Anthropology (ANTH)

Courses

ANTH 125   Cultural Anthropology (3 Hours)  

This introductory course will employ various anthropological theories, perspectives and methodologies to critically and comparatively examine an array of cultural and social topics as they relate to selected Western and non-Western cultures and societies. 3 hrs./wk.

ANTH 125H   HON: Cultural Anthropology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 126   Physical Anthropology (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to selected concepts and principles important to an understanding of evolutionary forces and their influence on the physiology and behavior of humans. The importance of the scientific method will be explored. Awareness of humans and their place in nature will be achieved by examining basic genetics, micro- and macroevolution, primate ecology and behavior, the paleoanthropological evidence for human evolution, and modern human adaptation and variation. 3 hrs./wk.

ANTH 126H   HON: Physical Anthropology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 130   World Cultures (3 Hours)

This introductory course will utilize an ethnographic approach to introduce students to various cultural and social practices of Westernized and non-Westernized cultures and societies from around the world. This course will examine a wide range of topics including economic production, religion, world view, kinship patterns and political and economic institutions. 3 hrs./wk.

ANTH 130H   HON: World Cultures* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 134   Native Americans (3 Hours)

This ethnographic course will introduce students to the indigenous peoples and First Nations of North, Central and South America, with particular attention being paid to North America. This course will focus on selected First Nations cultures and societies to examine a wide range of topics including arts, oral traditions, religions, and Indian-White relations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 134H   HON: Native Americans* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 135   American Indian Artistic Tradition (3 Hours)

This course introduces students to many art forms of the various American Indian nations of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Mediums to be explored include traditional and contemporary visual art, traditional and contemporary music and dance, oral tradition, and film. In addition, social, political, economic, and legal influences on art will be discussed. Lectures, discussions, readings, and films will be utilized to accomplish this. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 136   Contemporary American Indian Cultures & Societies (3 Hours)

This course will introduce students to the contemporary lifeways and cultural and social practices of the Native peoples of the United States. The primary focus of this course will be the second half of the 20th century through the present. A wide range of topics and issues will be covered, including, but not limited to, current Indian-White relations, federal and international laws and policies, economic development, gender issues, health disparities, contemporary arts, and religious practices. Course objectives will be accomplished through lectures, discussions, readings, and video presentations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 142   World Prehistory (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the variety and continuity of the prehistoric human past. Through the archaeological record we will consider the evolution of humans, the transition of foraging to farming economies, the rise of complex societies, secondary state formation, and the collapse of complex societies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 142H   HON: World Prehistory* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 144   Archaeology (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and findings in archaeology. The historical origins of the discipline and modern approaches to understanding the past will be presented. The course will describe the range of archaeological evidence and techniques for locating, analyzing, and interpreting these remains. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 144H   HON: Archaeology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 146   Archaeology of Ancient North America (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the indigenous peoples and cultures of ancient North America. Drawing upon archaeological and anthropological perspectives, we will survey the culturally diverse and environmentally complex continent from the first Ice Age peoples through the earliest interactions with Europeans. Key theoretical issues considered in this course include human-environmental interaction, the emergence of complexity, warfare, ritual and religion, trade, and identity. Finally, we will explore how new archaeological evidence and contemporary approaches have changed our perspectives on the peoples and lifeways of ancient North America and impacted our ethical responsibilities to their descendants. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 146H   HON: Archaeology of Ancient North America* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 150   People and Cultures of Mesoamerica (3 Hours)

This course is a survey of Mesoamerican cultural beliefs, traditions, and practices from the prehistoric era to the present day. Through the archaeological, historical, and ethnographic record we will adopt an anthropological perspective on the global, national, regional, and local forces on everyday life in Mesoamerica. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

ANTH 150H   HON: Peoples and Cultures of Mesoamerica* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors Department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ANTH 153   The Anthropology of the Paranormal & Supernatural (3 Hours)

This introductory course will employ various Western and non-Western perspectives, including scientific and popular culture theories, to critically and comparatively examine a wide array of phenomena classified as paranormal or supernatural. Topics to be covered include extra-sensory perception, witchcraft and magic, ghosts, extra-terrestrial beings, and cryptozoological organisms. Lectures, discussions, readings, and films will be used to accomplish the aforementioned, as well as optional trips to local locations associated with the paranormal and supernatural. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 160   Medical Anthropology (3 Hours)

This course will introduce students to an understanding of human health and disease that includes both culture and biology. Western and non-Western cultures will be considered. This course will consider topics such as medical beliefs and curing practices, disease and nutrition, the connection between inequality and health disparities, and how to apply medical anthropological concepts to real-world problems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 165   Linguistic Anthropology (3 Hours)  

This course is an introduction to the interaction between language and culture. We will explore the various ways humans communicate and analyze how these modes of communication reflect social and cultural identities. Students will also look at how linguistic anthropologists use methods in the field to analyze language use. At the conclusion of this course, students will see how race, ethnicity, gender and other cultural identities are expressed through language. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ANTH 205   Archaeological Field Methods (5 Hours)

This course is a practicum of archaeological field methods and techniques. The fundamental principles of archaeological research will be considered. Students will create and implement their own research design in the context of on-going investigations. Emphasis will be placed on practicing the essential skills needed to conduct archaeological research. 160 integrated lecture lab hrs./semester.

ANTH 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ANTH 292   Special Topics: (1-3 Hour)

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Anthropology, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Department of Anthropology curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Anthropology for credit but only on different topics.

ANTH 125

  • Title: Cultural Anthropology
  • Number: ANTH 125
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This introductory course will employ various anthropological theories, perspectives and methodologies to critically and comparatively examine an array of cultural and social topics as they relate to selected Western and non-Western cultures and societies. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Trace the development of anthropology and its relationship to other social sciences.
  2. Describe the connection between cultural anthropology and the other subfields of anthropology - physical anthropology, archeology, linguistic anthropology and medical anthropology.
  3. Identify and analyze numerous anthropological theories and perspectives.
  4. Identify and apply established anthropological research methods.
  5. Analyze environmental factors which influence the development of various subsistence patterns and associated technologies.
  6. Discuss the roles power and social inequality play in cultures and societies.
  7. Investigate the major forms of kinship and family organization found throughout the world.
  8. Discuss selected Western and non-Western religious and worldview traditions.
  9. Compare and contrast major political and economic institutions.
  10. Describe aesthetic traditions, including visual arts, music and dance, from around the world.
  11. Investigate and describe the connection between language and culture.

12.  Describe and evaluate the effects of globalization on world cultures.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Anthropology

A. Identify and discuss the subfields of anthropology.

1. Cultural anthropology

2. Archaeology

3. Biological anthropology

4. Linguistic anthropology

5. Medical anthropology

B. Identify and comprehend the core concepts of cultural anthropology.

1. Culture

2. Ethnocentrism

3. Cultural relativism

4. Holism

5. Ethnology

6. Ethnography

II. Principal Anthropological Theories and Frameworks

A. List and describe 19th century theories.

1. Marxism

2. Unilinear evolution

B. List and describe 20th and 21st century theories.

1. Historical particularism

2. Materialism

3. Structuralism

4. Functionalism

5. Interpretive frameworks

6. Post-Modernism

7. Critical frameworks

8. Explanatory models

9. Social capital

C. Discuss how different anthropological perspectives model cultural change and continuity.

III. Basic Anthropological Methodologies

A. Discuss components of fieldwork.

1. Observation

a. Participant observation

b. Critical observation

c. Direct observation

2. Culture shock

3. Ethics

4. Safety

B. Identify and utilize basic qualitative research methodologies.

1. Interviews

a. Unstructured

b. Structured

2. Focus Groups

3. Surveys

C. Identify and utilize quantitative research methodologies.

1. Surveys

2. Pile sorts

3. Triads

IV. Anthropological Modes

A. Diagram and utilize an ecological base model.

B. Diagram and utilize a model of sociocultural change.

V. Economic Systems

A. Compare and contrast forms of economic production.

1. Hunting and gathering

2. Pastoralism

3. Intensive agriculture

4. Extensive agriculture

5. Industrialism

B. Compare and contrast systems of exchange.

1. Reciprocity

2. Redistribution

3. Market

VI. Forms of Social Organization

A. Identify sociocultural systems.

1. Bands

2. Tribes

3. Chiefdoms

4. States

B. Identify and comprehend models of the evolution of the state.

VII. Power and Social Inequality

A. Compare and contrast race and ethnicity.

B. Compare and contrast sex and gender.

C. Describe colonialism.

VIII. Forms of Kinship, Descent and Marriage

A. Compare and contrast various types of family.

1. Matrilocal/patrilocal

2. Nuclear

3. Polygamous

a. Polygynous

b. Polyandrous

4. Extended

a. Matrilocal

b. Patrilocal

c. Bilocal

d. Avunculocal

B. Compare and contrast patterns of descent.

1. Unilateral

a. Matrilineal

b. Patrilineal

2. Bilateral

3. Consanguineal

4. Affinal

5. Lineage

6. Clan

C. Compare and contrast types of marriage.

1. Endogamous

2. Exogamous

3. Levirate

4. Sororate

IX. Social Control

A. Examine informal forms of social control.

1. Gossip

2. Ridicule

3. Witchcraft accusations

B. Investigate formal forms of social control.

1. Law

2. Policy

X. Religion and Worldview

A. Compare and contrast religious taxonomies.

1. Monotheism

2. Polytheism

3. Animism

4. Mana

B. Discuss the functions of religion.

1. Explanation

2. Validation

3. Integration

C. Discuss the concept of worldview.

XI. Aesthetics

A. Investigate various forms of visual arts.

B. Explore different types of music.

C. Examine various dances.

XII. Language and Culture

A. Identify the cultural specificity of selected verbal forms of communication.

B. Identify the cultural specificity of selected nonverbal forms of communication.

C. Discuss examples of how culture is learned, shared, and transmitted through symbolic systems including language.

XIII. Globalization

A. Describe the historical colonial and imperial context for globalization.

B. Identify and discuss key concepts in globalization, such as:

1. Acculturation

2. Modernization

3. Transnational immigration

4. Cultural Pluralism

5. Multiculturalism

6. Nongovernmental organizations

C. Explain how globalization can lead to inequalities and structural violence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations covering course content are required. Examinations of course content will make up at least 40% of the final grade. At the instructor's discretion, students may be required to complete in-class assignments, quizzes, presentations, experiential learning, an in-depth research project or other assessment of competencies. Additional materials will not count for more than 60% of the final grade.

