Solar Technologies, A.A.S.

The future of US energy prosperity rests on developing a portfolio of technologies and practices that can address America's energy needs--technologies that increase and diversify domestic energy supply, while having little or no effect on the environment. To that end the Solar Technologies AAS is structured to train professional designers, technicians and installers in a full spectrum of solar hardware, software, and best practices. The degree program targets those who see the AAS as a terminal degree and will enter the market prepared to design and install state of the art solar energy systems. The program is also adaptable to the needs of a student who is considering a four year degree option in technology or engineering. Students will prepare to sit for the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP), Entry Level Solar Thermal and Entry Level Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Installer exams.

Additionally the program will provide opportunities for the participants to gain necessary field experience for full NABCEP Solar Thermal and PV Installer Certification.

(Major Code 2190; State CIP Code 15.0505)

Associate of Applied Science

First Semester

ELTE 122National Electrical Code I4
ELTE 125Residential Wiring Methods*4
ELTE 123Electromechanical Systems4
CET 150Construction Safety3
or INDT 125 Industrial Safety/OSHA 30
INDT 155Workplace Skills1
Total Hours16

Second Semester

HPER 200First Aid and CPR2
ENGL 121Composition I*3
EPRM 120Introduction to Residential Energy3
EPRM 142Solar Thermal Systems3
HVAC 125Energy Alternatives2
MATH 130Technical Mathematics I*3
Total Hours16

Third Semester

DRAF 129Interpreting Architectural Drawings2
EPRM 252Solar Electric Systems*3
EPRM 256Solar Electric Systems Lab*1
ELTE 210Code Certification Review*3
ELTE 271Electrical Internship I*3
Social Science and/or Economics Elective ^3
Total Hours15
^

Social Science and/or Economics Elective

Fourth Semester

Technical Electives (see below)5
ELTE 202Electrical Estimating*3
ENGL 123Technical Writing I*3
CET 105Construction Methods3
Humanities Elective ^3
Total Hours17
^

Humanities Elective

Technical Electives

BUS 140Principles of Supervision3
BUS 145Small Business Management3
CET 150Construction Safety3
CPCA 128PC Applications: MS Office3
DRAF 130Introduction to CAD Concepts - AutoCAD*3
DRAF 250Electrical Drafting*3
ELEC 120Introduction to Electronics3
ELEC 125Digital Electronics I4
ELEC 131Introduction to Sensors and Actuators3
ELEC 133Programmable Controllers3
ELEC 165Advanced Programmable Controllers*3
ELEC 185LAN Cabling and Installation3
ELTE 200Commercial Wiring Methods*4
ELTE 215Generators, Transformers and Motors*4
ENTR 142Fast Trac Business Plan3
HVAC 121Basic Principles of HVAC*4
INDT 125Industrial Safety/OSHA 303

Total Program Hours: 64

Courses

EPRM 120   Introduction to Residential Energy (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate energy usage of the past and the future, describe the energy picture of today's world, identify the priorities for energy efficiency, and describe the purpose of a residential energy audit. Competencies will include knowing energy and the laws of thermodynamics; heat transfer through building envelope; sources of internal heat gain and heat loss calculations; energy transformation and heat flow; efficiency of HVAC systems, water heating systems, and appliances; and basic electrical wiring, lighting, and components of a residence. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EPRM 123   Active & Passive Residential Systems (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: EPRM 120 or deparment approval

This is a course to explain how active and passive systems work together in a residence, and to discuss the energy efficiency of each system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the components of the building shell and their relationship to air-conditioning systems, heating systems, hot water heating, lighting, appliances, occupants, and the electrical or gas systems that supply energy. Topics will include heat laws, refrigeration cycle, electrical theory, various types of furnaces, air conditioners, hot water heaters, lighting, windows and doors, and various types of controls. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

EPRM 127   Residential Energy Data Collection and Input (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ERPM 123

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures used in the residential construction industry to determine the construction details of the residence, the size and type of HVAC equipment, and other appliances as it relates to a residential energy audit. The student will be required to complete field data collection forms and record detailed information of the components of a residence. This data will be entered into various computer modeling programs. The output from the software will help determine what recommendations should be made to the homeowner to improve the energy efficiency of their residence. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs instructional lab.

