Health Care Info Systems (HCIS)

Courses

HCIS 225   Healthcare Data Analytics (2 Hours)

This course presents data analytics focused on the key needs of healthcare. Data analytics has been defined as the extensive use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive models, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions. Although the focus of health IT in recent years has been on electronic health record (EHR) implementation and capturing and sharing of data, work in the future will shift to putting that data and information to use improving individual health and healthcare delivery. As the quantity and complexity of healthcare data grow through EHR data capture, genomics and other sources, the number of facts per clinical decision will increase, requiring increasing support for those making decisions.

HCIS 235   Care Coordination and Interoperable Health IT Systems (2 Hours)

This course discusses care coordination as deliberate organization of patient care activities between two or more participants involved in a patient’s care (including the patient) to facilitate the appropriate delivery of healthcare services. This course provides an overview of interoperable health information technology (IT) that is patient-centered making the right data available to the right people at the right time, across products and organizations, in a way that can be relied upon and meaningfully used by recipients. The ability to seamlessly share health information is essential to building a patient-centered, interoperable health IT ecosystem in the United States, thus facilitating coordination of care.

HCIS 245   Population Health (2 Hours)

This course discusses the role of health information technology (IT) and emerging data sources in deriving population health solutions and explains their application in the context of population health management.

HCIS 255   Technology Concepts in Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course provides a basic overview of computing concepts related to the healthcare sector. Topics include computing terminology, computer architecture, and networking and data communication. The design and development of a large healthcare computing system is discussed, including the electronic health record. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 262   Customer Service in the Health Environment (2 Hours)

This course introduces the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings. Appropriate customer service skills, effective written and oral communication, and ethical and cultural awareness are emphasized. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 263   Working with Health Information Technology (HIT) Systems (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to work with real technology used in the healthcare environment. This course focuses on the end user experience with emphasis also placed on standards, system usability, security and integration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 264   Configuration and Implementation of Electronic Health Records (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks in the role of a configuration/implementation analyst in the health information technology (HIT) workplace. This course focuses on designing and building a system with emphasis placed on implementation and configuration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 265   Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems (2 Hours)

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks typically performed by an electronic health record (EHR) system administrator or support technician. Topics include testing prior to implementation, system configuration and system support. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

HCIS 267   EHR Design, Functionality and Usability (3 Hours)

This course discusses human factors associated with designing and implementing health information systems. Concepts of usability and the effects of new technology and workflow redesign on downstream processes, such as clinical decision support, will be covered. This course provides an overview of the most utilized electronic health systems. System features are evaluated and compared as they would relate to practical deployments. Key factors such as cost, licensing and staffing are also discussed.

HCIS 270   Health Information Systems Internship* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the knowledge and skills acquired in the healthcare information systems (HCIS) courses. An average of 40-60 onsite hours will be required along with class assignments for a total of 90 hrs./semester.

HCIS 271   The Culture of Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course introduces students to job expectations in healthcare settings. Topics also include the organization of care inside a practice setting, privacy laws, the changing environment of healthcare delivery, and professional and ethical issues. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 272   Terminology in Health Care Settings (2 Hours)

This course introduces students to terminology and clinical procedures associated with body systems. It also covers terminology related to health information management (HIM), health information technology (HIT), and public health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 273   Quality Improvement in Healthcare (2 Hours)

This course introduces the concepts of health information technology (IT) and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement (QI). Students will learn methods to establish a culture that supports increased quality and safety in healthcare and be introduced to the principles of value-based care and patient engagement. Approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems will be discussed.

HCIS 274   Healthcare Workflow Analysis and Redesign (2 Hours)

This course introduces healthcare workflow analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation. The topics of process validation and change management are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

HCIS 277   Training and Instructional Design (2 Hours)

This course provides participants with essential knowledge and skills to deliver training to adult learners implementing electronic health records (EHRs) in a variety of healthcare settings. The Instructional Systems Design (ISD) model, which includes analysis of the learner and learning environment, design and development of customized education, implementation of the training plan and evaluation of the training program's effectiveness, will be used. 2 hrs lecture/wk.

HCIS 225

  • Title: Healthcare Data Analytics
  • Number: HCIS 225
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course presents data analytics focused on the key needs of healthcare. Data analytics has been defined as the extensive use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, explanatory and predictive models, and fact-based management to drive decisions and actions. Although the focus of health IT in recent years has been on electronic health record (EHR) implementation and capturing and sharing of data, work in the future will shift to putting that data and information to use improving individual health and healthcare delivery. As the quantity and complexity of healthcare data grow through EHR data capture, genomics and other sources, the number of facts per clinical decision will increase, requiring increasing support for those making decisions.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe different types of data generated in healthcare.
  2. Communicate data analysis results.
  3. Describe different approaches to identity management.
  4. Discuss the value and approaches of machine learning and natural language processing.
  5. Describe the application of risk adjustment and predictive modeling.
  6. Select a secondary use (re-use) of clinical data and describe its goals and limitations.
  7. Conduct basic data analyses for a specified purpose.
  8. Describe the applications of data analytics in clinical and patient-oriented settings.
  9. Define the learning health system and describe its operations.
  10. Apply the principles of usability to data capture, analysis and usage.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Healthcare-Generated Data

