Fire Services Administration (FIRE)

Courses

FIRE 111   Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

Corequisites: FIRE 131 and FIRE 141.

This course prepares the student for the Hazardous Materials certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute. The purpose of this course is to develop an emergency response contingency plan to deal with hazardous material or chemical emergencies in compliance with regulations in order to protect human health and the environment as well as to minimize an organization's risk. Students will also implement the various portions of the plan as required.

FIRE 126   Historical Foundations of the Fire Service (3 Hours)

Emphasis is placed on the historical evolution of the fire service as it pertains to the equipment, organizational structures, terminology, customs and traditions. Students will be involved in looking at primary and secondary documents in developing an understanding of the fire service culture. Critical analysis and historical research will be advanced in the curriculum using historical records and artifacts.

FIRE 131   Firefighter I* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

Corequisites: FIRE 111 and FIRE 141.

This course provides an entry level overview of firefighter safety, fire behavior, building construction, protective clothing, equipment, firefighting techniques and rescue procedures. The students receive a solid foundation of classroom and hands-on training to prepare them for the Firefighter I certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute.

FIRE 133   Fire Investigation (3 Hours)

An orientation and introduction to fire origin and cause, laws of arson, fire and police investigation, and a technical analysis of arson and fraud. Emphasis is placed on the collection and preservation of evidence, photography, diagrams, interviewing, and preparing for court.

FIRE 136   Fire and Emergency Management (3 Hours)

Managing resources is a part of every incident. The ability to manage these resources is crucial in safely and effectively mitigating the incident. Organizations must have a system in place prior to the incident, which will facilitate the management of resources. Federal legislation mandates organizations, which respond to hazardous materials incidents, use an incident management system. This course provides information about incident management systems, as well as pursues issues wherein it needs to be utilized.

FIRE 141   Firefighter II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

Corequisites: FIRE 111 and FIRE 131.

This course builds on the concepts and skills presented in FIRE 131 Firefighter I course. Students will have the opportunity to expand their understanding of fire ground operations and prevention activities reinforced by realistic exercises in various fire ground operations including: extrication, rescues, water supplies, suppression of combustible materials, emergency communications and responsibilities of the firefighter. A life safety inspection project on commercial and residential properties is an integral component of this course. The students receive a solid foundation of classroom and hands-on training to prepare them for the Firefighter II certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute.

FIRE 152   Codes/Detection and Suppression Systems (3 Hours)

This course will provide a basis for students to become familiar with and utilize fire codes that are in use today. It will also provide students with basic knowledge of detection and suppression systems that are an ever increasing part of fire control today.

FIRE 162   Firefighting Tactics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : Firefighter Certificate completion and/or Department approval.

Strategy and tactics are essential competencies required to mitigate fires. This course is designed to prepare a fire officer to be able to provide tactics at a structure fire, fully utilizing available resources in a safe and efficient manner.

FIRE 201   Leadership in the Fire Service* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : Firefighter Certificate completion and/or Department approval.

This is a course that will delve into leadership as defined and utilized in the fire service setting. It will review many types of leaders and the qualities that make them leaders. It will also provide students insight into the type of leaders they may see in the fire service as well as provide them with role models for their use as future fire service leaders.

FIRE 220   Fire Management (3 Hours)

This course will involve the student in learning proper methods of supervision and the duties of a fire department first line manager. It will encompass supervisory techniques as well as various management theories. This course will assist the student in the application of techniques and the practical use of management theories in the role as a fire service manager.

FIRE 222   Fire Science Law (3 Hours)

The student will have the opportunity to explore legal aspects of the fire and emergency services departments. This course discusses OSHA regulations, basic human resources concepts, employee and employer rights, HIPPA regulations from the lens of fire and emergency services administrators. Case studies of legal precedence for fire investigations are used as a method of applying concepts in this course.

FIRE 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites : 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

FIRE 111

  • Title: Hazardous Materials Awareness and Operations*
  • Number: FIRE 111
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.
Corequisites: FIRE 131 and FIRE 141.

Description:

This course prepares the student for the Hazardous Materials certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute. The purpose of this course is to develop an emergency response contingency plan to deal with hazardous material or chemical emergencies in compliance with regulations in order to protect human health and the environment as well as to minimize an organization's risk. Students will also implement the various portions of the plan as required.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize hazardous materials incidents.
  2. Identify hazardous materials.
  3. Explore awareness-level actions at hazardous materials incidents.
  4. Discuss chemical properties and hazardous materials behaviors.
  5. Describe proper management of a hazardous materials incident.
  6. Discuss decision-making, strategic goals and tactical objectives. 
  7. Distinguish among terrorist attacks, criminal activities and disasters.
  8. Determine the best practices for using personal protective equipment (PPE). 
  9. Determine the best practices for decontamination.
  10. Determine best practices for product control.
  11. Demonstrate the use of air monitoring and sampling equipment.
  12. Demonstrate proper victim rescue and recovery techniques.
  13. Recognize proper evidence preservation and sampling procedures.
  14. Recognize illicit laboratories.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Hazardous Materials Incidents

A. Distinguish between hazardous materials incidents and other emergencies.

B. Discuss the roles of awareness-level personnel and operations-level responders.

C. Describe the various types of hazardous materials dangers.

D. Explain each of the routes of entry for hazardous chemicals.

E. Describe the U.S., Canadian and Mexican hazardous materials regulations and definitions.

F. Discuss hazardous materials incident statistics.

II. Hazardous Materials Identification

A. Identify the seven clues to the presence of hazardous materials.

B. Discuss the occupancy types, locations and pre-incident surveys that may indicate hazardous materials.

C. Describe the container shapes that may contain hazardous materials.

D. Identify placards, labels and markings that designate the presence of hazardous materials.

E. Explain the written resources available to indicate the presence of hazardous materials.

F. Discuss monitoring and detection devices.

III. Awareness-Level Actions at Hazardous Materials Incidents

A. Discuss predetermined procedures and emergency response plans.

B. Describe notification requirements.

C. Discuss the use of the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) to obtain information about a hazardous material.