40-100%    Examinations
0-60%        Additional methods

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 125H

  • Title: HON: Cultural Anthropology*
  • Number: ANTH 125H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 126

  • Title: Physical Anthropology
  • Number: ANTH 126
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to selected concepts and principles important to an understanding of evolutionary forces and their influence on the physiology and behavior of humans. The importance of the scientific method will be explored. Awareness of humans and their place in nature will be achieved by examining basic genetics, micro- and macroevolution, primate ecology and behavior, the paleoanthropological evidence for human evolution, and modern human adaptation and variation. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the scientific method in the analysis of problems.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of evolutionary theory in terms of molecular genetics, inheritance, microevolution and macroevolution.
  3. Identify the patterns of physiological and behavioral adaptation for the major classes of primates.
  4. Trace the evolution of fossil hominids using paleosteological, archaeological, and genetic evidence.
  5. Identify the effects of biocultural evolution on modern human adaptation and variation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Physical Anthropology
   A. Compare/contrast physical anthropology to other fields in
anthropology
      1. Socio-cultural anthropology
      2. Archaeology
      3. Linguistics
      4. Applied
   B. Define science
      1. Discuss hypothesis testing
      2. Compare/contrast dynamism of science with staticism of dogma
   C. Explore the development of the evolutionary theory
      1. Review the steps leading from Aristotle’s static Great Chain of
Being to Darwin’s dynamic process of natural selection 
      2. Discuss in detail the process of natural selection 
         a. Differential mortality and fertility
         b. Variety, the spice of life

II. Human biology and adaptation
   A. Examine biological basics
      1. Define chromosomes
      2. Detail differences between mitosis and meiosis
      3. Discuss DNA and explore the role it plays in cell division and
protein synthesis
   B. Review the development of Mendelian (monogenic) genetics
      1. Particulate inheritance
      2. Segregation
      3. Independent assortment
      4. Dominant/recessive traits
   C. Explore problems
      1. Meiotic: Chromosomal abnormalities
      2. Genetic: X-linked traits
   D. Analyze polymorphic blood systems and their anthropological value
      1. The ABO system
      2. The Rhesus system
      3. Use Punnett squares to explore inheritance patterns
   E. Examine the forces of evolution
      1. Define:
         a. Mutation
         b. Gene flow
         c. Genetic drift
         d. Natural selection
      2. Investigate the impact of the various forces on a hypothetical
population
   F. Compare/contrast polygenic and monogenic traits
      1. Detail role of polygenic traits in phenotypic adaptation
      2  List phenotypic traits displaying continuous variation (polygenic
traits)
         a. Hair color
         b. Body mass
         c. Intelligence
   G. Review the role that the development of agriculture had in the
spread of infectious disease
      1. Discuss paleopathology and the evidence of health in past
populations
      2. Explore the interaction of biology and culture in:
         a. Malaria
         b. Hookworm
         c. Syphilis
   H. Examine the polygenic nature of human physical diversity
      1. Recognize that simple classification schemes do not work for
humans
      2. Detail the interaction of UVB radiation and degree of latitude
with variation in pigmentation
         a. Melanoma
         b. Rickets
      3. Explore the development of the “race” concept and its lack of
biological validity
      4. Examine the impact of racism on the study of IQ

III. Primates
   A. View examples of the different types of primates
      1. Prosimians
      2. Monkeys
         a. The Americas
         b. Africa/Eurasia
      3. Apes/Humans
   B. Detail the characteristics that define and differentiate primates
from other mammals
      1. Generalized dentition and skeleton
      2. Elaborated visual apparatus and decreased sense of smell
      3. Elaborated brain
      4. Tendency toward orthograde posture
      5. Increased maternal investment in offspring
   C. Define the traits that differentiate the various primate groups from
each other
   D. Using casts of primate skulls and jaws
      1. Examine differences in dentition and orbits
      2. Compare members of same group by similar features
      3. Contrast members of differing groups by dissimilar features
      4. Obtain an understanding of the relative size differences between
the various primates
      5. Determine how to differentiate males from females
   E. Explore primate behavior
      1. Examine the impact of lack of appropriate mothering models on the
mothering behavior of captive vs. wild primates
      2. Detail the various types of tool use and other learned behaviors
among chimps
      3. Investigate the results of habitat destruction and poaching on
primates
      4. Analyze the language studies among the apes
      5. Compare/contrast chimpanzee behavior with human behavior

IV. Paleoanthropology
   A. Detail the development of the primate order during the last 65
million years
      1. Discuss major primate finds of each epoch
      2. Examine casts of fossil primate skulls
   B. Explore methods of evaluating fossil material
      1. Dating methods
      2. Taphonomy
      3. Intermembral index
      4. Comparative skeletal analysis with living populations
   C. Examine evidence of Mid-Pleistocene hominids
      1. Detail mosaic evolution of skull, dental and skeletal features
      2. Explore movement of hominids from Africa into Eurasia
      3. Discuss in detail Neanderthals and their place in our ancestry
         a. Morphological similarities
         b. Behavioral similarities
         c. Sites showing transition from more robust body/face
(“Neanderthal”) to more gracile body/face (“modern”)

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Four Examinations      50% of grade
   In Class Activities    25% of grade
   Research Project       25% of grade
                         100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 126H

  • Title: HON: Physical Anthropology*
  • Number: ANTH 126H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 130

  • Title: World Cultures
  • Number: ANTH 130
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This introductory course will utilize an ethnographic approach to introduce students to various cultural and social practices of Westernized and non-Westernized cultures and societies from around the world. This course will examine a wide range of topics including economic production, religion, world view, kinship patterns and political and economic institutions. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Thoroughly explain what anthropology is and how it relates to other academic disciplines;
  2. Recognize how ethnography and ethnology, branches of cultural anthropology, contribute to a greater understanding of the world’s cultures and societies;
  3. Explain research methods commonly used by ethnographers and ethnologists, including fieldwork and qualitative data collection techniques, and discuss how these methods contribute to a greater understanding of cultures and societies;
  4. Identify common anthropological theories and frameworks;
  5. Make use of some of the various taxonomies and classification systems employed by ethnographers and ethnologists to classify cultures and societies;
  6. Explain the role various social institutions, such as religion, politics, and art, play in cultures and societies all around the world.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Identify and differentiate the sub-fields of anthropology 
      1. Cultural anthropology
         a. Ethnography
         b. Ethnology
      2. Archaeology
      3. Biological anthropology
      4. Linguistic anthropology
      5. Medical anthropology
   B. Define the core concepts of anthropology 
      1. Ethnocentrism
      2. Cultural relativism
      3. Holistic perspective
   
II. Ethnographic Research Methodologies
   A. Describe fieldwork and its components
      1. Direct observation 
      2. Critical observation
      3. Participant observation
      4. Culture shock
      5. Ethical dilemmas
      6. Safety concerns
   B. Describe Basic Qualitative Research Methodologies
      1. Research design
      2. Literature reviews
      3. Unstructured interviews
      4. Structured interviews
      5. Focus groups
      6. Surveys 

III. Anthropological Theories and Frameworks
   A. List the fundamental components of common anthropological theories
and frameworks
   B. Compare and contrast common anthropological theories and frameworks

IV. Economic Production 
   A. Recognize a hunting and gathering culture/society
   B. Recognize a pastoral culture/society
   C. Recognize an intensive agricultural culture/society
   D. Recognize an extensive agricultural culture/society
   E. Recognize an industrial society

V. Cultural and Social Characteristics 
   A. Identify and describe the various cultural and social
characteristics of selected hunting and gathering, pastoral, intensive
agricultural, extensive agricultural, and industrial cultures and
societies
        1. Religion
        2. World view
        3. Kinship
        4. Subsistence
        5. Social organization
        6. Political organization
        7. Systems of exchange
        8. Aesthetics
        9. Social inequality
        10. Social control

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Class Participation     - 15%
Mid-term                - 20%
Final                   - 20%
Paper                   - 15%
Presentation            - 30%
                Total  - 100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 130H

No information found.

ANTH 134

  • Title: Native Americans
  • Number: ANTH 134
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This ethnographic course will introduce students to the indigenous peoples and First Nations of North, Central and South America, with particular attention being paid to North America. This course will focus on selected First Nations cultures and societies to examine a wide range of topics including arts, oral traditions, religions, and Indian-White relations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss both scientific and traditional Native theories concerning the origins of the First Nations in the Western Hemisphere.
  2. Summarize the role the natural environment has played in the development of indigenous cultures in the Americas.
  3. Compare and contrast major cultural, social, and linguistic characteristics of the First Nations of the Americas.
  4. Analyze the religious traditions and world views of a number of selected First Nations.
  5. Discuss the artistic traditions, including visual arts, music, dance, and oral traditions, of selected First Nations.
  6. Describe the phases and types of contact between First Nations and Euro-Americans.
  7. Discuss the major trends in U.S. Federal Indian policy from the Revolutionary War to the present.
  8. Discuss the dynamics of contemporary American Indian life.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to American Indians  
   A. Explain the differences between the terms “Native American” and
“American Indian”
   B. Discuss the historical and legal uses of the terms “Tribe” and
“Nation”
   C. Identify current American Indian demographic statistics

II. North American Indian Culture Areas
   A. Identify and describe the characteristics of North American Indian
Culture Areas
      1. The Northeast Culture Area
      2. The Southeast Culture Area
      3. The Plains Culture Area
      4. The Southwest Culture Area
      5. The Great Basin Culture Area
      6. The Plateau Culture
      7. The California Culture Area
      8. The Northwest Coast Culture Area
      9. The Sub-Arctic Culture Area
      10. The Arctic Culture Area

III. Indian Origins
   A. Identify and discuss Euro-American perspectives
      1. Bering Strait Theory
      2. Creationism
   B. Identify and explain Native perspectives
      1. Turtle Island
      2. Emergences

IV. Pre-Contact and Early Contact Indian Cultures and Societies
   A. Discuss Paleo-Indians
   B. Discuss the Hisatsinom (Anasazi) 
   C. Discuss Mississippian Mound Builders
   D. Discuss the Mayans

V. Indians and Missionaries 
   A. Document and explain the historical relationships between Spanish
missionaries and American Indians in the Southwest
   B. Document and explain the historical relationships between French
missionaries and American Indians in the Northeast
   C. Document and explain the historical relationships between English
missionaries and American Indians in the Northeast and Southeast

VI. Indian Religions and World Views
   A. Summarize the basic tenets of Navajo religion and world view
   B. Summarize the basic tenets of Western Apache religion and world
view
   C. Summarize the basic tenets of Lakota religion and world view
   D. Summarize the basic tenets of the Native American Church

VII. 18th Century Federal U.S. Indian Policies
   A. Trace and discuss the U.S. Constitution 
   B. Trace and discuss the Trade and Intercourse Act

VIII. 19th Century Federal U.S. Indian Policies 
   A. Trace and discuss the Marshall Trilogy
   B. Trace and discuss the Courts of Indian Offences
   C. Trace and discuss the Dawes Act
   D. Trace and discuss Indian boarding schools

IX. 20th Century Federal U.S. Indian Policies
   A. Trace and discuss the Citizenship Act
   B. Trace and discuss Indian New Deal 
   C. Trace and discuss Termination
   D. Trace and discuss Relocation

X. Red Power Movements
   A. Identify and discuss the National Indian Youth Council
   B. Identify and discuss the National Congress of American Indians
   C. Identify and discuss the American Indian Movement

XI. American Indian Artistic Traditions
   A. Identify and discuss various visual arts
   B. Identify and discuss various styles of music
   C. Identify and discuss various styles of dance
   D. Identify and discuss various styles of story-telling

XII. Contemporary American Indian Identity 
   A. Trace and analyze American Indian stereotypes
   B. Analyze the relationship between American Indians and
Anthropologists
   C. Analyze the relationship between American Indians and
Environmentalists

XIII. Contemporary American Indian Economic Development
   A. Trace the development of Indian tourism   
   B. Analyze Indian gaming 

XIV. Contemporary American Indian Health Issues
   A. Discuss diabetes
   B. Discuss substance abuse
   C. Discuss domestic violence
   D. Discuss obesity

XV. American Indian Languages and Communication
   A. Explore and discuss verbal forms of communication
   B. Explore and discuss non-verbal forms of communication

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15% - Class Participation                  
20% - Exam #1                           
20% - Exam #2                           
20% - Exam #3                           
25% - Presentation
100% - Total

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 134H

No information found.