A. Categorize data into the different types.

B. Select an appropriate technology or tool for working with different data types.

C. Determine whether data fits the definition of Big Data.

D. Summarize the challenges faced when working with Big Data.

E. Define or apply common terms used in data analysis.

II. Data Analysis Results

A. Select the best data communication mode, given the analysis goals and results. 

B. Interpret data analysis results. 

C. Present solutions for a variety of technical data communication challenges. 

D. Prepare a simple data visualization using open-source tools. 

E. Participate in the design and development of a complex data visualization. 

III. Identity Management

A. Define the key attributes of patient identifiers.

B. Describe the challenges of duplicate and overlaid records.

C. Discuss the pros and cons of standard identifiers vs. linking records.

D. Describe the methods used for patient record-matching.

E. Match a sample set of patient records.

F. Discuss the benefits and limitations of de-identified data.

IV. Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing

A. Describe the major tasks for which machine learning is used.

B. Compare and contrast the major approaches for machine learning.

C. Describe the major tasks for which natural language processing is used.

D. Describe the major approaches and challenges in processing clinical narratives.

V. Risk Adjustment and Predictive Modeling

A. Define risk adjustment, predictive modeling and validations of models in healthcare.

B. Identify the healthcare and other data needed to perform risk adjustment and predictive modeling.

C. Relate risk adjustment and population segmentation to allocation of healthcare resources and healthcare redesign.

D. Discuss uses of risk adjustment and modeling in value-based models of care.

E. Delineate the use of health information technology in the creation, delivery and evaluation of prediction models.

F. Describe ethical considerations of risk adjustment in population management.

VI. Secondary Use of Clinical Data

A. Describe the secondary uses of clinical data, including the electronic health record.

B. Discuss the limitations and challenges of re-using clinical data.

C. Conduct a data re-use analysis for healthcare quality measurement utilizing a sample data set.

VII. Data Analyses

A. Describe reasons why data needs to be cleaned or modified before analysis.

B. Demonstrate ability to identify and correct basic errors in data.

C. Demonstrate ability to perform descriptive statistics.

D. Demonstrate ability to use pivot tables.

E. Demonstrate ability to create histograms.

F. Describe the relationship between the database in a health information technology system and data analysis tools.

VIII. Data Analytics in Clinical and Patient-Oriented Settings

A. Describe the current state of data analytics in clinical settings.

B. Identify key tools and approaches to improve analytics capabilities in clinical settings.

C. Describe different governance and operational strategies in analytics in clinical settings.

D. Discuss value-based payment systems and the role of data analytics in achieving their potential.

E. Analyze data used in population management and value-based care systems.

IX. Learning Health Systems

A. Define a learning health system.

B. Compare the current state of health systems to the promise of learning health systems.

C. Discuss different models of learning health systems in theory and practice.

D. Evaluate the capabilities of learning health systems.

E. Characterize the data and data systems necessary for a learning health system.

X. Usability

A. Discuss the different threats to health information system usability.

B. Determine a plausible analysis given a usability concern.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 235

  • Title: Care Coordination and Interoperable Health IT Systems
  • Number: HCIS 235
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course discusses care coordination as deliberate organization of patient care activities between two or more participants involved in a patient’s care (including the patient) to facilitate the appropriate delivery of healthcare services. This course provides an overview of interoperable health information technology (IT) that is patient-centered making the right data available to the right people at the right time, across products and organizations, in a way that can be relied upon and meaningfully used by recipients. The ability to seamlessly share health information is essential to building a patient-centered, interoperable health IT ecosystem in the United States, thus facilitating coordination of care.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define patient-centered care coordination, discuss best practice tools and emerging models for care coordination, distinguish care coordination roles and responsibilities and identify stakeholders.
  2. Describe key elements for transforming to team-based care, identify types of team-based interventions and implement multi-disciplinary care planning.
  3. Compare and contrast the barriers and challenges to achieve and examine the government’s vision for interoperable health IT.
  4. Explore the technical principles of health interoperability by distinguishing its various levels and dimensions, differentiating intra- and inter-organizational interoperability and identifying its key tools.
  5. Explain the rationale for interoperability standards, identify various health interoperability standards in use and list and describe key health interoperability standards.
  6. Recognize the special requirements for implementing healthcare interoperability projects and describe the steps required to implement and support interoperability projects.
  7. Identify key health interoperability topics addressed in health IT-related legislation and policies and discuss how the Meaningful Use program aims to facilitate care coordination.
  8. Articulate the issues that health information exchange (HIE) is intended to address, identify the challenges to successful HIE implementation, examine the strategies (organizational, technological and policy-related) utilized to advance HIE and discuss the future of HIE.
  9. Define mobile health (mHealth) and telehealth, list examples of its use, and describe its application to care coordination and patient access to care.
  10. Summarize federal policy to protect and secure health information for care coordination, discuss challenges related to policy implementation and provide examples of tools and techniques for evaluation of compliance.
  11. Relate the importance and describe the concept of patient-driven care coordination and list ways that technology can be used to drive care decisions.
  12. Explain the value and use of a data-driven care coordination strategy and discuss challenges in its implementation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Care Coordination Overview

A. Define care coordination effectiveness.

B. Explain the purposes of care coordination.

C. Discuss various models of care coordination.

D. Compare care coordination roles and responsibilities in the post-Affordable Care Act models of care across the care continuum.

E. Discuss specialty care coordination.

F. Discuss long-term/post-acute care.

G. Identify stakeholders in care coordination.

II. Team-Based Approach to Patient Care

A. Identify best-practice types of team-based interventions.

B. Discuss key elements for transforming to team-based care.

C. Plan for transformation to team-based care.

D. Identify evidence-based clinical practice guidelines resources.

III. Interoperable Health IT Overview

A. Define healthcare interoperability.

B. Summarize the vision and benefits of interoperable health IT.

C. Identify and examine various barriers and challenges to obtaining interoperable health IT.

D. Discuss the U.S. strategy for health interoperability.

IV. Technical Principles of Interoperable Health IT Systems

A. Name and define types of interoperability.

B. Explain the complexities of semantic harmonization and the benefits of using standards.

C. Describe and contrast intra- and inter-organizational interoperability.

D. Identify and discuss common types of tools and technologies used to solve health interoperability problems.

V. Standards for Interoperable Health IT

A. Explain why standards are required, how they are developed and how adoption is encouraged.

B. Name and describe the types of interoperability standards available.

C. Summarize the functionality of various standards in use.

D. Recognize standard messages, documents, and resources.

VI. Health Interoperability Implementation

A. Identify the major tasks required to implement interoperability.  

B. Explain why interoperability implementation projects are needed.

C. Define and discuss each phase of the interoperability implementation lifecycle.

D. Describe how to apply each phase of the interoperability implementation lifecycle to simple interoperability implementation problems.

E. List types of production issues with interoperability and identify and describe support strategies.

VII. Policy and Interoperable Health IT

A. List the impact of key heath interoperability-related topics in healthcare legislation.  

B. Identify and discuss how the Meaningful Use program and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) certification programs have impacted interoperable health IT.  

C. Assess and leverage Meaningful Use, ONC certification and other health IT policy activities to facilitate interoperability.

VIII. Health Information Exchange

A. List the quality problems in healthcare that the exchange of health information is intended to remediate.  

B. Describe the nature of health information technology assets that the exchange of health information is designed to interconnect.  

C. Explain the motivations, capabilities and challenges of health information exchange organizations (HIEOs).

D. Explain the motivations, capabilities and challenges of using Meaningful Use and Direct to advance the exchange of health information.  

E. Describe the future directions for the exchange of health information.

IX. mHealth and Telehealth

A. Name and describe mHealth technologies.

B. Describe a real-world scenario in which a mHealth technology is used to achieve better coordination of care.

C. Explain ways in which mHealth data can be used by clinicians.

D. Identify access to telehealth solutions in a variety of settings.

E. Compare models of telehealth systems.

F. Evaluate populations served with telehealth tools and services.

X. Protected Health Information Security

A. Identify the applicable federal and state laws and regulations related to protected health information shared during care coordination.

B. Assess the processes and systems to ensure compliance with applicable privacy and security regulations during care coordination.

C. Explain the challenges of establishing, preserving and restoring trust from multiple stakeholder perspectives.

D. Review interoperable systems for weaknesses in structure or processes which may result in a loss of trust.

E. Discuss the need for data provenance.

F. Analyze the system specifications and functionality to establish data provenance.

G. Categorize privacy concerns appropriately.

H. Modify privacy and security policies and procedures for sensitive protected health information and other special considerations.

I. Employ the appropriate tools and methods to ensure privacy and security during care coordination processes.

XI. Patient-Driven Care Coordination and Supporting Technology

A. Explain the importance of patient-driven care coordination.

B. List ways a patient can use technology to drive care decisions.

C. Describe the concept of patient-initiated information exchange.

XII. Data-Driven Care Coordination Strategy

A. Identify the care coordination data sources.

B. Demonstrate care coordination effectiveness using analytics.

C. Evaluate interoperability opportunities and challenges.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 245

  • Title: Population Health
  • Number: HCIS 245
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course discusses the role of health information technology (IT) and emerging data sources in deriving population health solutions and explains their application in the context of population health management.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1.  Describe the definitions and perspectives related to population health and provide an overview of the potential health IT applications in population health.
  2. Describe factors that contribute to the health of a population and how informatics and health IT are applied to assessing and improving the health of geographic communities.
  3. Describe new models of care for population health and the role of payment reform in the context of population health and accountable care and explain the challenges of chronic care management in populations while analyzing the ways that health IT can be used for effective population management.
  4. Discuss and interpret the key policies, finance and business drivers in the United States healthcare systems and their implications on population health and IT challenges going forward.
  5. Identify various data sources used for population health management, including both traditional and nontraditional data sources, and examine how data quality affects population health analytics.
  6. Explain perspectives related to the concept of risk measurement and segmentation within the population health context and explore developing frontiers in the population-based predictive-modeling field.
  7. Analyze processes of population health management, from population assessment and risk stratification to strategic deployment of interventions, that are sensitive to the population assessment and needs.
  8. Describe strategies and frameworks used to formulate, build and evaluate population health programs with a focus on community engagement.
  9. Identify challenges in using population health data sources and describe the conceptual and practical challenges of developing population health analytic methods.
  10. Discuss the research processes by which population health IT solutions bring about change and the environmental and organizational contexts within which they work best.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Population Health and the Application of Health IT

A. Define the terms and describe the perspectives related to population health and public health.

B. Discuss paradigms and strategies relevant to improving the health of populations.

C. Summarize the potential for health IT to improve the health of populations through public health programs and integrated health care delivery systems.

II. Application of Health IT to Improve Population Health at the Community Level

A. Describe the framework’s relevance to the concept of population health at the community level.

B. Examine other types of factors and discuss how they impact health and wellness.

C. Compare and contrast traditional public health perspectives with that of the newer, and at times controversial, population health perspective.