D. Demonstrate isolate and deny entry to a scene techniques.

E. Discuss terrorist incidents.

IV. Chemical Properties and Hazardous Materials Behavior

A. Discuss three states of matter

B. Discuss flammability of various hazardous materials.

C. Explain concept of vapor pressure, boiling point, specific gravity, solubility and miscibility.

D. Explain the reactivity triangle.

E. Describe the General Hazardous Materials Behavior Model.

V. Incident Management

A. Describe incident priorities.

B. Discuss various incident management systems.

C. Identify communication procedures and guidelines for use at hazardous materials incidents.

VI. Strategic Goals and Tactical Objectives

A. Describe each of the steps of the basic problem-solving formula.

B. Discuss isolation and scene control.

C. Explain the notification process.

D. Discuss protection of responders, the public, the environment and property.

E. Describe recovery and termination of an incident.

VII. Terrorist Attacks, Criminal Activity and Disasters

A. Define terrorism.

B. Distinguish between a terrorist attack and routine emergency.

C. Discuss explosive, chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear attacks.

D. Identify dangers of illegal hazardous materials dump.

E. Demonstrate proper evidence preservation.

VIII. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

A. Demonstrate proper use of respiratory protection.

B. Discuss protective clothing and ensembles.

C. Don and doff different types of PPE.

D. Discuss inspection, storage, testing and maintenance of PPE.

IX. Decontamination

A. Explore various decontamination methods.

B. Describe the types of victims that may receive decontamination.

C. Perform emergency decontamination.

D. Demonstrate set-up and implementation of technical decontamination.

E. Perform mass decontamination.

X. Product Control

A. Describe each of the various spill control tactics.

B. Perform spill absorption/adsorption, damming, diking, diversion and retention.

C. Demonstrate leak control and perform remote valve shutoff.

D. Explain fire control.

E. Demonstrate Foam line set-up and applications.

XI. Air Monitoring and Sampling Equipment

A. Discuss air monitoring and sampling.

B. Discuss concentrations and exposure limits.

C. Explain the components of air monitoring.

D. Describe the selection and maintenance of detection and monitoring devices.

E. Perform a pH test on an unknown liquid.

F. Perform air monitoring with a multi-gas meter.

XII. Victim Rescue and Recovery Techniques

A. Discuss rescue operations.

B. Conduct a triage.

C. Identify rescue tools and equipment.

D. Demonstrate various rescue drag methods.

XIII. Evidence Preservation and Sampling Procedures

A. Discuss various hazards at crimes involving hazardous materials or weapons of mass destruction.

B. Discuss the first responder’s role in investigation.

C. Describe the different response phases at criminal hazardous materials/weapons of mass destruction incidents.

XIV. Illicit Laboratories

A. Discuss general hazards at illicit laboratories.

B. Identify and avoid booby traps at illicit laboratories.

C. Describe illicit drug, chemical agent, explosive and biological labs.

D. Discuss remediation operations for illicit labs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Eight Unit Exams:  100 points each
Two Comprehensive Exams:  100 points each
Twenty Quizzes:  20 points each
Practical Skills Evaluation:  Pass/Fail

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 126

  • Title: Historical Foundations of the Fire Service
  • Number: FIRE 126
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Emphasis is placed on the historical evolution of the fire service as it pertains to the equipment, organizational structures, terminology, customs and traditions. Students will be involved in looking at primary and secondary documents in developing an understanding of the fire service culture. Critical analysis and historical research will be advanced in the curriculum using historical records and artifacts.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the history of fire and the dawn of firefighting.
  2. Research the evolution of firefighting equipment.
  3. Analyze fire department traditions and their significance.
  4. Outline significant fire disasters and the lessons learned.
  5. Discuss the incorporation of emergency medical services into the fire service.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of fire and the dawn of firefighting

A. Discuss the history of mans use and control of fire.

B. Explain the connection between the Roman Empire, firefighting equipment and long held traditions.

C. Iterate how St. Florian became the patron saint of firefighters.

D. Discuss the important people, theoretical concepts and innovations developed during colonial times in America.

II. Evolution of firefighting equipment

A. Discuss the development of the first fire engine.

B. Iterate why red became the signature color for fire engines.

C. Discuss the evolution of fire hydrants.

D. Discuss the evolution of fire extinguishers.

E. Describe the advent of the fire hose.

F. Discuss evolution of personal protective gear.

III. Fire department traditions and their significance

A. Evaluate the validity of information regarding the adoption of the Maltese Cross as the firefighters badge throughout the United Stated.

B. Explain the fire department ranks and insignias.

C. Discuss the use of canines in the fire service.

IV. Significant fire disasters and the lessons learned

A. Explore fire departments history of retroactive fire prevention.

B. Discuss various fire catastrophes that could have been prevented.

C. Iterate the lessons learned from catastrophic fire events.

D. Research the “Mayday” call, the tradition of using bagpipes and tolling bells at firefighters funerals.

V. Incorporation of emergency medical services into the fire department

A. Identify the persons and organizations responsible for the Star of Life becoming the recognized symbol of emergency medical services.

B. Describe the evolution of the ambulance service.

C. Discuss the history of emergency medical response in the United States.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-20%    Quizzes
10-15%    Written Projects
20-30%    Unit Tests
30-40%    Final

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 131

  • Title: Firefighter I*
  • Number: FIRE 131
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 7

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.
Corequisites: FIRE 111 and FIRE 141.