ANTH 135

  • Title: American Indian Artistic Tradition
  • Number: ANTH 135
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces students to many art forms of the various American Indian nations of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Mediums to be explored include traditional and contemporary visual art, traditional and contemporary music and dance, oral tradition, and film. In addition, social, political, economic, and legal influences on art will be discussed. Lectures, discussions, readings, and films will be utilized to accomplish this. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe various forms of traditional and contemporary American Indian visual arts.
  2. Identify and describe numerous traditional and contemporary genres of American Indian music.
  3. Identify and describe several American Indian dance styles.
  4. Identify and describe various forms of American Indian oral traditions.
  5. Identify and analyze the connection between traditional American Indian storytelling and contemporary American Indian film making.
  6. Trace and describe historical and contemporary social, political, economic, and legal trends that have affected American Indian artisans and their art.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to American Indians  
   A. Explain the differences between the terms “Native American” and
“American Indian”
    B. Describe the historical and legal uses of the terms “Tribe” and
“Nation”
    C. Identify current American Indian demographic statistics

II. Historical Factors on American Indian Arts 
   A. Describe the effect the following European and American groups have
had on American Indian artistic traditions
      1. Explorers
      2. Fur Trappers and Traders
      3. Missionaries
      4. Tourists
   B. Describe the effect the following American institutions have had on
American Indian artistic traditions
      1. Reservations
      2. Boarding Schools

III. American Indian Visual Arts
   A. Analyze briefly the history and cultures of the ten American Indian
culture areas
      1. Northeast
      2. Southeast
      3. Plains
      4. Southwest
      5. Great Basin
      6. Plateau
      7. California
      8. Northwest Coast
      9. Sub-Arctic
     10. Arctic
   B. Identify and describe selected visual artistic traditions from the
ten American Indian culture areas 
      1. Northeast
         a. Basketry
         b. Masks
         c. Bags
      2. Southeast
         a. Baskets
         b. Masks
         c. Patchwork
      3. Plains
         a. Quillwork
         b. Beadwork
         c. Hide Paintings
      4. Southwest
         a. Pottery
         b. Basketry
         c. Textiles
      5. Great Basin, Plateau, and California
         a. Basketry
         b. Beadwork
         c. Leatherwork
      6. Northwest Coast
         a. Wood Carvings
         b. Masks
         c. Blankets
      7. Sub-Arctic and Arctic
         a. Beadwork
         b. Embroidery
         c. Soapstone Carvings 

IV. Contemporary American Indian Visual Arts
   A. Identify and describe Contemporary American Indian painting
   B. Identify and describe Contemporary American Indian sculpture
   C. Identify and describe Contemporary American Indian mixed media
   D. Identify and describe Contemporary American Indian installations
   E. Identify and describe Contemporary American Indian performance art

V. American Indian Music
   A. Identify and analyze traditional Indian music
      1. War Songs
      2. Ceremonial Songs
      3. Courting Songs
   B. Identify and analyze powwow music
      1. Northern Style
      2. Southern Style
   C. Identify and analyze Native American Church music
   D. Identify and analyze contemporary Indian music
      1. Folk
      2. Gospel
      3. Country
      4. Hip Hop
      5. Rock

VI. American Indian Dance 
   A. Identify and describe men’s styles
      1. Traditional
      2. Grass
      3. Fancy
      4. Smoke
      5. Gourd
   B. Identify and describe women’s styles
      1. Traditional
      2. Shawl
      3. Jingle
      4. Round
   C. Identify and describe children’s styles

VII. American Indian Oral Traditions and Film
   A. Describe ceremonial oral traditions
      1. Songs
      2. Prayers
   B. Discuss story telling
   C. Discuss poetry
   D.Analyze American Indian Film Making

VIII. Legal and Political Connections between American Indian Identity and
American Indian Art
   A. Explain the Indian Arts and Crafts Board
   B. Explain the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990

IX. American Indian Art and American Indian Economics
   A. Analyze role of trading posts
   B. Analyze role of pawn shops
   C. Analyze role of art galleries
   D. Analyze role of museums and cultural centers
   E. Analyze role of powwows 
   F. Analyze role of roadside stands
   G. Analyze role of art markets

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Research Project    35%
 Class Participation 25%
 Mid-Term Exam       20%
 Final Exam          20%
              Total 100%
Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%   
  B = 80 –  89% 
  C = 70 –  79% 
  D = 60 – 69%  
  F = 0 –  59%   

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 136

  • Title: Contemporary American Indian Cultures & Societies
  • Number: ANTH 136
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will introduce students to the contemporary lifeways and cultural and social practices of the Native peoples of the United States. The primary focus of this course will be the second half of the 20th century through the present. A wide range of topics and issues will be covered, including, but not limited to, current Indian-White relations, federal and international laws and policies, economic development, gender issues, health disparities, contemporary arts, and religious practices. Course objectives will be accomplished through lectures, discussions, readings, and video presentations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Define and distinguish the various contemporary cultural, social, and legal categories and designations of Native peoples in North America.
  2. Compare and contrast the historical identities of Native peoples and Indian Nations from their respective contemporary identities.
  3. Examine and critique the various cultural, social, and legal definitions and perspectives concerning tribal sovereignty and self-determination.
  4. Identify and discuss the various forms of modern-day economic development found among Indian Nations.
  5. Be conversant with the various issues surrounding sex, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Indian communities.
  6. Be conversant with the diverse religious belief systems found among Indian peoples today.
  7. Identify and discuss contemporary artistic traditions found among Indian peoples.
  8. Identify and examine the current health care systems and health disparities found in Indian communities.
  9. Identify and analyze the current educational and professional trends among Indian peoples.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to American Indian Studies

A. Define and discuss the various terms used to distinguish Native peoples of the United States, such as, but not limited to,  “Native American,” “American Indian,” First Nations Peoples,” etc.

B. Trace and critique the historical and contemporary cultural, social, and legal uses of terms such as, but not limited to, “Tribe,” “Nation,” Incorporation,” etc.

C. Identify and analyze current Native North American demographic statistics

II. Contemporary Native Identity

A. Identify and discuss cultural, social, and legal factors that influence contemporary Native identity at the individual-level, such as, but not limited to:

1. The Blood Quantum Concept

2. Certificate Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) Cards

3. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978

B. Identify and examine cultural, social, and legal factors that influence contemporary Native identity at the tribal-level, such as, but not limited to:

1. Tribal origins and histories

2. Tribal land-bases

3. Native languages

4. Tribal enrollment cards

C. Identify and examine cultural, social, and legal factors that influence contemporary Native identity at the national level, such as, but not limited to:

1. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)

2. Treaties, executive orders, and Supreme Court rulings

3. The Federal Acknowledgement Process of 1978

4. The Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1996

D. Identify and discuss cultural, social, and legal factors that influence contemporary Native identity in international arenas, such as, but not limited to:

1. The United Nations

a. The 2007 Declaration on Rights for Indigenous Peoples

III. Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination

A. Evaluate various definitions of “sovereignty” and “self-determination”

B. Identify and discuss historical issues that frame contemporary Native sovereignty, such as, but not limited to:

1. Terra Nullius

2. The “Right of Occupancy” Concept

3. The Marshall Trilogy

4. The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924

5. The Termination Era

6. The Red Power Movement  

7. The Indian Self-Determination and Education Act of 1975

IV. Economic Development

A. Trace and analyze the current causes and rates of poverty found in Indian Country

1. Reservations and Tribal Lands

2. Suburban and Urban Areas

B. Examine and discuss the development and establishment of Indian casinos and gaming

1. California v. the Cabezon Band of Indians (1987) Supreme Court case

2. Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988

3. National Indian Gaming Commission

4. Classes of Indian Gaming

5. Current Gaming Statistics

C. Examine and discuss natural resource extraction on Native land and the impacts on Indian peoples

1. Water

2. Coal

3. Oil

4. Uranium

D. Examine and discuss the pros and cons of tourism on Indian land

1. Cultural/heritage tourism

2. Eco-tourism

V. Gender and Sexuality

A. Examine contemporary male roles in Indian communities

B. Examine contemporary female roles in Indian communities

C. Define and discuss additional gender roles and movements found in Indian Country, such as, but not limited to, the Two-Spirit Movement, winkté, and nádleehí  

VI. Religion and Spirituality

A. Define and examine the concepts of “religion” and “spirituality” in present-day Indian communities

B. Discuss the Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 and Employment Division, Department of Human Resources of Oregon v. Smith (1990) Supreme Court case

C. Trace and examine the use of traditional substances and objects (e.g. tobacco, sage, etc.) in contemporary religious and spiritual settings

D. Trace and examine the commercialization of Indian religions and spirituality  

1. The New Age Movement

2. The appropriation and use of Native spiritual objects, by non-Natives, such as, but not limited to, eagle feathers, sweat lodges, etc.

a. The Migratory Bird Act

b. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act of 1962

E. Discuss contemporary religious and spirituality practices found in Indian communities

1. Indigenous traditions

2. Christian traditions

3. The Native American Church

4. Non-Western and Non-Indigenous traditions

VII. Art

A. Discuss contemporary visual art forms including, but not limited to, paintings, sculptures, jewelry, etc.

B. Discuss contemporary music and dance genres including, but not limited to, folk, hip-hop, rock, etc.

C. Examine the role of films and movies in contemporary Indian communities  

VIII. Health Care and Health Disparities

A. Examine and discuss access to health care in contemporary Indian Country

1. Indian Health Service (IHS)

2. Tribally-Operated 638 Programs

3. Veterans Affairs

4. Non-Native public and private health insurance plans and health care providers

B. Examine and discuss various Indian health disparities including, but not limited to:

1. Substance abuse

2. Cardiovascular health

3. Obesity

4. Diabetes

5. Sexually-transmitted diseases

6. Domestic violence

7. Suicide and homicide

C. Examine and discuss cultural, social, economic, and political factors that contribute to current Indian health disparities