D. Summarize the potential for health IT to improve the health of populations at the community and geographic levels.

III. Accountable Care Approaches for Target Population

A. Describe the integrated and accountable care movements.

B. Define clinically integrated networks and how they can be used as a strategy for accountable care.

C. Describe new models of care for population health.

D. Explain the role of payment reform in the context of population health and accountable care.

E. Differentiate denominator-focused care from current primary-care delivery that is patient centered and episodic.

F. Explain the challenges of chronic care management in populations, including the role of social and community factors.

IV. Policy, Finance and Business Implications on Population Health

A. Discuss and interpret the key financial drivers in the U.S. health care systems and their implications.

B. Summarize the major federal policy changes driving value-based purchasing of health care and population health.

C. Discuss key state innovations and employer response to the key financial drivers and federal policies.

D. Describe the key delivery system and accrediting organization response.

E. Discuss the key population health and IT policy challenges going forward.

V. Population Health IT and Data Systems

A. Identify various data sources used for population health management, including both traditional and nontraditional data sources.

B. Describe the advantages and disadvantages in using various data sources for population health management and analysis.

C. Explain the value-added of nontraditional data sources for population health IT.

D. Explain the features of available population-wide health data sources.

E. Examine how data quality affects population health analytics.

F. Analyze data access, privacy and interoperability challenges that may hinder population health management.

VI. Risk Measurement and Segmentation:  Predictive Analytics for Population Health

A. Define and discuss perspectives related to the concept of “risk” measurement and segmentation within the population health context.

B. Describe the commonly used case identification, predictive measurement and modeling tools.

C. Discuss real-world examples of how common risk segmentation/case-finding methods have been applied to population health.

D. Examine the role of various electronic data sources in risk identification/segmentation.

E. Identify and discuss the developing frontiers in the population-based predictive modeling field.

VII. Population Health Management Interventions

A. Describe the population health data necessary for segmenting into risk cohorts.

B. Differentiate the key cohorts of a population by degree of risk.

C. Analyze the root causes of risk in a population by utilizing socioeconomic, behavioral, electronic medical record data and other demographic data.

D. Explain the processes and key decision points by which interventions are prioritized for segments of the population.

E. Delineate interventions and staff who are deployed for high-risk, rising-risk, at-risk and low-risk populations.

F. Describe three types of deployment strategies or models for population health management.

G. Articulate successful strategies for human resource recruitment, retention and training for population health staff.

H. Describe the necessary health IT for documentation of population health interventions.

VIII. Engagement in Population Health Programs

A. Identify population health programs’ key constituents.

B. Describe the needs and goals of key constituents.

C. Analyze constituents’ competing objectives to predict factors facilitating and inhibiting change.

D. Compare behavior change models.

E. Evaluate the design of individual behavior change interventions.

F. Evaluate the design of organizational behavior change interventions.

G. Evaluate the design of community-level behavior change interventions.

H. Recognize and relate the capabilities, users and purposes of health information technology.

I. Describe informatics tools broadly and how they measure health program progress.

IX. Analytics for Population Health

A. Identify challenges in using population health data sources, including issues related to big data, interoperability and population segmentation.

B. Describe the conceptual and practical challenges of developing valid and reliable population health analytic methods.

C. Explain how population health analytic models are evaluated and compared against each other.

D. Describe new approaches for population health analytics.

E. Explain the challenges and opportunities of population health analytics in special populations, such as pediatric, mental health and long-term care populations.

F. Analyze and critique a variety of sample population health analytic results.

X. Research Processes in Population Health

A. Prepare research goals.

B. Apply the correct research design to goals.

C. Describe program evaluation strategies.

D. Explain elements needed to ensure population safety.

E. Identify relevant literature and studies to inform proposed interventions.

F. Discuss heath IT needs for proposed interventions.

G. Extend current trends in population health research into the future given new capabilities that are emerging.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion
Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 255

  • Title: Technology Concepts in Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 255
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides a basic overview of computing concepts related to the healthcare sector. Topics include computing terminology, computer architecture, and networking and data communication. The design and development of a large healthcare computing system is discussed, including the electronic health record. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Explain basic computing concepts and history in relation to healthcare.
  2. Describe and use the Internet and the World Wide Web in relation to healthcare.
  3. Discuss computer hardware and architecture and their use in healthcare settings.
  4. Explain different types of functionality of application and system software.
  5. Discuss a broad overview of programming languages and explain essential programming concepts.
  6. Discuss fundamental database concepts and create simple queries and tables.
  7. Discuss the basics of computer networking.
  8. Describe security concerns and safeguards.
  9. Describe the components and development of a large-scale system and its implementation in a complex health information system.
  10. Discuss the future of computing and its impact on healthcare.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Computing Concepts and History

A. List different types of computers and how they are used in healthcare.

B. Define the common elements of computer systems.

C. Describe the various hardware and software options for typical desktop, laptop and server systems in the healthcare environment.

D. Explain the development of computers and the Internet, including healthcare systems up until the present time.

II. Internet and the World Wide Web

A. Define the Internet and how to connect to it.

B. Define the World Wide Web and how to access it with a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

C. Write effective search queries for Internet search engines, filter the results and evaluate credibility of information.

D. Discuss Internet security and privacy concerns.

E. List ethical issues for the Internet, including intellectual property rights, copyright and free speech.

F. Examine online healthcare applications and discuss associated security and privacy issues.

III. Computer Hardware and Architecture

A. List the major hardware components of a computer.

B. Describe how data is stored in memory and in secondary storage.

C. Describe how data is represented in binary code.

D. Describe the function of the central processing unit (CPU).

E. Describe how data is input/output from the computer.

F. Describe how a computer system works together.

G. Discuss specialized architectures and embedded systems used in healthcare settings.

IV. Application and System Software

A. Define application vs. system software.

B. Cite examples of application software and the elements that comprise them, focusing on healthcare systems.

C. Describe the functions of operating systems and file organization.

D. List different types of operating systems.

E. Explain the purpose and usage of file systems.

V. Overview of Programming Languages and Concepts

A. Define the purpose of programming languages.

B. Describe the different types of programming languages.

C. Explain the continuum of programming languages, from machine code and assembly languages through scripting languages and high-level structured programming languages.

D. Explain the compiling and interpreting process for computer programs.

E. Discuss simple computer programs with variables, loops and conditional statements.

F. Discuss additional programming concepts such as objects and modularity.

VI. Databases and the Structured Query Language (SQL)

A. Define and describe the purpose of databases.

B. Define a relational database.

C. Describe the SQL language.

D. Define the basic data operations for databases and how to implement them in SQL, including data modeling and normalization.

E. Design simple relational tables (and optionally implement them using database software).

F. Create simple querying statements for a database.

VII. Networks

A. List and describe the various types of network communications and network addressing.

B. List and define the different types of networks.

C. Describe different network topologies.

D. List and describe different network standards and protocols.

E. Describe wireless communication.

F. List and describe network hardware.

VIII. Security

A. Describe safeguards against common security concerns, including firewalls, encryption, virus protection software, and patterns and programming for security.

B. Describe security concerns for wireless networks and how to address them.

C. List security concerns and regulations for healthcare applications.

D. Describe security safeguards used for healthcare applications.

IX. Large-Scale System Components and Development

A. Describe the building blocks of a large-scale system.

B. Explain the initial design process and options for a large-scale system.

C. Describe the evaluation process and criteria for including and selecting existing software applications.

D. Describe the process for new software development.

E. Describe the different types of system testing and when testing should occur.

F. Describe system maintenance and explain the process of financially supporting large-scale systems over time.

X. Future of Computing

A. Describe the current trends in computing technology.

B. Discuss implications for healthcare systems, including potential risks.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:
30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion
Total       100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 262

  • Title: Customer Service in the Health Environment
  • Number: HCIS 262
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces the skills necessary to communicate effectively across the full range of roles that will be encountered in healthcare and public health settings. Appropriate customer service skills, effective written and oral communication, and ethical and cultural awareness are emphasized. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define customer service and explain key elements of customer service in health information technology (HIT).