Description:

This course provides an entry level overview of firefighter safety, fire behavior, building construction, protective clothing, equipment, firefighting techniques and rescue procedures. The students receive a solid foundation of classroom and hands-on training to prepare them for the Firefighter I certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explore the organization, structure and history of the fire service.
  2. Discuss firefighter safety and health matters.
  3. Explain fire behavior.
  4. Discuss building construction as it relates to fires.
  5. Demonstrate proper use of firefighters' personal protective equipment.
  6. Demonstrate proper use of portable fire extinguishers.
  7. Demonstrate proper use of ropes and knots.
  8. Explain rescue and extrication techniques.
  9. Discuss forcible entry procedures.
  10. Demonstrate safe use of ground ladders.
  11. Explain ventilation of a structure.
  12. Explore various types of water supplies.
  13. Demonstrate proper use of fire hose.
  14. Demonstrate use of fire streams.
  15. Explain fire control.
  16. Discuss fire detection, alarm and suppression systems.
  17. Explain the philosophy of loss control, salvage and overhaul.
  18. Discuss protecting fire scene evidence.
  19. Demonstrate proper fire department communications.
  20. Explain the importance of fire prevention and public education.
  21. Demonstrate basic pre-hospital emergency medical care.
  22. Identify hazardous materials incidents.
  23. Demonstrate proper operations of a hazardous materials incident.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Firefighter Orientation

