Automotive Technology (AUTO)

Courses

AUTO 114   Introduction to Automotive Practices (4 Hours)

This course is an introductory course required for all students in the Automotive Technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to develop shop safety habits, tool usage, information management and become proficient in general vehicle service and minor electrical diagnosis, while maintaining good work habits and ethics. Emphasis will be placed on learning basic skills needed to enter advanced automotive classes.

AUTO 121   Small Engine Service (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to compare and contrast operating principles of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engines. The student should be able to describe lubricating, cooling, fuel and governor systems; troubleshoot engine problems; inspect engine components; and service the fuel, cooling and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

AUTO 129   Brakes I* (3 Hours)

Corequisites: AUTO 131.

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Students will perform system pressure and travel calculations utilizing Pascal's Law, complete service work orders, determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, determine brake system concerns and necessary actions, diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses, determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles, determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures, determine how to accomplish caliper piston retractions, diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns, and determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies through a variety of classroom and lab/shop learning and assessment activities.

AUTO 131   Brakes II* (1 Hour)

Corequisites: AUTO 129.

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Students will determine necessary brake system correction, conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, perform diagnosis and correction for poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, conduct inspection, fabrication and/or replacement of brake lines and hoses, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, perform drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform disc brake repair and replacement procedures, machine rotor according to service specifications, perform caliper piston retraction where applicable, inspect and test power assist systems, determine necessary action on wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses, and perform the removal, inspection and replacement of bearing and hub assemblies.

AUTO 150   Steering and Suspension I* (3 Hours)

Corequisites: AUTO 151.

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

In this course students will document fundamental suspension systems concerns, perform fundamental diagnostics of steering systems, perform fundamental repairs of suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment, perform a four wheel alignment, and perform fundamental diagnostics and repair of wheel and tire systems.

AUTO 151   Alignment Practicum* (1 Hour)

Corequisites: AUTO 150.

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

This course will enhance the skills of diagnosing the need for wheel alignment and performing alignment of the steering and suspension systems.

AUTO 155   Automotive Engine Repair* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125 or department approval.

This course is designed to teach an understanding of the four-stroke cycle internal combustion engine. Students should be able to diagnose and repair cylinder heads and cylinder block assemblies to include lubrication and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses.

AUTO 156   Electrical I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Students will complete service work orders; describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage; perform basic electrical circuit repairs; identify electrical system faults; identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information; perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM; describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits through a variety of classroom and shop learning and assessment activities.

AUTO 161   Engine Performance I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 156.

In this learning plan students will: complete work order and check history; identify engine mechanical integrity; explore the fundamentals of fuel system theory; identify fuel system concerns; explore the fundamentals of ignition theory; identify ignition system concerns; identify induction system concerns; identify exhaust system concerns; identify engine mechanical integrity through a variety of learning and assessment activities.

AUTO 162   Electrical II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 156.

This course is designed to teach starting system diagnosis and repair, charging system diagnosis and repair, and lighting systems diagnosis and repair.

AUTO 201   ASE Certification Review* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: (AUTO 208 or AUTO 214) and (AUTO 207 or AUTO 209) and (AUTO 211 or AUTO 221) and (AUTO 250 or AUTO 252).

This course will prepare students to take any of the eight (8) basic National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) automotive student certification tests.

AUTO 205   Engine Performance II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 161.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the operation of engine management systems to include: general engine diagnosis, computerized engine controls diagnosis and repair, fuel, air induction, and exhaust diagnosis and repair, and emissions control systems diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

AUTO 207   Manual Drivetrains and Axles* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : (AUTO 114 or AUTO 125) and AUTO 156.

This course covers the theory of operation and service procedures for drivelines, constant velocity joints, manual transmissions and transaxles, differentials, clutches, and driveline phasing including noise, harness, and vibration analysis, and four wheel drive/all wheel drive systems.

AUTO 211   Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 156.

This course is designed to teach the operation, service, diagnoses and repair of automotive heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The theory and operation of these systems, major components, testing, recycling and other service procedures will be covered.

AUTO 214   Electrical III* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 162 or AUTO 166.

This course is designed to teach advanced electrical/electronic systems. Students will perform general electrical system diagnosis; gauges, warning devices, and driver information systems diagnosis and repair; and body electrical systems diagnosis and repair.

AUTO 215   Engine Performance III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 205.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to service and repair fuels systems, ignition systems, and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

AUTO 237   Diesel and Hybrid Vehicles Maintenance and Light Repair* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 131 and (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166) or department approval.

This course is designed to teach an understanding of hybrid electric, diesel powerplants and related vehicle systems as it pertains to light maintenance and repair.

AUTO 252   Automatic Transmissions* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 162 or AUTO 166.

This course is designed to teach diagnoses, service and repair of various automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles, both on vehicle and off vehicle, including computer-controlled systems.

AUTO 265   Comprehensive Vehicle Diagnosis* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : AUTO 161 and (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166).

This course is designed as a comprehensive technical course for learners in the Automotive Technology major. The course is primarily a lab-based course, with most of the course work consisting of diagnosing and repairing various problems on cars that the student may not have encountered in previous classes. Labs will test the learner on their ability to diagnose failures on a complete vehicle scale that include all electrical and mechanical systems and how they function relative to each other. As a portion of the course, reviewed material will follow the eight ASE 2017 standard areas of study, and will expand upon these areas via diagnostic and industry standard technical material and testing methods. Usage of the proper diagnostic processes is required for success in this course. Proper use of lab scopes, DVOM’s, scan tools, and other high level diagnostic equipment are crucial to success in the course.

AUTO 271   Automotive Technology Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites : (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166) or Department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals.

AUTO 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites : 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

AUTO 114

  • Title: Introduction to Automotive Practices
  • Number: AUTO 114
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course is an introductory course required for all students in the Automotive Technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to develop shop safety habits, tool usage, information management and become proficient in general vehicle service and minor electrical diagnosis, while maintaining good work habits and ethics. Emphasis will be placed on learning basic skills needed to enter advanced automotive classes.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Inspect and make minor adjustments to engines.
  2. Inspect and make minor adjustments to Automatic Transmission and Transaxle.
  3. Inspect and make minor adjustments to Manual Drivetrain and Axles.
  4. Inspect and make minor adjustments to Suspension and Steering.
  5. Inspect and make minor adjustments to Heating and Air Conditioning.
  6. Inspect and make minor adjustments for Engine Performance.
  7. Identify general shop safety rules and procedures.
  8. Demonstrate safe and accurate usage and storage of tools and equipment.
  9. Demonstrate preparation of the vehicle for service and return to the customer.
  10. Develop personal standards and work habits appropriate to the automotive industry.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Engine Repair

A. General

1. Verify operation of the instrument panel engine warning indicators.

2. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant and other leaks; determine necessary action.

B. Lubrication and Cooling Systems

1. Perform cooling system pressure and dye tests to identify leaks; check coolant condition and level; inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, heater core and galley plugs; determine necessary action.

2. Inspect, replace and/or adjust drive belts, tensioners and pulleys; check pulley and belt alignment.

3. Remove, inspect and replace thermostat and gasket/seal.

4. Inspect and test coolant; drain and recover coolant; flush and refill cooling system; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification; bleed air as required.

5. Perform engine oil and filter change; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification; reset maintenance reminder as required.

II. Automatic Transmission and Transaxle

A. General

1. Research vehicle service information including fluid type, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins.

2. Check fluid level in a transmission or a transaxle equipped with a dip-stick.

3. Check fluid level in a transmission or a transaxle not equipped with a dip-stick.

4. Check transmission fluid condition; check for leaks.

5. Identify drive train components and configuration.

B. In-Vehicle Transmission/Transaxle

1. Inspect, adjust and/or replace external manual valve shift linkage, transmission range sensor/switch and/or park/neutral position switch.

2. Inspect for leakage at external seals, gaskets and bushings.

3. Inspect replace and/or align power train mounts.

4. Drain and replace fluid and filter(s); use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification.

C. Off-Vehicle Transmission and Transaxle

1. Describe the operational characteristics of a continuously variable transmission (CVT).

2. Describe the operational characteristics of a hybrid vehicle drive train.

III. Manual Drivetrain and Axles

A. General

1. Research vehicle service information including fluid type, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins.

2. Drain and refill manual transmission/transaxle and final drive unit; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification.

3. Check fluid condition; check for leaks.

4. Identify manual drive train and axle components and configuration.

5. Describe the operational characteristics of an electronically-controlled manual transmission/transaxle.

B. Clutch

1. Check and adjust clutch master cylinder fluid level; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification.

2. Check for hydraulic system leaks.

C. Drive Shaft, Half Shafts, Universal and Constant-Velocity (CV) Joints

1. Inspect, remove and/or replace bearings, hubs and seals.

2. Inspect, service and/or replace shafts, yokes, boots and universal/CV joints

3. Inspect locking hubs.

4. Check fir leaks at drive assembly and transfer case seals; check vents check fluid level; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification.

D. Differential Case Assembly

1. Clean and inspect differential case; check for leaks; inspect housing vent.

2. Check and adjust differential case fluid level; use proper fluid per manufacturer specification.

3. Drain and refill differential housing.

4. Inspect and replace drive axle wheel studs

IV. Suspension and Steering Systems

A. Wheels and Tires

1. Inspect tire condition; identify tire wear patterns; check for correct size, application (load and speed ratings) and adjust air pressure as listed on the tire information placard/label.

2. Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations including vehicles equipped with tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS).

3. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire assembly (static and dynamic).

4. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire pressure monitoring system sensor.

5. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; determine necessary action.

6. Repair tire following manufacturer approved procedure.

B. TPMS (tire pressure monitoring systems)

1. Identify indirect and direct tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS); calibrate system; verify operation of instrument panel lamps.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of steps required to remove and replace sensors in a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS), including relearn procedure.

V. Heating and Air Conditioning

A. General

1. Research vehicle service information, including refrigerant/oil type, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins.

2. Identify heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) components and configuration.

B. Refrigeration System Components

1. Inspect and replace A/C compressor drive belts, pulleys and tensioners; visually inspect A/C components for signs of leaks; determine necessary action.

2. Identify hybrid vehicle A/C system electrical circuits and the service/safety precautions.

3. Inspect A/C condenser for airflow restrictions; determine necessary action.

C. Heating, Ventilation and Engine Cooling Systems

1. Inspect engine cooling and heater systems hoses and pipes.

2. Perform necessary action.

D. Operating Systems and Related Controls

1. Inspect A/C-heater ducts, doors, hoses, cabin filters and outlets; determine necessary action.

2. Identify the source of A/C system odors.

VI. Engine Performance

A. Fuel, Air Induction and Exhaust Systems

1. Check diesel exhaust fluid (DEF).

2. Refill DEF.

B. Emissions Control Systems

1. Inspect positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) filter/breather cap, valve, tubes, orifices and hoses.

2. Test and service the positive crankcase ventilation system; perform necessary action.

VII. Required Supplemental Tasks

A. Shop and Personal Safety

1. Identify general shop safety rules and procedures.

2. Utilize safe procedures for handling of tools and equipment.

3. Identify and use proper placement of floor jacks and jack stands.

4. Identify and use proper procedures for safe lift operation.

5. Utilize proper ventilation procedures for working within the lab/shop area.

6. Identify marked safety areas.

7. Identify the location and the types of fire extinguishers and other fire safety equipment; demonstrate knowledge of the procedures for using fire extinguishers and other fire safety equipment.

8. Identify the location and use of eye wash stations.

9. Identify the location of the posted evacuation routes.

10. Comply with the required use of safety glasses, ear protection, gloves and shoes during lab/shop activities.

11. Identify and wear appropriate clothing for lab/shop activities.

12. Secure hair and jewelry for lab/shop activities.

13. Demonstrate awareness of the safety aspects of supplemental restraint systems (SRS), electronic brake control systems and hybrid vehicle high voltage circuits.

14. Demonstrate awareness of the safety aspects of high voltage circuits (such as high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, ignition systems, injection systems, etc.).

15. Locate and demonstrate knowledge of material safety data sheets (MSDS).

B. Tools and Equipment

1. Identify tools and their usage in automotive applications.

2. Identify standard and metric designation.

3. Demonstrate safe handling and use of appropriate tools.

4. Demonstrate proper cleaning, storage and maintenance of tools and equipment.

5. Demonstrate proper use of precision measuring tools (i.e. micrometer, dial-indicator, dial-caliper).

C. Preparing Vehicle for Service

1. Identify information needed and the service requested on a repair order.

2. Identify purpose and demonstrate proper use of fender covers, mats.

3. Demonstrate use of the three C’s (concern, cause and correction).

4. Review vehicle service history.

5. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause and correction.

D. Preparing Vehicle for Customer

1. Ensure vehicle is prepared to return to customer per school/company policy (floor mats, steering wheel cover, etc.).

2. Review vehicle paperwork for return of vehicle to customer.

E. Workplace Employability Skills

1. Personal Standards (see Standard 7.9)

a. Reports to work daily on time; able to take directions and motivated to accomplish the task at hand.

b. Dresses appropriately and uses language and manners suitable for the workplace.

c. Maintains appropriate personal hygiene

d. Meets and maintains employment eligibility criteria, such as drug/alcohol-free status, clean driving record, etc.

2. Demonstrates honesty, integrity and reliability

F. Work Habits / Ethic (see Standard 7.10)

1. Complies with workplace policies/laws

2. Contributes to the success of the team, assists others and requests help when needed.

3. Works well with all customers and coworkers.

4. Negotiates solutions to interpersonal and workplace conflicts.

5. Contributes ideas and initiative

6. Follows directions

7. Communicates (written and verbal) effectively with customers and coworkers.

8. Reads and interprets workplace documents; writes clearly and concisely.

9. Analyzes and resolves problems that arise in completing assigned tasks.

10. Organizes and implements a productive plan of work.

11. Uses scientific, technical, engineering and mathematics principles and reasoning to accomplish assigned tasks

12. Identifies and addresses the needs of all customers, providing helpful, courteous and knowledgeable service and advice as needed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-50%    Lab Competencies
30-40%    Test and Homework
10-20%    Attendance, Attitude and Work Habits

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The Automotive and Communication Studies (formerly Speech & Debate Department) departments agree to shared teaching duties for this course.

  2. For every task in Introduction to Automotive Practices, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced:

Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 121

  • Title: Small Engine Service
  • Number: AUTO 121
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to compare and contrast operating principles of two-stroke and four-stroke cycle engines. The student should be able to describe lubricating, cooling, fuel and governor systems; troubleshoot engine problems; inspect engine components; and service the fuel, cooling and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and may be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. List the rules for personal and shop safety.
  2. Perform proper hand tool and equipment usage on small engines.
  3. Measure engine parts using micrometers and calipers.
  4. Identify engine principles and design (both 2- and 4-stroke).
  5. Define ignition, charging and starting systems.
  6. Perform maintenance on the: a) Lubrication and fuel system, b) Cooling and governor system.
  7. Troubleshoot and overhaul one four-stroke and one two-stroke engine.
  8. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Safety Rules
   A. List and discuss personal safety.
   B. List and discuss shop safety.

II. Hand Tools and Equipment Usage
   A.  Perform work on small engine using proper hand tools.
   B.  Perform work on small engine using shop equipment properly.

III. Measuring Engine Parts
   A.  Use and read a micrometer.
   B.  Measure parts using calipers.
   C.  Operate cylinder micrometer and hole gauges.

IV. Small Engine Design
   A.  Identify a two-stroke engine.
   B.  Identify a four-stroke engine.
   C.  Compare vertical and horizontal shaft engines.

V. Ignition, Charging and Starting Systems
   A.  Explain ignition systems.
   B.  Describe engine charging system.
   C.  Define starting systems.

VI. Engine Maintenance
   A.  Explain lubrication and fuel system.
   B.  Describe cooling and governor systems.

VII. Troubleshooting and Overhaul Engines
   A.  Troubleshooting and overhaul one four-stroke engine.
   B.  Troubleshooting and overhaul one two-stroke engine.

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
employees appropriate for the workplace, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

<
Competency completion level      50% of grade 
Tests and quizzes                40% of grade 
Participation and work habits    10% of grade 
TOTAL                           100%

Attitude and Work Habits:
Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits
affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and
will be a factor in determining grades.  In addition, collaboration and
teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 129

  • Title: Brakes I*
  • Number: AUTO 129
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Corequisites: AUTO 131.
Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Description:

Students will perform system pressure and travel calculations utilizing Pascal's Law, complete service work orders, determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, determine brake system concerns and necessary actions, diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses, determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping, noise, vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles, determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures, determine how to accomplish caliper piston retractions, diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns, and determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies through a variety of classroom and lab/shop learning and assessment activities.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete service work orders.

  2. Determine appropriate system pressure tests utilizing service specifications.

  3. Determine brake system concerns and necessary actions.

  4. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system.

  5. Determine how to inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses.

  6. Determine the service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums.

  7. Apply drum brake repair and replacement procedures.

  8. Diagnose poor stopping, noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns on disc-brake vehicles.

  9. Determine disc brake repair and replacement procedures.

  10. Determine how to caliper piston retractions.

  11. Diagnose wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concerns.

  12. Determine how to remove, inspect and replace bearing and hub assemblies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complete Service Work Orders

A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause, and correction. 5.A.1

B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. 5.A.3

C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers. 5.A.4

II. Appropriate System Pressure Tests Utilizing Service Specifications

A. Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic principles (Pascal's Law). 5.B.1

B. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable); determine necessary action. 5.B.2

C. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3

D. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4

E. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5

F. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

G. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

H. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

I. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

J. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning (balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10

K. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light system. 5.B.11

L. Bleed and/or flush brake system. 5.B.12

M. Test brake fluid for contamination. 5.B.13

III. Brake System Concerns and Necessary Actions

A. Identify and interpret brake system concern; determine necessary action. 5.A.2

B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. 5.A.3

C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers. 5.A.4

IV. Poor Stopping, Pulling or Dragging Concerns Caused by Malfunctions in the Hydraulic System

A. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable); determine necessary action. 5.B.2

B. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3

C. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4

D. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5

E. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

F. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

G. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

H. Select, handle, store and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

I. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning (balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10

J. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light system. 5.B.11

V. Inspect, Fabricate and/or Replace Brake Lines and Hoses

A. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear, tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

B. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

C. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

D. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

VI. Service Specifications Pertaining to the Removal, Cleaning and Refinishing Procedures on Brake Drums

A. Remove, clean, inspect, and measure brake drums; determine necessary action. 5.C.2

B. Refinish brake drum; measure final drum diameter. 5.C.3

VII. Drum Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures

A. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips, levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and backing support plates; lubricate and reassemble. 5.C.4

B. Inspect, and install wheel cylinders. 5.C.5

C. Pre-adjust brake shoes and parking brake; install brake drums or drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings. 5.C.6

D. Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments. 5.C.7

VIII. Poor Stopping, Noise Vibration, Pulling, Grabbing, Dragging, or Pedal Pulsation Concerns on Disc-Brake Vehicles

A. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.D.1

B. Remove caliper assembly; inspect for leaks and damage to caliper housing; determine necessary action. 5.D.2

C. Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides/pins for operation, wear, and damage; determine necessary action. 5.D.3

IX. Disc Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures

A. Remove, inspect, and replace pads and retaining hardware; determine necessary action. 5.D.4

B. Disassemble and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear, rust, scoring, and damage; replace seal, boot, and damaged or worn parts. 5.D.5

C. Reassemble, lubricate, and reinstall caliper, pads, and related hardware; seat pads, and inspect for leaks. 5.D.6

D. Clean, inspect, and measure rotor thickness, lateral runout, and thickness variation; determine necessary action. 5.D.7

E. Remove and reinstall rotor. 5.D.8

F. Check brake pad wear indicator system operation; determine necessary action. 5.D.13

G. Retract caliper piston on an integrated parking brake system. 5.D.11

H. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns; determine necessary action. 5.F.1

X. Remove, Inspect and Replace Bearing and Hub Assemblies

      A. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns; determine          necessary action. 5.F.1

B. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings and replace seals; install hub and adjust bearings. 5.F.2

C. Check parking brake cables and components for wear, binding, and corrosion; clean, lubricate, adjust or replace as needed. 5.F.3

D. Check parking brake and indicator light system operation; determine necessary action. 5.F.4

E. Check operation of brake stop light system; determine necessary action. 5.F.5

F. Replace wheel bearing and race. 5.F.6

G. Inspect and replace wheel studs. 5.F.7

H. Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly. 5.F.8

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50%    Test and quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe adn efficient operation of the automotive lab area. students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 131

  • Title: Brakes II*
  • Number: AUTO 131
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Corequisites: AUTO 129.
Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Description:

Students will determine necessary brake system correction, conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications, perform diagnosis and correction for poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system, conduct inspection, fabrication and/or replacement of brake lines and hoses, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform service specifications pertaining to the removal, cleaning and refinishing procedures on brake drums, perform drum brake repair and replacement procedures, diagnose poor stopping noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns, perform disc brake repair and replacement procedures, machine rotor according to service specifications, perform caliper piston retraction where applicable, inspect and test power assist systems, determine necessary action on wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses, and perform the removal, inspection and replacement of bearing and hub assemblies.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Conduct system pressure tests utilizing service specifications.

  2. Diagnose and repair poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system and noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation.

  3. Inspect, fabricate and/or replace brake lines and hoses.

  4. Perform disc and drum brake repair and replacement procedures following service specifications.

  5. Diagnose and repair power assist systems.

  6. Diagnose and repair wheel bearing noise, wheel shimmy and vibration concern diagnoses.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Brake System Correction

A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause, and correction. 5.A.1

B. Identify and interpret brake system concern; determine necessary action. 5.A.2

C. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as brake system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. 5.A.3

D. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers. 5.A.4

II. System Pressure Tests Utilizing Service Specifications

A. Diagnose pressure concerns in the brake system using hydraulic principles (Paschal's Law). 5.B.1

B. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable); determine necessary action. 5.B.2

C. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3

D. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4

E. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5

F. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

G. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

H. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

I. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

J. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning (balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10

K. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light system. 5.B.11

L. Bleed and/or flush brake system. 5.B.12

M. Test brake fluid for contamination. 5.B.13

III. Poor Stopping, Pulling or Dragging Concerns Caused by Malfunctions in the Hydraulic System

A. Measure brake pedal height, travel, and free play (as applicable); determine necessary action. 5.B.2

B. Check master cylinder for internal/external leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.B.3

C. Remove, bench bleed, and reinstall master cylinder. 5.B.4

D. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling or dragging concerns caused by malfunctions in the hydraulic system; determine necessary action. 5.B.5

E. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

F. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

G. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

H. Select, handle, store, and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

I. Inspect, test, and/or replace metering (hold-off), proportioning (balance), pressure differential, and combination valves. 5.B.10

J. Inspect, test, and/or replace components of brake warning light system. 5.B.11

IV. Inspect, Fabricate and/or Replace Brake Lines and Hoses

A. Inspect brake lines, flexible hoses, and fittings for leaks, dents, kinks, rust, cracks, bulging or wear; tighten loose fittings and supports; determine necessary action. 5.B.6

B. Replace brake lines, hoses, fittings, and supports. 5.B.7

C. Fabricate brake lines using proper material and flaring procedures (double flare and ISO types). 5.B.8

D. Select, handle, store and fill brake fluids to proper level. 5.B.9

V. Poor Stopping, Noise Vibration, Pulling, Grabbing, Dragging or Pedal Pulsation Concerns

A. Diagnose poor stopping, noise vibration, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pedal pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.C.1

B. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing, dragging or pulsation concerns; determine necessary action. 5.D.1

C. Remove caliper assembly; inspect for leaks and damage to caliper housing; determine necessary action. 5.D.2

D. Clean and inspect caliper mounting and slides/pins for operation, wear, and damage; determine necessary action. 5.D.3

VI. Service Specifications Pertaining to the Removal, Cleaning and Refinishing Procedures on Brake Drums

A. Remove, clean, inspect, and measure brake drums; determine necessary action. 5.C.2

B. Refinish brake drum; measure final drum diameter. 5.C.3

VII. Drum Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures

A. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes, springs, pins, clips, levers, adjusters/self-adjusters, other related brake hardware, and backing support plates; lubricate and reassemble. 5.C.4

B. Inspect, and install wheel cylinders. 5.C.5

C. Pre-adjust brakes shoes and parking brake; install brake drums or drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings. 5.C.6

D. Install wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments. 5.C.7

VIII. Disc Brake Repair and Replacement Procedures

A. Remove, inspect, and replace pads and retaining hardware; determine necessary action. 5.D.4

B. Disassemble and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear, rust, scoring, and damage; replace seal, boot, and damaged or worn parts. 5.D.5

C. Reassemble, lubricate, and reinstall caliper, pads, and related hardware; seat pads, and inspect for leaks. 5.D.6

D. Clean, inspect, and measure rotor thickness, lateral runout, and thickness variation; determine necessary action. 5.D.7

E. Remove and reinstall rotor. 5.D.8

F. Check brake pad wear indicator system operation; determine necessary action. 5.D.13

G. Retract caliper piston on an integrated parking brake system. 5.D.11

IX. Machine Rotor According to Service Specifications

A. Refinish rotor on vehicle; measure final rotor thickness. 5.D.9

B. Refinish rotor off vehicle; measure final rotor thickness. 5.D.10

X. Power Assist Systems

A. Test pedal free travel; check power assist operation. 5.E.1

B. Check vacuum supply to vacuum-type power booster. 5.E.2

C. Inspect the vacuum-type power booster unit for leaks; inspect the check valve for proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.E.3

D. Inspect and test hydraulically assisted power brake system for leaks and proper operation; determine necessary action. 5.E.4

XI. Remove, Inspect and Replace Bearing and Hub Assemblies

      A. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy, and vibration concerns; determine          necessary action. 5.F.1

B. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, and install wheel bearings and replace seals; install hub and adjust bearings. 5.F.2

C. Check parking brake cables and components for wear, binding, and corrosion; clean, lubricate, adjust or replace as needed. 5.F.3

D. Check parking brake and indicator light system operation; determine necessary action. 5.F.4

E. Check operation of brake stop light system; determine necessary action. 5.F.5

F. Replace wheel bearing and race. 5.F.6

G. Inspect and replace wheel studs. 5.F.7

H. Remove and reinstall sealed wheel bearing assembly. 5.F.8

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50%    Test and quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.

  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.

  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 150

  • Title: Steering and Suspension I*
  • Number: AUTO 150
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Corequisites: AUTO 151.
Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Description:

In this course students will document fundamental suspension systems concerns, perform fundamental diagnostics of steering systems, perform fundamental repairs of suspension systems, determine the need for wheel alignment, perform a four wheel alignment, and perform fundamental diagnostics and repair of wheel and tire systems.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compile vehicle resource materials.
  2. Disable and enable supplemental restraint systems.
  3. Inspect suspension and steering components.
  4. Diagnose suspension and steering systems.
  5. Repair or replace suspension and steering components.
  6. Perform prealignment inspections.
  7. Perform a four wheel alignment.
  8. Diagnose and repair wheel and tire issues.
  9. Identify and test tire pressure monitoring systems.
  10. Replace tire pressure sensors.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General

A. Research applicable vehicle and service information, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins. P-1

B. Identify and interpret suspension and steering system concerns; determine necessary action. P-1

C. Disable and enable supplemental restraint system (SRS). P-1

II. Related Suspension and Steering Service

A. Remove and replace steering wheel; center/time supplemental restraint system (SRS) coil (clock spring). P-1

B. Inspect rack-and-pinion steering gear, inner tie rod ends (sockets) and bellows boots; replace as needed. P-2

C. Diagnose power steering gear (both rack and pinion and non-rack and pinion) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering and noise concerns; determine necessary action. P-2

D. Inspect steering shaft universal joint(s), flexible coupling(s), collapsible column, lock cylinder mechanism and steering wheel; perform necessary action. P-2