EPRM 130   Residential Energy Auditing Application (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: EPRM 127

This course outlines a complete energy audit procedure that will ensure consistent data collection for a residence. Topics include diagnostic procedures to evaluate the building shell, doors and windows, air leakage, and other residential energy inefficiencies. The course includes recommendations the auditor can make to increase the energy efficiency and functionality of a client's home based on the audit. Analysis of residential heating and cooling systems and appliances, as well as performing a combustion appliance zone test is included in the course. A major focus of the course is the use of appropriate test equipment, such as a blower door, duct blaster, and other hand-held evaluation and measuring devices necessary to conduct effective energy audits. Information from the audit will be entered into modeling software to determine energy efficiency measures for the residence being audited. Students will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs instructional lab/wk.

EPRM 142   Solar Thermal Systems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Solar Thermal Systems presents the key components of thermal conversion systems to absorb and use heat from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, energy management, and economics for a variety of solar thermal system applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of solar thermal systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level Solar Thermal exam. 4 hours of integrated lecture lab/wk.

EPRM 252   Solar Electric Systems (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELTE 125 or ELTE 200

Solar Electric Systems presents the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface, energy management, and economics for a variety of PV applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of photovoltaic systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level PV exam. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EPRM 256   Solar Electric Systems Lab (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: EPRM 252

Solar Electric Systems Lab presents practice in the use of the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface PV applications are installed. The course includes hands-on details of design, installation, and operation. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level PV exam. 2 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

EPRM 120

  • Title: Introduction to Residential Energy*
  • Number: EPRM 120
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate energy usage of the past and the future, describe the energy picture of today's world, identify the priorities for energy efficiency, and describe the purpose of a residential energy audit. Competencies will include knowing energy and the laws of thermodynamics; heat transfer through building envelope; sources of internal heat gain and heat loss calculations; energy transformation and heat flow; efficiency of HVAC systems, water heating systems, and appliances; and basic electrical wiring, lighting, and components of a residence. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the purpose of an energy audit.
  2. State the principles of energy and assess energy usage.
  3. Compare building construction and the building shell.
  4. Describe air leakage and the purpose of insulation.
  5. Explain basic heating and cooling principles.
  6. Identify the construction methods of windows and doors.
  7. List energy efficient types of lighting and appliances.
  8. Compare the various types of water heating systems.
  9. State health and safety issues as related to residential homes. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles of Energy Use as Applied to the Consumer
   A. Define the purpose of an energy audit.
   B. Apply appropriate terminology to describe energy-efficiency homes.
II. Energy and Its Related Laws and Principles
   A. State the laws of thermodynamics.
   B. Explain energy transformation.
   C. Distinguish between climate and comfort.
   D. List types of energy for home use.
   E. Identify electrical wiring, circuits, and controls.
III. Types of Building Construction
   A. Discuss building-shell and flow of heat.
   B. Describe building inspection and diagnosis.
IV. Air Leakage and Insulation Characteristics
   A. List air sealing principles.
   B. Describe blower-door testing and air duct leakage testing.
   C. Identify air sealing methods and materials.
V. Heating and Cooling Principles
   A. State basic heating and cooling principles.
   B. Describe combustion efficiency and safety.
   C. Identify various heating and cooling systems.
   D. Define air movement in a residence.
   E. Identify various controls for heating and cooling units.
VI. Windows and Doors
   A. Evaluate the construction and characteristics of various types of
doors.
   B. Assess the construction and characteristics of various types of
windows.
   C. State the selection process for replacement windows.
VII. Energy Efficient Lighting and Residential Appliances
   A. Define lighting principles.
   B. State the purposes of illumination.
   C. Evaluate various types of lighting for energy efficiency. 
   D. Identify various energy efficient household appliances.
VIII. Energy Usage as Applied to Water Heating
   A. Evaluate types of storage water heaters.
   B. Identify alternatives to storage water heaters.
   C. Describe techniques for improving efficiency of water heating.
   D. Explain techniques for maintenance and operation of water heaters.
IX. Residential Health Problems and Safety Precautions
   A. Identify indoor pollutants.
   B. Describe moisture management techniques.
   C. State the purposes of mechanical ventilation.
   D. List the purposes for dehumidifiers.
   E. Identify pollutant control strategies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter and/or unit tests   20%-30% of grade
Quizzes                     20%-30% of grade
Final written exam          20%-30% of grade
Participation               10%-20% of grade
Total                       100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%  