A. Describe the history and culture of the fire service.

B. Describe the mission of the fire service.

C. Explain fire department organizational principles.

D. Distinguish among functions of fire companies.

E. Summarize primary knowledge and skills the firefighter must have to function effectively.

F. Distinguish among the primary roles of the fire service personnel.

G. Distinguish among policies, procedures and standard operating procedures.

H. Summarize components of the Incident Command System (ICS).

I. Distinguish among the functions of the major subdivisions within the ICS structure.

II. Firefighter Safety and Health

A. Discuss Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.

B. Summarize the International Fire Service Training Association (IFSTA) principles of risk management.

C. Discuss firefighter health considerations and employee assistance and wellness programs.

D. Discuss safety in the fire station.

E. Explain how to maintain and service equipment used in training.

F. Describe emergency escape and rapid intervention.

III. Fire Behavior

A. Describe physical and chemical changes of matter related to fire.

B. Discuss modes of combustion, the fire triangle and the fire tetrahedron.

C. Explain the difference between heat and temperature.

D. Describe sources of heat energy.

E. Discuss the transmission of heat.

F. Explain how the physical states of fuel affect the combustion process.

G. Explain how oxygen concentration affects the combustion process.

H. Distinguish among classifications of fires.

I. Describe the stages of fire development within a compartment.

IV. Building Construction

A. Describe common building materials.

B. Describe construction types and the effect fire has on the structural integrity of the construction type.

C. Identify the primary strengths and weaknesses of construction.

D. Describe dangerous building conditions created by fire or by actions taken attempting to extinguish a fire.

E. Recognize indicators of building collapse.

F. Explore actions to take when imminent building collapse is suspected.

G. Describe hazards associated with lightweight and truss construction.

V. Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment

A. Describe the purpose of personal protective gear.  

B. Summarize guidelines for the care of personal protective clothing.

C. Demonstrate effective air management.  

D. Describe basic Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) component assemblies.

E. Demonstrate donning and doffing SCBA.  

F. Demonstrate proper use of SCBA during emergency situations.

G. Demonstrate changing a SCBA cylinder using both the one person and two person methods.

VI. Portable Fire Extinguishers

A. Demonstrate the proper selection and use of portable fire extinguishers. 

B. Distinguish among classifications of fire and the most common agents used to extinguish them.

C. Discuss fire extinguisher types and uses.

D. Discuss damaged portable fire extinguishers and obsolete portable fire extinguishers.

VII. Ropes and Knots

A. Discuss types of rope construction.

B. Describe parts of a rope and considerations in tying a knot.

C. Describe characteristics of knots commonly used in the fire service.

D. Demonstrate selecting rope hardware for a given application.  

E. Summarize hoisting safety considerations.

F. Demonstrate knowledge of tying a variety of knots specific to the fire service. 

VIII. Rescue and Extrication Techniques

A. Distinguish between rescue and extrication operations.

B. Summarize safety guidelines for search and rescue personnel.

C. Describe actions that should be taken by a rapid intervention crew when a firefighter is in distress.

D. Conduct a primary and secondary search. 

E. Demonstrate various emergency rescue carries.

IX. Forcible Entry Procedures 

A. Select appropriate cutting tools for specific applications.

B. Summarize forcible entry tool safety rules.

C. Summarize general care and maintenance practices for forcible entry tools.  

D. Explain how fire doors operate.

E. Describe the characteristics of basic types of locks.

F. Describe rapid-entry lockbox systems.

G. Explain actions that can be taken to force entry involving padlocks.

H. Discuss hazards in forcing windows.

X. Ground Ladders  

A. Describe types of ground ladders used in the fire service.

B. Summarize factors that contribute to safe ladder operations.

C. Describe proper procedures or positioning ground ladders.

D. Explain precautions to take before raising a ladder.

E. Describe methods for lowering conscious or unconscious victims down ground ladders.

F. Demonstrate selecting, carrying and raising a ladder properly for various types of activities.

XI. Ventilation

A. Discuss factors that are taken into account when deciding the need to ventilate a building.

B. List precautions to observe when undertaking vertical ventilation.

C. List warning signs of and unsafe roof condition.

D. Explain procedures for ventilation of a conventional basement.

E. Distinguish between advantages and disadvantages of forced ventilation.

XII. Water Supply

A. Describe dry-barrel and wet-barrel hydrants.

B. Discuss fire hydrant markings and location.

C. Summarize potential problems to look for when inspecting fire hydrants.

D. Demonstrate operating a hydrant.

E. Discuss alternative water supplies.

XIII. Fire Hose

A. Discuss general care and maintenance of fire hose.

B. Distinguish between characteristics of threaded couplings and nonthreaded couplings.

C. Describe the characteristics of hose appliances and tools.

D. Demonstrate basic hose loads.

E. Demonstrate basic hose lays for supply hose.

F. Demonstrate techniques for operating hose lines.

XIV. Fire Streams  

A. Discuss the extinguishing properties of water.

B. Distinguish among characteristics of fire stream sizes.

C. Demonstrate use of hose streams and nozzles.

D. List checks that should be included in nozzle inspections.

XV. Fire Control

A. Summarize considerations prior to entering a burning building.

B. Describe direct attack, indirect attack and combination attack.

C. Discuss deploying master stream devices.

D. Describe aerial devices used to deliver elevated master streams.

E. Discuss responsibilities of companies in structural fires.

F. Explain action taken when performing firefighting and rescue operations in confined space.

XVI. Fire Detection, Alarm and Suppression Systems

A. Compare function of fire detection, alarm and suppression systems.

B. Discuss general automatic sprinkler protection and types of coverage.

C. Describe major applications of sprinkler systems.

XVII. Loss Control

A. Explain the philosophy of loss control.

B. Demonstrate salvage cover techniques.  

XVIII. Protecting Fire Scene Evidence  

A. Describe signs and indications of an incendiary fire.

B. Summarize important observations to be made en route, after arriving at the scene and during firefighting operations.

C. Explain firefighting responsibilities after the fire.

D. Discuss protecting and preserving evidence.

XIX. Fire Department Communications  

A. Demonstrate proper emergency communications to initiate a response.

B. Explain the purpose of tactical channels.

C. Discuss evacuation signals and personnel accountability reports.

XX. Fire Prevention and Public Education 

A. Discuss the fire prevention activities.

B. Develop a fire prevention presentation.

XXI. Basic Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Care for Firefighters

A. Discuss the importance of body substance isolations.

B. Discuss diseases of concern.

C. Describe scene safety considerations at hazardous materials incidents and rescue operations.

D. Demonstrate cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

E. Discuss indications of effective CPR and when CPR may be interrupted.

XXII. Introduction to Hazardous Materials (Haz Mat)

A. Summarize Awareness level and Operational level responsibilities at hazardous materials incidents.

B. Demonstrate emergency breathing techniques using SCBA. 

C. Describe National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) 1994 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ensemble classifications.

D. Discuss heath and safety issues when wearing PPE.

E. Describe health and physical hazards that may be present at Haz Mat incidents.

XXIII. Operations at Haz Mat Incidents

A. Summarize incident priorities for all haz mat and terrorist incidents.

B. Discuss the management structure at haz mat or terrorist incidents.

C. Summarize general guidelines for decontamination operations.

D. Describe the three types of decontamination.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Eight Unit Exams:   100 points each
Two Comprehensive Exams:  100 points each
Twenty Quizzes:  20 points each
Practical Skills Evaluation:  Pass/Fail

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 133

  • Title: Fire Investigation
  • Number: FIRE 133
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

An orientation and introduction to fire origin and cause, laws of arson, fire and police investigation, and a technical analysis of arson and fraud. Emphasis is placed on the collection and preservation of evidence, photography, diagrams, interviewing, and preparing for court.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explore the issues of fire investigation.
  2. Analyze of the chemistry of combustion.
  3. Discuss various behaviors of fire.
  4. Research gaseous fuels and their behaviors.
  5. Research solid fuels and their behaviors.
  6. Determine the best method to conduct investigations. 
  7. Discuss the many and varied sources of ignition. 
  8. Discuss structure fire investigations.
  9. Research wildland fires.
  10. Discuss vehicle fire investigations.
  11. Analyze electrical fires.
  12. Analyze clothing and fabric fires.
  13. Discuss explosions and explosive materials.
  14. Discuss chemical fire and hazardous materials.
  15. Research laboratory services.
  16. Discuss fire fatalities and injuries.
  17. Discuss the crime of arson.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction

A. Explore the issues of fire and fire investigations in the United States.

B. Discuss the detection of incendiary fires.

C. Describe analytical fire investigation.

II. The Elementary Chemistry of Combustion

A. Discuss the interactions of compounds.

B. Determine the various states of fuel in regard to fire load.

III. The Nature and Behavior of Fire

A. Discuss combustion, fire behavior, and growth.

B. Describe the effects of environmental conditions on fire behavior.

IV. Combustion Properties of Liquid and Gaseous Fuels

A. Discuss types of liquid fuel, their properties and behaviors.

B. Discuss investigation techniques for liquid fuels

V. Combustion Properties of Solid Fuels

A. Discuss types of solid fuels, their properties and behaviors.

B. Discuss investigative techniques for solid fuels.

VI. Conducting the Structure and Vehicle Fire Investigation

A. Discuss the scientific method.

B. Discuss the use of photo, video and written documentation.

C. Research the data that can be collected from the investigation.

VII. Sources of Ignition

A. Discuss ignition sources and their uses.

B. Discuss electrical ignition sources.

C. Determine the difference between incendiary and accidental ignition sources.

VIII. Structure Fires and Their Investigation

A. Discuss elements of building construction.

B. Determine the process for examination of a structure fire scene.

C. Document the fire scene.

D. Determine conclusions about the fire investigation.

VIX. Grass and Wildland Fires and Their Investigation

A. Discuss how to determine the origin of a wildland fire.

B. Discuss sources of ignition for wildland fires.

C. Describe proper collection and preservation of physical evidence.

X. Automobile, Motor Vehicle and Ship Fires

A. Analyze automobile and motor vehicle fires.

B. Analyze boat and ship fires.

XI. Electrical Cause of Fire

A. Describe basic electricity and wiring systems.

B. Discuss investigation of electricity-related fires.

XII. Clothing and Fabric Fires

A. Discover regulations on flammable fabrics.

B. Discuss flammability testing.

XIII. Explosions and Explosive Combustion

A. Discuss explosive combustion and its phases.

B. Describe investigation of explosions.

XIV. Chemical Fires and Hazardous Materials

A. Describe chemical fires and hazardous materials fire investigations.

B. Describe investigative techniques for clandestine drug laboratories.

XVI. Laboratory Services

A. Discuss the availability of and use of laboratory services.

B. Describe fire-related and non-fire-related criminal evidence.

XVII. Fire-Related Deaths and Injuries

A. Discuss the medico-legal death investigation process.

B. Describe pathological and toxicological examinations.

XVII. Arson as a Crime

A. Discuss the crime of arson.

B. Deduce from the interpretation of evidence.

C. Research court procedures and the laws governing fire investigation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes 15 – 25%
In class projects 10 – 15%
Unit tests 20 – 30%
Final 30 – 40%