E. Remove and replace rack-and-pinion steering gear; inspect mounting bushings and brackets. P-2

F. Determine proper power steering fluid type; inspect fluid level and condition. P-1

G. Flush, fill, and bleed power steering system. P-2

H. Inspect for power steering fluid leakage; determine necessary action. P-1

I. Remove, inspect, replace, and adjust power steering pump drive belt. P-1

J. Remove and reinstall power steering pump. P-2

K. Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings. P-2

L. Remove and reinstall press fit power steering pump pulley; check pulley and belt alignment. P-2

M. Inspect and replace Pitman arm, relay (center link/intermediate) rod, idler arm and mountings, and steering linkage damper. P-2

N. Inspect, replace and adjust tie rod ends (sockets), tie rod sleeves and clamps. P-1

O. Diagnose short and long arm suspension system noises, body sway and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. P-1

P. Diagnose strut suspension system noises, body sway and uneven ride height concerns; determine necessary action. P-1

Q. Inspect, remove and install upper and lower control arms, bushings and shafts. P-3

R. Inspect and replace rebound and jounce bumpers. P-3

S. Inspect remove and install track bar, strut rods/radius arms, and related mounts and bushings. P-3

T. Inspect remove and install upper and lower ball joints (with or without wear indicators). P-2

U. Inspect, remove and install steering knuckle assemblies. P-3

V. Inspect, remove and install short and long arm suspension system coil springs and spring insulators (silencers). P-3

W. Inspect, remove and install suspension system torsion bars and mounts. P-3

X. Inspect and replace front stabilizer bar (sway bar) bushings, brackets and links. P-3

Y. Inspect remove and install strut cartridge or assembly, strut coil spring, insulators (silencers), and upper strut bearing mount. P-3

Z. Inspect, remove and install upper front strut bearing and mount. P-3

AA. Inspect, remove and install front and rear suspension system lateral links/arms (track bars), strut rods/radius arms, control (trailing) arms, and related mounts and bushings. P-3

BB. Inspect rear suspension system leaf spring(s), spring insulators (silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings, center pins/bolts and mounts. P-1

CC. Inspect, remove and replace shock absorbers; inspect mounts and bushings. P-1

DD. Inspect electric power-assisted steering. P-3

EE. Inspect, test and diagnose components of electronically-controlled steering systems using a scan tool; determine necessary action. P-3

FF. Identify hybrid vehicle power steering system electrical circuits and safety precautions. P-2

GG. Remove, inspect, and service or replace front and rear wheel bearings. P-1

HH. Describe the function of the power steering pressure switch. P-3

III. Wheel Alignment

A. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer, memory steer, torque steer and steering return concerns; determine necessary action. P-1

B. Perform pre-alignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height; determine necessary action. P-1

C. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on alignment machine; perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear wheel caster, camber and toe as required; center steering wheel. P-1

D. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action. P-2

E. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine necessary action. P-2

F. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action. P-1

G. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action. P-2

H. Check front and/or rear cradle (sub frame) alignment; determine necessary action. P-3

I. Reset steering angle sensor. P-2

IV. Wheels and Tires

A. Inspect tire condition; identify tire wear patterns; check for correct size and application (load and speed ratings) and adjust air pressure; determine necessary action. P-1

B. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy and noise; determine necessary action. P-2

C. Rotate tires according to manufacturer’s recommendations. P-1

D. Measure wheel, tire, axle flange and hub runout; determine necessary action. P-2

E. Diagnose tire pull problems; determine necessary action. P-2

F. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel; balance wheel and tire assembly (static and dynamic). P-1

G. Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel equipped with tire pressure monitoring system sensor. P-2

H. Inspect tire and wheel assembly for air loss; perform necessary action. P-1

I. Repair tire using internal patch. P-1

J. Identify and test tire pressure monitoring systems (indirect and direct) for operation; calibrate system; verify operation of instrument panel lamps. P-2

K. Demonstrate knowledge of steps required to remove and replace sensors in a tire pressure monitoring system. P-1

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Tests 
30-50%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
10-20%    Quizzes
10-20%    Participation and work habits

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields must be worn during lab activities associated with this course. Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2.  Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. The student is responsible for the purchase of tools. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 151

  • Title: Alignment Practicum*
  • Number: AUTO 151
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Corequisites: AUTO 150.
Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Description:

This course will enhance the skills of diagnosing the need for wheel alignment and performing alignment of the steering and suspension systems.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compile vehicle resource materials
  2. Inspect suspension and steering components.
  3. Perform pre-alignment inspections.
  4. Perform a four wheel alignment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General

A. Research applicable vehicle and service information, vehicle service history, service precautions and technical service bulletins. P-1

B. Inspect steering and suspension components as a prealignment check. P-1

II. Wheel Alignment

A. Diagnose vehicle wander, drift, pull, hard steering, bump steer, memory steer, torque steer, and steering return concerns; determine necessary action. P-1

B. Perform prealignment inspection and measure vehicle ride height; determine necessary action. P-1

C. Prepare vehicle for wheel alignment on alignment machine; perform four-wheel alignment by checking and adjusting front and rear wheel caster, camber and toe as required; center steering wheel. P-1

D. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine necessary action. P-2

E. Check SAI (steering axis inclination) and included angle; determine necessary action. P-2

F. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine necessary action. P-1

G. Check for front wheel setback; determine necessary action. P-2

H. Check front and/or rear cradle (sub frame) alignment; determine necessary action. P-3

I. Reset steering angle sensor. P-2

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Tests
30-50%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
10-20%    Quizzes
10-20%    Participation and work habits

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields must be worn during lab activities associated with this course. Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. The student is responsible for the purchase of tools. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 155

  • Title: Automotive Engine Repair*
  • Number: AUTO 155
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125 or department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to teach an understanding of the four-stroke cycle internal combustion engine. Students should be able to diagnose and repair cylinder heads and cylinder block assemblies to include lubrication and cooling systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform general engine diagnosis.
  2. Diagnose and repair cylinder heads and valve trains.
  3. Diagnose and repair engine block assemblies.
  4. Diagnose and repair lubrication and cooling systems.
  5. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the automotive shop.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: Engine Diagnosis; Removal and Re-installation (R & R) 

A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause, and correction. 

B. Research vehicle service information including fluid type, internal engine operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins. 

C. Verify operation of the instrument panel engine warning indicators. 

D. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks; determine needed action. 

E. Install engine covers using gaskets, seals, and sealers as required. 

F. Verify engine mechanical timing. 

G. Perform common fastener and thread repair, to include: remove broken bolt, restore internal and external threads, and repair internal threads with thread insert. 

H. Inspect, remove and/or replace engine mounts. 

I. Identify service precautions related to service of the internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle. 

II. Cylinder Head and Valve Train Diagnosis and Repair 

A. Remove cylinder head; inspect gasket condition; install cylinder head and gasket; tighten according to manufacturer’s specification and procedure. 

B. Clean and visually inspect a cylinder head for cracks; check gasket surface areas for warpage and surface finish; check passage condition. 

C. Inspect pushrods, rocker arms, rocker arm pivots and shafts for wear, bending, cracks, looseness, and blocked oil passages (orifices); determine needed action. 

D. Adjust valves (mechanical or hydraulic lifters).  

E. Inspect and replace camshaft and drive belt/chain; includes checking drive gear wear and backlash,  end play, sprocket and chain wear, overhead cam drive sprocket(s), drive belt(s), belt tension,  tensioners, camshaft reluctor ring/tone-wheel, and valve timing components; verify correct camshaft timing. 

F. Establish camshaft position sensor indexing.  

G. Inspect valve springs for squareness and free height comparison; determine needed action. 

H. Replace valve stem seals on an assembled engine; inspect valve spring retainers, locks/keepers, and valve lock/keeper grooves; determine needed action. 

I. Inspect valve guides for wear; check valve stem-to-guide clearance; determine needed action. 

J. Inspect valves and valve seats; determine needed action. 

K. Check valve spring assembled height and valve stem height; determine needed action. 

L. Inspect valve lifters; determine needed action. 

M. Inspect and/or measure camshaft for runout, journal wear and lobe wear. 

N. Inspect camshaft bearing surface for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine needed action. 

III. Engine Block Assembly Diagnosis and Repair 

A. Remove, inspect, and/or replace crankshaft vibration damper (harmonic balancer).  

B. Disassemble engine block; clean and prepare components for inspection and reassembly. 

C. Inspect engine block for visible cracks, passage condition, core and gallery plug condition, and surface warpage; determine needed action. 

D. Inspect and measure cylinder walls/sleeves for damage, wear, and ridges; determine needed action. 

E. Inspect and measure camshaft bearings for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine needed action. 

F. Inspect crankshaft for straightness, journal damage, keyway damage, thrust flange and sealing surface condition, and visual surface cracks; check oil passage condition; measure end play and journal wear; check crankshaft position sensor reluctor ring (where applicable); determine needed action. 

G. Inspect main and connecting rod bearings for damage and wear; determine needed action.  

H. Identify piston and bearing wear patterns that indicate connecting rod alignment and main bearing bore problems; determine needed action. 

I.  Inspect and measure piston skirts and ring lands; determine needed action. 

J. Determine piston-to-bore clearance. 

K. Inspect, measure, and install piston rings. 

L.  Inspect auxiliary shaft(s) (balance, intermediate, idler, counterbalance and/or silencer); inspect shaft(s) and support bearings for damage and wear; determine needed action; reinstall and time. 

M. Assemble engine block.  

IV. Lubrication and Cooling Systems Diagnosis and Repair 

A. Perform cooling system pressure and dye tests to identify leaks; check coolant condition and level; inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, heater core, and galley plugs; determine needed action. 

B. Identify causes of engine overheating. 

C. Inspect, replace, and/or adjust drive belts, tensioners, and pulleys; check pulley and belt alignment. 

D. Inspect and/or test coolant; drain and recover coolant; flush and refill cooling system; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification; bleed air as required. 

