. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
      1. Problem-solve in groups
      2. Respond to supervision
      3. Collaborate with peers and build consensus
      4. Maintain a positive attitude toward tasks and peers
      5. Give and accept constructive criticism and praise.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of 3 projects  75% of grade
Studio performance       25% of grade
Total                   100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 131H

No information found.

GDES 132

  • Title: Typography*
  • Number: GDES 132
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 124 and GDES 120 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

Description:

This course will provide instruction in the basic principles of contemporary typographic design. Information concerning typography, from traditional letterpress through digital type design and typesetting, will be included. The course content will emphasize effective methods of communicating to a mass audience through the printed letter, word, line and page. Working knowledge of QuarkXpress and Adobe InDesign required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the origins of type, major trends in type design, the changing technology of type and the changing application of type design.
  2. Identify type classifications and type families.
  3. Define and explain basic typographic principles and vocabulary as they relate to design.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of comping, transfer type and digital type.
  5. Select the appropriate traditional and/or digital tools and software applications necessary to satisfy established project specifications.
  6. Select the appropriate arrangement for legibility and typestyle to convey a specific graphic communication message or theme.
  7. In project assignments, effectively employ visual contrasts, the individual letter, word, lines on a page, type size, style, weight, texture, color, spacing, leading and arrangement.
  8. Utilize the visual contrasts, optical relationships, and typographic grids and combinations with other graphic elements to satisfy established project standards.
  9. Demonstrate problem-solving skills that include the identification of important information, generation of alternative solutions and selection of the appropriate course of completion.
  10. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Type
   A. Describe the origins of type.
   B. Trace the evolution of type design (major trends).
   C. Describe and illustrate changing technology of type.
   D. Describe the implications of design trends and technological
innovations.

II. Basic Type Technologies
   A. Define the common and unique terminology of each of the following
typographical processes:
      1. Traditional
      2. Photo typesetting
      3. Digital
   B. Compare and contrast the three typographical processes listed
above.
   C. Design a specific project using traditional press type.
   D. Design projects using digital software, specifically Quark XPress.

III. Layout Content
   A. Define the givens and the variables of the project.
   B. Research the project topic.
   C. Explore potential visual images for the project.
   D. Create the design concept.
   E. Compose the "thumbnails."
   F. Revise selected thumbnails to "roughs."
   G. Select and refine rough.
   H. Edit and produce final version [comprehensive(s)].

IV. Legibility and Arrangements
   A. Recognize and select the appropriate attributes of type fonts.
      1. Type size (text type and display type)
      2. Line length 
      3. Leading
      4. Kerning
   B. Recognize and select the appropriate arrangements of type.
      1. Justified
      2. Rag right
      3. Rag left
      4. Centered
      5. Non-horizontal (diagonal)
   C. Recognize and select the appropriate compositional placements of
type.
      1. Symmetrical
      2. Asymmetrical
   D. Recognize and select the appropriate visual coding of text.
      1. Paragraphs
      2. Indentations
      3. Margins
   E. Recognize and select the appropriate parameters of the compositional
page.
      1. Page size
      2. Material choice
      3. Color selection

V. Design With Type
   A. Describe the basic typographic elements, including:
      1. Texture
      2. Value
      3. Weight
      4. Color
      5. Size
   B. Select the appropriate visual relationships from the basic
typographical elements listed above.
   C. Describe the relational typographic elements, including:
      1. Legibility
      2. Spacing
      3. Leading
      4. Alignment
   D. For specific projects, incorporate various configurations as
described above based on the criteria of the projects given to best solve
the design problem.

VI. Nature of Type
   A. Select and employ the appropriate compositional tools for designing
a project including:
      1. Geometrical (mathematical)
         a. Grid structure
         b. The golden section
      2. Optical/Gestalt principle
         a. Proportion
         b. Contrast
         c. Relationship
      3. Organic forms and patterns from nature
   B. Apply the principles of integral design in creating a project,
including:
      1. Photo
      2. Illustration
      3. Graphic devices, including boarders, bullets, icons, buttons,
patterns, and background

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of four projects               50-75% of grade
One examination and one written report 10-25% of grade
Studio performance                     15-25% of grade
Total                                   100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

  1. Working knowledge of QuarkXpress and Adobe InDesign is required. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 132H

No information found.