Caveats:

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 123

  • Title: Active & Passive Residential Systems*
  • Number: EPRM 123
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4.5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 1.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EPRM 120 or deparment approval

Description:

This is a course to explain how active and passive systems work together in a residence, and to discuss the energy efficiency of each system. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the components of the building shell and their relationship to air-conditioning systems, heating systems, hot water heating, lighting, appliances, occupants, and the electrical or gas systems that supply energy. Topics will include heat laws, refrigeration cycle, electrical theory, various types of furnaces, air conditioners, hot water heaters, lighting, windows and doors, and various types of controls. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the implications of climate on energy use in buildings.
  2. Distinguish between various energy sources and end uses.
  3. Identify major components of a building envelope and their relation to heat transfer.
  4. Apply basic electrical theory and identify types of residential electrical circuits.
  5. Apply basic combustion theory and identify types of residential combustion systems.
  6. Identify residential HVAC control and electrical monitoring technology.
  7. Describe the fundamentals of air and water heating and the related components.
  8. Describe the fundamentals of refrigeration and the related components.
  9. Explain the implications of an energy-efficient residence on indoor environmental quality.
  10. Identify residential diagnostic tools and their function.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Implications of Climate on Energy Use in Buildings
   A. Define temperature and molecular motion.
   B. Make conversions between Fahrenheit and Celsius scales.
   C. Define British Thermal Unit.
   D. Distinguish differences between sensible heat, latent heat, and
specific heat.
   E. Define density.
   F. Characterize a climate zone by design elements (solar exposure,
temperature, humidity).
   G. Describe heat, air, and moisture flow through various substances.
   H. Explain the transfer of heat by conduction, convection, and
radiation.
II. Various Energy Sources and End Users
   A. State two forms of energy important to air conditioning (heating and
cooling).
   B. Describe work and state the formula used to determine the amount in
a given task.
   C. Convert units of energy.
   D. Identify modes of electrical power generation and discuss their
differences.
   E. Distinguish differences of various combustion fuels and discuss
their differences.
   F. Identify common residential appliances and discuss their power
consumption.
   G. Complete a residential analysis of baseload energy use and seasonal
energy use.
III. Major Components of a Building Envelope and Relation to Heat
Transfer
   A. Discuss R-Value and U-Factor.
   B. Discuss windows and doors and their resistance to heat transfer.
   C. Define various types insulation and describe characteristics of
common insulation materials.
   D. Describe methods for quantifying insulation values.
   E. Explain effective R-Value based on the quality of an installed
product.
   F. Calculate the R-Value of a wall of various insulation types.
   G. Calculate the R-Value of a parallel path for heat through a wall and
convert to the U-Factor for the wall.
   H. Calculate the U-Factor of a wall with various envelope components
(windows, wood, insulation).
   I. Explain and calculate the relationship between U-Factor and the
BTU/hour load.
IV. Basic Electrical Theory and Types of Residential Electrical Circuits
   A. Explain the atomic theory and its relationship to physical objects
and electron flow.
   B. Describe electrical potential, current flow, and resistance.
   C. Define electrical power.
   D. Explain Ohm's law.
   E. Calculate the potential, current, and resistance of an electrical
circuit using Ohm's law.
   F. Calculate the electrical power of a circuit and the BTU/hour rating
of an electrical resistance heater.
   G. Describe the concepts of a basic electric circuit.
   H. Explain a series circuit and a parallel circuit.
   I. Describe the basic difference between direct and alternating
currents.
   J. Explain the function of a transformer in a circuit.
   K. Describe the power distribution system.
   L. Define the smart power distribution system or smart grid. 
V. Basic Combustion Theory and Types of Residential Combustion Systems
   A. Explain combustion and the fire-triangle.
   B. Discuss the products of combustion and their affect on humans and
structures.
   C. Describe spillage and identify potential causes.
   D. Distinguish between drafting and backdrafting and identify potential