E. Inspect, remove, and replace water pump. 

F. Remove and replace radiator. 

G. Remove, inspect, and replace thermostat and gasket/seal. 

H. Inspect and test fan(s), fan clutch (electrical or mechanical), fan shroud, and air dams; determine needed action. 

I. Perform oil pressure tests; determine needed action. 

J. Perform engine oil and filter change; use proper fluid type per manufacturer specification. 

K.  Inspect auxiliary coolers; determine needed action. 

L. Inspect, test, and replace oil temperature and pressure switches and sensors. 

M.  Inspect oil pump gears or rotors, housing, pressure relief devices, and pump drive; perform needed action. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50%    Test and quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

    3. For every task in Engine Repair, the following safety requirement must be strictly                  enforced: 

Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 156

  • Title: Electrical I*
  • Number: AUTO 156
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: AUTO 114 or AUTO 125.

Description:

Students will complete service work orders; describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage; perform basic electrical circuit repairs; identify electrical system faults; identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information; perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM; describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits through a variety of classroom and shop learning and assessment activities.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete service work orders.
  2. Describe the relationship between voltage, ohms and amperage.
  3. Perform basic electrical circuit repairs.
  4. Identify electrical system faults.
  5. Identify basic wiring diagram symbols, components, and legend information.
  6. Perform basic electrical circuit measurements using a DVOM.
  7. Describe basic circuit characteristics of series, parallel and series parallel circuits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Electrical System Diagnosis

A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause, and correction.

B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as electrical/electronic system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.

C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification numbers.

II. The Relationship Between Voltage, Ohms and Amperage

A. Demonstrate knowledge of electrical/electronic series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits using principles of electricity.

B. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems including source voltage, voltage drop, current flow, and resistance.

III. Basic Electrical Circuit Repairs

A. Remove and replace electrical connectors and terminal ends.

B. Perform solder repair of electrical wiring.

IV. Electrical System Faults

A. Identify and interpret electrical/electronic system concern; determine necessary action.

B. Check electrical circuits with a test light; determine necessary action.

C. Check electrical circuits using fused jumper wires; determine necessary action.

D. Inspect and test fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses; determine necessary action.

E. Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solid state devices, and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; perform necessary action.

F. Demonstrate knowledge of the causes and effects from shorts, grounds, opens, and resistance problems in electrical/electronic circuits.

G. Use wiring diagrams during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.

I. Measure key-off batter drain (parasitic draw).

V. Battery Service

A. Perform battery state-of-charge test; determine necessary action.

B. Conform proper batter capacity for vehicle application; perform batter capacity test; determine necessary action.

C. Maintain or restore electronic memory functions.

D. Inspect and clean battery; fill battery cells; check cables, connectors, clamps, and hold-downs.

E. Perform slow/fast battery charge according to manufacturer’s recommendations.

F. Jump-start a vehicle using jumper cables and a booster battery or auxiliary power supply.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% Test and quizzes
10-20% Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are requied to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Electrical, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced:  Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing, eye protection, hand tools, power equipment, proper ventilation, and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 161

  • Title: Engine Performance I*
  • Number: AUTO 161
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156.

Description:

In this learning plan students will: complete work order and check history; identify engine mechanical integrity; explore the fundamentals of fuel system theory; identify fuel system concerns; explore the fundamentals of ignition theory; identify ignition system concerns; identify induction system concerns; identify exhaust system concerns; identify engine mechanical integrity through a variety of learning and assessment activities.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Complete work order and check history.
  2. Identify engine mechnical integrity.
  3. Describe the fundamentals of fuel system theory.
  4. Identify fuel system concerns.
  5. Describe the fundamentals of ignition theory.
  6. Identify ignition system concerns.
  7. Identify induction system concerns.
  8. Identify exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Complete Work Order and Check History
   A. Complete work order to include customer information, vehicle
identifying information, customer concern, related service history, cause,
and correction. 8.A.1
   B. Research applicable vehicle and service information, such as engine
management system operation, vehicle service history, service precautions,
and technical service bulletins. 8.A.3
   C. Locate and interpret vehicle and major component identification
numbers. 8.A.4

II. Engine Mechanical Integrity
   A. Identify and interpret engine performance concern; determine
necessary action. 8.A.2
   B. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks;
determine necessary action. 8.A.5
   C. Diagnose abnormal engine noise or vibration concerns; determine
necessary action. 8.A.6
   D. Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine
necessary action. 8.A.7
   E. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   F. Perform cylinder power balance test; determine necessary action.
8.A.9
   G. Perform cylinder cranking and running compression tests; determine
necessary action. 8.A.10
   H. Perform cylinder leakage test; determine necessary action. 8.A.11
   I. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   J. Perform cooling system pressure tests; check coolant condition;
inspect and test radiator, pressure cap, coolant recovery tank, and hoses;
perform necessary action. 8.A.15
   K. Verify correct camshaft timing. 8.A.16
   L. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   M. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   N. Inspect and test crankshaft and camshaft position sensor(s); perform
necessary action. 8.C.3

III. Fuel System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   C. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   D. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   E. Check fuel for contaminants and quality; determine necessary action.
8.D.2
   F. Inspect and test fuel pumps and pump control systems for pressure,
regulation, and volume; perform necessary action. 8.D.3
   G. Replace fuel filters. 8.D.4
   H. Inspect throttle body, air induction system, intake manifold and
gaskets for vacuum leaks and/or unmetered air. 8.D.5
   I. Inspect and test fuel injectors. 8.D.6
   J. Verify idle control operation. 8.D.7

IV. Ignition System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   C. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   D. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool, determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   E. Diagnose ignition system related problems such as no-starting, hard
starting, engine misfire, poor driveability, spark knock, power loss, poor
mileage, and emissions concerns; determine necessary action. 8.C.1
   F. Inspect and test ignition primary and secondary circuit wiring and
solid state components; test ignition coil(s); perform necessary action.
8.C.2
   G. Inspect and test crankshaft and camshaft position sensor(s); perform
necessary action. 8.C.3
   H. Inspect, test, and/or replace ignition control module,
powertrain/engine control module; reprogram as necessary. 8.C.4

V. Induction System Concerns
   A. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   B. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   C. Access and use service information to perform step-by-step
diagnosis. 8.B.6
   D. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   E. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   F. Inspect throttle body, air induction system, intake manifold and
gaskets for vacuum leaks and/or unmetered air. 8.D.5
   G. Verify idle control operation. 8.D.7

VI. Exhaust System Concerns
   A. Diagnose abnormal exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine
necessary action. 8.A.7
   B. Perform engine absolute (vacuum/boost) manifold pressure tests;
determine necessary action. 8.A.8
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60% of grade Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50% of grade Test and quizzes
10-20% of grade Attendance, attitude and work habits
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 162

  • Title: Electrical II*
  • Number: AUTO 162
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156.

Description:

This course is designed to teach starting system diagnosis and repair, charging system diagnosis and repair, and lighting systems diagnosis and repair.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform general electrical system diagnosis.
  2. Perform starting system diagnosis and repair.
  3. Perform charging system diagnosis and repair.
  4. Perform lighting Systems diagnosis and repair.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: Electrical System Diagnosis

A. Research vehicle service information including vehicle service history, service precautions, and technical service bulletins.

B. Use wiring diagrams during the diagnosis (troubleshooting) of electrical/electronic circuit problems.

C. Inspect and test switches, connectors, relays, solenoid solid state devices, and wires of electrical/electronic circuits; determine necessary action.

D. Repair wiring harness.

II. Starting System Diagnosis and Repair

A. Perform starter current draw tests; determine needed action.

B. Perform starter circuit voltage drop tests; determine needed action.

C. Inspect and test starter relays and solenoids; determine needed action.

D. Remove and install starter in a vehicle.

E. Inspect and test switches, connectors, and wires of starter control circuits; determine needed action.

F. Differentiate between electrical and engine mechanical problems that cause a slow-crank or a no-crank condition.

III. Charging System Diagnosis and Repair

A. Perform charging system output test; determine needed action.

B. Diagnose (troubleshoot) charging system for causes of undercharge, no-charge, or overcharge conditions.

C. Inspect, adjust, and/or replace generator (alternator) drive belts; check pulleys and tensioners for wear; check pulley and belt alignment.

D. Remove, inspect, and/or replace generator (alternator).

E. Perform charging circuit voltage drop tests; determine needed action.

IV.  Lighting Systems Diagnosis and Repair

A. Diagnose (troubleshoot) the causes of brighter-than-normal, intermittent, dim, or no light operation; determine needed action.

B. Inspect interior and exterior lamps and sockets including headlights and auxiliary lights (fog lights/driving lights); replace as needed.

C. Identify system voltage and safety precautions associated with high-intensity discharge headlights.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Electrical, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced:  Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 201

  • Title: ASE Certification Review*
  • Number: AUTO 201
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: (AUTO 208 or AUTO 214) and (AUTO 207 or AUTO 209) and (AUTO 211 or AUTO 221) and (AUTO 250 or AUTO 252).