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 136

  • Title: Fire and Emergency Management
  • Number: FIRE 136
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Managing resources is a part of every incident. The ability to manage these resources is crucial in safely and effectively mitigating the incident. Organizations must have a system in place prior to the incident, which will facilitate the management of resources. Federal legislation mandates organizations, which respond to hazardous materials incidents, use an incident management system. This course provides information about incident management systems, as well as pursues issues wherein it needs to be utilized.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the essential elements of an effective emergency management program.
  2. Describe the role of the Emergency Manager.
  3. Summarize facts about the evolution of guidelines and standards for national preparedness.
  4. Distinguish among major national laws affecting emergency management.
  5. List documents of programs that can assist in hazard identification, risk assessment, and impact analysis.
  6. List the items included in a documented emergency management program.
  7. Define incident prevention and hazard mitigation.  
  8. Summarize facts about resource management aspect of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
  9. Describe types of mutual aid agreements.
  10. Summarize the objectives of continuity of operations (COOP) plans.
  11. Summarize requirements for an incident management system.
  12. Discuss emergency communications and warning systems.
  13. Summarize operational procedures requirements for emergency management.
  14. Summarize finance and administration requirement for emergency management

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Incident Management System (IMS)

A. Describe the why and how of the beginning of the IMS.

B. Distinguish among functions of the Office of Homeland Security.

C. Describe major Findings of the National Commission of Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (9/11) Commission).

D. Explain interagency, intergovernmental, interoperability, and interdisciplinary concepts as the relate to emergency management.

II. Roles within Emergency Management

A. Discuss information emergency managers should know and be able to access.

B. Summarize facts about partnerships in emergency management.

C. Explain the concept of integrated emergency management.

D. Describe activities citizens should take to prepare for emergencies as listed in the Ready New York campaign.

III. National preparedness guidelines and standards

A. Summarize facts about National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards related to emergency management.

B. Summarize facts about the Capability Assessment for Readiness (CAR) process instrument.

C. Describe the five levels of preparedness based on CAR results.

D. Discuss national preparedness assessment programs.

E. Describe individual education, certification, and accreditation in the field of emergency management.

IV. Laws and Authorities of Emergency Management

A. List benefits of the emergency manager having knowledge of necessary laws and applicable authorities.

B. Summarize facts about executive orders and presidential directives.

C. Discuss local emergency planning committee guides.

D. Describe the FIRESCOPE program used in California.

V. Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment, and Impact Analysis

A. List documents or programs that can assist in hazard identification, risk assessment, and impact analysis.

B. Describe a simple hazard identification process.

C. Explain how vulnerability can be examined.

D. Explain how hazard maps are used in emergency management.

E. Describe the seven process steps in the basic business model or risk management.

VI. Emergency Management Program Administration

A. Describe the roles of the emergency management coordinator, manager, and advisory committee.

B. List activities that may be conducted following a program evaluation.

C. Describe the vision and goals of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency (DHS-FEMA).

D. Describe coordination in the context of NIMS.

E.      Define each component of a strategic plan.

VII. Incident Prevention and Hazard Mitigation

A. List the basic actions taken when planning for incident prevention and hazard mitigation.

B. Summarize facts about NFPA 1600, Standard on disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs, and Capability Assessment for Readiness (CAR) mitigation strategies.

C. List the elements included in the loss prevention matrix.

D. Identify mitigation measures that lessen the effects of disasters.

E. Summarize facts about cost-benefit analyses.

VIII. Resource Management

A. Describe the emergency response plan element that explains the procedures for ordering resources.

B. Identify agencies, department, and or groups that could supply possible planning participants for local jurisdiction resource management plans.

C. Describe local, tribal, and state responses to resource requirement.

D. Explain how volunteer and donations management should be addressed.

IX. Mutual Aid Agreements

A. Discuss benefits of mutual aid agreements.

B. Discuss limitations of mutual aid agreements. Summarize National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) recommendations for mutual aid agreements.

C. Discuss best practices in mutual aid.

X. Emergency Plans for All Hazards and Continuity of Operations (COOP) Plans

A. Explain how catastrophic incidents differ from other types of emergencies.

B. List planning considerations of continuity of operations (COOP) plan and continuity of government (COG) plans.  

C. Discuss steps managers and supervisors can take to address response measures.

D. Describe elements of recovery plans, including public assistance, individual assistance, and private-sector recovery.

XI. Direction, Command, Control, and Coordination of the Incident Command System

A. Describe the development history of the Incident Command System (ICS).

B. Discuss management characteristics of ICS.

C. List incident action plan (IAP) components.

D. List resources for emergency operations centers (EOCs).

E. Summarize issues to consider while conducting an EOC assessment.

F. Discuss training opportunities for direction, command, control, and coordination of emergency response.

XII. Emergency Communication and Warnings

A. Summarize compliance requirements for emergency communications and warnings.

B. Describe aspects to consider for maximizing the use of warning systems.

C. Define mass communications and selective communication.

D. Discuss logistical and sociological considerations for warning communications.

E. Discuss challenges in warning dissemination.

XIII. Operational Procedure Requirements for Emergency Management

A. Discuss how operational procedures apply to the phases of the emergency management process.

B. Explain why the Incident Command System (ICS) is useful for Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs).

C. Discuss lessons learned from the Florida hurricanes of 2004.

D. Discuss operational procedures best practices.

XIV. Finance and Administration Requirements for Emergency Management

A. Discuss fiscal aspects to emergency management programs that should be considered, evaluated, and implemented.

B. Discuss the Emergency Management Performance Grant Program.

C. Summarize the basic organizational structure and responsibilities for a Finance/Administration Section.

D. Discuss financial management recovery operation.

E. Discuss best practices in emergency management finance and administration. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15 – 25%   Quizzes 
10 – 15%   In class projects
20 – 30%   Unit tests  
30 – 40%   Final    

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 141

  • Title: Firefighter II*
  • Number: FIRE 141
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.
Corequisites: FIRE 111 and FIRE 131.