GDES 134

  • Title: Layout Design*
  • Number: GDES 134
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 132

Description:

This course will provide a basic study of layout elements. Students will acquire the skills necessary to produce layouts. These skills include photographic indication techniques, comp lettering, advertising and editorial grid systems and electronic page design. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the basic techniques of photograph indication using markers with colored pencils
  2. Effectively use lettering tools, materials and techniques.
  3. Select the appropriate typestyle to convey a specific graphic communication message or theme.
  4. Analyze and determine the use of color, texture, size, proportion, weight, form and function for the effectiveness of letter symbols as elements in design.
  5. Describe and evaluate the structure of letters and the effective spacing of letters, words and lines on a page.
  6. Recognize and develop basic advertising and editorial grid format systems.
  7. Develop and demonstrate professional behavior regarding career opportunities, current technical developments in the field, and aesthetic trends in the arts.
  8. Demonstrate problem solving skills that include the identification of important information, generation of alternative solutions, and selection of the appropriate course of completion.
  9. Define and explain basic layout principles and vocabulary as they relate to layout design.
  10. Relate the basic elements of layout design to page composition.
  11. Demonstrate basic skills working with traditional and digital tools for layout design to include: marker photographic indication technique, grid construction, type indication, and the use of representational and non-representational images.
  12. Select the appropriate traditional and/or digital tools and software applications necessary to satisfy established project specifications.
  13. Demonstrate the ability to be an effective member of a team through team problem solving activities.
  14. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Photograph Indication Techniques
   A. Employ photographic indication with markers and colored pencils
using:
      1. Textures and surfaces
      2. Black and white   
      3. Full color

II. Lettering and Typography
   A. Describe and utilize the basic principles of typography.
   B. Develop skills using traditional comprehensive lettering using
pencil, ink, markers and liquid media by indicating:
      1. Looping with and without T-square for body copy
      2. Comping display type
      3. Overlay refining systems and copy transfer
      4. Applying basic typographic settings for page layouts
      5. Employ basic typographic measurements in points and picas
   C. Develop skills using electronic type generation in a page layout
program including:
      1. Basic digital typesetting and formatting.
         a. Greeking (lourum ipsum)
         b. Master pages
         c. Paragraph style sheets
         d. Page set-up and printing outputs
         e. Image runarounds
      2. Applying basic typographic settings for page layouts.
      3. Employing basic typographic measurements in points and picas.

III. Applied Grid Systems
   A. Apply the principles and elements for designing advertising layout
formats.
   B. Apply the principles and elements for designing editorial layout
formats.

IV. Research and Resource for Layout Artists and Professional Vocabulary
   A. Establish an "artist's morgue" for idea and photo reference.
   B. Employ various resource materials for development of a visual/verbal
vocabulary.
   C. Implement distillations from research for use with the creative
problem solving processes.

V. Compositional Considerations for Basic Layout Elements
   A. Apply the principles of integral design in creating a project,
including:
      1. Typographic
      2. Representational images
      3. Non-representational images
   B. Apply the stages of conceptualization including: 
      1. Define the givens and the variables of the project
      2. Research the project topic
      3. Explore potential visual images for the project
      4. Create the design concept
      5. Compose the "thumbnails"
      6. Revise selected thumbnails to "roughs"
      7. Select and refine rough
      8. Edit and produce finial version (comprehensive(s))
   C. Apply the selection of appropriate tools.
      1. Traditional
      2. Digital
      3. Various combining of forms and media

VI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of four projects                  50 - 75% of grade
One examination and/or one written report 10 - 25% of grade
Studio performance                        15 - 25% of grade
Total                                       100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 140

  • Title: Technical Processes*
  • Number: GDES 140
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 121 and CDTP 135 and CDTP 140 and CDTP 145

Description:

This course covers digital prepress applications, scanning, image manipulation and color output devices. The transition from conventional to digital production will be covered. Analysis of output and file management and the understanding of proofing systems will be covered. Proper usage of peripheral equipment will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define conventional reproduction photography in terms of photographic exposure and equivalent comparisons to digital processes.
  2. Identify materials including: line paper print, positive line film, negative film and halftone line screens.
  3. Identify production problems derived from evaluation of product including overexposure, underexposure, processing errors and handling errors.
  4. Explain enlargement and reduction as it relates to reproduction ratios and proper dpi for correct correlation for output line screening.
  5. Analyze and identify various proofing processes including color key, cromalins, blue lines and other digital output proofs.
  6. Define halftone negatives and identify the qualities of a good halftone.
  7. Describe color reproduction methods and procedures including: flat or match color, four color process, CMYK, RGB and spot color.
  8. Demonstrate printing on various paper stocks.
  9. Prepare film work to produce a color key, than produce a color key working with line art.
  10. Describe color key materials and processes.
  11. Describe several introductory methods used in desktop prepress technology including: scanning photographic prints and slides, using a film recorder, and color output devices.
  12. Document the steps in correcting scanned images for proper output.
  13. Differentiate between and create various digital photo manipulation techniques used in the print industry.
  14. Demonstrate appropriate procedures for concise file management for file output.
  15. Demonstrate managing digital files for use on a network and procedures for storing digital files.
  16. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Transition from Conventional to Digital Production
   A. Define conventional reproduction photography.
   B. Trace the history of pre-press, on-press, and post-press.
   C. Define digital reproduction photography. 
      