  2. Discuss professional behavior in the healthcare environment.

  3. Discuss communication relevant to HIT, including purpose, meaning and disability etiquette.

  4. Identify core elements of effective communication.

  5. Summarize regulatory issues.

  6. Discuss aspects of team and small group communication.

  7. Describe conflict and conflict resolution, including techniques and strategies to resolve conflict.

  8. Explain ethical and cultural issues related to communication and customer service.

  9. Discuss personal communication in the healthcare workplace.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Customer Service in HIT

A. Describe the definitions of customer service.

B. Identify customers' needs based on context.

C. Discuss different metrics to measure customer service in HIT.

II. Professional Behavior in the Healthcare Environment

A. Define contextual norms expected in healthcare organizations.

B. Discuss the importance of dress, deportment, demeanor and grooming.

III. Overview of Communication Relevant to HIT

A. Explain the purpose and goal of professional communication.

B. Describe what is meant by effective and ineffective communication.

C. Identify communication needs of common roles in healthcare.

D. Describe the contribution of disability etiquette to professional communication.

IV. Key Elements of Effective Communication

A. Discuss the definition of communication.

B. Discuss assumptions used in communication.

C. Discuss the communication models from general to health-specific.

D. Discuss variables used in communication.

E. Define nonverbal communication.

F. Describe how nonverbal communication functions in the human communication process.

G. Describe specific dimensions and give examples of nonverbal communication.

H. Discuss communication in paper-based and electronic formats.

I. Discuss personal communication in the work setting.

J. Discuss listening skills.

K. Discuss diversity.

V. Regulatory Issues

A. Describe the importance of and guidelines associated with infection control.

B. Relate protection of yourself and others to standard precautions.

C. Explain the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and related communication.

VI. Team and Small Group Communication

A. Define group communication and tiered characteristics.

B. Describe goals, norms and cohesiveness of groups.

C. List stages of team communication.

D. Describe communication networks and sociograms.

VII. Conflict Resolution

A. Describe dimensions of conflict.

B. Define conflict.

C. Explain approaches used in conflict resolution.

D. Discuss conflict resolution styles.

E. Describe communication strategies to resolve conflict.

F. Discuss sources and strategies addressing technical implementation conflict.

VIII. Ethical and Cultural Issues Related to Communication and Customer Service

A. Define ethics and ethical dilemmas.

B. Differentiate between ethics and codified law.

C. Discuss the utilitarian, individualism, moral-rights and justice approaches to ethical decision making.

D. Describe the role of the medical ethics committee.

E. Define culture and diversity.

F. Describe the primary and secondary dimensions of diversity.

G. Explain the potential benefits and costs of workforce diversity and how diversity can be leveraged for better performance.

H. Discuss the role of ethnocentrism and stereotypes in communication.

I. Explain four major cultural differences and their effect on communication.

J. Discuss the major Equal Employment Opportunity laws.

K. Define cultural competency and describe its role in addressing health disparities.

IX. Personal Communication and Professionalism

A. Describe appropriate use of personal communication devices in the healthcare workplace.

B. Discuss the impact of inappropriate use of personal communication devices in the healthcare workplace.

C. Identify the differences between personal and professional communication.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 263

  • Title: Working with Health Information Technology (HIT) Systems
  • Number: HCIS 263
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to work with real technology used in the healthcare environment. This course focuses on the end user experience with emphasis also placed on standards, system usability, security and integration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe basic concepts, components and use of health information technology (HIT) systems, and demonstrate beginning level competency in maneuvering within an HIT system.
  2. Identify functions of HIT systems.
  3. Explain common elements of health information exchange and standards and efforts to facilitate exchange.
  4. Define effective HIT systems.
  5. Discuss usability fundamentals in HIT systems.
  6. Explain HIT system facilitated errors, examine sources of errors and propose solutions.
  7. Identify threats and propose solutions in the areas of HIT privacy.
  8. Discuss HIT system planning, acquisition, installation and training.
  9. Identify potential adoption and installation issues of an HIT system and propose solutions.
  10. Examine the role of HIT in patient-centered care.
  11. Discuss the future of HIT.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. HIT Systems

A. Define a system and relate system concepts to HIT.

B. Discuss specific examples of HIT environments.

C. Identify common components of a clinical HIT system.

D. Demonstrate beginning level competency in maneuvering an HIT system.

II. HIT System Functions

A. Identify the HIT functions that support a generic ambulatory patient care process.

B. Identify the HIT functions that support a generic inpatient care process.

III. Information Exchange in HIT Systems

A. Identify common elements in HIT information exchange.

B. Explain the need for standards and why they exist.

C. Define and differentiate between messaging standards and terminology standards.

D. Compare current efforts to facilitate health information exchange between providers, communities, regions and the nation.

IV. HIT Systems

A. Identify characteristics of an effective HIT system.

B. Define and provide examples of how evidence-based practice can be supported in HIT systems.

C. Define and cite examples of usability, configurability, scalability and reliability in HIT systems.

D. List and contrast different types of reports/queries required for internal and external reporting.

V. HIT System Usability

A. Define usability in relation to HIT systems.

B. Explain the impact of HIT usability on user satisfaction, adoption and workarounds in error rates or unintended consequences.

C. Provide alternatives to HIT usability bottlenecks.

VI. HIT System Facilitated Errors

A. Explain the concept of facilitated errors in HIT systems.

B. Cite examples of situations where HIT systems could increase the potential for user error.

C. Analyze sources of HIT system facilitated errors and propose realistic solutions.

VII. HIT System Privacy, Security and Confidentiality

A. Explain and illustrate privacy, security and confidentiality in environments using HIT systems.

B. Identify common threats encountered when using IT systems.

C. Formulate strategies to minimize threats to privacy, security and confidentiality in HIT systems.

VIII. HIT System Planning, Acquisition, Installation and Training

A. Conduct a basic user needs analysis for a given example situation.

B. Create a plan for training users in a small office practice, a large community clinic or a single unit in an ambulatory care setting.

C. Identify potential challenges that may emerge during installation, and generate potential solutions.

IX. Adoption and Installation of an HIT System

A. Identify frequently encountered challenges to adoption and implementation of HIT systems.

B. Design an action plan to address barriers to implementation of HIT systems.

C. Propose solutions to common problems in the implementation of HIT systems.

X. Patient-Centered Care Aspects in HIT

A. Define patient-centered care.

B. Propose HIT-enabled solutions/strategies to enhance patient involvement in health and healthcare.

C. Assess the effectiveness of HIT systems in supporting patient-centered care.

D. Perform self-assessment of personal beliefs related to HIT and patient-centered care.

XI. HIT in the Future

A. Recommend approaches for using HIT to enhance patient-centeredness.

B. Propose strategies to increase patient access to their health information.

C. Suggest alternative designs for HIT for busy/mobile clinicians.

D. Hypothesize how HIT may intersect with publicly available data to improve health.

E. List and predict applications of social networking for health.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 264

  • Title: Configuration and Implementation of Electronic Health Records
  • Number: HCIS 264
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks in the role of a configuration/implementation analyst in the health information technology (HIT) workplace. This course focuses on designing and building a system with emphasis placed on implementation and configuration. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the process of migration to an electronic health record (EHR) from organizational strategy, planning, vendor selection and negotiation.
  2. Discuss and perform system configuration.
  3. Integrate and perform creation of orders.
  4. Discuss and perform creation of order sets.
  5. Review and perform creation of data entry templates and reports.
  6. Discuss and perform creation of alerts/notifications and order-check reminders.
  7. Model and perform creation of a health summary document.
  8. Discuss concepts of data infrastructure.
  9. Discuss and analyze key issues of EHR implementation in specific settings.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. EHR Migration

A. Determine appropriate committee members for planning EHR implementation.

B. Develop and apply criteria for selecting an appropriate EHR vendor.

C. Define the steps in a basic strategic management plan.

D. Develop a timeline for choosing and implementing an EHR.

II. System Configuration

A. Develop and apply basic system configuration settings.

B. Produce test evidence of proper system configuration.

C. Mitigate issues with improper system configuration.

III. Orders

A. Build formatted order item.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built order.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built order.