IX. Education  

A. Analyze and discuss current Native educational/degree attainment rates (e.g. high school, college, graduate, and professional)

B. Examine and discuss Native peoples and educational institutions

1. Non-Native Colleges and Universities

2. Native-Focused Colleges and Universities

a. Tribal Colleges

b. Bureau of Indian Education Institutes of Higher Learning

C. Discuss Native Education Associations, such as, but not limited to, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, the American Indian College Fund, etc.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using a combination of the possible following methods:

Class Participation                             10% -15%

Exams                                               20% -50%

In-Class Projects                               20% 25%

Research Paper/Project                     20% -50%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 142

  • Title: World Prehistory
  • Number: ANTH 142
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the variety and continuity of the prehistoric human past. Through the archaeological record we will consider the evolution of humans, the transition of foraging to farming economies, the rise of complex societies, secondary state formation, and the collapse of complex societies. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the historical origins of Archaeology as a discipline and outline common techniques for understanding the prehistoric past through material remains.
  2. Compare current theories on the origins of modern humans and their ancestors by considering the archaeological, physical, and genetic lines of evidence.
  3. Explain the variety of human adaptation to the climatic and ecological conditions of the early Holocene.
  4. Compare theories on the rise and spread of food production by considering archaeological evidence from around the world.
  5. Explain the variety of prehistoric complex cultural organizations.
  6. Compare theories on the rise of complex cultures by considering archaeological evidence from around the world.
  7. Demonstrate the relevance of archaeological interpretation on contemporary local and global conditions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Discipline of Archaeology
   A. The Study of the Human Past
      1. Define the field of archaeology and discuss how it can aid in
understanding the human past. 
      2. Trace the historical origins and development of archaeology. 
      3. Explain the significance of radiocarbon dating and the impact in
archaeology.
      4. Distinguish the goals and methods of contemporary schools of
archaeology. 

II. Human Origins
   A. African Origins
      1. List the names and sequence of species ancestral to humans
(hominins), who lived in Africa between 6 million and 2 million years ago.

      2. Compare and contrast the physical and behavioral characteristics
of hominin species.  
      3. Explain hominin development from an evolutionary perspective.
      4. Discuss the evidence for tool use and its significance to human
evolution. 
   B. Hominin Dispersals in the Old World
      1. List the names and sequence of species in the genus Homo.
      2. Compare and contrast the physical and behavioral characteristics
of species in the genus Homo.
      3. Explain the development of the genus Homo from an evolutionary
perspective. 
      4. Discuss the evidence for hominin migrations out of Africa.
      5. Be conversant with key finds and current debates related to the
genus Homo. 
   C. Rise of Modern Humans
      1. Compare and contrast the physical and behavioral characteristics
of archaic and modern humans.
      2. Discuss the origin and spread of anatomically modern humans.
      3. Evaluate models for the origins of modern humans.
      4. Describe the role of DNA research in Middle and Upper Paleolithic
studies.

III. Early Holocene Human Adaptation
   A. Concepts and Theories on the Domestication of Plants and Animals
      1. List the timing and characteristics of the Pleistocene and
Holocene. 
      2. Examine human responses to environmental change.
      3. Explain the processes that lead to recognizably domesticated
forms of species.
      4. Evaluate theories for the origins of sedentism, agriculture,
social complexity and state formation.
      5. Assess the consequences of agriculture as an adaptive strategy.
   B. Early Holocene: Africa
      1. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
Africa, and their effect on local social developments.
      2. Describe the cultural adaptations of Holocene hunter-gatherers in
Africa.
      3. Characterize the Neolithic transition in the various regions of
Africa: the Nile Valley, the Sahara, Central, and Southern Africa.
   C. Early Holocene: Southwest Asia
      1. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
Africa, and their effect on local social developments.
      2. Describe the Natufian culture. 
      3. Characterize the Neolithic transition in Southwest Asia. 
   D. Early Holocene: East Asia
      1. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
East Asia, and their effect on local social developments.
      2. Describe the cultural adaptation of Holocene hunter-gatherers in
East Asia. 
      3. Characterize the Neolithic transition in East Asia. 
      4. Discuss how Neolithic rice farmers migrated from the Yangzi
valley to other parts of East Asia.
   E. Early Holocene: Australia and the Austronesians
      1. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
Australia and the Pacific Islands, and their effect on local social
developments.
      2. Discuss the colonization and early occupation of Australia.
      3. Characterize the Neolithic transition in Australia and the
Pacific Islands. 
      4. Explain the Austronesian dispersal, as a language family and
material culture system.
   F. Early Holocene: Europe
      1. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
Europe, and their effect on local social developments.
      2. Describe the cultural adaptation of Holocene hunter-gatherers in
Europe.
      3. Characterize the Neolithic transition in Europe and subsequent
Bronze Age.
   G. Early Holocene: Americas
      1. Evaluate different models for the peopling of the Americas
through archaeological, physical, and genetic evidence. 
      2. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of
the Americas, and their effect on local social developments.
      3. Describe the cultural adaptation of Archaic hunter-gatherers in
the Americas.
      4. Characterize the transition to food production in the Americas.

IV. Rise of Civilizations
   A. Concepts and Theories on the Rise of Complex Societies
      1. Review various theories on the origins of state level societies.
      2. Define key terms and concepts crucial to an understanding of
state development.
      3. Evaluate the explanations for state development through various
lines of evidence. 
   B. Rise of Civilization: Southwest Asia
      1. Identify the environment, climate, and topography found in
Southwest Asia, and the impact of these conditions on the development of
complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric Southwest Asia.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in
Southwest Asia.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient Southwest Asian civilization. 
   C. Rise of Civilizations: Africa
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography
found in Africa, and the impact of these conditions on the development of
complex societies. 
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric Africa.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in Africa.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient African civilization.
   D. Rise of Civilization: Mediterranean System
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography
found in the Mediterranean region and the impact of these conditions on
the development of complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in the prehistoric Mediterranean
region. 
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies throughout
the Mediterranean.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to the
ancient Mediterranean civilizations.
   E. Rise of Civilization: South Asia
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography
found in South Asia and the impact of these conditions on the development
of complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric South Asia. 
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in South
Asia.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient South Asia. 
   F. Rise of Civilizations: East and Southeast Asia
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography
found in East, Central and Southeast Asia, and the impact of these
conditions on the development of complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric East and Southeast
Asia.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in East and
Southeast Asia. 
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient East and Southeast Asia.
   G. Rise of Civilization: Mesoamerica
      1. Identify the environment, climate, and topography of Mesoamerica,
and the impact of these conditions on the development of complex
societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric Mesoamerica.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in
Mesoamerica.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient Mesoamerica. 
   H. Rise of Civilization: South America
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography of
South America, and the impact of these conditions on the development of
complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric South America.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in South
America.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient South America.
   I. Complex   Societies of North America
      1. Identify the variety of environments, climates, and topography of
North America, and the impact of these conditions on the development of
middle-range and complex societies.
      2. Describe the cultural periods in prehistoric North America.
      3. Explain the transition of simple to complex societies in North
America.
      4. Be conversant with key sites, finds, and concepts related to
ancient North America.

V. Understanding Prehistory
   A. Relevance of the past
      1. Examine the ways in which knowledge of the past can give insight
into current problems.
      2. Describe the long and short-term consequences of human responses
to social, ecological, and climate change.
      3. Characterize the ways in which archaeology can contribute to an
understanding of the past and present.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations covering course content are required.
Examinations of course content will make up at least 60% of the final
grade. At the instructor’s discretion, students may be required to
complete in-class assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, experiential
learning, or an in-depth research project. Additional material will not
count for more that 40% of the final grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 142H

No information found.

ANTH 144

  • Title: Archaeology
  • Number: ANTH 144
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and findings in archaeology. The historical origins of the discipline and modern approaches to understanding the past will be presented. The course will describe the range of archaeological evidence and techniques for locating, analyzing, and interpreting these remains. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the goals, techniques, and constraints of archaeological inquiry into the human past.
  2. Trace the historical origins of the discipline through contemporary approaches to understanding the past.
  3. Identify different lines of archaeological evidence.
  4. Evaluate the best techniques for using archaeological evidence to comprehend the past.
  5. Use archaeological evidence and techniques to assess the range and meaning of human diversity in the past.
  6. Describe general patterns of human adaptation in the past and examine the relevance of past human strategies to present human conditions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Archaeology
   A. The Framework of Archaeology
      1. Explain the context of Archaeology as one of the four fields of
Anthropology.
      2. Compare and contrast Archaeology with other social sciences and
natural sciences.  
      3. Describe the principal research topics and archaeological
approaches.
      4. Discuss how the use of different approaches will influence
interpretation of the past. 
   B. History of Archaeology 
      1. Describe the early attempts to know the past. 
      2. Evaluate the role of the European Renaissance on the rise of
Archaeology.  
      3. Discuss the impact of evolutionary thinking on the development of
modern archaeology.
      4. Review the historical and cultural factors that led to
development of European and American Prehistory.
      5. Outline the key concepts, goals, and methods of 20th century
archaeological movements. 
      6. Explain the significance of radiocarbon dating and its impact in
archaeology. 
      7. Assess the current state of archaeological theory and practice. 
      8. Evaluate the ethical, moral, and practical responsibilities that
archaeologists     have to the public
   C. Archaeological Evidence 
      1. Define the categories of archaeological evidence:
         a. artifact
         b. ecofact
         c. feature
         d. site
      2. Determine the context of a find through analysis of matrix,
provenience, and association with other finds. 
      3. Compare and contrast primary and secondary contexts. 
      4. Explain how the archaeological record is formed, altered, and
preserved. 
   D. Survey and Excavation of Sites and Features
      1. Explain how archaeological research is designed to answer
specific questions. 
      2. List the range of evidence within the landscape.
      3. Describe how sites and features are located, documented, and
studied.
      4. Discuss the implication of various sampling strategies.  
      5. Explain the purpose and key concepts in excavation.
      6. List different forms of documentation. 
      7. Explain how artifacts are processed and classified. 
      8. Discuss how inferences of past behaviors are drawn from
archaeological evidence. 
   E. Dating Methods and Chronology
      1. Compare and contrast relative dating and absolute dating.
      2. List common dating conventions.
      3. Define stratigraphy and discuss its significance to dating. 
      4. Be conversant with key relative dating techniques. 
      5. Be conversant with key absolute dating techniques. 
      6. Discuss the principle of radioactive decay and its implications
for archaeological dating.  
      7. Consider the accomplishments and limitations of these dating
techniques for our understanding of the past. 