II. Color Reproduction
   A. Define flat or match color.
   B. Define four color process.
   C. Identify different forms of proofing and printing options.
   
III. Material Identification and Quality Inspection
   A. Identify and demonstrate an understanding of the use for the
following items: 
      1. Line paper print
      2. Line film
      3. Line negative film
      4. Halftone line screens
      5. Printing plate
      6. Blue line
      7. Color Key
      8. Cromalins
      9. Digital proofs
   B. Troubleshoot problems for the above materials which could include:
      1. Overexposure
      2. Underexposure
      3. Processing errors
      4. Handling errors

IV. Enlargement and Reduction
   A. Calculate scaling ratios.
   B. Calculate and demonstrate proper digital reproduction ratios for:
      1. Line art
      2. Continuous tone images 
   C. Contrast the differences between resizing and resampling.   

V. Scanning Input
   A. Identify the differences between raster graphics and vector
graphics.
   B. Define and delineate the relationship between the following:
      1. Bitmaps
      2. Pixels
      3. Pixel depth
      4. Pixels per inch
      5. Dots per inch
      6. Spots per inch
      7. Lines per inch
   C. Utilize appropriate scanning techniques from both reflective art and
transparencies.
   D. Utilize appropriate scanning techniques to produce the following:
      1. Line art
      2. Grayscale
      3. RGB
      4. CMYK

VI. Image Manipulation
   A. Correct an image for reproduction by using the following items:
      1. Levels
      2. Curves
      3. Brightness and contrast
      4. Threshold
      5. Sharpening
      6. Color correction
   B. Demonstrate the ability to work with the following:
      1. Layers
      2. Masks
      3. COB
      4. Clipping Path
      5. Retouching
      6. Merging multiple images
   C. Produce the following types of images:
      1. Posterization
      2. Mezzotint
      3. Combined filters
      4. Duotone

VII. File Management
   A. Articulate the particular purpose for saving work in:
      1. TIFF
      2. EPS
      3. DCS
      4. JPEG
      5. PICT
      6. GIF
      7. PDF
   B. Prepare files using the proper file formats. 
   C. Employ managing file size.
   D. Develop managing naming files and arranging files.
   E. Demonstrate saving work to various storage devices to include:
      1. Removable storage disks
      2. Hard drive
      3. Server  
   F. Demonstrate the use of placing files and extracting files from a
server.

VIII. The Film Recorder and Building a Queue
   A. Demonstrate the use of the film recorder.
   B.    Create a series of slides by building a queue using the available
software.

IX. Printing
   A. Assemble proper settings for printing a document.
   B. Demonstrate and differentiate between the various printing
technologies to include:
      1. Black and white laser printer
      2. Color thermal wax printers
      3. Color laser printer
      4. Dye-sublimation printer
      5. Ink jet printer

X. Preparation and Completion of a Color Key
   A. Employ stripping procedures with film negatives.
   B. Utilize opaquing techniques to complete the stripping procedure.
   C. Describe and employ the process in developing a color key for line
art and halftone. 
   