Description:

This course will prepare students to take any of the eight (8) basic National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) automotive student certification tests.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the ASE certification process.
  2. Discuss ASE test construction.
  3. Categorize automotive systems components.
  4. Describe diagnostic methods used in automotive repair.
  5. Identify repair procedures used in automotive repair.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. ASE Certification Process

A. List the eight areas needed to be a Master Technician.

B. Explain how to register for ASE tests.

C. Describe the price structure for ASE tests.

D. Describe how test results are obtained.

II. ASE Test Construction

A. Describe the ASE test question format.

B. Analyze the author’s intent for questions.

C. List the different question types used in ASE tests.

D. Describe the level of proficiency ASE test questions address.

III. Automotive System Components

A. Identify key components in automotive systems.

B. Recognize key component names and uses.

IV. Automotive Diagnostic Methods

A. Describe various troubleshooting methods.

B. Apply troubleshooting methods to test questions.

V. Automotive Repair Procedures

A. Describe various repair procedures.

B. Apply repair procedures to test questions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Participation
20-30%    Quizzes
50-60%    Tests

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 205

  • Title: Engine Performance II*
  • Number: AUTO 205
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 161.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the operation of engine management systems to include: general engine diagnosis, computerized engine controls diagnosis and repair, fuel, air induction, and exhaust diagnosis and repair, and emissions control systems diagnosis and repair. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze engine mechanical integrity.
  2. Analyze ignition system concerns.
  3. Analyze induction and exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Engine Mechanical Integrity

A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12

B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test, and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary action. 8.A.13

C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status, and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1

D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret scan tool data. 8.B.2

E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3

F. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 8.B.8

G. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1

H. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5

I. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8

II. Ignition System

A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12

B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test, and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary action. 8.A.13

C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status, and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1

D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret scan tool data. 8.B.2

E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3

F. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine necessary action. 8.B.8

G. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1

H. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5

I. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action. 8.E.6

J. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7

K. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8

III. Induction and Exhaust System

A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12

B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test, and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary action. 8.A.13

C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status, and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1

D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret scan tool data. 8.B.2

E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3

F. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1

G. Diagnose oil leaks, emissions, and driveability concerns caused by the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system; determine necessary action. 8.E.1

H. Inspect, test, and service positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) filter/breather cap, valve, tubes, orifices, and hoses; perform necessary action. 8.E.2

I. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system; determine action. 8.E.3

J. Inspect, test, service, and replace components of the EGR system, including EGR tubing, exhaust passages, vacuum/pressure controls, filters and hoses; perform necessary action. 8.E.4

K. Inspect and test electrical/electronic sensors, controls, and wiring of EGR systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.5

L. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action. 8.E.6

M. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7

N. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8

O. Inspect and test catalytic converter efficiency. 8.E.9

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50%    Test and quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 207

  • Title: Manual Drivetrains and Axles*
  • Number: AUTO 207
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (AUTO 114 or AUTO 125) and AUTO 156.

Description:

This course covers the theory of operation and service procedures for drivelines, constant velocity joints, manual transmissions and transaxles, differentials, clutches, and driveline phasing including noise, harness, and vibration analysis, and four wheel drive/all wheel drive systems.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform diagnosis and repair of manual drive trains.
  2. Perform diagnosis and repair of clutches.
  3. Perform diagnosis and repair of manual transmissions and transaxles.
  4.  Perform diagnosis and repair of drive shafts, half shafts, universal, constant-velocity (CV) joints and drive axles.
  5.  Perform diagnosis and repair of four-wheel drive/all-wheel drive components.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: Drive Train Diagnosis

A. Visually inspect drive train.

B. Identify and interpret drive train concerns; determine needed action.

II. Clutch Diagnosis and Repair

A. Diagnose clutch noise, binding, slippage, pulsation, and chatter; determine needed action.

B. Inspect clutch pedal linkage, cables, automatic adjuster mechanisms, brackets, bushings, pivots, and springs; perform needed action.

C.  Inspect and/or replace clutch pressure plate assembly, clutch disc, release (throw-out) bearing, linkage, and pilot bearing/bushing (as applicable).

D. Bleed clutch hydraulic system.

E. Inspect flywheel and ring gear for wear, cracks, and discoloration; determine needed action.

F. Measure flywheel runout and crankshaft end play; determine needed action.

G. Describe the operation and service of a system that uses a dual mass flywheel.

III. Transmission/Transaxle Diagnosis and Repair

A. Inspect, adjust, lubricate, and/or replace shift linkages, brackets, bushings, cables, pivots, and levers.

B. Diagnose noise concerns through the application of transmission/transaxle powerflow principles.

C. Diagnose hard shifting and jumping out of gear concerns; determine needed action.

D. Diagnose transaxle final drive assembly noise and vibration concerns; determine needed action.

E. Disassemble, inspect clean, and reassemble internal transmission/transaxle components.

IV. Drive Shaft and Half Shaft, Universal and Constant-Velocity (CV) Joint Diagnosis and Repair (Front, Rear, All-wheel, and Four-wheel drive)

A. Diagnose constant-velocity (CV) joint noise and vibration concerns; determine needed action.

B. Diagnose universal joint noise and vibration concerns; perform needed action.

C. Inspect, remove, and/or replace bearings, hubs, and seals.

D. Inspect, service, and/or replace shafts, yokes, boots, and universal/CV joints.

E. Check shaft balance and phasing; measure shaft runout; measure and adjust driveline angles.

V. Drive Axle Diagnosis and Repair

A. Ring and Pinion Gears and Differential Case Assembly

1. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine needed action.

2. Inspect and replace companion flange and/or pinion seal; measure companion flange runout.

3. Inspect ring gear and measure runout; determine needed action.

4. Remove, inspect, reinstall and/or drive pinion and ring gear, spacers, sleeves, and bearings.

5. Measure and adjust drive pinion depth.

6. Measure and adjust drive pinion bearing preload.

7. Measure and adjust side bearing preload and ring and pinion gear total backlash and backlash variation on a differential carrier assembly (threaded cup or shim types).

8. Check ring and pinion tooth contact patterns; perform needed action.

9. Disassemble, inspect, measure, adjust, and/or replace differential pinion gears (spiders), shaft, side gears, side bearings, thrust washers, and case.

10. Reassemble and reinstall differential case assembly; measure runout; determine needed action.

B. Limited Slip Differential

1. Diagnose noise, slippage, and chatter concerns; determine needed action.

2. Measure rotating torque; determine needed action.

C. Drive Axles 

1. Remove and replace drive axle shafts.

2. Inspect and replace drive axle shaft seals, bearings, and retainers.

3. Measure drive axle flange runout and shaft end play; determine needed action.

4. Diagnose drive axle shafts, bearings, and seals for noise, vibration, and fluid leakage concerns; determine needed action.

VII. Four-wheel Drive/All-wheel Drive Component Diagnosis and Repair

A. Inspect, adjust, and repair shifting controls (mechanical, electrical, and vacuum), bushings, mounts, levers, and brackets.

B. Identify concerns related to variations in tire circumference and/or final drive ratios. 

C. Diagnose noise, vibration, and unusual steering concerns; determine needed action.

D. Diagnose, test, adjust, and/or replace electrical/electronic components of four-wheel drive/all-wheel drive systems.

E. Disassemble, service, and reassemble transfer case and components.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-50%    Test and quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.


2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

3. For every task in Manual Drivetrains and Axles, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced: Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 211

  • Title: Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning*
  • Number: AUTO 211
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 156.

Description:

This course is designed to teach the operation, service, diagnoses and repair of automotive heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The theory and operation of these systems, major components, testing, recycling and other service procedures will be covered.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Research service information, diagnose and repair general symptoms.
  2. Diagnose and repair refrigeration Systems.
  3. Diagnose and repair heating, ventilation, and engine cooling systems.
  4. Diagnose and repair operating systems and related controls.
  5. Perform refrigerant recovery, recycling, and handling.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: A/C System Diagnosis and Repair

A. Performance test A/C system; identify problems.

B. Identify abnormal operating noises in the A/C system; determine needed action.

C. Identify refrigerant type; select and connect proper gauge set/test equipment; record temperature and pressure readings.

D. Leak test A/C system; determine needed action.

E. Inspect condition of refrigerant oil removed from A/C system; determine needed action.

F. Determine recommended oil and oil capacity for system application.

G. Using a scan tool, observe and record related HVAC data and trouble codes.

II. Refrigeration System Component Diagnosis and Repair

A. Determine need for an additional A/C system filter; perform needed action.

B. Remove and inspect A/C system mufflers, hoses, lines, fittings, O-rings, seals, and service valves; perform needed action.

C. Remove, inspect, and replace receiver/drier or accumulator/drier; determine recommended oil type and quantity.

D. Remove, inspect, and install expansion valve or orifice (expansion) tube.

E. Inspect evaporator housing water drain; perform needed action.

F. Diagnose A/C system conditions that cause the protection devices (pressure, thermal, and/or control module) to interrupt system operation; determine needed action.

G. Determine procedure to remove and reinstall evaporator; determine required oil type and quantity.

H. Remove, inspect, reinstall, and/or replace condenser; determine required oil type and quantity.

III. Heating, Ventilation, and Engine Cooling Systems Diagnosis and Repair

A. Inspect and test heater control valve(s); perform needed action

B. Diagnose temperature control problems in the HVAC system; determine needed action.

C. Determine procedure to remove, inspect, reinstall, and/or replace heater core.

IV. Operating Systems and Related Controls Diagnosis and Repair

A. Inspect and test HVAC system blower motors, resistors, switches, relays, wiring, and protection devices; determine needed action.

B. Diagnose A/C compressor clutch control systems; determine needed action.

C. Diagnose malfunctions in the vacuum, mechanical, and electrical components and controls of the heating, ventilation, and A/C (HVAC) system; determine needed action.

D. Inspect and test HVAC system control panel assembly; determine needed action.

E. Inspect and test HVAC system control cables, motors, and linkages; perform needed action.

F. Check operation of automatic or semi-automatic HVAC control systems; determine needed action.

V. Refrigerant Recovery, Recycling, and Handling

A. Perform correct use and maintenance of refrigerant handling equipment according to equipment manufacturer’s standards.