II. Reconstructing the Past
   A. Social Organization and Social Archaeology
      1. Describe the key characteristics and archaeological correlates
of:
         a. Mobile hunter-gatherer society
         b. Segmentary society
         c. Cheifdom or Middle-range society
         d. State 
      2. Explain how archaeologists establish the nature and scale of
society.
      3. Compare and contrast the usefulness of certain techniques and
approaches for the study of different social organizations and individual
identities. 
   B. Reconstructing the Past Environment
      1. Describe the different techniques for reconstructing global
climate and environmental change.
      2. Explain the significance of the plant environment in terms of
reconstructing the past environment and past subsistence strategies.
      3. List the commonly studied plant remains and explain how they are
analyzed.
      4. Explain the significance of the animal environment in terms of
reconstructing the past environment and past subsistence strategies. 
      5. List the commonly studied animal remains and explain how they are
analyzed.
      6. Explain how archaeologists reconstruct patterns of human
adaptation to the environment.
   C. Subsistence and Diet
      1. Discuss the possibilities and limitations for identifying diet in
the past.
      2. List the common lines of evidence used to reconstruct meals and
diet; explain how they are analyzed.
      3. Explain the significant of domesticated plants and animals and
list various techniques for identifying domesticated species.
   D. Technology
      1. Discuss the possibilities and limitations of understanding past
technology.   
      2. List the categories of tool materials and explain how they are
analyzed. 
      3. Discuss the significance of pyrotechnology and metallurgy to our
understanding of the human past
   E. Trade and Exchange
      1. Compare and contrast social interactions with the exchange of
material goods.
      2. Discuss the key techniques and implications for determining the
source of traded goods. 
      3. Describe commonly cited exchange systems and explain how
archaeologists reconstruct these systems. 
      4. Explain the techniques used to study production and discuss how
production is related to exchange and consumption.
      5. Explain the techniques used to study consumption and discuss how
consumption is related to exchange and production.
      6. Discuss the possibilities and limitations of analyzing exchange
and interaction as a complete system.
      7. Assess the impact of trade and exchange on cultural change.
   F. Cognitive Archaeology, Art, and Religion
      1. Define the theoretical perspective and methods of Cognitive
Archaeology.
      2. Explain the origin and function of symbolic thought and behavior
in humans.
      3. Describe how archaeologists analyze past symbols and reconstruct
their various meanings.
   G. Archaeology of People
      1. List common human physical attributes and abilities; explain how
they are assessed.
      2. Discuss the possibilities and limitations of identifying
nutrition, disease, deformity, and cause of death in the past.
      3. Describe the use of genetic analysis to assess ancestry.  
      4. Compare and contrast the concepts of genetic identity and
cultural identity. 
 
III. Explanation in Archaeology 
   A. Migrationist and Diffusionist Explanations
      1. Explain the historical context of Migrationist and Diffusionist
explanations.
      2. Describe the theoretical perspective, approaches, and key
concepts used in Migrationist and Diffusionist explanations.
      3. Critique Migrationist and Diffusionist explanations of past
cultural change.
   B. Processual Approach
      1. Explain the historical context of Processual Archaeology.
      2. Describe the theoretical perspective, approaches, and key
concepts used in Processual explanations.
      3. Critique Processual explanations of past cultural change. 
   C. Postprocessual or Interpretive Explanations
      1. Explain the historical context of Postprocessual or Interpretive
explanations.
      2. Describe the theoretical perspective, approaches, and key
concepts used in Postprocessual or Interpretive explanations.
      3. Critique Postprocessual or Interpretive explanations of past
cultural change.
   D. Cognitive-Processual Archaeology
      1. Identify the points of difference between Cognitive-processual
archaeology and earlier functional-processual approaches.
      2. Describe the theoretical perspective, approaches, and key
concepts used in Cognitive-Processual approaches.
      3. Critique Cognitive-Processual explanations of past cultural
change.
   E. Agency, Materiality, and Engagement
      1. Define the current concepts in archaeological explanation.
      2. Discuss the possibilities and limitations of new approaches for
explaining cultural change.
      3. Evaluate the direction of future approaches to explaining the
past.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations covering course content are required.
Examinations of course content will make up at least 50% of the final
grade. At the instructor’s discretion, students may be required to
complete in-class assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, experiential
learning, or an in-depth research project. Additional material will not
count for more that 50% of the final grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 144H

No information found.

ANTH 146

  • Title: Archaeology of Ancient North America
  • Number: ANTH 146
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the indigenous peoples and cultures of ancient North America. Drawing upon archaeological and anthropological perspectives, we will survey the culturally diverse and environmentally complex continent from the first Ice Age peoples through the earliest interactions with Europeans. Key theoretical issues considered in this course include human-environmental interaction, the emergence of complexity, warfare, ritual and religion, trade, and identity. Finally, we will explore how new archaeological evidence and contemporary approaches have changed our perspectives on the peoples and lifeways of ancient North America and impacted our ethical responsibilities to their descendants. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the historical development of American Archaeology.
  2. Outline the common techniques for understanding the prehistoric American past through material remains.
  3. Identify the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of North America.
  4. Trace the key cultural developments of ancient North America across time and space.
  5. Critically consider the prominent issues of historical and contemporary concern regarding the indigenous peoples and cultures of North America.
  6. Identify appropriate source materials and demonstrate scholarly research methods.
  7. Evaluate your own perspective, history, experiences and worldviews as you reflect upon the multiple and diverse interpretations of ancient North American peoples and cultures. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Rise of North American Archaeology
   A. Early European-Native Interaction
       1. Outline the key encounters between Native Americans and Europeans.
       2. Compare and contrast the motivations and outcomes for early explorers and colonists.
       3. Discuss how these early interactions shaped subsequent characterizations of Native Americans.
   B. Historical Development of American Archaeology
       1. Assess the context and significance of the Moundbuilder controversy.
       2. Explain the impact of evolutionary thinking on 19th and early-20th century Anthropology.
       3. Describe the influence of early ethnographic methods on the rise of culture historical archaeology.
       4. Identify the key figures and their contribution to the rise of modern archaeology.
       5. Explain the significance of radiocarbon dating and its impact in archaeology.
       6. Assess the current state of theory and practice in North American archaeology.

II. Principles and Techniques in American Archaeology
   A. Framework of Archaeology
       1. Place Archaeology in the context of multi-field Anthropology.
       2. Compare and contrast archaeological research with other approaches to understanding the past.
   B. Fundamental Archaeological Concepts
       1. Define the categories of archaeological evidence.
       2. Describe the relationship between excavation contexts and site-formation processes.
       3. List commonly used dating methods and their appropriate applications.
       4. Compare and contrast the different approaches employed by archaeologists to reconstruct the past, such as:
           a. Subsistence strategies and the environment
           b. Social organization
           c. Technology
           d. Patterns of trade and exchange
           e. Cognition, art, and religion
           f. Health
           g. Biological and cultural identity
       5. Compare and contrast the different approaches employed by archaeologists to explain and interpret patterns of cultural change.

III. Culture History of Ancient North America
   A. Fundamental Concepts in the Culture History of Ancient North America
       1. Describe the geographic, climatic, and environmental features of North America.
       2. Evaluate the strengths and limitations of a culture area perspective.
       3. Organize the key cultural periods of ancient North America by time and space. 
   B. Peopling of the Americas
       1. Correlate the late Ice Age climatic patterns with archaeological evidence in Northeast Asia and North America.
       2. Assess the scale, timing, and route of population movements using available evidence, such as
           a. Genetics
           b. Dentition
           c. Linguistics
       3. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the Clovis Horizon and subsequent Paleo-Indian peoples.
       4. Examine the relationship among Paleo-Indian peoples, climate change, and Megafaunal extinction.
   C. Great Plains
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the Great Plains.
       2. Compare and contrast the nomadic bison hunters and the semi-sedentary agriculturalists of the Great Plains.
       3. Assess the impact of the introduction of horses and firearms on the Great Plains.
   D. Far North
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the Arctic and Sub-Arctic regions of North America.
       2. Compare and contrast the technologies and material culture of marine and terrestrial hunter-gatherers.
       3. Identify the main factors in the transition from the Dorset Tradition to the Thule Tradition. 
       4. Assess the scale and nature of interaction among Arctic peoples and Europeans. 
   E. West Coast
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the West Coast.
       2. Assess the influence of climate change and environmental diversity on population density and social interaction.
       3. Compare and contrast the emergence of cultural and social complexity on the Northwest Coast and southern coast of California.
   F. Great Basin
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the Great Basin.
       2. Assess the influence of settlement pattern analysis and ecological perspectives on interpretations of Great Basin peoples. 
   G. Southwest
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the Southwest.
       2. Evaluate the various models accounting for population growth in the Southwest.
       3. Describe the transition from hunter-gatherer to farming societies in the Southwest.
       4. Discuss the various Ancestral Pueblo patterns of social and cultural complexity and their relationship with risk-management.
   H. Eastern Woodlands
       1. Describe the key sites, finds, and concepts related to the peoples of the Eastern Woodlands.
       2. Discuss the proliferation of projectile point types in terms of their chronological, adaptive and cultural significance.
       3. Describe the social, ritual, and economic aspects of the Adena Complex.
       4. Explain how Hopewell Culture reveals transformations and continuity in Middle Woodland society, politics, ritual, and economy.
       5. Discuss the significance of the Mississippian Climax.
       6. Review various explanations accounting for the Iroquoian origin and the relationship between the Iroquois and Algonquians.

IV. Issues of Historical and Contemporary Concern
   A. Ecology and Subsistence
       1. Compare and contrast the practices of ecosystem management, cultivation, and domestication.
       2. Citing examples from ancient North America, discuss how human-environment interaction can be used to explain cultural change.
       3. Discuss the strengths and limitations of common ecological perspectives (i.e. Cultural Ecology, Evolutionary Ecology, Optimal Foraging Strategy).
   B. Emergence of Complexity and Inequality
       1. Define the key terms and concepts related to an understanding of complexity and inequality.
       2. Compare and contrast different examples of cultural, technological, and political complexity in ancient North America.
       3. Explain how the concepts of agency, confederation, and alliance are used to understand ancient North American politics.
   C. Identity and Diversity
       1. Consider the evidence for and factors driving increasing territoriality and cultural diversity.
       2. Discuss how archaeologists use material culture, the archaeological record, and other lines of evidence to infer changing patterns of identity. 
   D. Trade and Exchange
       1. Describe the different mechanisms of exchange common to ancient North America.
       2. Review the prominent exchange networks and the raw materials and finished goods moved within them.
       3. Explain how intercommunity reciprocal exchanges can be an adaptive strategy and also lead to social distinctions, inequality, and cultural complexity.
   E. Religion and Ritual
       1. Be conversant in the central ritual and ceremonial customs for ancient North America.
       2. Evaluate the relationship between politics, exchange, society, and ritual.
   F. Warfare
       1. Identify the different forms of episodic or sustained violence that constitute warfare among the indigenous peoples of North America.
       2. Review the various models that explain the rise and fall of warfare in ancient North America.