XI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate or the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of four projects     40 - 65% of grade
Minimum of two examinations  20 - 45% of grade
Studio performance           15 - 25% of grade
Total                          100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 230

  • Title: Drawing and Media Methods 3*
  • Number: GDES 230
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 131 and GDES 132 and GDES 134

Description:

This course will provide an understanding of the application of illustration to graphic design. Visual problem-solving processes acquired in Drawing and Media Methods 2 will be further developed through problems in image composition emphasizing expressive communication. Techniques in traditional and digital media are explored. This course is typically taught in the fall semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify major categories of illustration applied to design communications.
  2. Identify the work of illustrators and artists and the media and techniques used in their work.
  3. Effectively conduct visual research and begin building a personal visual reference file.
  4. Work from photographic reference using both traditional and digital means to reach effective aesthetic decisions in the solution of complex visual problems.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of, and sensitivity to, the relationships between type and image.
  6. Effectively apply visual problem-solving processes and methods in the development of visual concepts.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of, and skill in the use of, media, tools, techniques and processes commonly used by illustrators.
  8. Effectively apply the design principles of visual language to image composition and communication.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Illustration
   A. Identify the following categories of illustration:
      1. Editorial
      2. Book
      3. Advertising
      4. Institutional
      5. Other
   B. Identify illustrators and artists based on their media and
techniques. 

II. Visual Resources
   A. Demonstrate appropriate use of photographs as a visual resource.
   B. Cite and utilize appropriate reference books and professional
periodicals.
   C. Build a visual reference collection file within appropriate
classifications, utilizing a variety of sources.

III. Illustration Techniques, Media and Processes
   A. Demonstrate appropriate ways of working with photographic reference
including the following:
      1. Copyright issues
      2. Color and value interpretations
      3. Enlarging, reducing, combining and altering images
         a. Photocopier  
         b. Laser scanner
         c. Computer programs
         d. Other
   B. Demonstrate the ability to apply traditional media methods and
techniques:
      1. Dry media
      2. Liquid media
      3. Mixed media and collage
      4. Other

IV. Image Development
   A. Appropriately utilize the following visual problem-solving processes
and methods:
      1. Research
      2. Thumbnails
      3. Roughs
      4. Comprehensives
      5. Finished Art
   B. Apply design principles of visual language.   
   C. Employ appropriate combinations of type and image.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Demonstrate productive work habits.
      1. Record data
      2. Attend to detail
      3. Complete tasks on schedule
      4. Maintain the work setting
   B. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
      1. Problem-solve in groups
      2. Respond to supervision
      3. Collaborate with peers and build consensus
      4. Maintain a positive attitude towards tasks and peers
      5. Give and accept constructive criticism and praise

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   A minimum of 3 projects    75% of grade
   Studio performance         25% of grade
   Total                     100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 231

  • Title: Advanced Typography*
  • Number: GDES 231
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 134

Description:

This course is a continuation of Layout Design. Emphasis will be on typographic solutions that explore verbal/visual messages. Projects include designs for publication, such as posters, brochures, packaging and graphic campaigns. Typography as a functional and experimental medium will be stressed. Design problem-solving for a diverse range of specifications, including audience, client needs and budget constraints, are included. Traditional and digital tools will be incorporated to produce comprehensives. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only. Working knowledge of Macromedia Dreamweaver is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and synthesize the history of type design in project solutions.
  2. Delineate between the developmental stages of the design process and the application of these stages.
  3. Use the elements of layout design as well as the fundamentals of effective layout composition.
  4. Create visual typographic solutions that communicate a message through legibility as well as inherent expressive qualities capable of communicating subtleties of thought and feeling.
  5. Demonstrate the use of elements in a layout to communicate a message to a defined audience.
  6. Demonstrate problem solving skills that include the identification of important information, generation of alternative solutions and selection of the appropriate course of completion.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to be an effective member of a team through team problem-solving activities.
  8. Read proofreader's marks, perform basic copyfitting and copy markup to be typeset, and generate digital typesetting.
  9. Select the appropriate traditional and/or digital tools and software applications necessary to satisfy established project specifications.
  10. Demonstrate the use of tools, materials and equipment necessary to produce finished layouts, both by traditional and digital means.
  11. Utilize methods of how professionals gain new knowledge.
  12. Define and explain typographic design principles and vocabulary as they relate to composing elements on the page.
  13. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Type
   A. Identify and distinguish between twentieth century type designers.
   B. Trace the evolution of twentieth century type design (major
trends).

II. Typographic Design Considerations
   A. Analyze the nature of type and demonstrate how to design with type
to express an idea.
   B. Employ the principles of legibility to convey a particular idea or
expression.
   C. Explore and utilize various typographic elements.
   D. Select and manipulate relational typographic elements in design
projects.

III. Layout Content
   A. Demonstrate creative conceptualization and problem solving skills.
      1. Define the givens and the variables of the project.
      2. Research the project topic.
      3. Explore potential visual images for the project.
      4. Create the design concept.
      5. Compose the "thumbnails."
      6. Revise selected thumbnails to "roughs."
      7. Select and refine rough.
      8. Edit and produce finial version [comprehensive(s)].
   B. Employ various graphic communication modes in creative projects.
   C. Develop techniques to determine audience response to project
designs.