IV. Order Sets

A. Build formatted order set.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built order set.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built order set.

V. Data Entry Templates

A. Build data entry template.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built data entry template.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built data entry template.

VI. Alerts/Notifications and Order Reminders

A. Build new alerts/notifications and reminders.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built alert/notification and reminder.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built alert/notification and reminder.

VII. Health Summary Document

A. Build a new health summary.

B. Produce test evidence of a properly built health summary.

C. Resolve issues with an improperly built health summary.

VIII. Data Infrastructure

A. Discuss the concepts of data infrastructure including data architecture, data sets, repositories, data dictionary, data standards and data types.

B. Produce a sample entity relationship diagram with a given case study.

IX. EHR Implementation in Specific Settings

A. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting acute care.

B. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting long-term care.

C. Discuss key issues in EHR development and implementation affecting ambulatory care.

D. Discuss key issues in EHR development in other healthcare settings including physician practice, home health and hospice, behavioral health and health departments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 265

  • Title: Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems
  • Number: HCIS 265
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is powered by Cerner architecture to give students an opportunity to experience real-world tasks typically performed by an electronic health record (EHR) system administrator or support technician. Topics include testing prior to implementation, system configuration and system support. 2 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Examine system selection criteria regarding software and certification.
  2. Examine system selection criteria regarding functional and technical requirements.
  3. Explain systems analysis and design at a beginning level.
  4. Identify system security procedures and standards.
  5. Develop procedures for system maintenance and upgrades.
  6. Discuss plans for fault-tolerance, backups and decommissioning.
  7. Describe testing strategies and plans.
  8. Discuss pilot-testing and full-scale deployment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Software and Certification Requirements for System Selection

A. Define commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) and in-house/homegrown systems.

1. Identify financial benefits of initial creation, setup, customization, maintenance and integration with existing systems and processes.

2. Identify personnel or consultant costs for creation, customization and maintenance.

3. Estimate cost impact on internal staff, including hiring, training and lost productivity.

4. Identify training costs for developer and users, including development of training resources.

B. Estimate costs and consider advantages and disadvantages of purchasing versus licensing hardware and software.

C. Discuss vendor documentation of system functionality and requirements.

D. Determine system compliance with the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT) certification.

E. Determine whether systems meet "meaningful use" criteria.

F. Compare and rank vendor systems.

G. Evaluate and select system based on requirements and certification needs.

II. Functional and Technical Requirements for System Selection

A. Identify 12 possible steps in choosing an EHR system.

B. Gather functional requirements from institution and users.

C. Document use-cases and relate them to functional requirements.

D. Prioritize functional requirements, including grouping as essential versus desired.

E. Identify minimum and recommended software and hardware requirements.

III. Systems Analysis and Design

A. Discuss aspects of systems analysis and design.

B. Create a project plan for system design and implementation, including data migration and conversion.

IV. System Security Procedure and Standards

A. Identify regulatory requirements, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), for EHRs and integrate into a project plan.

B. Identify best practices for operating system and network system security installation and patches, and integrate into project planning.

C. Discuss training for system users regarding the methods and importance of security compliance.

V. System Maintenance and Upgrades

A. Identify and implement an effective troubleshooting procedure for reporting, evaluating, fixing, deploying and follow-up of errors, problems or limitations for the system.

B. Develop the downtime schedule for maintaining and updating.

C. Develop a process for communicating requirements and supplying updates among vendors, developers and users.

D. Create a baseline for system performance measurement and comparison for troubleshooting.

VI. Fault-Tolerant Systems, Backups and Decommissioning

A. Discuss creating redundant and fault-tolerant systems for access and data storage, thus providing high performance and reliability.

B. Describe backup and restoration of databases, applications and operating systems.

C. Develop a plan for decommissioning systems and data.

VII. Test Strategies and Plans

A. Discuss the gathering of user feedback and developing a performance baseline for system validation and testing.

B. Document problems and resolution status.

C. Create, execute and document a test plan.

VIII. Pilot Testing and Full-Scale Deployment

A. Discuss how to identify a pilot group, and plan scope of a pilot.

B. Discuss installation of a pilot system, training pilot users and making the pilot system available.

C. Discuss process to gather and prioritize feedback from the pilot test and potentially revise project plans.

D. Develop and implement strategies for the following:

1. Communicate deployment plan to end users and management.

2. Technical support of deployment.

3. Feedback from end users following deployment.

4. Usage and capacity of system resources under conditions of full deployment.

E. Discuss deployment of a revised system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 267

  • Title: EHR Design, Functionality and Usability
  • Number: HCIS 267
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course discusses human factors associated with designing and implementing health information systems. Concepts of usability and the effects of new technology and workflow redesign on downstream processes, such as clinical decision support, will be covered. This course provides an overview of the most utilized electronic health systems. System features are evaluated and compared as they would relate to practical deployments. Key factors such as cost, licensing and staffing are also discussed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Articulate a systems approach to usability as it applies to health information technology.
  2. Explain requirements engineering for data gathering and interpretation methods.
  3. Demonstrate concept knowledge of cognition and human performance models in their relevance to systems evaluation methods.
  4. Apply concept knowledge of human factors to the evaluation of systems-design and the study of human errors and patient safety.
  5. Select the most appropriate usability evaluation method, given a particular system, setting and development phase.
  6. Apply principles of usability and design to the critique of electronic health records (EHR) systems and recommendations for iterative improvement.
  7. Diagnose problems associated with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) considering a human factors approach.
  8. Characterize the multifaceted nature of the design process and evaluate whether a given user interface embraces sound principles of design to support usability goals.
  9. Describe the role of mobile and ubiquitous computing in healthcare.
  10. Diagnose various types of errors and create or select potential solutions when considering safety design.
  11. Describe variety, strengths and weaknesses of input and selection methods available in health information technology.
  12. Describe how information visualization can support and enhance the representation of trends and aggregate data.
  13. Assess and compare common commercial EHR systems in training and organizational decision-making contexts.
  14. Analyze the functionality of a vendor EHR system, given a set of user needs.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Usability Application to Health Information Technology

A. Explain the importance of technology in healthcare.

B. Describe the contributions of human-computer interaction (HCI) to the health field.

C. Describe the seven stages of User Activity in Norman’s Theory of Action

D. Demonstrate concept knowledge of principles of user-centered design, methods of cognitive research and sources of usability evidence. 

E. Apply the principles of user-centered design to address the challenges to effective design.

F. Compare and contrast usability evaluation methods.

G. Identify and differentiate various types of errors in medicine.

H. Identify patient safety issues in the workplace and at home.

II. Requirements Engineering

A. Explain the role of requirements gathering in usability evaluation.

B. Identify the uses, advantages and disadvantages of data collection.

C. Describe methods used for requirements gathering.

D. Identify contextual design principles as they apply to the healthcare setting.

III. Cognition and Human Performance

A. Define the concept of cognitive engineering.

B. Describe the representational effect as it applies to human computer interaction and web design.

C. Describe how humans process information and obtain skills.

D. Describe the Gestalt principles of perception and their relevance to HCI and cognitive theory.

E. Describe the processes of memory and their relationship to web-design.

F. Describe the cognitive constructs for mental representation.

G. Explain how cognition and human performance models should inform iterative design processes.

IV. Human Factors in Healthcare

A. Distinguish between human factors and HCI as they apply to usability.

B. Explain how cognitive, physical and organization ergonomics can be applied to human factors engineering.

C. Describe how the concepts of mental workload, selective attention and information overload affect usability.

D. Describe the different dimensions of the concept of human error.

E. Describe a systems-centered approach to error and patient safety.

F. Apply methods for measuring mental workload and information overload.

G. Describe how human factors analysis can be applied to the study of medical devices.

V. Usability Evaluation Methods

A. Describe the importance of usability in relation to health information technologies.

B. List and describe usability evaluation methods.

C. Given a situation and set of goals, determine which usability evaluation method would be most appropriate and effective.