V. The Archaeological Past and Modern Descendants
   A. Archaeology and the Consequences of European Contact
       1. Review the demographic, cultural, and political transformations that follow European contact.
       2. Assess how these transformations limit our ability to use ethno-historical accounts as an analogy for prehistoric peoples.
   B. Ethical Responsibilities and Treatment of Cultural Heritage
       1. Define the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and discuss the significance of this act in terms of museum collections and North American archaeological research.
       2. Define Cultural Resources Management and discuss the significance of public archaeology in North America.
   C. American Indian Concerns about the Practice of Archaeology
       1. Review the prevalent concerns about the curation of Native American artifacts and ancestral remains, and how North American archaeologists address these concerns.
       2. Define the concept of multivocality and consider how multiple interpretations of the archaeological record can be mediated.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations covering course content is required. 
Examinations of course content will make up at least 50% of the final grade. 
A class project based upon appropriate source materials and utilizing 
scholarly research methods, such as a presentation or paper, is required. 
The class project will make up at least 20% of the final grade. 
At the instructor’s discretion, students may be required to complete 
in-class assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, or experiential learning. 
Additional material will not count for more that 30% of the final grade. 

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F < 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 146H

  • Title: HON: Archaeology of Ancient North America*
  • Number: ANTH 146H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 150

  • Title: People and Cultures of Mesoamerica
  • Number: ANTH 150
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a survey of Mesoamerican cultural beliefs, traditions, and practices from the prehistoric era to the present day. Through the archaeological, historical, and ethnographic record we will adopt an anthropological perspective on the global, national, regional, and local forces on everyday life in Mesoamerica. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the geographic, cultural, and political boundaries of Mesoamerica.
  2. Describe the pre-Columbian culture of Mesoamerica from an anthropological perspective.
  3. Assess the transformation of Mesoamerican culture following contact and conquest by Spain.
  4. Trace the significant cultural and historical processes from the Colonial period through the Modern era.
  5. Explain the variety and continuity of cultural traditions in the lives of Mesoamericans throughout time.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Mesoamerica
   A. Anthropological Perspective
      1. Define the goals of Anthropology in relationship to the goals of
History, Economics, and other Social Sciences.
      2. Outline the history of anthropological scholarship in
Mesoamerica.
      3. Consider the central research questions applied to Mesoamerica. 
B. The Physical Environment
      1. List the geographic zones of Mesoamerica.
      2. Identify the characteristics of the natural areas of
Mesoamerica.
      3. Place the boundaries of modern nations, major cities, and key
topographic features of Mesoamerica on a map. 

II. Pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica
   A. Origins and Development of Mesoamerican Civilization
      1. Discuss the origins of the first inhabitants of Mesoamerica. 
      2. Describe the subsistence practices and cultural organization of
the Paleo-Indian and Archaic hunter-gatherers. 
      3. List the cultural characteristics of Mesoamerican societies from
the Formative period through the Classic period. 
      4. Be conversant with key Formative period archaeological sites and
their significance.
      5. Review the various theories on the rise of complex societies in
Mesoamerica. 
      6. Be conversant with key Classic period archaeological sites and
their significance. 
      7. Assess theories accounting for the 9th and 10th century southern
Maya collapse.
      8. Discuss the rise of militarism and increased economic interaction
during the Epiclassic and Early Postclassic periods. 
   B. Late Postclassic Mesoamerica
      1. Be conversant with key Postclassic period archaeological sites
and their significance. 
      2. Compare and contrast the economy, politics, and religion of the
Aztec, Mixtec, and Maya during the Late Postclassic Period.
      3. Discuss the role of native historical documents in constructing
interpretations of Postclassic societies. 
   C. Mesoamerican World at Spanish Contact
      1. Adopt an insider’s perspective of the Mesoamerican world on the
eve of Spanish contact using archaeological and ethnohistoric evidence.
      2. Characterize the degree of Mesoamerican sociocultural complexity
in terms of political organizations, ethnic groups, and regional
networks.
      3.Apply a world-systems model to Mesoamerica; discuss the role and
significance of each region within the world system. 

III. Colonial Mesoamerica
   A. The Spanish Conquest of Mesoamerica
      1. Describe the historical context of Spanish Imperialism
      2. Explain the origin and significance of militarism and commerce in
Spain preceding the age of exploration. 
      3. Identify the factors contributing to Spain’s early colonial
expansion. 
      4. Outline the key arguments and identify the central figures in the
debate over Indian rights.
      5. Compare and contrast the strategies and outcomes of the Spanish
campaign of conquest against the Aztec, Tarascans, and Maya.
   B. The Colonial Period in Mesoamerica
      1. Discuss the role of the nobility, conquistadors, and clergy in
the development of Mesoamerican colonies.
      2. Identify the political units within the colonial regime and how
they changed throughout the Colonial period.
      3. List the key civic-religious institutions of colonial Mesoamerica
and discuss the impact of these institutions on native communities. 
      4. Be conversant with the broader political and social issues
involved in the evangelization of colonial Mesoamerica.
      5. Explain how castas were formed and list the rights and status of
each social category. 
      6. Describe the corporate community model and relate this model to
the variety of life in colonial Mesoamerica.
      7. Discuss the native rebellions as a response to Spanish colonial
rule. 
   C. Indigenous Literature from Colonial Mesoamerica
      1. Review the existing forms and subject matter of pre-Columbian
literature.
      2. Distinguish the similarities and differences between
pre-Columbian and Colonial codices. 
      3. Examine the relationship between colonial texts and oral
literature. 
      4. Assess the influence of native and mestizo historians on colonial
writing. 
      5. Compare and contrast Indo-Christian literature with civil or
notarial literature. 
   D. Mesoamericans in the Neocolonial Era
      1. Identify key issues in the social history of nineteenth century
Mesoamerica. 
      2. Examine the relationship between Mesoamericans and independence
movements in Mexico and Central America.
      3. Assess the impact of conservative and liberal rule on the social
life and culture of Mesoamericans.
      4. Detail the cultural, political, and economic characteristics of
the nineteenth century and early twentieth-century nativist movements. 
      5. Review the role of U.S. interaction in Mesoamerica during the
Neocolonial era. 

IV. Modern Mesoamerica
   A. Native Mesoamericans in the Modern Era
      1. Discuss the relationship among development, revolution, and
modernization. 
      2. Identify the key contributions of native Mesoamericans in the
Mexican and Central American revolutions. 
      3. Explain the significance of idigenismo in the development of
modern Mexico and Central America. 
      4. Distinguish the similarities and differences of among local
ethnicity, hegemonic nationalism, and multiculturalism in Mesoamerica. 
   B. Transnationalism and the Political Economy of Mesoamerica
      1. Define the key concepts related transnationalism and the
political economy.
      2. Discuss the practice of milpa farming as both a subsistence
strategy and a cultural tradition. 
      3. Identify the social and economic impact of colonialism in
Mesoamerica. 
      4. Relate Mesoamerican labor production strategies to the global
economy:
         a. wage labor
         b. petty commodity production
         c. cottage industries
         d. maquiladora industries
      5. Describe how various market forms have impacted the distribution
and consumption of goods and services in Mesoamerica. 
      6. Assess the impact of transnational economic conditions on the
lives of Mesoamericans. 

V. Understanding Mesoamerican Cultural Traditions
   A. Language and Languages of Mesoamerica
      1. Review the diversity, distribution, and structure of Mesoamerican
languages.
      2. Explain how language variation and change arise. 
      3. Assess the influence of language change across time in
Mesoamerica. 
      4. Discuss the significance of writing in ancient Mesoamerica. 
      5. Be conversant with the central issues regarding language,
history, and culture in Mesoamerica. 
   B. Women and Gender in Mesoamerica
      1. Define the key concepts in gender studies. 
      2. Trace the continuity and transformation of gender roles and
gender relations through time:
         a. Pre-Columbian period
         b. Colonial period
         c. Post-Colonial period
      3. Discuss the challenges, opportunities, and themes of contemporary
gender relations in Mesoamerica:
         a. Machismo
         b. Domestic economy
         c.Transnational economy
         d. Activism and grassroots movements
   C. The Indian Voice in Recent Mesoamerican Art
      1. Characterize the representation of Indian voices in recent
Mesoamerican art and literature.
      2. Identify the native voice or native themes in the work of
twentieth century Mesoamerican artists. 
      3. Assess the state of traditional Indian verbal arts in
contemporary society.
      4. Discuss the integration of art to contemporary Mesoamerican
cultural traditions.
   D. Mesoamerican Religious Traditions
      1. Describe the key concepts and practices of religion in ancestral
Mesoamerica. 
      2. Examine the influence of Catholicism on Mesoamerican spirituality
and society. 
      3. Identify the major religious groups in contemporary Mesoamerica
and consider how religion relates to geography, class, ethnicity, gender,
and other factors. 
      4. Distinguish the common religious concepts and practices shared by
native Mesoamericans.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two examinations covering course content are required.
Examinations of course content will make up at least 60% of the final
grade. Examinations may be written or oral. At the instructor’s
discretion, students may be required to complete in-class assignments,
quizzes, oral presentations, experiential learning, or an in-depth
research project. Additional material will not count for more than 40% of
the final grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Taken in conjunction with field school requires professor approval.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 150H

No information found.

ANTH 153

  • Title: The Anthropology of the Paranormal & Supernatural
  • Number: ANTH 153
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This introductory course will employ various Western and non-Western perspectives, including scientific and popular culture theories, to critically and comparatively examine a wide array of phenomena classified as paranormal or supernatural. Topics to be covered include extra-sensory perception, witchcraft and magic, ghosts, extra-terrestrial beings, and cryptozoological organisms. Lectures, discussions, readings, and films will be used to accomplish the aforementioned, as well as optional trips to local locations associated with the paranormal and supernatural. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and distinguish between the paranormal and the supernatural.
  2. Discuss the role anthropological methods, theories, and perspectives can play in understanding paranormal and supernatural phenomena.
  3. Compare and contrast various Western and non-Western theories and perspectives on paranormal and supernatural phenomena.
  4. Identify and discuss various paranormal phenomena.
  5. Identify and discuss various supernatural phenomena.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Anthropology  
   A. Identify and Define the Sub-fields of Anthropology
      1. Archaeology
      2. Biological Anthropology 
      3. Cultural Anthropology
      4. Linguistics 
      5. Medical Anthropology            
   B. Identify Anthropological Perspectives and Methods That Can Play a
Role in Understanding the Paranormal and Supernatural
      1. Emic and Etic Perspectives
      2. Holistic Perspective 
      3. Ethnography and Ethnology
      4. Observatons                                       
         a. Direct
         b. Critical
         c. Participant  
      5. Interviews
         a. Unstructured
         b. Semi-structured
         c. Structured
      6. Surveys

II. Core Concepts and Terms 
   A. Define the Paranormal
   B. Define the Supernatural
   C. Define, Compare, and Contrast Naturalization and
Supernaturalization
   D. Define, Compare, and Contrast Science and Pseudoscience 