IV. Applied Grid Systems
   A. Apply the principles and elements for designing advertising layout
formats.
   B. Apply the principles and elements for designing editorial layout
formats.
   C. Explain and accommodate the differences and design grids for paper
and/or the illuminated screen. 

V. Applied Typography
   A. Employ traditional and digital type production systems including:
      1. Type measurements systems using points and picas
      2. Traditional and digital body copy indication    
      3. Copy mark-up/character counting and copy fitting
   B. Interpret the use of type as a design element.
      1. Type as a graphic element
      2.    Type as a pattern or background
      3.    Type as picture element
      4. Type as textural or three dimensional element

VI. Layout Elements
   A. Identify design and production considerations.
      1. Explain traditional tools and materials.
      2. Relate traditional design and materials to digital tools and
materials
      3. Explain and employ digital tools and materials.
   B. Define and select appropriate states of finish.
   C. Select the appropriate function of a layout element and determine
its usage.

VII. Research and Resource for Graphic Designers and Professional
Vocabulary
   A. Establish an "artist's morgue" for idea and pictorial photo
reference.
   B. Employ various resource materials for development of a visual/verbal
vocabulary.
   C. Establish concepts from research and use them with the creative
problem solving processes.
   D. Establish methods for controlling production/cost limitations.

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of four projects                  50 - 75% of grade
One examination and/or one written report 10 - 25% of grade
Studio performance                        15 - 25% of grade
Total                                       100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

  1. Working knowledge of Macromedia Dreamweaver is required. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 231H

No information found.

GDES 235

  • Title: Production Methods*
  • Number: GDES 235
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 134 and GDES 140

Description:

This course will provide the fundamentals of preparing art for reproduction. Traditional camera-ready art techniques and digital prepress production methods will be emphasized. This course is typically offered in the fall semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the stages of production and describe why designers need to understand production methods.
  2. Develop throughout the course of the class the essential professional vocabulary.
  3. Define and explain the traditional printing processes.
  4. Describe the impact of the digital processes and the future trends in the printing industry.
  5. Identify and demonstrate the use of basic proofreader's marks, perform copyfitting and copy markup using points and picas, generate digital typesetting, and prepare files for output.
  6. Produce mechanicals for line and halftone reproduction from traditional and digital formats.
  7. Demonstrate the stages of preparing art for production using traditional and electronic tools and materials.
  8. Assemble production techniques required for one- and two-color printing and compare and contrast traditional camera ready art techniques to digital prepress.
  9. Describe the uses for imposition, binding, folds, paper, inks, bleeds, and demonstrate color separation for spot or match color.
  10. Estimate costing and time to complete activities, research how to execute techniques for a specific tasks, and determine the sequencing of activities that need to be accomplished in order to complete a project.
  11. Select the appropriate traditional and/or digital tools and software applications necessary to satisfy established project specifications.
  12. Demonstrate preparation of all aspects of mechanical art from rough copy to the finished piece for a variety of production jobs including spot color.
  13. Demonstrate the ability to be an effective member of a team through team problem solving activities.
  14. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Graphic Production
   A. Define the stages of production.
   B. Trace the designers role in understanding production methods.
   C. Employ essential professional vocabulary.
      1. Traditional
      2. Digital

II. History of Printing
   A. Trace the traditional printing processes.
   B. Explain the impact of digital processes on the print industry.
   C. Be aware of the future trends that will impact the print industry.

III. Copy Preparation
   A. Employ traditional and digital type production systems including:
      1. Type measurements systems using points and picas
      2. Traditional and digital body copy indication
      3. Copy mark-up/character counting and copy fitting
      4. Digital typesetting
      5. Preparing files for output to an image setter

IV. Preparing Art for Production at All Stages
   A. Research and assemble basic materials for the project.
   B. Develop layout(s).
   C. Utilize copyfitting, appropriate measurements and correct markup.
   D. Generate typography.
   E. Describe consultation with art director, client and printer as
needed.
   F. Generate the mechanical (final art for printing).
   G. Employ electronic prepress techniques.
      1. Spot color trapping and separation
      2. Two color process trapping and separation

V. Production Considerations
   A. Demonstrate general procedures.
      1. Imposition
      2. Binding
      3. Folds
      4. Paper
      5. Inks
      6. Bleeds
   B. Demonstrate color separation for spot or match color.
      