B. Identify A/C system refrigerant; test for sealants; recover, evacuate, and charge A/C system; add refrigerant oil as required.

C. Recycle, label, and store refrigerant.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Heating and Air Conditioning, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced: Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 214

  • Title: Electrical III*
  • Number: AUTO 214
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 8
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 162 or AUTO 166.

Description:

This course is designed to teach advanced electrical/electronic systems. Students will perform general electrical system diagnosis; gauges, warning devices, and driver information systems diagnosis and repair; and body electrical systems diagnosis and repair.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze and apply diagnostic information obtained from wiring diagrams.
  2. Perform general electrical system repairs.
  3. Diagnose and repair driver information systems malfunctions
  4. Diagnose instrument cluster gauge malfunctions.
  5. Diagnose and repair various accessory/body electrical system concerns.
  6. Analyze, diagnose and repair data bus circuits.
  7. Describe vehicle programming general procedures.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: Electrical System Diagnosis

A. Inspect, test, repair, and/or replace components, connectors, terminals, harnesses, and wiring in electrical/electronic systems (including solder repairs); determine needed action.

B. Check electrical/electronic circuit waveforms; interpret readings and determine needed repairs.

C. Repair data bus wiring harness.

II. Instrument Cluster and Driver Information Systems Diagnosis and Repair

A. Inspect and test gauges and gauge sending units for causes of abnormal readings; determine needed action.

B. Diagnose (troubleshoot) the causes of incorrect operation of warning devices and other driver information systems; determine needed action.

III. Body Electrical Systems Diagnosis and Repair

A. Diagnose operation of comfort and convenience accessories and related circuits (such as: power window, power seats, pedal height, power locks, truck locks, remote start, moon roof, sun roof, sun shade, remote keyless entry, voice activation, steering wheel controls, back-up camera, parking assist, cruise control, and auto dimming headlamps); determine needed repairs.

B. Diagnose operation of security/anti-theft systems and related circuits (such as: theft deterrent, door locks, remote keyless entry, remote start, and starter/fuel disable); determine needed repairs.

C. Diagnose operation of entertainment and related circuits (such as: radio, DVD, remote CD changer, navigation, amplifiers, speakers, antennas, and voice-activated accessories); determine needed repairs.

D. Diagnose operation of safety systems and related circuits (such as:  horn, airbags, seat belt pretensioners, occupancy classification, wipers, washers, speed control/collision avoidance, heads-up display, parking assist, and back-up camera); determine needed repairs.

E. Diagnose body electronic systems circuits using a scan tool; check for module communication errors (data communication bus systems); determine needed action.

F. Describe the process for software transfer, software updates, or reprogramming of electronic modules.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Electrical/Electronics, the following safety requirement must be strictly  enforced: Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 215

  • Title: Engine Performance III*
  • Number: AUTO 215
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 205.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to service and repair fuels systems, ignition systems, and exhaust systems. The student will be required to provide ANSI Z87 safety glasses and will be expected to provide other basic hand tools and/or equipment.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Service fuel system concerns.
  2. Repair fuel system concerns.
  3. Service ignition system concerns.
  4. Repair ignition system concerns.
  5. Service induction and exhaust system concerns.
  6. Repair induction and exhaust system concerns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fuel System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   I. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   J. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   K. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   L. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   M. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   N. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7

II. Ignition System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action. 8.B.8
   I. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   J. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, poor driveability, incorrect idle
speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine misfire, power
loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions problems; determine
necessary action. 8.D.1
   K. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   L. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   M. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   N. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7

III. Induction and Exhaust System Concerns
   A. Diagnose engine mechanical, electrical, electronic, fuel, and
ignition concerns; determine necessary action. 8.A.12
   B. Prepare 4 or 5 gas analyzer; inspect and prepare vehicle for test,
and obtain exhaust readings; interpret readings, and determine necessary
action. 8.A.13
   C. Retrieve and record diagnostic trouble codes, OBD monitor status,
and freeze frame data; clear codes when applicable. 8.B.1
   D. Diagnose the causes of emissions or driveability concerns with
stored or active diagnostic trouble codes; obtain, graph, and interpret
scan tool data. 8.B.2
   E. Diagnose emissions or driveability concerns without stored
diagnostic trouble codes; determine necessary action. 8.B.3
   F. Check for module communication (including CAN/BUS systems) errors
using a scan tool. 8.B.4
   G. Inspect and test computerized engine control system sensors,
powertrain/engine control module (PCM/ECM), actuators, and circuits using
a graphing multimeter (GMM)/digital storage oscilloscope (DSO); perform
necessary action. 8.B.5
   H. Diagnose driveability and emissions problems resulting from
malfunctions of interrelated systems (cruise control, security alarms,
suspension controls, traction controls, A/C, automatic transmissions,
non-OEM-installed accessories, or similar systems); determine necessary
action. 8.B.7
   I. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool; determine
necessary action 8.B.8
   J. Describe the importance of running all OBDII monitors for repair
verification. 8.B.9
   K. Diagnose hot or cold no-starting, hard starting, poor driveability,
incorrect idle speed, poor idle, flooding, hesitation, surging, engine
misfire, power loss, stalling, poor mileage, dieseling, and emissions
problems; determine necessary action. 8.D.1
   L. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the secondary
air injection and catalytic converter systems; determine necessary action.
8.E.6
   M. Inspect and test mechanical components of secondary air injection
systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.7
   N. Inspect and test electrical/electronically-operated components and
circuits of air injection systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.8
   O. Inspect and test catalytic converter efficiency. 8.E.9
   P. Diagnose emissions and driveability concerns caused by the
evaporative emissions control system; determine necessary action. 8.E.10
   Q. Inspect and test components and hoses of the evaporative emissions
control system; perform necessary action. 8.E.11
   R. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and scan tool data related
to the emissions control systems; perform necessary action. 8.E.12
   S. Identify hybrid vehicle internal combustion engine service
precautions. 8.F.7 
 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Competency completion level/Lab Assignments 30-60% of grade
Test and quizzes 20-50% of grade
Attendance, attitude and work habits 10-20% of grade
Total 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In
addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grading Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. The Associated Cost for all of the tools required for the Automotive Technology degree will be $300 - $800. The tool cost is a one time purchase for auto students. The same basic tools are used for all our classes in the degree program.
  2. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Students Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  3. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 237

  • Title: Diesel and Hybrid Vehicles Maintenance and Light Repair*
  • Number: AUTO 237
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 131 and (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166) or department approval.

Description:

This course is designed to teach an understanding of hybrid electric, diesel powerplants and related vehicle systems as it pertains to light maintenance and repair.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain diesel high pressure fuel injection systems.
  2. Describe, explain and diagnose various diesel injection nozzle types.
  3. Identify and describe electronically controlled diesel injection systems.
  4. Identify and explain diesel common rail injection systems.
  5. Identify, describe and explain the different diesel emission control / exhaust treatment systems.
  6. Explain and demonstrate hybrid/electric safety procedures.
  7. Describe and explain hybrid-electric battery systems.
  8. Describe and explain electric motors, generators and their controls.
  9. Describe and explain regenerative braking systems.
  10. Describe and explain various aspects of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Diesel Powered Vehicles

A. High Pressure Fuel Injection

1. Identify and explain the purpose and function of high pressure fuel.

2. Identify and describe the methods of fuel metering.

3. Identify and explain the purpose and function of governor controls.

4. Describe and explain injection timing.

5. Define and describe injection rate control.

6. Define and explain fuel atomization.

7. Define and describe fuel distribution.

B. Injection Nozzles

1. Identify and describe principles of injection nozzles.

2. Identify and describe nozzle types, construction and applications.

3. Perform nozzle diagnostics and evaluation.

C. Electronically Controlled Injection Systems

1. Identify and explain the advantages of an electronically controlled system.

2. Identify and classify different injector types.

3. Identify and describe components of high pressure actuation systems.

4. Identify and describe components of the electronic control systems.

D. Common Rail Systems

1. Describe the construction and function of the different types of common rail systems.

2. Describe and explain the operation of the different types of common rail injectors.

3. Identify and describe common rail pressure control components.

E. Emission Controls/Exhaust Treatment Systems

1. Describe the construction, functions, and application of exhaust treatment systems.

2. Identify, describe and explain diesel particulate filter systems and their maintenance.

3. Identify and describe the types, composition, construction and operation of NOx emission-reduction after-treatment systems.

II. Hybrid-Electric Systems

A. Safety and Service Procedures

1. Demonstrate safely de-powering a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV).

2. Demonstrate safely performing a high-voltage disconnect.

3. Describe service issues related to HEV high-voltage systems.

4. Demonstrate correct use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).

5. Explain the hazards of driving, moving, towing and hoisting a HEV.

B. Hybrid-Electric Battery Systems

1. Describe how hybrid-electric battery systems work.

2. List necessary safety precautions for working with batteries.

3. Explain safely recharging the batteries.

4. Explain high-voltage battery types.

C. Electric Motors, Generators and their Controls

1. Describe the operation of DC (direct current) and AC (alternating current) electric motors.

2. Explain how a brushless DC motor works.

3. Discuss the use of electric motors in HEV’s.

4. Describe DC-to-DC converter operation.

5. Discuss DC-to-AC inverter operation.

D. Regenerative Braking Systems

1. Explain how regenerative braking works and the principles involved.

2. Discuss regenerative braking parts and components.

3. Describe service precautions with regenerative brakes.

E. Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles

1. Identify a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV).

2. Explain recharging a high-voltage battery in a PHEV and electric vehicle (EV).

3. Discuss battery capacity and range correlation in an EV.

4. Describe the different chargers used for PHEV or EV vehicles.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Diesel and Hybrid Vehicles, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced: Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 252

  • Title: Automatic Transmissions*
  • Number: AUTO 252
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 162 or AUTO 166.