D. Describe the appropriate tasks for a usability test.

E. Describe the usability testing environment, required equipment, logistics and materials.

F. Conduct a cognitive walkthrough.

VI. EHRs and Usability

A. Discuss the role of usability testing, training and implementation of EHRs. 

B. Describe and define usability as it pertains to the EHR.

C. Explain the challenges of EHR design and usability in typical workflow.

D. Identify a set of well-established principles of usability and design and describe their application to EHRs.

E. Identify and explain usability methods for enhancing efficiency of use and minimizing likelihood of user error.

F. Explain how user-centered design can enhance adoption of EHRs.

G. Describe Web 2.0 and novel concepts in system design.

H. Identify potential methods of assessing and rating EHR usability when selecting an appropriate EHR system.

VII. CDSS:  A Human Factors Approach

A. Understand the cognitive basis for decision making and its effect on clinical error.

B. Discuss the role of usability testing, training and implementation of clinical decision support (CDS).

C. Describe and define usability as it pertains to CDS.

D. Identify examples of usability barriers to adoption of CDS.

E. Identify a set of well-established principles of usability and design and describe their application to CDS.

VIII. Nature of Design

A. Explain a user-centered design approach.

B. Define conceptual models.

C. Explain the iterative design process.

D. Describe requirements analysis and cognitive task analysis.

E. Characterize the role of prototypes in design.

F. Describe the principles of participatory design.

G. Describe principles of sound design to support usability.

H. Describe how Nielsen’s heuristics and design principles apply to user interface design.

I. Explain the difference between low-fidelity and high-fidelity prototypes and when it would be appropriate to use each prototype.

IX. Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing in Healthcare

A. Explain the history of ubiquitous computing and its basic principles.

B. Communicate the role of mobile and ubiquitous computing in healthcare.

C. Describe some of the technical challenges.

X. Safety Design

A. Define workflow analysis and methods for examining and addressing human errors.

B. Design a workflow analysis study.

C. Identify common sources of error documented in medical research studies.

D. Apply the cognitive taxonomy of errors.

E. Apply principles underlying the design of healthcare systems for safety.

XI. Provide a rationale as to why input methods are an important consideration in the design process for health technology.

A. Compare and contrast technology input methods.

B. Select appropriate technology input methods given different technology uses, user populations and contexts.

XII. Information Visualization

A. Identify and describe the role of information visualization and describe its purpose in enhancing usability of health technology.

B. Describe how information visualization can support and enhance the representation of trends and aggregate data.

XIII. Common Commercial EHR Systems

A. Describe the mission and vision of current resources and how they can be used to research EHR systems.

B. Describe shared and distinguishing features of common EHR systems.

XIV. EHR Functionality

A. Describe the EHR functionality of a results review.

B. Describe the EHR functionality of Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE).

C. Describe the EHR functionality of documentation.

D. Describe the EHR functionality of messaging among different vendor systems.

E. Describe the procedures for billing supported by EHR vendor systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total:100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 270

  • Title: Health Information Systems Internship*
  • Number: HCIS 270
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 90
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 90

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

Students will work in an approved training situation under instructional supervision. The internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to use the knowledge and skills acquired in the healthcare information systems (HCIS) courses. An average of 40-60 onsite hours will be required along with class assignments for a total of 90 hrs./semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the company or organization. 

  2. Describe the work activities performed during the internship. 

  3. Demonstrate effective workplace skills. 

  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical behaviors in the work place.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Company or Organization Description
   A. Describe the mission, vision, and goals.
   B. Provide a general outline of the organizational structure.
   C. Describe the roles of employees and workflow of the organization.
   D. Discuss the products and services of the organization.

II. Description of Work Activities
   A. Follow written and oral instructions.
   B. Manage time and resources effectively.
   C. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication.
   D. Participate in meetings and teams as assigned.
   E. Follow employer's rules, regulations and policies.

III. Workplace Skills
   A. Apply technical skills learned in coursework.
   B. Demonstrate analytical and problem solving skills.
   C. Demonstrate acquisition of new knowledge and skills.
   D. Perform industry related tasks as specified by intern supervisors.

IV. Professionalism and Ethics
   A. Demonstrate appropriate business behaviors and attire for assigned area.
   B. Demonstrate interpersonal skills appropriate to a business environment.
   C. Demonstrate and promote ethical standards of practice as per American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).
   D. Demonstrate the principles of privacy, confidentiality and security with health information systems as per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  1. The internship coordinator will evaluate the student based on weekly progress reports as well as a final summative report. 

  2. The employing supervisor will evaluate the student in writing by submitting an evaluation report to the internship coordinator. 

  3. At least two on-site visits will be made by the internship coordinator. An initial visit will establish internship and workplace expectations, and a final visit will discuss outcomes and employer evaluation.

Employer's Evaluation  50-60%
Final Report    10-25%
Weekly Reports    25-40%
                        100%
 

Grade Criteria:

A = 90%
B = 80%
C = 70%
D = 60%
F = <59.5%

Caveats:

  1. Students will be required to attend an orientation in preparation for the internship which will cover the expectations, documentation, and evaluation of the internship experience.
  2. Student may be required to meet specific criteria of the assigned organization which will be at the expense of the student, i.e. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) training, proof of TB test, etc. 
  3. Transportation to the work-site is the responsibility of the student.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 271

  • Title: The Culture of Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 271
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces students to job expectations in healthcare settings. Topics also include the organization of care inside a practice setting, privacy laws, the changing environment of healthcare delivery, and professional and ethical issues. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss basic terminology related to the culture of healthcare.
  2. Describe the requirements and roles of healthcare personnel.
  3. Compare the major types and functions of different healthcare settings.
  4. Describe the major processes used by clinicians to detect, understand, and prevent or treat diseases.
  5. Explain the key elements and processes involved with evidence-based medicine.
  6. Discuss the nature of nursing care.
  7. Describe how healthcare quality can be measured.
  8. Discuss the role of medical ethics and professional values in healthcare delivery.
  9. Discuss how socio-technical factors impact the healthcare environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Healthcare Terminology

A. Define basic healthcare terminology.

B. Describe the culture of healthcare, cultural competence and the concept of a ‘just’ culture.

C. Explain cultural competence.

D. Describe the multiple cultures that interact in healthcare delivery.

II. Health Professionals

A. Contrast the different roles and requirements of health professionals.

B. Describe the different support roles.

III. Healthcare Settings

A. Differentiate the range of care-delivery organizations.

B. Analyze the organization of healthcare delivery from the perspective of a continuum of care.

C. Compare the similarities and differences of community hospitals, teaching hospitals and community health clinics.

D. Describe the various departments and services offered by an outpatient clinic, community hospital, academic medical center and long-term care facility.

E. Describe ways in which medical and/or information technology has improved interdepartmental communication and consequently improved the patient experience.

IV. Healthcare Processes

A. Describe the classic paradigm of the clinical process.

B. List the types of information used by clinicians in caring for patients.

C. Describe the steps of managing information during the interaction of clients and patients.

D. List the different information structures used to organize clinical information.

E. Explain what is meant by the hypothetico-deductive reasoning process.

F. Describe the factors that clinicians consider when devising a management plan for a patient's condition.

V. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM)

A. Define the key tenets of EBM and its role in the culture of healthcare.

B. Construct clinical questions and critically appraise evidence in answering them.

C. Describe the critical appraisal of other key clinical questions of diagnosis, harm and prognosis.

D. Discuss the benefits and limitations to summarizing evidence.

E. Describe how to implement EBM in clinical settings and its limitations.

VI. Nursing Care Processes

A. Describe nursing assessment, intervention and judgment.

B. Discuss nursing roles in inpatient, outpatient and long-term care settings.

C. Discuss the role of the nurse in these areas: patient education, medication administration and quality improvement.

D. Discuss invasive procedures performed by nurses.

VII. Quality Measurement in Healthcare

A. Describe the current state of healthcare quality in the United States.

B. Discuss how variations in healthcare can diminish quality.

C. Distinguish among structural, process and outcome measures.

D. Provide examples of quality measures being applied in the current healthcare environment.

VIII. Professional Values and Medical Ethics

A. Define traditions, ethics and values for medical professionals.

B. Describe the role of a professional code of ethics.

C. Compare the professional codes of ethics for nurses and physicians.

D. Compare the professional code of ethics to the legal responsibilities of physicians.

E. Describe the purpose of Medical Practice Acts (MPA's).

F. Apply the tenets of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act's (HIPAA) privacy and security rules in healthcare settings.