VI. Production Preparation and Printing a Job
   A. Complete costing of the job.
   B. Develop time estimating practices.
   C. Employ sequencing the project.
   D. Employ appropriate tools.
   E. Employ appropriate materials.
   F. Employ appropriate equipment.
   G. Employ appropriate processes.
   H. Employ appropriate techniques.

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of four projects                  50 - 70% of grade
One examination and/or one written report 20 - 30% of grade
Studio performance                        10 - 15% of grade
Total                                       100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 236

  • Title: Electronic Production*
  • Number: GDES 236
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

Description:

This course is a continuation of the Production Methods course, providing experience in digital prepress and electronic production techniques. The student will apply production skills to problems of professional scope and complexity, including specialty processes, trapping and color separation. Preparation of graphic files for screen presentation and for the Web will be explored. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Delineate the role of the artist/designer when preparing production art.
  2. Demonstrate teamwork skills.
  3. Define and explain printing terms and techniques.
  4. Make informed production decisions concerning appropriate combinations of elements in a production job.
  5. Select the appropriate digital tools and software applications necessary to satisfy established project specifications.
  6. Demonstrate preparation of all aspects of mechanical art from rough copy to the finished piece for a variety of production jobs including spot color and four-color process.
  7. Demonstrate advanced skills in the use of professional tools, materials and equipment commonly used for electronic production.
  8. Identify important information needed to solve specific production problems.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Production Artist's Job
   A. Define, compare and contrast traditional and digital production
methods.
   B. Describe the importance and methods of collaboration and teamwork
essential for the production artist. 

II. Professional Vocabulary and Sources of Information
   A. Employ essential professional vocabulary.
      1. Traditional
      2. Digital
   B. Employ appropriate sources of information.
      1. Books and Periodicals
      2. Organizations
      3. Service Bureaus
      4. Printers

III. Preparing Art for Production at All Stages
   A. Research and assemble basic materials for the project.
   B. Develop layout(s).
   C. Utilize copyfitting, appropriate measurements and correct markup.
   D. Generate typography.
   E. Describe consultation with art director, client and printer as
needed.
   F. Generate the mechanical (final art for printing).
   G. Employ electronic prepress techniques:
      1. Spot color trapping and separation
      2. Four color process trapping and separation
      3. Preparing graphics for the Web
      4. Preparing presentation graphics (for the computer screen)
   H. Demonstrate costing the job.

IV. Production Procedures
   A. Demonstrate general procedures.
      1. Folds
      2. Bleeds
      3. Binding
   B. Demonstrate specialty procedures.
      1. Embossing
      2. Die cuts
      3. Three-dimensional construction
   C. Demonstrate color trapping.
      1. Spot or match color
      2. Four color process
   D. Demonstrate color separation.
      1. Spot or match color
      2. Four color process

V. Production Issues
   A. Employ appropriate tools.
   B. Employ appropriate materials.
   C. Employ appropriate equipment.
   D. Employ appropriate processes.
   E. Employ appropriate techniques.
   F. Distinguish between digital and traditional methodologies.

VI. The Process for Preparing and Printing a Job
   A. Complete costing of the job.
   B. Produce film separations.
   C. Produce color match proof.
   D. Define plate preparation.
   E. Define press preparation.

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Project #1         25% 
Project #2         25%
Project #3         25%
Studio Performance 25%
Total             100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 244

  • Title: Communication Systems*
  • Number: GDES 244
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

Description:

This course will explore the scope and potential of graphic design as a vehicle for visual communication in contemporary society. Signs and symbols, as well as communicative power of typographic, hand graphic and photographic modes, will be studied. Traditional and electronic methods will be used to develop projects. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scope and potential of graphic design as a vehicle of communication in contemporary society.
  2. Compare and contrast visual communication methods as they attempt to inform or persuade the receiver of the visual message.
  3. Solve communication problems of both an informative and persuasive nature.
  4. Identify major types of signs and symbols used in graphic communication.
  5. Apply a selected identity mark to an identity system.
  6. Conduct market research and define the message and the audience.
  7. Demonstrate the use of the following graphic communication modes: typographics, hand graphics, and photographics.
  8. Identify important information needed to solve a creative problem.
  9. Exhibit skills related to both electronic and traditional preparation of comprehensives.
  10. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Relationship Between and Definition of Visual and Graphic
Communication
   A. Describe the similarities and differences of the following visual
communication methods:
      1. Graphics
      2. Film
      3. Television
      4. Video
      5. Computer
   B. Compare and contrast the following graphic communication forms:
      1. Two dimensional
      2. Three dimensional