causes for both.
   E. Describe industry standards and tests for worst case
depressurization.
   F. Describe industry standards tests for spillage.
   G. Interpret industry standards and tests for draft.
   H. Describe industry standards and tests for products of combustion,
such as carbon monoxide.
   I. Compare combustion fuels and list their potential energy in BTUs by
quantity.
   J. Describe the atmospherically drafted furnace or water heater and its
components.
   K. Identify the mechanically assisted furance or water heater and its
components.
   L. Describe the condensing furnace or water heater and its components.
   M. Define unvented and direct vented combustion appliances.
VI. Residential HVAC Controls and Electrical Monitoring Technology
   A. Define bimetal.
   B. Make general comparisons between different control applications
(bimetal, rod and tube, fluid-filled, partial liquid, partial
vapor-filled, bellows, diaphragm, mercury control bulb, and Bourdon tube.
   C. Identify the termocouple.
   D. Discuss the thermistor.
   E. Describe the pilot safety controls and methods of ignition of
burners in a combustion system.
   F. Describe the difference between low-high and high voltage controls.
   G. Name components of low- and high-voltage controls.
   H. Name two ways motors are protected from high temperature.
   I. Describe the function of mechanical and electromechanical controls.
   J. Explain the basic function of a line and low-voltage thermostat in a
control system.
   K. Explain the basic function of a programmable thermostat.
   L. Identify the common types of thermostats used in the industry.
   M. Discuss control technology for a smart home.
   N. Discuss monitoring and feedback technology for a smart home.
VII. Fundamentals of Air and Water Heating and Related Components
   A. Discuss measures of efficiency.
   B. Describe electric systems for air and water heating.
   C. Identify combustion systems for air and water heating.
   D. Explain stack, wind, and chimney effect.
   E. Define air infiltration and exfiltration.
VIII. Fundamentals of Refrigeration and Related Components
   A. Describe the basic refrigeration cycle.
   B. Explain the relationship between pressure and the boiling point of
water or other liquids.
   C. Describe the function of the evaporator or cooling coil.
   D. Explain the purpose of the compressor.
   E. Describe the function of the condensing coil.
   F. State the purpose of the metering device.
   G. List refrigerants commonly used in residential and air conditioning
systems.
IX. Implications of an Energy-Efficient Residence on Indoor Environmental
Quality
   A. Discuss air flow and industry standards associated with fresh air
exchange.
   B. Calculate the minimum ventilation requirements for a building.
   C. Identify moisture, mold, and options for prevention and
remediation.
   D. Discuss radon and options for prevention and remediation.
   E. Discuss lead, lead-based products, and options for prevention and
remediation.
   F. Identify volatile organic compounds and list products that
incorporate VOCs.
   G. Define integrated pest management.
   H. Discuss combustion and combustion by products, and their effect on
humans.
   I. Locate industry standards or resources that cross reference energy
and air quality.
X. Residential Diagnostic Tools and Functions
   A. Explain how electrical potential, current flow, and resistance are
measured.
   B. Demonstrate the use of volt meter, an ammeter, and an ohmmeter.
   C. Explain how electrical power is measured.
   D. Describe basic hand tools and their function.
   E. Distinguish between the analog meter and digital meter and explain
their differences.
   F. Describe a manometer and its function, and demonstrate the use.
   G. Distinguish between a blower door and a duct blaster and explain
their function.
   H. Acquire a blower door and duct blaster, and demonstrate the use of
each.
   I. Describe a thermometer and its function, and demonstrate the use.
   J. Define a combustion analyzer and its function, and demonstrate the
use for detecting quantities of gases.
   K. Describe a combustible gas detector and its function, and
demonstrate the use for detecting the presence of a combustible gas.
   L. Identify a sling-psychrometer and a humidistat and their function,
and demonstrate the use.
   M. Describe an anemometer and belometer, among other inline airflow
measuring devices and their function, and demonstrate the use.
   N. Define a thermal imaging camera and its function, and demonstrate
the use.
   O. Describe a boroscope and its function, and demonstrate the use.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter and/or unit tests: 20% - 30% of grade
Quizzes: 20% - 30% of grade
Final written exam: 20% - 30% of grade
Participation: 10% - 20% of grade       
TOTAL   100% Grade Criteria:

  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring safety glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 127

  • Title: Residential Energy Data Collection and Input*
  • Number: EPRM 127
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ERPM 123

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify techniques and procedures used in the residential construction industry to determine the construction details of the residence, the size and type of HVAC equipment, and other appliances as it relates to a residential energy audit. The student will be required to complete field data collection forms and record detailed information of the components of a residence. This data will be entered into various computer modeling programs. The output from the software will help determine what recommendations should be made to the homeowner to improve the energy efficiency of their residence. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs instructional lab.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare load calculation methods and programs.
  2. Perform data collection using standardized forms.
  3. Sketch various views of a residence showing size and construction details.
  4. Evaluate building materials and their relationship to heat transfer.
  5. Examine the windows and doors for energy efficiency.
  6. Evaluate mechanical equipment used for heating and cooling.
  7. Document type of lighting and appliances.
  8. Measure and calculate the volume of a residence.
  9. Input data into various computer software programs. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Load Calculation Methods
   A. Discuss/compare various methods and programs for determining the
cooling load for a residence.
   B. Discuss/compare various methods and programs for determining the
heating load for a residence.

II. Data Collection
   A. Complete a field data collection form(s) for construction details of
a residence.
   B. Compile information for the type of HVAC, lights and appliances in
the home.

III. Residence and Construction Details
   A. Measure and sketch a plan (top) view of a residence to scale.
   B. Draw/sketch four elevation views showing each side of the home.

IV. Building Materials and Their Relationship to Heat Transfer
   A. Gather information on the type of foundation walls.
   B. Describe the type of slab floor.
   C. Document the type of frame floor(s).
   D. Record the type of rim and band joists and amount of insulation
present.
   E. Evaluate the construction type of above grade walls.
   F. Record type of ceiling and amount of attic insulation.

V. Windows and Doors Evaluations
   A. Evaluate the type of windows and sliding glass doors.
   B. Assess the type and construction of entry/exit doors.
   C. Measure and record the type of skylights, if present.

VI. Mechanical equipment for Heating and Cooling
   A. Document the type and size of AC unit.
   B. Record type and size of heating unit.

VII. Lighting and Appliances
   A. Evaluate the types of lighting used in the residence.
   B. Document the system used for heating water in the residence.
   C. Record other appliances that are presently used in the home.

VIII. Volume and Type of Space Within a Residence
   A. Evaluate the residence for area that are conditioned and
unconditioned space.
   B. Measure and record the overall size of the residence.
   C. Identify the height of ceilings in the structure.
   D. Calculate the volume of vaulted ceilings and skylights, if present.

IX. Data Input Into Computer Software Programs
   A. Enter residential data into Manual J spreadsheet.
   B. Input residential data using various industry standardized
software.
   C. Generate reports using various industry standardized software.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Periodic quizzes and/or chapter tests   20% to 30%
Mid Term Test                           20% to 30%
Final Test                              20% to 30%
Participation                           10% to 20%
Total                                   100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = 0-59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 130

  • Title: Residential Energy Auditing Application*
  • Number: EPRM 130
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: EPRM 127

Description:

This course outlines a complete energy audit procedure that will ensure consistent data collection for a residence. Topics include diagnostic procedures to evaluate the building shell, doors and windows, air leakage, and other residential energy inefficiencies. The course includes recommendations the auditor can make to increase the energy efficiency and functionality of a client's home based on the audit. Analysis of residential heating and cooling systems and appliances, as well as performing a combustion appliance zone test is included in the course. A major focus of the course is the use of appropriate test equipment, such as a blower door, duct blaster, and other hand-held evaluation and measuring devices necessary to conduct effective energy audits. Information from the audit will be entered into modeling software to determine energy efficiency measures for the residence being audited. Students will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 1 hr. lecture, 3 hrs instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete an analysis of the building shell of a residence.
  2. Access the type of HVAC system and efficiency of combustion appliances.
  3. Measure and record various conditions using hand-held instruments.
  4. Inspect the health and safety conditions of the residence.
  5. Conduct a blower door test and other tests as required.
  6. Input data from audit into a computer modeling software.
  7. Communicate energy audit results to customer/building owner. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Analysis of the Building Shell of a Residence
   A. Inspect for penetrations in the building shell.
   B. Document the type of construction, siding, roofing, and insulation
levels.
   C. Evaluate the presence of the thermal boundary within the residence.

II. HVAC System and Combustion Appliances
   A. Locate and record the type of unit to heat the residence.
   B. Identify and record the type of unit to cool the residence.
   C. Locate and record the type of unit to heat water in the residence.
   D. Check burners and heat exchanger, if applicable.
   E. Inspect the units for condition of motors, fans, and coils.
   F. Document other applicances which consume energy.