Description:

This course builds on the concepts and skills presented in FIRE 131 Firefighter I course. Students will have the opportunity to expand their understanding of fire ground operations and prevention activities reinforced by realistic exercises in various fire ground operations including: extrication, rescues, water supplies, suppression of combustible materials, emergency communications and responsibilities of the firefighter. A life safety inspection project on commercial and residential properties is an integral component of this course. The students receive a solid foundation of classroom and hands-on training to prepare them for the Firefighter II certification through Kansas Fire and Rescue Training Institute.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain how building construction impacts fire suppression efforts.
  2. Demonstrate vehicle extrication and rescue operations.
  3. Demonstrate the use of water supplies for fire suppression.
  4. Explain the proper implementation, handling, care and storage of fire hose.
  5. Demonstrate the suppression of common combustible, electrical and flammable liquid fires.
  6. Explain fire detection, suppression and alarm systems.
  7. Explore how to protect evidence of fire origin and cause.
  8. Describe emergency services communications.
  9. Explain fire prevention and public safety responsibilities of the firefighter.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Building Construction

A. Compare common building materials as it relates to fire suppression.

B. Discuss Construction Classifications.

C. Discuss firefighter hazards related to building construction.

II. Rescue and Extrication 

A. Discuss fire ground search and rescue principles.

B. Explain strategies for victim removal from a fire.

C. Explore rescue and extrication tools and equipment.

D. Demonstrate technical rescue techniques.

E. Demonstrate vehicle extrication techniques.

III. Water Supply

A. Explain water supply principles.

B. Discuss extinguishing properties of water and foam.

C. Explain how pressure is gained and lost in fire hose.

D. Explain fire streams and nozzles.

E. Demonstrate firefighting foam applications.

F. Demonstrate suppression of structure fires.

G. Deploy a master stream at a fire.

H. Explore alternative water supplies.

I. Discuss rural water supply operations.

IV. Fire Hose 

A. Discuss the general care and maintenance of fire hose.

B. Demonstrate how to test fire hose.

V. Fire Streams

A. Discuss water supply principles.

B. Explain the extinguishing properties of water.

C. Discuss how pressure is gained or loss in a fire hose.

D. Discuss causes of a water hammer.

E. Compare various types of fire streams and nozzles.

F. Explore methods of dispensing firefighting foam.

G. Compare proportioners, delivery devices and generating systems

H. Demonstrate assembling a foam fire stream system.

I. Discuss foam application techniques ad hazards.

VI. Fire Control

A. Demonstrate how to suppress structure fires.

B. Demonstrate how to deploy master streams at a fire.

C. Compare suppression techniques of class A, B and C fires.

D. Explore company level fire tactics.

VII. Fire Detection, Alarm and Suppression Systems

A. Explore various types of alarm systems in structures.

B. Discuss automatic sprinkler systems.

C. Discuss operations at fires in protected properties.

VIII. Protecting Fire Scene Evidence

A. Demonstrate how to recognize and protect evidence at a fire scene.

B. Explain firefighter roles and duties at a fire scene as it pertains to origin and cause of fire.

IX. Fire Department Communications

A. Explain emergency communication as it pertains to fire and emergency medical services.

B. Compare management of non-emergent and emergent calls from the public.

C. Demonstrate proper radio communication in the fire service.

D. Demonstrate completing a fire incident report.

X. Fire Prevention and Public Education

A. Perform a private dwelling fire and safety survey.

B. Prepare a pre-incident survey.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Eight Unit Exams:  100 points each
Two Comprehensive Exams:  100 points each
Twenty Quizzes:  20 points each
Practical Skills Evaluation:  Pass/Fail

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 152

  • Title: Codes/Detection and Suppression Systems
  • Number: FIRE 152
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will provide a basis for students to become familiar with and utilize fire codes that are in use today. It will also provide students with basic knowledge of detection and suppression systems that are an ever increasing part of fire control today.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the basic history of codes and the code-making process.
  2. Utilize codes during review and inspections.
  3. Describe the principles of fire.
  4. Explain how fire can be extinguished and utilize this knowledge in reviewing extinguishing and detection systems.
  5. Explain water and its effect on fire.
  6. Explain the science behind and the operation of other fixed suppression systems.
  7. Explain the science behind and the operation of major types of detection systems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The History of Codes and Their Use by Various Nations and Empires

A. Identify various codes employed in historic times.

B. Provide examples of why they were produced.

C. Examine tragedies as part of the codes process.

II. The Utilization and Interpretation of Codes During Review and Inspections

A. Explain the use of codes in actual situations.

B. Explain the use of various chapters in a code.

C. Explain a code in specific exiting situations.

D. Discuss the term "performance" as it relates to codes and enforcement.

III. Fire Aids in the Placement and Operation of Detection and Extinguishing Systems

A. Explain the various interpretations of what fire is, especially the fire tetrahedron.

B. Utilize the knowledge of fire in describing various types of fires.

IV. Extinguishing Methods Utilized to Control and Extinguish a Fire

A. Connect these methods to types of fires.

B. Connect types of fires to types of extinguishing systems.

V. Basic Fire Extinguishment Using Water

A. Explain how water extinguishes a fire and why it is still the most effective extinguishing agent.

B. Examine math in the process of building and using water as an extinguishing agent.

C. Explain how various types of water suppression systems function.

VI. Other Extinguishing Agents and Systems

A. Discuss water additives as a basis for effective extinguishing systems.

B. Discuss utilizing various types of non-water based extinguishing systems.

VII. Fire Detection Systems

A. Discuss the earliest types of heat detectors.

B. Explain the operation of products of combustion detection systems.

C. Discuss the need for fire detection systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes 15 – 25%
In class projects 10 – 15%
Unit tests 20 – 30%
Final 30 – 40%

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 162

  • Title: Firefighting Tactics*
  • Number: FIRE 162
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Firefighter Certificate completion and/or Department approval.