II. Information and Persuasion Through Graphic Communication
   A. Solve information communication problems.
      1. Knowledge
      2. Skills
   B. Solve persuasion communication problems.
      1. Attitudes
      2. Preferences
      3. Prejudices

III. Communication to a Variety of Audiences
   A. Compare and contrast mass audience/low literacy issues.
      1. Simplicity
      2. Realism
   B. Compare and contrast sophisticated audience issues.
      1. Education level
      2. Symbolic association
   C. Utilize the communication process.
      1. Research
      2. Analysis
      3. Implementation
      4. Feedback

IV. Signs and Symbols in Graphic Communication
   A. Define, describe and identify signs and symbols including logogram,
phonogram, pictogram and diagram.
   B. Use appropriate signs and symbols in creative projects.

V. Graphic Communication Modes
   A. Explain graphic communication modes including typographic, hand
graphic and photographic.
   B. Employ various graphic communication modes in creative projects.

VI. Evaluation of Communication Systems
   A. Evaluate specific projects for the following criteria:
      1. Semantic (meaning)
      2. Synthetic (graphic)
      3. Pragmatic (reproduction)
   B. Address the preceding criteria in the development of creative
projects.

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Minimum of three projects  75 - 80% of grade
Studio performance         15 - 25% of grade
Total                        100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 245

  • Title: Advanced Design Practice*
  • Number: GDES 245
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235

Description:

This course will focus on the use of the student's total design capability and technical knowledge in solving graphic design problems of professional scope and complexity. Students will have the opportunity to work with three art directors and produce three professional projects for potential inclusion in their portfolios. This course is typically offered in the spring semester only. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the ability to solve complex visual problems.
  2. Identify important information needed to solve complex visual problems.
  3. Estimate the time required to complete an assigned project.
  4. Demonstrate a systematic approach to creative problem solving.
  5. Demonstrate the effective methods of translating abstract verbal concepts into visual images.
  6. Define the needs and interests of the audience.
  7. Design projects involving given materials, formal materials and psychological materials.
  8. Relate a variety of visual information vehicles to both 2- and 3-dimensional design forms.
  9. Design graphic products for potential inclusion in a portfolio.
  10. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Evaluating Graphic Design and Advertising
   A. Define the graphic designer's problem.
   B. Describe and follow the steps in the creative problem solving
process.
      1. Concepting
      2. Thumbnails
      3. Roughs
      4. Comprehensives
   C. Identify the classes of materials the designer works with.
      1. Given materials (products, copy, slogans, logotypes, format,
media, production, etc.)
      2. Formal materials (space, contrast, proportion, harmony, rhythm,
repetition, line, mass, shape, color, weight, value, texture, etc.)
      3. Psychological materials (visual perceptions, optical illusions,
the instincts, intuitions, emotions of the audience, etc.)
   D. Describe the impact of electronic information.
      1. Communicating with clients
      2. Access and copyright issues
      3. Networks, servers and back-ups
      4. Compression of market delivery time

II. Information Vehicles - The Visual Vocabulary
   A. Choose the most appropriate graphic mode for a given problem.
      1. Photography
      2. Illustration
      3. Typography
   B. Employ hand graphic elements as necessary.
      1. Symbols/logos
      2. Charts and diagrams
      3. Maps
      4. Minor graphic elements
   C. Appropriately employ electronic elements.
      1. Fonts
      2. Stock photography
      3. Stock illustration
      4. Clip art

III. Graphic Design Products
   A. Compare and contrast the different types of graphic design products
including:
      1. TV graphics
      2. Corporate advertising
      3. Publications
      4. Educational media
      5. Promotional materials
      6. Exhibition design
      7. Packaging design
      8. Environmental signage
   B. Follow the creative problem solving process to create three projects
selected from the preceding list.
   C. Respond to the projects through professional critiques and
evaluation, including self evaluation.