III. Various Hand-Held Instruments
   A. Document ambient temperature inside and out.
   B. Determine the CO level upon entering the residence.
   C. Perform draft test on combustion appliances in 'worse case'
scenario.
   D. Evaluate combustion efficiency of combustion appliances using a CO
meter.
   E. Measure the humidity level on each level of the house.
   F. Inspect for air infiltration using IR camera and/or other devices.

IV. Health and Safety Concerns of the Residence
   A. Check for plumbing leaks.
   B. Inspect clothes dryer vent.
   C. Inspect attic for moisture problems and proper ventilation.
   D. Inspect crawl-space and/or basement for moisture problems and proper
ventilation.

V. Blower Door Test and Related Tests
   A. Perform a blower door test and record data.
   B. Conduct a duct blaster test, if applicable.
   C. Evaluate the residence for air infiltration.

VI. Data Input into Computer Modeling Software
   A. Measure and calculate the area and volume of conditioned space in
the residence.
   B. Calculate the air changes per hour and natural air changes per hour
for the residence.
   C. Using computer modeling software, enter data into the program.
   D. Provide a hard-copy (print-out) to the customer/building owner, if
required.
   E. Make recommendation for energy efficiency improvements based upon
software output information.

VII. Communicate Audit Results
   A. Communicate energy audit results clearly to customer/building
owner.
   B. Speak in terms the customer can understand.
   C. Answer questions completely.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chapter and/or unit tests:        20% - 30% of grade
Quizzes:                          20% - 30% of grade
Final written exam/final project: 20% - 30% of grade
Participation:                    10% - 20% of grade
Total                             100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = 0 - 59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Safety glasses brought to lab and worn will be part of the lab grade. Failure to bring saftey glasses to lab will result in the students being dismissed from class until they have safety glasses. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 142

  • Title: Solar Thermal Systems*
  • Number: EPRM 142
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness

Description:

Solar Thermal Systems presents the key components of thermal conversion systems to absorb and use heat from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, energy management, and economics for a variety of solar thermal system applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of solar thermal systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level Solar Thermal exam. 4 hours of integrated lecture lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain solar phenomena as it applies to energy collection.
  2. Demonstrate safety practices with solar thermal systems.
  3. Identify system types and their components.
  4. Adapt a system to a specific design.
  5. Conduct a site assessment.
  6. Install a solar thermal collector.
  7. Install a storage tank.
  8. Install piping, pipe insulation and connecting system piping.
  9. Install mechanical/plumbing equipment and related components.
  10. Install electrical control systems.
  11. Perform a system checkout.
  12. Demonstrate appropriate maintenance and troubleshooting protocols for a solar thermal system. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Solar Phenomena and Energy Collection
   A. Explain sun-earth geometric relationships with regards to annual and
diurnal cycles.
   B. Calculate the difference between solar time and standard time at a
given longitude and time zone.
   C. Differentiate between solar radiation and irradiance.
   D. Diagram appropriate solar array orientation for a given latitude.
   E. Interpret solar radiation data sets.
   F. Demonstrate how radiation data is used in sizing of thermal
systems.
   G. Discuss current issues in solar energy.

II. Solar Water Heating Systems Safety
   A. Demonstrate knowledge of OSHA Regulations.
   B. List safety hazards on the job.
      1. Roof
      2. Attics
      3. Confined spaces

III. Systems Components and Control Systems
   A. Describe freeze protection protocols.
   B. Define indirect systems.
   C. Define direct systems.
   D. Differentiate between types of valves and their uses.
   E. Define types and functions of thermostats.
   F. Define types and functions of thermal sensors and control boxes.

IV. System Design Adaptation
   A. List steps and pitfalls in getting permits.
   B. Demonstrate ability to estimate costs.
   C. List installation sequence.
   D. List steps in the inspection of a system.
   E. List components specific to solar pool heating.

V. Site Assessment
   A. Demonstrate use of site analysis hardware and software.
   B. Describe procedures to perform a rough site analysis.

VI. Solar Collectors
   A. List characteristics of an evacuated tube collector.
   B. List characteristics of a flat plate collector.
   C. List characteristics of an fin and tube collector.