G. Discuss bioethical issues and the government agencies dealing with bioethics.

H. Compare and contrast ethical decisions concerning life and death.

I. Discuss the populations that experience gaps in the quality of healthcare received.

J. Discuss economic and regulatory definitions for the rationing of care.

K. Compare and contrast explicit and implicit rationing of care that occurs in the United States.

L. Describe the organizational and technological tools available to protect patient privacy, confidentiality and security.

IX. Socio-Technical Factors

A. Describe medical error and patient safety.

B. Compare and contrast the interaction and interdependence of social and technical elements of resistance to change.

C. Discuss the impact of changing socio-technical processes on quality, efficiency and safety.

D. Discuss the challenges inherent with adapting work processes to new technology.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 272

  • Title: Terminology in Health Care Settings
  • Number: HCIS 272
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces students to terminology and clinical procedures associated with body systems. It also covers terminology related to health information management (HIM), health information technology (HIT), and public health. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze elements of medical terminology.

  2. Describe terminology related to the body systems and the care of those systems.

  3. Define commonly used terms in public health.

  4. Discuss terms and topics related to HIT, HIM, and electronic health records (EHRs).

  5. Explain standardization of healthcare terminology.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Medical Terminology Analysis

A. Discuss the four parts of medical terms.

B. Recognize word roots and combining forms.

C. Identify the most common prefixes and suffixes.

D. Define directional and positional terms.

E. Build, divide, spell and pronounce common medical words.

II. Body Systems

A. Define and correctly pronounce medical terms associated with body systems.

B. Describe common diseases and conditions, laboratory and diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical procedures, and medications.

III. Public Health

A. Discuss terms used to define public health.

B. Identify distinguishing features of public health.

C. Discuss terms used to define health.

D. Identify categories and factors that influence health.

E. Identify terms commonly used as measures of health status.

IV. HIT, HIM and EHRs

A. Explain common terms, acronyms and abbreviations used in HIT and HIM.

B. Discuss the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

C. Describe portions of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009.

D. Identify factors affecting the need for an EHR.

E. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the automated record versus the paper record.

F. Discuss the obstacles to implementation of a paperless record.

G. Discuss the differences among EHRs, electronic medical records (EMRs) and personal health records (PHRs).

H. Define functional requirements of an EHR.

I. Discuss the purpose of EHR components.

J. Describe methods to ensure data security and confidentiality.

K. Identify the hardware and software requirements for EHR implementation.

V. Standardization

A. Discuss the relevance of standardized terminologies to healthcare practice and research.

B. Describe the attributes of a terminology.

C. Identify the difference between classification systems and reference terminologies.

D. Discuss the interest and involvement of the federal government in terminology standards.

E. Identify systems used to classify and document healthcare diagnoses, interventions and outcomes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
0-20%    Participation/Discussion

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 273

  • Title: Quality Improvement in Healthcare
  • Number: HCIS 273
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces the concepts of health information technology (IT) and practice workflow redesign as instruments of quality improvement (QI). Students will learn methods to establish a culture that supports increased quality and safety in healthcare and be introduced to the principles of value-based care and patient engagement. Approaches to assessing patient safety issues and implementing quality management and reporting through electronic systems will be discussed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the fundamentals of QI and health IT.
  2. List and describe principles of safety for health IT.
  3. Explain the reliability and culture of safety.
  4. Describe decision support for QI.
  5. Analyze QI methods to assist clinical teams in improving quality and safety.
  6. Explain health IT implementation planning that maximizes quality and safety.
  7. Discuss the impact of health IT on patient safety.
  8. Explain different types of quality and safety measures, with emphasis on electronic clinical quality measures (eCQMs).
  9. Describe the role of health IT in error detection, reporting and analysis.
  10. Discuss key concepts associated with value-based care, the role of health IT in value-based care and how it impacts QI.
  11. Describe the current state of patient engagement and how it will improve quality of care.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamentals of QI and Health IT

A. Identify the current challenges in healthcare quality.

B. Examine the components of the healthcare system that have an impact on quality.

C. Explain healthcare quality and QI.

D. Describe QI as a goal of key national healthcare priorities, including the National Quality Strategy.

E. Analyze the ways that health IT can help and/or hinder quality and patient safety.

II. Principles of Safety for Health IT

A. Investigate the fallibility of people and systems.

B. Describe how systems are designed to achieve expected results.

C. Apply the basic principles of safe design.

D. Explain how teams can make wise decisions with diverse and independent input.

III. Reliability and Culture of Safety

A. Discuss the basic concepts of reliability.

B. Understand what makes organizations highly reliable.

C. Discuss reliability as a tool for ensuring safety.

D. Examine the operations of ultra-safe organizations.

IV. Decision Support for QI

A. Define decision support, its importance and why it is difficult to implement.

B. Compare decision support tools that help improve quality.

C. Analyze the benefits and shortfalls of alerts and clinical reminders.

V. QI Methods

A. Describe strategies for QI.

B. Describe the role of leadership in QI.

C. Describe the local clinic improvement capabilities.

D. Describe and recommend tools for QI.

E. Compare and contrast the QI methodologies, tools and their appropriate uses in the healthcare setting.

VI. Health IT Implementation Planning to Maximize Quality and Safety

A. Critique an implementation team and the roles they play to ensure quality and safety of patient care during implementation.

B. Analyze effective implementation planning.

C. Assess the quality implications of “big bang” versus “staggered” approaches to activation.

D. Discuss “go live” support strategies that minimize risk.

E. Discuss “post live” maintenance support strategies.

VII. Health IT Impact on Patient Safety

A. Apply QI tools to the analysis of health IT errors.

B. Identify strategies for adaptive work that can be useful to health IT initiatives.

C. Identify techniques for adaptive leadership.

D. Identify frameworks to support a patient safety culture.

E. Differentiate between technical and adaptive change.

VIII. eCQMs and Quality of Care Measurement

A. Review types of quality and safety measures used nationally.

B. Explain the attributes of an eCQMs reporting system.

C. Examine the importance of having standardized and structured health information for quality measurement, especially eCQMs.

D. Discuss the role of health IT standards and terminologies in eCQMs.

E. Discuss how health IT can facilitate data collection and reporting to improve quality of care and patient safety.

F. Describe data quality issues in electronic measures.

IX. Error Reporting and Analysis

A. Explain how reporting errors can help to identify health IT system issues.

B. Describe ways in which health IT can facilitate error reporting and detection.

C. Assess health IT for unintended negative consequences.

D. Examine common themes in health IT design deficiencies.

E. Apply QI tools to the analysis of health IT errors.

X. Key Concepts of Value-Based Care 

A. Describe in general terms the features of the fee-for-service healthcare system and outline why this payment model is changing.