IV. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Project #1          25%
Project #2          25%
Project #3          25%
Studio performance  25% 
Total              100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 272

  • Title: Professional Preparation*
  • Number: GDES 272
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: GDES 230 and GDES 231 and GDES 235 Prerequisite: The student must have completed all required studio courses in the graphic design program prior to the semester for which he or she is enrolling in this course or be co-enrolled in all fourth-semester studio courses

Description:

This course will provide graphic design majors instruction in the organization and presentation of his or her work in a portfolio format of professional quality. A portfolio, digital portfolio archive, self promo, resume and business ensemble will be produced. Instruction in interviewing techniques and employment searches will also be provided. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the types of work appropriate for inclusion in his/her portfolio that will interest a potential employer and present the student as a potential asset to the firm.
  2. Select from his/her body of work those pieces that communicate his/her design and graphic strengths, skills, versatility, originality and problem-solving ability and that meet his/her professional goal(s).
  3. Evaluate a variety of portfolios and select one that supports his/her professional goal(s) and scale of work, giving special consideration to the ease of transporting, setting up and viewing the portfolio of work.
  4. Design his/her portfolio for an effective presentation.
  5. Document his/her work through the production of a digital portfolio archive on current portable storage.
  6. Describe and list the basic components and structure of a professional resume.
  7. Design and produce a professional resume, business ensemble and self promo.
  8. Demonstrate successful interviewing techniques.
  9. Describe effective employment search methods.
  10. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the classroom. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Portfolio
   A. Select appropriate level of work and determine the total number of
pieces.
   B. Research and select the appropriate type of portfolio.
   C. Prepare work for the selected type of portfolio.
   D. Rework projects as necessary for the final portfolio.
   E. Reduce work as necessary to fit the scale of the portfolio.
   F. Employ proper photography studio techniques to photograph wall
reliefs and three-dimensional work.
   G. Sequence the work for greatest visual impact.

II. Documentation Digital Portfolio Archive
   A. Employ the appropriate digital imaging storage recording devices
necessary for proper image exposure, calibration, and resolution for
documenting all works in the final digital portfolio archive.
   B. Make duplicate portable storage archives as necessary.
   C. Properly label portable storage archives as directed.
   D. Prepare the portable storage archives for presentation as directed.

III. Professional Resume, Business Ensemble and Self Promo
   A. Collect resume, business ensemble and self promo information.
   B. Select an appropriate type of resume, business ensemble and self
promo.
   C. Write the resume, business ensemble and self promo copy.
   D. Design the resume, business ensemble and self promo.
   E. Produce the resume, business ensemble and self promo.

IV. Professional Considerations
   A. Establish personal and professional goals.
   B. List professional organizations and contacts.
   C. List professional publications.
   D. Demonstrate interview techniques.
   E. Describe how to conduct a job search.
   F. Describe how to evaluate a job offer.
      
V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Portfolio                      40% of grade
Slide and/or digital portfolio 20% of grade
Resume                         20% of grade
Studio Performance             20% of grade
Total                         100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 275

  • Title: Graphic Design Internship*
  • Number: GDES 275
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Graphic design faculty review committee approval

Description:

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the skills learned in the graphic design program. Student interns will complete a minimum of 180 hours on the job and will be compensated with at least the minimum hourly wage.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate his/her ability to secure an appropriate internship position based on his/her career goals, design and graphic skills, employer needs and his/her interviewing techniques.
  2. Apply conceptual and technical creative skills acquired as students in the CD program at the place of employment.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to work effectively as a member of a creative team.
  4. Demonstrate acceptable performance on the job through the midterm and final evaluations by both the intern's sponsor and the course instructor. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Internship Search Techniques
   A. Make phone calls to appropriate potential employers to schedule an
interview.
   B. Conduct personal interviews with potential employers.
   C. Evaluate the internship interviews for comparison and competency.
   D. Identify potential employers to follow-up with correspondence. 

II. Formal Internship Agreement and Related Issues
   A. Negotiate hours and salary with the internship sponsor.
   B. Submit the signed cooperative training agreement at the beginning of
the employment period.  

III. Establishing Evaluation Criteria
   A. Discuss the midterm and final evaluation with the sponsor.
   B. Discuss the midterm and final evaluation with the instructor.
   
IV. Review of Internship Activities
   A. Evaluate the work produced with the instructor.
   B. Evaluate your work habits, including: accepting criticism and
praise, productive work habits, completing tasks in a timely manner,
problem solving (individual or group), and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Sponsor's mid-term evaluation      25% of grade
Instructor's mid-term evaluation   25% of grade
Sponsor's final evaluation         25% of grade
Instructor's final evaluation      25% of grade
                                  100%

Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade scale: 
      4.0  = A 
      3.75 = A-    
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-   
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D or F.

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

GDES 291

No information found.