VII. Storage Tanks and Water Heaters
   A. Describe the interface with existing or new water heaters and hot
water systems.
   B. Describe use of On-Demand heaters as backup.
   C. Demonstrate installation of storage tanks specific to solar hot
water system.
   D. Demonstrate installation of heat exchanger, and direct use types of
systems.

VIII. Solar System Piping and Pipe Insulation
   A. Install solar system pipe.
      1. Copper
      2. CPVC and PVC
      3. PexTM tubing
   B. Install pipe insulation.
   C. Connect solar system to existing system piping.

IX. Mechanical/Plumbing Equipment and Other Components
   A. Locate position for and install plumbing valves.
   B. Install monitoring components.
   C. Install indirect system heat exchanger.
   D. Install pumps.
   E. Pressure relief valves.
   F. Install check valves.

X. Electrical Control System
   A. Interpret wiring diagrams.
   B. Install sensors and evaluate their function.
   C. Install pump controls.
   D. Install thermostatic controls.

XI. Performing a System Checkout
   A. Install operation and identification tags and labels.
   B. Conduct pressure testing of system.
   C. Conduct leak testing of system.
   D. Conduct control set point testing.

XII. Maintaining and Troubleshooting A Solar Thermal System
   A. Demonstrate appropriate maintenance protocols for a solar thermal
system.
   B. Demonstrate appropriate troubleshooting protocols for a solar
thermal system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Assignments -  20% - 30% of grade
Lab Participation -  10% - 20% of grade
Lab Tests -          30% - 40% of grade
Final Written Exam - 20% - 30% of grade

Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F = 0% - 59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 252

  • Title: Solar Electric Systems*
  • Number: EPRM 252
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELTE 125 or ELTE 200

Description:

Solar Electric Systems presents the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface, energy management, and economics for a variety of PV applications are studied. The course includes details of design, installation, operation, and evaluation of photovoltaic systems. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level PV exam. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain solar phenomena as it applies to energy collection.
  2. Explain the basic components of a photovoltaic system (PV).
  3. Explain the variables that impact PV system design.
  4. Identify appropriate PV system for application situations.
  5. Evaluate a sample structure to determine appropriate sizing of a PV array.
  6. Design a PV array for a sample structure. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Solar Phenomena and Energy Collection
   A. Explain sun-earth geometry as it relates to daily and yearly
cycles.
   B. Calculate the difference between solar time and standard time.
   C. Differentiate between solar radiation and irradiance.
   D. Diagram the appropriate solar array orientation for a given
latitude.
   E. Interpret solar radiation data sets.
   F. Demonstrate how radiation data is used in sizing and performance of
PV systems.
   G. Discuss current issues in solar energy.

II. PV System Components
   A. Demonstrate use of the site survey and equipment.
   B. Differentiate between types of collector geometries.
   C. Define system components and their use.
      1. Micro inverters
      2. Stand alone - Charge controllers, Maximum Power Point Tracker
(MPPT)
      3. Grid tied - Inverters, power conditioning units, MPPT
      4. Storage battery sizing and maintenance
      5. Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) methods and other storage
systems
   D. Explain types of racks, mounts, connectors and combiner methods.
      1. Sketch a typical rack and mounting system and label the parts.
      2. List and describe module, subarray, and array connection and
combiner methods and hardware.

III. PV System Design Variables
   A. Collect load and typical use inputs and calculations.
   B. Explain the process and function of an energy audit.
   C. Explain effect of shading on a given site.
   D. Evaluate climate effects on a given site.
   E. Evaluate impact of access to solar array.
   F. Interpret ordinances, codes, permitting processes.
   G. Outline mechnical considerations of installations.
      1. Safety
      2. Roof types and issues
      3. Space orientation and limitations
   H. Outline Electrical considerations of installations.
      1. Safety
      2. Grounding
      3. Disconnects
      4. Battery Systems
   I. Evaluate sizing methods and calculations.
   J. Evaluate utility interface considerations.
      1. Physical
      2. Legal

IV. PV Systems Applications
   A. List the defining characteristics of a stand alone system.
   B. List the defining characteristics of a grid tied system.
   C. List the defining characteristics of a hybrid system.
   D. Compare the strengths and weaknesses of each.

V. PV Project Preparation
   A. Collect project data for a sample structure.
   B. List variables that impact project.
   C. Evaluate impact of data collected.
   D. Determine the optimum size and type of array.