Description:

Strategy and tactics are essential competencies required to mitigate fires. This course is designed to prepare a fire officer to be able to provide tactics at a structure fire, fully utilizing available resources in a safe and efficient manner.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain fire chemistry terms and concepts.
  2. Apply fundamental principles of fire safety programs.
  3. Formulate procedures for tactical operations.
  4. Effectively cope with fire ground emergency issues.
  5. Research best practices in pre-fire planning.
  6. Ensure that post fire analysis is employed in the most effective manner. 
  7. Develop a basic structure fire tactical process.
  8. Explore issues with basic firefighting skills.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fire Chemistry Terms and Concepts

A. Define heat transfer in tactical situations.

B. Describe principal fire characteristics of materials to enhance knowledge of tactical situations.

C. Explain a fire tetrahedron and its relationship to tactics.

D. Explain the five stages of fire and its impact on tactical issues.

E. Define flashover and how it can be reduced as a significant issue in structure fires.

F. Explain fire spread and how it impacts fire attack.

II. Developing a Fire Department Safety Program

A. Discuss the three basic tenets of fireground safety.

B. Provide a basic structure for training about firefighter safety.

C. Discuss the need for record keeping, especially regarding near-miss situations.

D. State various needs for fitness of firefighters.

E. Explain how risk management fits into the fire service.

III. Eight Orders of Tactical Operations

A. Discuss each as to basic understanding of role.

B. Describe basic styles of interior attack.

C. Delineate the differences between the three methods of attack based on fire size.

IV. Prioritizing Issues on the Fireground

A. Discuss the five concepts of size up.

B. Provide information so as to make fireground prioritizing effective.

V. Pre-fire Planning for Initial Fire Attack

A. Define the pre-fire plan concept.

B. Delineate the methods used in pre-fire planning.

VI. The Effects of Post-Fire Analysis

A. Discuss the objectives of doing a post-fire analysis.

B. Describe the methods employed in a post-fire analysis.

C. Describe the format employed to provide a post-fire analysis.

VII. Basic Structural Fire Tactical Process

A. Explain basic fire attack in dwellings.

B. Explain basic fire attack in other structures.

VIII. Issues with Basic Firefighting Skills

A. Describe proper hose line placement and use.

B. Explain appropriate information on search techniques.

C. Explain basic ladder placement.

D. Discuss how and when to use ventilation.

E. Illustrate the proper method of fighting a single family residential fire.

F. Describe various types of hidden space fires and tactics used to suppress.

G. Describe construction of high rises and its effect on tactics.

H. Describe medical process in large victim fire.

I. Discuss building-under-construction tactical issues.

J. Describe other non-structure fire problems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes 15 – 25%
In class projects 10 – 15%
Unit tests 20 – 30%
Final 30 – 40%

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 201

  • Title: Leadership in the Fire Service*
  • Number: FIRE 201
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Firefighter Certificate completion and/or Department approval.

Description:

This is a course that will delve into leadership as defined and utilized in the fire service setting. It will review many types of leaders and the qualities that make them leaders. It will also provide students insight into the type of leaders they may see in the fire service as well as provide them with role models for their use as future fire service leaders.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define leaders and leadership styles.
  2. Review the basis of what makes a good leader.
  3. Discuss conflict resolution in the fire service.
  4. Discuss leading in dangerous situations versus managing committees.
  5. Interpret Crew Resource Management as it should be used in the fire service today.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Leaders

A.  Define the term leadership.

B. Describe the terms traits and abilities and provide insight into their meanings as they pertain to leadership.

C. Describe the various leadership roles that individuals in the fire service need to be involved with, and delineate how various types of leadership styles would fit into those leadership roles.

D. Describe the various types of leaders that are most prevalent today inside and outside the fire service.

E. Provide specific personal aspects of leadership and tie them to types of leaders.

F. Discuss how changing your leadership style can possibly change your actions.

II. Leadership In Its Simplest Form

A. Describe how answers can be found by leaders that pay attention to their personnel.

B. Describe the root cause of success.

C. Describe how leaders can return to the right track when confronted with mistakes being made.

D. Discuss the role emotions play in leadership and issues being confronted.

III. Leading Through Conflict

A. Discuss the three styles of leaders when faced with conflict.

B. Define the tools needed and used by a mediator.

IV. Leading As If Your Life Depended On It

A. Discuss the type of leadership that is effective when leading during extremely dangerous circumstances.

B. Describe how effective leaders can overcome fear in themselves and others.

C. Describe the role of an effective leader when they and their personnel are faced with tragedy.

D. Delineate how an effective leader builds effective teams.

V. Crew Resource Management (CRM) and Leadership

A. Describe the five parts of CRM.

B. Describe how effective leaders can and should overcome errors, by utilizing CRM.

C. Define the term situational awareness and its critical importance to a leader.

D. Describe effective decision-making skills during critical times faced by a leader.

E. Discuss the importance of, and proper method of effective communication, both for a leader and for their personnel.

F.  Define teamwork and followership.

G. Describe the barriers to effective leadership and management.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-20%    Quizzes
15-20%    Paper
20-30%    Unit Tests
30-40%    Final

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 220

  • Title: Fire Management
  • Number: FIRE 220
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will involve the student in learning proper methods of supervision and the duties of a fire department first line manager. It will encompass supervisory techniques as well as various management theories. This course will assist the student in the application of techniques and the practical use of management theories in the role as a fire service manager.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss changes in fire service management and how that may impact the service.
  2. Research organizational design and the impact they have on workers and the community.
  3. Discuss the basic principals of management.
  4. Research management theories and how different styles impact the working environment.
  5. Explain the responsibilities expected of the different management levels.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Change in Fire Service Management