 IV. The Paranormal - Ufology
   A. Define and Analyze the Field of Ufology 
   B. Define and Analyze Extra-Terrestrials (ET)
   C. Define and Analyze Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO)
   D. Define and Analyze Unidentified Submerged Objects (USO)
   E. Define and Analyze Unidentified Flying Humanoids (UFH)
   F. Define and Analyze Alien Abductions
   G. Define and Analyze Crop Circles
   H. Analyze Famous UFO Cases
      1. Aurora, Texas (1897)
      2. Roswell, New Mexico (1947)
      3. Pittsburg, Kansas (1952)
      4. The Phoenix Lights (1997)
   I. Identify and Analyze Associations and Organizations that Study
Unidentified Flying Objects

V. The Paranormal – Cryptozoology
   A. Define and Analyze the Field of Cryptozoology and Key
Crytozoological Concepts
      1. Zoology
      2. Adaptation
      3. Natural Selection
      4. Evolution
      5. Reproductive Isolation
      6. Genetic Drift
   B. Define, Identify and Analyze Cryptids
      1. Flying Cryptids 
         a. Rods
         b. Kongamato
         c. Thunderbirds
      2. Night Cryptids 
         a. The Jersey Devil
         b. Chupacabra
      3. Cryptohomonids
         a. Yeti
         b. Sasquatch
         c. Almas
      4. Sea/Lake Cryptids
         a. Sea Serpents
         b. Lake Monsters
   C. Identify and Analyze Associations and Organizations that Study
Cryptids

VI. The Paranormal – Parapsychology
   A. Define and Analyze the Field of Parapsychology
   B. Compare and Contrast Psychology and Parapsychology
   C. Define and Analyze Extra-Sensory Perception (ESP)
      1. Telepathy
      2. Precognition
      3. Clairvoyance
   D. Define and Discuss Psychokinesis 
   E. Define and Analyze Psychometry
   F. Identify and Analyze Associations and Organizations that Study
Parapsychology  

VII. The Paranormal – Paranormal Places and Geo-Anomalies
   A. Define, Identify, and Analyze Paranormal Places and Geo-Anomalies  
      1. The Bermuda Triangle
      2. The Bimini Road 
      3. The Dragon Triangle
      4. The Michigan Triangle
      5. Nazca Lines
      6. Vortexes

   B.  Analyze Scientific Explanations for Paranormal Places and
Geo-Anomalies  
      1. The Kusche Hypothesis     
      2. Rogue Waves
      3. Methane Hydrates
      4. Magnetic Variations
      5. Human Error 

VIII. The Supernatural – Gods and Goddesses 
   A. Define Religion and Analyze Its Role in Culture and Society
   B. Define World View and Analyze Its Role in Culture and Society
   C. Define, Identify, and Analyze Supernatural Beings
      1. Gods, Goddesses, and Creators 
      2. Elementals
         a. Angels
         b. Demons
         c. Fairies
         d. Jinn
         e. Little People

IX. The Supernatural – Ghosts and Hauntings 
   A. Define and Analyze Ghosts and Hauntings 
      1. Types of Ghosts
         a. Apparitions
         b. Mists
         c. Orbs
         d. Shadows
      2. Types of Hauntings
         a. Intelligent
         b. Residual
         c. Demonic
         d. Poltergeist
   B. Identify and Analyze Famous National and International Hauntings
      1. Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia,   PA 
      2. Aokigahara (Sea of Trees), Japan
      3. Dublin Castle, Ireland
   C. Identify and Analyze Famous Local Hauntings
      1. Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, KS
      2. The Olathe Airport Hanger, Olathe, KS
      3. The Town of Atchison, KS
   D. Analyze Contemporary Ghost Hunting Techniques
      1. Electronic Voice Phenomena (EVP)
      2. Thermal Cameras 
      3. Electromagnetic Field Meters (EMF)
   E. Identify and Analyze Associations and Organizations that Study
Ghosts and Hauntings

 X. The Supernatural – Near-Death Experiences (NDE) 
    A. Define and Analyze Near-Death Experiences (NDE)
    B. Identify and Analyze the NDE 5-Stage Continuum
    C. Identify and Analyze Associations and Organizations that Study NDE


 XI. The Supernatural – Magic and Witchcraft
     A. Define and Analyze Magic and Witchcraft
     B. Compare and Contrast Types of Witchcraft and Magic
     C. Define, Identify, and Analyze Practitioners of Witchcraft   and
Magic in Western Cultures and Societies 
     D. Define, Identify, and Analyze Practitioners of Witchcraft and
Magic in Non-Western Cultures and Societies 
     E. Define, Identify, and Analyze Various Shapeshifters Found
Throughout the World
        1. Werewolves
        2. Skinwalkers
        3. Animagi
        4. Fold-Overs
        5. Vampires

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Participation - 15%
Mid-Term - 20% 
Final - 20%

In-Class Projects - 15%
Research Project - 30%
Total     - 100%  

A = 90 – 100%               
B = 80 –  89%               
C = 70 –  79%               
D = 60 – 69%                
F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 160

  • Title: Medical Anthropology
  • Number: ANTH 160
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will introduce students to an understanding of human health and disease that includes both culture and biology. Western and non-Western cultures will be considered. This course will consider topics such as medical beliefs and curing practices, disease and nutrition, the connection between inequality and health disparities, and how to apply medical anthropological concepts to real-world problems. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the connection between medical anthropology and the other subfields of anthropology;
  2. Define and distinguish various medical anthropological theories and perspectives;
  3. Identify and explain how medical anthropologists carry out research;
  4. Discuss the significance of biology and culture among early human beings and in human biological evolution;
  5. Examine how human biological variation, culture, and environment are interlinked;
  6. Identify and describe illness behaviors, social and cultural variables affecting health, curing practices, and medical beliefs of selected Western and Non-Western traditions;
  7. Discuss how a medical anthropological perspective can be applied to real-world problems such as unequal access to health care and disparity in patient-provider communication;
  8. Describe how medical anthropology is related to other fields in the biological sciences, social sciences, and law and policy.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Medical Anthropology 

A. Identify and differentiate the subfields of anthropology

1. Archaeology

2. Biological anthropology

3. Cultural anthropology

4. Linguistics

5. Medical anthropology

B. Trace the historical development of medical anthropology

C. Identify and describe the core concepts of medical anthropology

1. Ethnocentrism

2. Cultural relativism

3. Holism

4. Health

5. Wellness

6. Sickness

a. Disease

b. Illness

c. Unwellness

II. Medical Anthropological Theories and Perspectives

A. Identify and discuss major medical anthropological theories and perspectives, such as

1. Evolutionary models

2. Bioarchaeology and historical approaches

3. Darwinian medicine

4. Ecological models

5. Ethnobotany

6. Culture-bound syndromes

7. Explanatory models

8. Interpretive perspectives

9. Critical perspectives

10. Applied perspectives

B.  Describe the premises common to major medical anthropological theories and perspectives

1. Importance of the intersection between human biology and culture

2. Role of culture in shaping the environment and disease

3. Disease as an instrument of human evolution

4. Importance of culture in medical systems

III. Medical Anthropological Research Methods

A. Discuss the significance of community-based participatory research

B. Identify and explain the strengths and weaknesses of basic research methods, such as

1. Participant observation

2. Direct observation

3. Interviews

a. Unstructured

b. Structured

4. Focus Groups

5. Surveys

6. Archives

7. Pile Sorts

C. Describe how to enhance validity and reliability through use of

1. Triads

2. Key informants

3. Mixed methods

D. Define and discuss community/cultural tailoring

E. Define the role of Institutional Review Boards and discuss the need for these committees when working with human subjects

IV. Trauma, Disease, and Human Biological Variation

A. Discuss and explain trauma and disease among early human beings as seen in biological evidence such as

1. Broken bones

2. Infectious disease bone imprints 

B. Discuss and explain diseases in human biological evolution, such as

1. Sickle cell anemia and malaria

2. Celiac sprue

3. Casein intolerance

4. Bubonic/pneumonic plague

C. Explain the interrelationship of human biological variation, genes, and culture through topics such as

1. Nutrition

2. Chronic disease

V. Ecology of Disease

A. Discuss the adaptation of human behaviors to local health risks, such as

1. Exposure-limiting behaviors

2. Ecology-altering behaviors

B. Describe how interactions between human groups have shaped ecology and given rise to differential patterns of disease

1. Political-economic origins of ecological change

2. Emergence and construction of disease

3. Differential rates of infection and access to treatment by social class

VI. Beliefs and Curing Practices

A. For selected groups and traditions, identify and describe beliefs and medical systems, such as

1. Illness behaviors

2. Etiologies

3. Sacred healing

4. Biomedicine

5. Magic

6. Complementary and alternative healing

7. Medicinal use

B. Describe the working of authority and examples of specialists in healing systems

1. Authority

2. Local healers

3. Biomedical professionals

4. Mediums

II. Cultural and Social Variables Affecting Health

A.Recognize and describe cultural variables that affect health in select case studies

B. Recognize and describe social variables such as gender, class, and race that affect health in select case studies.

VIII. Applications of Medical Anthropology

A. Identify and discuss medical anthropology projects in the United States

B. Identify and discuss international medical anthropology projects

IX. Medical Anthropology and Other Health-Related Disciplines

A. Examine the relationship between the biological sciences and medical anthropology

B. Examine the relationship between public health and medical anthropology

C. Examine how current federal and state laws and policies impact medical anthropological research

D. Discuss ethics in medical anthropological research

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

A minimum of two exams covering course content is required; examinations will comprise 50-80% of the final course grade. The instructor may choose to assess students on attendance or in-class assignments; class participation will comprise 0-20% of the final course grade. At the instructor’s discretion, students may be required to complete additional projects and assignments to complete the remaining points in the course.