VI. PV Project Design
   A. Design a system for a sample structure.
   B. Specify and list components, supplies and hardware for the PV
system.
   C. Estimate labor and project cost of the project.
   D. Evaluate life-cyle cost of the project.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class assignments -         20% - 30% of grade
Sample PV Design Project -  20% - 30% of grade
Exams -                     20% - 30% of grade
Final written exam -        20% - 30% of grade

Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F = 0% - 59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.

EPRM 256

  • Title: Solar Electric Systems Lab*
  • Number: EPRM 256
  • Effective Term: Spring/Summer 2014
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: EPRM 252

Description:

Solar Electric Systems Lab presents practice in the use of the key components of photovoltaic (PV) conversion systems to produce electricity from sunlight. Solar module types and properties, balance of system components, stand-alone and utility interface PV applications are installed. The course includes hands-on details of design, installation, and operation. The course prepares students for the NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners) Entry Level PV exam. 2 hrs. instructional lab/wk.

Course Fees:

None

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate basic and electrical job safety.
  2. Install commercially produced PV rack system.
  3. Install PV cable and conduit.
  4. Exhibit procedures for correct junction and combiner box installation.
  5. Describe the use of solar siting tools, hardware and software.
  6. Install a PV system storage battery.
  7. Describe the installation and functions of a charge controller.
  8. Demonstrate the installation of a PV inverter. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Electrical and Job Safety
   A. Demonstrate proper use of Personal Fall Arrest System (PFAS).
   B. Demonstrate proper use of tools.
   C. Demonstrate proper safety protocols.

II. PV Rack Systems
   A. Install a commercial rack system on a metal roof.
   B. Demonstrate installation of commercial rack system on a composite
roof.  
   C. Install a commercial rack system using a ballasted rack.
   D. Install appropriate roof jacks applicable to each of the roof
systems.

III. PV Cable and Conduit
   A. Demonstrate proper cable sizing protocol.
   B. Describe correct installation of cable systems.
   C. Sketch and describe conduit installation.
      1. Bending and installing solid conduit.
      2. Installing metallic flexible conduit.
      3. Installing non metallic flexible conduit.

IV. Junction and Combiner Box Installation
   A. Exhibit correct installation of junction hardware.
      1. Module junction boxes and connections.  
      2. Industry standared connectors and multi-junction connections.
   B. Model installation of combiner boxes.
      1. Sizing of hardware.
      2. Placement of hardware.
      3. Weather proofing of hardware.

V. Solar Siting Tools, Hardware and Software
   A. Demonstrate use of commercial siting tools, hardware and software.
      1. Analog tools.
      2. Electronic tools.
   B. Describe siting procedures without use of commercial tools, hardware
and software.

VI. Installation and Use of Storage Battery System
   A. Install a multi-module, single series string storage battery.
   B. Demonstrate the installation of a multi-module,
multi-series/parallel string storage battery.
   C. Describe the installation of battery isolation hardware.
   D. Demonstrate installation of manual and automatic transfer switches.
   E. Calculate appropriate set points for charge algorithm for various
chemistry and sizes of modules.

VII. Installation and Use of Charge Controllers
   A. Discuss the use of set points on simple charge controller.
   B. Demonstrate use of set points on Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT)
and associated charge controller.

VIII. Installation and Use of a PV System Inverter
   A. Demonstrate procedures to mechanically and electrically install a
stand alone inverter, including whole system and microinverters.
   B. Demonstrate procedures to mechanically and electrically install grid
tied inverter, including whole system and microinverters.
   C. Describe installation and use of system isolation hardware.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Participation -          40% - 50% of grade
Demonstrations of Competency - 50% - 60% of grade

Grading Scale:
A = 90% - 100%
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F = 0% - 59%

Caveats:

  1. Safety Glasses: Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during activities associated with this course. This requirement complies with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. Note: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: 1) provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or 2) wear cover goggles (if allowable), or 3) purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear. 

Student Responsibilites:

Disabilities:

If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services. Access Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your professor and his/her director. The professor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you desire support services, contact the office of Access Services for Students With Disabilities (913) 469-8500, ext. 3521 or TDD (913) 469-3885. The Access Services office is located in the Success Center on the second floor of the Student Center.