A. Delineate substantive changes in fire management and how they came about.

1. Discuss the three levels of fire service management.

2. Discuss the role of each level of management.

3. Discuss the process of change in fire service management throughout its history.

4. Explain the development of the fire service in the United States until 1900.

5. Discuss the change of management in the fire service since 1900.

B. Explain some basic impacts on the fire service.

1. Discuss at least 2 external fire prevention organizations.

2. Delineate the role of the company officer in fire prevention.

3. Differentiate between strategy and tactics.

4. Describe at least two tactical goals for fireground use.

5. Describe the role of the fire service in emergency management.

6. Discuss three ways of budgeting.

II. Organizational Design

A. Discuss provisions needed in an organizational structure.

1. Discuss the factors in the design of an organization.

2. Explain the provisions needed in an organizational structure.

3. Describe the two methods that organizations can be organized.

B. Describe how fire service culture can be changed.

1. Describe how organizational culture affects managing and supervising within it.

2. Describe how culture can be influenced and changed.

III. Basic Organizational Principles of Management

A. Discuss the 9 Principles of Management in various settings.

1. Describe the similarity of all organizational principles of management.

2. Discuss those differences in organizational principles of the fire service.

3. Discuss the need to properly apply these principles when managing.

4. Discuss how the environment (internal and external) shapes management principles and their use.

B. Describe how these principles can affect workflow and personnel.

1. Describe the pitfalls of conflicting orders.

2. Discuss the three basic principles of choosing the correct span of control.

3. Define the term empowerment.

IV. Fire Service Management Environment and Management Theories

A. Discuss four management theories.

1. State the contribution of Adam Smith to management theory.

2. State Fredrick Taylor's Time Studies and their relationship to management theory.

3. Explain the term management cycle.

4. List the 5 management functions according to Fayol.

5. Explain P.O.L.E.

6. Explain the dissatisfaction of people under previous management theories.

7. Describe the results of the Hawthorne experiment.

8. Explain the "management style" theory of management.

9. Explain the "linking element" behavioral management theory.

B. Explain how these theories can affect fire service operations.

1. State 2 similarities between organizations to utilize management theories.

2. Describe how management theories are applied.

3. Describe the "Management Environment" in the fire service as it pertains to management theories.

4. Discuss the term "Standards for Fire Protection."

5. Describe the 4 areas of management responsibility that any mid-manager must control.

V. Four Areas of Management Responsibility in the Fire Service

A. Provide observations on how the four areas may impact various fire department operations.

1. Provide discussion on 3 of the activities a typical fire prevention organization is involved.

2. Describe the three analyses that the Incident Commander needs to have information on.

3. State the importance of drills in good command.

4. Describe at least two strategic goals for fireground use.

5. Explain the need to update fire department resources with changes in society.

6. Explain the total time concept for emergency response.

7. Discuss the two major types of budgets.

8. Discuss the three general areas of responsibility in personnel management.

9. Describe the five functions of personnel management.

10. Explain the fire department's role in personnel management.

11. Discuss the basic laws governing labor relations.

12. Describe the public sector in labor relations bargaining.

13. Describe the term "needs assessment" in relation to the fire service and how to conduct one.

14. Describe influences on planning.

15. Provide a definition for the three levels of planning.

16. Define the term gap analysis.

B. Explain and provide backing for a specific theory that appeals to the student.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes 15 – 25%
In class projects 10 – 15%
Unit tests 20 – 30%
Final 30 – 40%

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 222

  • Title: Fire Science Law
  • Number: FIRE 222
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The student will have the opportunity to explore legal aspects of the fire and emergency services departments. This course discusses OSHA regulations, basic human resources concepts, employee and employer rights, HIPPA regulations from the lens of fire and emergency services administrators. Case studies of legal precedence for fire investigations are used as a method of applying concepts in this course.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Determine how the United States courts and legal system would apply to the fire service.

  2. Discuss the process of civil law as it applies to fire and emergency management services.

  3. Discuss how criminal laws apply to the fire service.

  4. Compare torts to criminal law as they relate to fire protection.

  5. Discern between employer and employee rights.

  6. Apply federal labor laws and OSHA standards to fire and emergency management departments.

  7. Research Supreme Court cases that affect fire department operations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to American Law

A. Describe the concepts of law.

B. Identify major historical issues that affect law.

C. Provide context for laws within the Constitution of the United States.

D. Describe the judicial and court system in America.

II. The Process of Civil Law

A. Describe a basic civil suit.

B. Describe the differences between civil and criminal acts.

III. The Description of Criminal Law

A. Provide examples of criminal law and the fire service.

B. Provide the appropriate definition of crime.

C. Describe the basic elements of a crime.

IV. A Study of the Law of Torts

A. Define the law of torts.

B. Describe elements of a tort.

C. Define negligence.

D. Describe defenses against negligence.

V. Employer and Employee Relationships and the Law

A. Provide insight into today's worker's compensation laws.

B. Describe various employee's rights.

C. Elucidate various aspects of union agreements and state and federal law.

VI. Federal Labor Laws

A. Examine Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

B. Define sexual harassment.

C. Define discrimination.

D. Provide context for a study of the fire service and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

VII. Fire Issues and The Supreme Court.

A. Provide examples of fire issues and the Supreme Court.

B. Identify potential issues in the fire service that could become a Supreme Court issue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Participation in activities in the course. 
  2. Completion of all assigned work by the identified date.
  3. Class attendance requirements follow the policies established by JCCC. 

COURSE EVALUATION:

The student will be evaluated on the results of scores accumulated on 15 papers, 15 weekly quizzes, one final test.

35%     Papers 

40%     Quizzes/Tests 

25%     Final 

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

FIRE 291

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