B. Describe the overall value and goals of value-based care from various stakeholder perspectives. 

C. Describe the recent history of the patient empowerment movement and why it is key in value-based care.

D. Name the key pieces of legislation and rule-making that create, define and regulate value-based care.

E. Discuss why attention to improving quality is essential in value-based care.

F. Discuss the types of health IT that support value-based care.

XI. Introduction to Patient Engagement and Participation

A. Describe the spectrum of patient engagement and participation.

B. Explore common manifestations of patient engagement and participation.

C. Review the role of technology in facilitating patient engagement and participation.

D. Describe the barriers to patient engagement and participation.

E. Describe some of the documented and proposed benefits of patient engagement and participation including QI.

F. Describe the commonly raised concerns related to patient engagement and participation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 274

  • Title: Healthcare Workflow Analysis and Redesign
  • Number: HCIS 274
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course introduces healthcare workflow analysis and redesign as a necessary component of complete practice automation. The topics of process validation and change management are also covered. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss foundational elements of workflow analysis and process redesign.
  2. Analyze different forms of flowcharts and diagrams.
  3. Analyze process diagrams and utilize appropriate symbols.
  4. Discuss methods to facilitate the gathering of information necessary to analyze and redesign processes.
  5. Explain the key aspects of process analysis leading to identification of desired electronic health record functionality.
  6. Describe elements of and methods for process redesign.
  7. Discuss skills and methods needed to facilitate decision-making meetings for process optimization.
  8. Discuss the fundamentals of and tools for quality improvement (QI) in healthcare.
  9. Explain how to best facilitate and manage change.
  10. Discuss how to best implement, communicate and evaluate process change.
  11. Describe how to sustain QI and assess plans for sustainability.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Elements of Workflow Analysis and Process Redesign

A. Describe the purpose for process analysis and redesign in the clinical setting.

B. Describe the role of a workflow process analyst and redesign specialist, and contrast it with other roles such as technical support and implementation management.

C. Explain how health process analysis and redesign is related to meaningful use.

D. Analyze a healthcare scenario and identify the components of clinical workflow.

E. Analyze the responsibilities of each participant in the redesign process and how the roles complement or overlap with one another.

F. Describe how the workflow processes might differ based on the type of healthcare facility.

II. Flowcharts and Diagrams

A. Articulate the value of process mapping.

B. Describe standard process mapping symbols and conventions.

C. Analyze an existing workflow process chart in terms of the information that could be generated and the sequence of steps that are being communicated.

D. Choose the correct scope and detail level for a process map.

E. Identify an appropriate process mapping methodology.

F. Analyze a process map for a healthcare system or component using correct symbols and conventions.

III. Process Diagrams and Symbols

A. Analyze context and data flow diagrams for a healthcare system or component using appropriate Yourdon symbols and conventions.

B. Identify a process flowchart for a healthcare system or component using appropriate International Standards Organization (ISO) 5807 symbols and conventions.

C. Identify the correct scope and detail level for a process flowchart and data flow diagram.

D. Analyze key types of diagrams.

IV. Methods to Gather Information

A. Identify how the strategic goals and stakeholders for a given healthcare facility can influence workflow processes in that facility.

B. Evaluate an agenda for an opening meeting to discuss workflow processes in a healthcare facility.

C. Compare different types of knowledge and their impact on organizations.

D. Analyze a healthcare scenario according to Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) levels.

E. Identify the healthcare system workflow to best streamline healthcare operations.

F. Identify key individuals whom an analyst should meet or observe in order to gain an understanding of the nature and complexity of their work.

G. Develop questions to facilitate a productive discussion of the information workflow, activities and roles within the facility.

H. Describe ways to successfully overcome common challenges encountered in knowledge acquisition.

I. Explain how to choose an appropriate knowledge acquisition method.

J. Draft a summary report from diagrams and observations in an information-gathering meeting.

V. Process Analysis

A. Describe the purpose of process analysis.

B. Describe skills and knowledge necessary for process analysis.

C. Evaluate a process analysis for a given clinic scenario.

D. Create a draft summary report based on the results of a process analysis.

E. Identify desired electronic medical record functionality based on the results of a process analysis.

VI. Process Redesign

A. Describe the purpose, skills and knowledge necessary for process redesign.

B. Identify common process problems in healthcare that result in increased cost, decreased safety and lack of efficacy.

C. Describe how meaningful use of information technology in healthcare compensates for human weaknesses and leverages the strengths of technology.

D. Choose an appropriate human-machine division of tasks for a given clinical scenario.

E. Enhance clinical workflow by applying process redesign strategies to common process problems.

F. Use knowledge of common software functionality to inform a process redesign for a given clinical scenario.

VII. Process Optimization Decisions

A. Discuss the process of planning and conducting a decision-making meeting.

B. Discuss how to communicate findings of a workflow process analysis to healthcare facility decision-makers.

C. Evaluate the results of decisions made and actions identified during an optimization meeting.

VIII. QI Methods

A. Describe strategies of quality improvement (QI) and the role of leadership in QI.

B. Describe opportunities for clinical improvement.

C. Describe and recommend tools for QI.

D. Compare quality improvement methodologies and tools, and define appropriate uses in healthcare.

IX. Change Management

A. Describe how concerns expressed by participants in a process analysis meeting may facilitate or impede proposed changes in workflow processes.

B. Describe strategies a workflow analyst can use to gain acceptance for proposed workflow process changes.

C. Identify appropriate change facilitation tools.

D. Evaluate a change facilitation plan.

E. Analyze various process change implementation strategies for a given healthcare facility.

X. Process Change Implementation and Evaluation

A. Evaluate a process change implementation plan for a healthcare facility to identify management tracking and measurement opportunities.

B. Develop a communication process change plan.

C. Evaluate a recently implemented process.

XI. Quality Improvement Sustainability

A. Describe control strategies for clinical processes.

B. Discuss how to create a sustainable and continuous improvement plan.

C. Describe a set of contingency plans to keep the practice running if the electronic health record system fails.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Quizzes/Tests
30-50%    Assignments/Projects
5-20%      Participation/Discussion

Total     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HCIS 277

  • Title: Training and Instructional Design
  • Number: HCIS 277
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides participants with essential knowledge and skills to deliver training to adult learners implementing electronic health records (EHRs) in a variety of healthcare settings. The Instructional Systems Design (ISD) model, which includes analysis of the learner and learning environment, design and development of customized education, implementation of the training plan and evaluation of the training program's effectiveness, will be used. 2 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe fundamental characteristics of the EHR training environment.
  2. Discuss conducting a needs assessment and analyzing learners and environment.
  3. Design education plans according to the ADDIE (analyze, design, development, implement and evaluate) ISD model.
  4. Develop educational materials using a variety of instructional tools and strategies.
  5. Describe the training implementation plan.
  6. Design evaluations that measure training program quality.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The EHR Training Environment

A. Discuss the role and competencies of a trainer.

B. Explain why people resist change and discuss methods to overcome resistance.

C. Select strategies to facilitate change based on analysis of the learners and environment.

D. Define the levels of learning per Bloom’s Taxonomy.

E. Describe the characteristics of adult learners that impact training design.

II. Needs Assessment and Analysis

A. Discuss the recommended training cycle of the ADDIE ISD model

B. Identify instructional design problems for a variety of learners and training settings.

C. List a range of data collection methods for conducting needs assessments in healthcare settings.

D. Analyze learner, task and situational characteristics.

E. Describe the special training needs and constraints in a healthcare setting.

III. Educational Design

A. Construct lesson plans using appropriate instructional methods and approaches.

B. Write measurable goals for a training program which meet the specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely (SMART) criteria.

C. Write specific level learning objectives based on Bloom’s Taxonomy.

D. Select content for development based on the objectives and lesson plan.

E. Identify the appropriate instructional approaches established by the needs analysis.

IV. Educational Materials Development

A. Choose appropriate instructional media for a given lesson plan.

B. Create customized written materials utilizing principles of instructional design.

C. Create an effective PowerPoint presentation utilizing evidence-based design principles.

D. Create and customize content using appropriate activities for training objectives.

E. Discuss methods for continuing education and training utilizing various technologies.

V. Training Implementation

A. Discuss components of successful EHR training implementation.

B. Select super-users based on recommended criteria.

C. Describe the components of a super-user training program.

D. Explain strategies for training implementation.

E. Demonstrate effective presentation skills using a variety of instructional tools and strategies.

VI. Training Evaluation

A. Design assessment instruments and procedures aligned with instructional goals/objectives.

B. Administer assessments as a component of training/instructional design.

C. Design a program evaluation tool that objectively measures a training program.

D. Discuss how data collection is analyzed and supports program improvement.

E. Specify revisions to training based on evaluations results.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Assignments and Projects
10-20%    Discussion
30-50%    Quizzes/Tests

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).