Exams (2+):      50-80%

Participation:     0-20%

Assignments:     0-50%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 165

  • Title: Linguistic Anthropology
  • Number: ANTH 165
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the interaction between language and culture. We will explore the various ways humans communicate and analyze how these modes of communication reflect social and cultural identities. Students will also look at how linguistic anthropologists use methods in the field to analyze language use. At the conclusion of this course, students will see how race, ethnicity, gender and other cultural identities are expressed through language. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the place of Linguistic Anthropology in a multifield anthropology.
  2. Describe the mutually constitutive relationship between language and culture.
  3. Define and apply key theories and concepts of Linguistic Anthropology.
  4. Explain different analytical approaches of Linguistic Anthropology.
  5. Explain different modalities of language.
  6. Apply Linguistic Anthropology field methods to analyze the social construction of society and identities through linguistic practices.
  7. Identify and explain different anthropological perspectives on language change.
  8. Recognize and think critically about the power of words.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Anthropology

A. Identify and discuss the core concepts in the subfields of anthropology.

1. Linguistic anthropology

2. Physical anthropology

3. Cultural anthropology

4. Archaeology

5. Medical anthropology

B. Compare and contrast research and applied aspects of the subfields.

II. Language and Culture

A. Define the concept of culture.

B. Identify culture emphasis as seen in different languages.

C. Describe the history and use of ethnosemantics to understand language.

D. Explain the difference between an emic and an etic point of view.

E. Discuss how context affects the type of language that is used.

F. Compare and contrast a speech community and a linguistic community.

III. Theoretical Approaches in Linguistic Anthropology

A. Discuss the development of linguistic theory from the 19th century to the present.

B. Explain linguistic relativity.

C. Explain linguistic determinism and its different degrees.

D. Define and apply the concept of indexicality.

E. Identify communities of practice.

F. Discuss how language can be characterized as a performance.

IV. Language Analysis

A. Explain the process of conducting fieldwork.

B. Identify different sounds in the International Phonetic Alphabet.

C. Distinguish between a phoneme and a morpheme.

D. Identify different types of morphemes based on their placement.

E. Evaluate syntax of a language through the use of a substitution frame.

F. List and explain the different parts of the ethnography of SPEAKING.

1. Setting

2. Participants

3. Ends

4. Act sequence

5. Key

6. Instrumentalities

7. Norms

8. Genres

G. Evaluate a transcribed conversation using discourse analysis.

V. Modalities of Language

A. Explain how body movements, facial expressions and gestures are used in language.

B. Discuss how space can be used to convey meaning.

C. Describe different uses of pitch, loudness and speed to change meaning when speaking.

D. Identify different modes of writing systems.

E. Describe the structure of various sign languages.

VI. Language Analysis and Exploration of Social Identities

A. Utilize language analysis techniques (see subheading 4) to identify how people express various identities, including:

1. Social class

2. Ethnicity

3. Gender

4. Sexuality

5. Age

6. Region

B. Reflect on how one's own identity is shaped by language.

VII. Language Change

A. Describe how languages change.

B.Discuss how glottochronology can be used to show the chronological relationship between languages of the world.

C. Explain the processes in which culture groups obtain new vocabulary.

D. Compare and contrast creoles and pidgins.

E. Characterize multilingualism among different culture groups.

F. Describe how languages become extinct and go through revitalization.

VIII. The Power of Words

A. Discuss how the way a group speaks can affect how others view and treat that group.

B. Describe how race, ethnic and nationalistic ideologies affect language policies.

C. Compare and contrast descriptivist and prescriptivist views on language.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two exams will be given. Exams will make up at least 40% of the final grade. Other assignments may include class participation, reading quizzes, in-class projects or an in-depth research project. Additional assignments will account for no more than 60% of the final grade.

Exams 40 - 100%

Additional Assignments 0 - 60%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 205

  • Title: Archaeological Field Methods
  • Number: ANTH 205
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 5

Description:

This course is a practicum of archaeological field methods and techniques. The fundamental principles of archaeological research will be considered. Students will create and implement their own research design in the context of on-going investigations. Emphasis will be placed on practicing the essential skills needed to conduct archaeological research. 160 integrated lecture lab hrs./semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the key goals and concepts of archaeological research.
  2. Develop and implement an archaeological research design.
  3. Demonstrate the skills necessary to collect, process, and analyze archaeological evidence.
  4. Interpret archaeological evidence.
  5. Write an archaeological research report.
  6. Assess the impact of archaeological research on local communities.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Archaeology and Anthropology
      1. Describe the key characteristics of the discipline of
Anthropology. 
      2. Explain the context of Archaeology as one of the four fields of
Anthropology.
      3. Distinguish between culture and material culture. 
   B. Understanding the Past
      1. Be conversant with the key figures and concepts in the rise of
the field of Archaeology.
      2. Discuss the current state of Archaeology in the relevant research
area.

II. Archaeological Fieldwork
   A. Research Design
      1. Explain how archaeological research is designed to answer
specific questions.
      2. Review existing research designs; evaluate why these designs were
successful or unsuccessful. 
      3. Identify data suitable to address research questions. 
      4. Determine a data collection strategy.
      5. Describe the protocols for processing, classifying, and analyzing
data after it has been collected.
      6. Discuss the final product of research and how archaeological
findings may be disseminated to professionals and the public.
      7. Create and complete an appropriate research design for the field
season. 
   B. Locating Sites
      1. Identify potential site locations using documentary sources,
aerial and satellite imagery, or informant interviews.  
      2. Discuss the implications of various sampling strategies. 
      3. Distinguish between extensive and intensive reconnaissance. 
      4. Conduct a pedestrian survey and identify surface-visible cultural
material (or the lack of cultural material).
      5. Demonstrate skills necessary to record the location and map an
archaeological site or feature, for example:
         a. Compass and tape
         b. Handheld GPS
         c. USGS or other appropriate map
         d. EDM and Total Station
   C. Assessing and Recording Site layout
      1. Describe an archaeological site or feature by its size, type, and
layout.
      2. Discuss the implications of various surface-collection strategies
and how these strategies relate to the research design. 
      3. Demonstrate skills necessary to collect and document
surface-visible cultural material, for example:
         a. Determine limits of an artifact scatter.
         b. Bag and tag archaeological remains.
         c. Complete documentation using site or feature sheet, sketch,
field notes, or photographs
      4. Discuss the implications of various sub-surface detection
strategies.
      5. Demonstrate skills necessary to test for sub-surface remains, for
example:
         a. Probe
         b. Shovel test-pit
      6. Review the various methods of noninvasive remote sensing
techniques. 
   D. Excavation
      1. Explain the purpose and key concepts in excavation.
      2. Discuss the implications of various excavation strategies and how
these strategies relate to the research design, for example:
         a. Test unit
         b. Axial trench
         c. Lateral excavation
         d. Tunneling
      3. Demonstrate skills necessary to conduct an excavation, for
example:
         a. Layout a one-meter by one-meter test unit.
         b. Determine structure orientation and correctly align an axial
trench.
         c. Select and use appropriate tools (e.g. pick, shovel, trowel,
brush, etc.).
         d. Use a line-level and measuring tape (or other technique) to
determine provenience.
      4. Identify stratigraphy, cultural deposits, and archaeological
context in an excavation unit.
      5. Recover various classes of archaeological remains.
      6. Demonstrate skills necessary to record excavation information,
for example:
         a. Field notes
         b. Photographs
         c. Drawings, including: sketch, plan, profile, and section
      7. Demonstrate proper etiquette in and around open excavations. 

III. Archaeological Laboratory Techniques
   A. Artifact Classes
      1. List the different cultural remains commonly recovered in the
research area, for example:
         a. Ceramics
         b. Lithics
         c. Metal
         d. Sculpture
         e. Botanical remains
         f. Faunal remains
         g. Skeletal remains
      2. Discuss how each class of cultural remains must be treated to
address questions from the research design. 
B. Processing
      1. Demonstrate proper cleaning technique for each class of cultural
remains. 
      2. Record the appropriate information for each class of cultural
remains. 
      3. Enter all information into a database. 
   C. Classification
      1. Discuss the methods commonly employed to categorize each class of
cultural remains, for example:
         a. Type-Variety System 
         b. Modal Analysis
         c. Technological or Behavioral Typologies
         d. Use-wear 
      2. Demonstrate the skills necessary to place cultural remains in a
typology using attributes of the artifact or ecofact. 

IV. Interpretation
   A. Reconstructing the Past
      1. Discuss how cultural remains can be used to reconstruct patterns
of behavior, for example:
         a. Individual activities and identities
         b. Community-specific activities and identities
         c. Society-wide activities and identities
      2. Develop an interpretation of the past based on the artifact
assemblage.
   B. Chronology
      1. Explain the significance of dating to archaeological
interpretation. 
      2. Discuss the implications of various dating techniques and how
these techniques relate to the research design, for example:
         a. Stratigraphy
         b. Typological sequence
         c. Seriation
         d. Radiocarbon dating
         e. Obsidian-hydration dating
      3. Apply the appropriate dating technique to the collected remains. 
 
   C. Current and Future Research
      1. Prepare a summary of research conducted over the season and the
results of the research. 
      2. Identify successful and problematic elements of the research
design.
      3. Address questions posed in the research design and propose new
questions for future research. 

V. Ethics and Responsibilities
   A. Conservation and Archival
      1. Review the human causes of site destruction:
         a. Archaeologists
         b. Looters
         c. Agriculture
         d. Development
      2. Be conversant with the problems and techniques associated with
the conservation of each class of cultural remains.
      3. Discuss archival techniques for cultural remains. 
      4. Review and evaluate examples of museum curation.
   B. Ownership and Cultural Patrimony
      1. Define cultural patrimony.
      2. Discuss the legal and ethical implications of possessing cultural
remains. 
      3. Evaluate the impact of archaeological interpretation on modern
communities. 
   C. Community-based strategies for Archaeology
      1. Identify the key concepts of applied Anthropology, specifically
community-based Archaeology. 
      2. Assess the impact of archaeological interpretation, education,
collaboration, and development on the local community.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency at skills, methods, and
techniques necessary for the successful completion of archaeological
fieldwork. Demonstration of skills will make up 60% of the final grade.
Students are required to develop and implement a research design by the
end of the class. The research design is worth 20% of the final grade.
Students are required to complete a final report of their research by the
end of the class. The final report is worth 20% of the final grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students are required to remain with the project for the duration of the course (three to four weeks).
  2. Students are guests of the host country and must act accordingly. Inappropriate behavior may result in immediate removal from the course.
  3. Students will participate in potentially strenuous activity under a variety of conditions.
  4. Students may incur additional travel and lodging expenses in addition to normal tuition and fees, dependent on external funding opportunities.
  5. Professor approval is required for enrollment.
  6. A cultural component will be taken in conjunction with this course based on the location of the field school. For example, if offered in Honduras, students are required to enroll in People and Cultures of Mesoamerica.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ANTH 291

No information found.

ANTH 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: ANTH 292
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Anthropology, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Department of Anthropology curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Anthropology for credit but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Be conversant with the relevant readings within the selected topic. 
  2. Define and explain key terms and concepts within the selected topic. 
  3. Demonstrate appropriate research methodology relevant to the selected topic. 
  4. Relate the special topic to essential issues and themes in Anthropology. 
  5. Articulate a critically informed perspective on the selected topic drawn from qualitative and/or quantitative evidence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

Content Outline and Competencies will vary because they are dependent upon the special topic being offered. The outline and competencies will follow the standard format for JCCC courses and will be written in outcomes-based language. The Special Topics course proposal will first be reviewed and approved by the Anthropology faculty. The Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review and approve each Special Topics course proposal. Scheduling of Special Topics courses will be the responsibility of the Department Chair.Â

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of evaluation will vary depending on the special topic being offered. Standard methods of evaluation may be employed, such as: readings, discussions, written assignments (short response through research papers), library or web-based research, individual or group projects, formal and informal presentations, and service learning. Other methods may be utilized to assess student mastery of competencies based upon the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:
A = 90-100% 
B = 80-89% 
C = 70-79% 
D = 60-69% 
F < 60% 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to four-year institutions as elective credit. 2. A class offered as a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).