Description:

This course is designed to teach diagnoses, service and repair of various automatic transmissions and automatic transaxles, both on vehicle and off vehicle, including computer-controlled systems.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perform general transmission and transaxle diagnosis using appropriate tests and methods.
  2. Perform in-vehicle transmission and transaxle maintenance and repairs.
  3. Perform off-vehicle transmission and transaxle inspection, cleaning, disassembly, measurement, repair, testing, replacement of worn or damaged components and reassembly

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General: Transmission and Transaxle Diagnosis

A. Identify and interpret transmission/transaxle concerns, differentiate between engine performance and transmission/transaxle concerns; determine needed action.

B. Perform pressure tests (including transmissions/transaxles equipped with electronic pressure control); determine needed action.

C. Diagnose noise and vibration concerns; determine needed action.

D. Perform stall test; determine needed action.

E. Perform lock-up converter system tests; determine needed action.

F. Diagnose transmission/transaxle gear reduction/multiplication concerns using driving, driven, and held member (power flow) principles.

G. Diagnose electronic transmission/transaxle control systems using appropriate test equipment and service information. 

H. Diagnose pressure concerns in a transmission using hydraulic principles (Pascal’s Law).

II. In-Vehicle Transmission/Transaxle Maintenance and Repair

A. Inspect, test, adjust, repair, and/or replace electrical/electronic components and circuits including computers, solenoids, sensors, relays, terminals, connectors, switches, and harnesses. 

B. Demonstrate understanding of the relearn procedure.

III. Off-Vehicle Transmission and Transaxle Repair

A. Inspect, leak test, flush, and/or replace transmission/transaxle oil cooler, lines, and fittings.

B. Disassemble, clean, and inspect transmission/transaxle.

C. Inspect, measure, clean, and replace valve body (includes surfaces, bores, springs, valves, switches, solenoids, sleeves, retainers, brackets, check valves/balls, screens, spacers, and gaskets).

D. Inspect servo and accumulator bores, pistons, seals, pins, springs, and retainers; determine needed action.

E. Assemble transmission/transaxle.

F. Inspect, measure, and reseal oil pump assembly and components.

G. Measure transmission/transaxle end play and/or preload; determine needed action.

H. Inspect, measure, and/or replace thrust washers and bearings.

I. Inspect oil delivery circuits, including seal rings, ring grooves, and sealing surface areas, feed pipes, orifices, and check valves/balls.

J. Inspect bushings; determine needed action.

K. Inspect and measure planetary gear assembly components; determine needed action.

L. Inspect case bores, passages, bushings, vents, and mating surfaces; determine needed action.

M. Diagnose and inspect transaxle drive, link chains, sprockets, gears, bearings, and bushings; perform needed action.

N. Inspect measure, repair, adjust or replace transaxle final drive components.

O. Inspect clutch drum, piston, check-balls, springs, retainers, seals, friction plates, pressure plates, and bands; determine needed action.

P. Measure clutch pack clearance; determine needed action.

Q. Air test operation of clutch and servo assemblies.

R. Inspect one-way clutches, races, rollers, sprags, springs, cages, retainers; determine needed action.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

Total: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Engine Repair, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced: Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 265

  • Title: Comprehensive Vehicle Diagnosis*
  • Number: AUTO 265
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: AUTO 161 and (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166).

Description:

This course is designed as a comprehensive technical course for learners in the Automotive Technology major. The course is primarily a lab-based course, with most of the course work consisting of diagnosing and repairing various problems on cars that the student may not have encountered in previous classes. Labs will test the learner on their ability to diagnose failures on a complete vehicle scale that include all electrical and mechanical systems and how they function relative to each other. As a portion of the course, reviewed material will follow the eight ASE 2017 standard areas of study, and will expand upon these areas via diagnostic and industry standard technical material and testing methods. Usage of the proper diagnostic processes is required for success in this course. Proper use of lab scopes, DVOM’s, scan tools, and other high level diagnostic equipment are crucial to success in the course.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify general shop safety rules and procedures.
  2. Demonstrate safe and accurate usage and storage of tools and equipment.
  3. Develop personal standards and work habits appropriate to the automotive industry.
  4. Demonstrate diagnostic principals and their usage
  5. Demonstrate ability to utilize a reliable diagnostic process
  6. Develop skillsets related to vehicle diagnostics
  7. Develop critical thinking skills related to vehicle symptoms and possible causes
  8. Apply learned concepts and critical thinking skills towards solutions and possible causes for vehicle complaints.
  9. Inspect and make repairs to vehicle electrical and/ir mechanical systems.
  10. Demonstrate preparation of the vehicle for service and return to the customer.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Shop safety and tool usage

A. Identify general shop safety rules.

B. Demonstrate shop safety procedures.

C. Demonstrate proper use and storage of tools and equipment.

II. Personal standards and work habits

A. Demonstrate personal integrity standards.

B. Demonstrate Work habits appropriate to the industry.

III. The diagnostic process

A. Create a personal diagnostic routine.

B. Demonstrate a reliable diagnostic process.

IV. Specialized equipment operation

A. Determine necessary tests and equipment for diagnosing the problem.

B. demonstrate the proper operation of specialized equipment.

V. Theory and operation review of vehicle electrical and mechanical systems.

A. Explain theory of vehicle electrical and mechanical systems.

B. Demonstrate the use of theory and operation of vehicle electrical and mechanical systems diagnosis and repair.

VI. Vehicle preparation for service and return to the customer

A. Demonstrate vehicle preparation for service.

B. Demonstrate vehicle preparation for return to the customer.

C. Demonstrate proper paperwork for each vehicle.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Competency completion level/ Lab Assignments
20-40%    Tests
20-40%    Quizzes
10-20%    Attendance, attitude and work habits

TOTAL: 100%

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is important, productive attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety in the automotive shop and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition, collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Safety glasses with side shields are required to be worn during lab activities for this course. This is in compliance with accepted eye protection practices and Kansas State Law (K.S.A. 72-5207). Safety glasses must meet American National Standards Institute Z87.1 specifications. (NOTE: Most prescription eyewear does not meet ANSI Z87.1. Students who wear prescription glasses must: a) Provide evidence that existing eyewear meets ANSI Z87.1, or b) Wear cover goggles (if allowable), or c) Purchase and wear ANSI Z87.1 prescription eyewear.
  2. Lab Guidelines: In order to assist with the safe and efficient operation of the automotive lab area, students are expected to be familiar with and adhere to the Automotive Student Lab Guidelines.
  3. For every task in Comprehensive Vehicle Diagnosis and Repair, the following safety requirement must be strictly enforced:  Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 271

  • Title: Automotive Technology Internship*
  • Number: AUTO 271
  • Effective Term: 2021-22
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: (AUTO 162 or AUTO 166) or Department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students on-the-job experience under the supervision of professionals in the industry. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe work activities which have been accomplished on the job.
  2. Prepare a resume.
  3. Complete a job application.
  4. Identify the steps in the job search process.
  5. List sources of job opportunities using local newspapers, job postings, and other available media.
  6. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training position.
  7. Keep accurate records of hours worked, job activities, and salary earned.
  8. Utilize classroom/lab knowledge to the work situation.
  9. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward employment and work.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to work with immediate supervisor, customers (if applicable), and fellow employees.
  11. Apply technical and human relations skills to the employment setting.
  12. Identify the major components of a job interview.
  13. Demonstrate proper conduct during a job interview.
  14. Identify ways to deal with termination of employment.
  15. Demonstrate an understanding of industrial applications and procedures that may have not encountered in other course work.
  16. Describe components of organizational structure including: labor relations, work standards, quality and production control, and work flow patterns.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Internship

A. Interpret program requirements.

B. Complete the required forms from the handbook.

C. Discuss the procedures set forth by the Career Program Facilitator.

II. The Job Search Process

A. Find three sources of job information.

B. Identify three job postings in your career program field.

III. Obtaining Employment

A. Write a letter of inquiry.

B. Write a resume.

C. Complete a job application. D. Describe a job interview.

IV. Employer/Employee Relationships

A. Define labor relations.

B. Explain human relations.

C. Write examples of conflict and resolution.

V. Employee Growth and Development

A. Define employment advancement.

B. Examine personal assessment of your job performance.

C. Depict management opportunities in your career area.

VI. Leadership in the Work Place

A. Describe qualities of leadership.

B. Define fellowship.

VII. Dealing with Termination

A. Define termination with cause.

B. Define termination without cause.

C. Describe how to deal with employment termination.

VIII. The Structure of Business and Industry

A. Explain organizational theory.

B. Describe work flow patterns.

IX. Conclusion

A. Summarize your employer evaluation.

B. Write a self evaluation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50%    Employer work assignments: This includes working not less than 15 hours per week for the semester, report to work regularly and adhere to the employer’s work rules and standards; notify the Career Program Facilitator immediately on any changes in employment status
30%    Classroom assignments, turned in on time and complete. The assignments will be graded on content, spelling and punctuation
5%      Employer Evaluations (2), turned in on time and complete
5%      Student self-evaluation, turned in on time and complete
10%    Attend all assigned Internship meetings with the Facilitator

TOTAL = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

A minimum average of 15 hours per week on-the-job training is required. Students are expected to keep the instructor informed about progress and any job changes.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

AUTO 291

No information found.