Art History (ARTH)

Courses

ARTH 180   Art History: Ancient to Renaissance (3 Hours)  

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas of world civilizations from the prehistoric period to the beginning of the Italian Renaissance. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs./wk.

ARTH 180H   HON: Art History: Ancient to Renaissance* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ARTH 182   Art History: Renaissance to Modern (3 Hours)  

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas of Western cultures from the beginning of the Italian Renaissance to the present. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs./wk.

ARTH 182H   HON: Art History: Renaissance to Modern* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ARTH 184   Art History: Twentieth Century (3 Hours)

This course introduces the student to the arts and ideas of Western Europe and the United States from the late 19th century to the present. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major movements in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARTH 184H   HON: Art History: Twentieth Century* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ARTH 186   Art History: Introduction to Asian Art (3 Hours)

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas that arose in India, China and Japan from the prehistoric to the early modern periods. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARTH 186H   HON: Art History: Introduction to Asian Art* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ARTH 188   History of Photography (3 Hours)

This course provides an introduction to the history of photography. Students will examine the aesthetic and technological evolution of photography as an art form, as a visual tool for and influence upon other artistic disciplines, and as a statement of perceived reality. The course will examine the elements that distinguish various aesthetic movements, the styles of major periods and the influences of individual photographers. Attention will be paid to the relationship between photographic imagery and various cultural and historical contexts. Recommended prior course is PHOT 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ARTH 292   Special Topics: (3 Hours)

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Art History not normally taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

ARTH 180

  • Title: Art History: Ancient to Renaissance
  • Number: ARTH 180
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas of world civilizations from the prehistoric period to the beginning of the Italian Renaissance. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of art and artifacts of selected Western civilizations from the Prehistoric to the Early Italian Renaissance.
  2. Identify and describe the artistic, cultural and historical importance of selected works of art within their cultures.
  3. Recognize and describe the aesthetic elements which mark selected periods and artists.
  4. Discuss ways in which cultural values are communicated through works of art.
  5. Recognize and describe the function and stylistic elements of selected works of art.
  6. Define and demonstrate use of the terminology, classifications and methods used in the study of art history.
  7. Explain the interdisciplinary role of art within the humanities and its relationship to current cultural issues.
  8. Discover the implications of the course material for understanding oneself.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Prehistoric Art in Europe

A. Paleolithic period

1. Identify and describe various examples of small sculpture and cave paintings.

2. Compare various theories explaining the creation of Paleolithic art.

B. Neolithic period

1. Identify and describe significant artifacts from the Neolithic period including rock-shelter art, architecture, sculpture and ceramics.

2. Describe the issues involved in the production and social use of Neolithic art and architecture.

II. Art of the Ancient Near East

A. Architecture

1. Identify and describe the similarities, differences, uses and materials used in ziggurats, palaces and city gates.

2. List the characteristics involved in the decoration of these structures.

B. Describe and differentiate between sculpture used for religious purposes and that created for political use.

III. Art of Ancient Egypt

A. The Old Kingdom

1. Explain ways in which religious and political factors influenced painting, sculpture and architecture.

2. Identify and describe the canon of proportions used to represent the human figure in both paintings and sculpture.

3. Discuss the evolution of funerary architecture, its various uses and types of decoration.

B. The Middle Kingdom

1. Discern the reasons for changes in funerary architecture.

2. Identify the new stylistic characteristics of Middle Kingdom sculpture and painting.

3. Explain the Egyptian concept of town planning.

C. The New Kingdom

1. Identify and describe the great temple complexes.

2. Evaluate the impact of the Pharaoh Akhenaten and the Amarna style.

IV. Aegean Art

A. Describe the idol figures from the Cycladic Islands and discuss the various theories about their meaning.

B. Crete and the Minoan Civilization

1. Identify and evaluate the secular palace architecture.

2. Describe and evaluate various theories about various types of sculpture.

3. Describe various significant artifacts including metalwork, ceramics and wall paintings.

C. Mainland Greece and the Mycenaean Civilization

1. Compare and contrast the architectural style with that of the Minoans.

2. Identify and describe the stylistic characteristics of significant artifacts including sculpture and metalwork.

V. Art of Ancient Greece

A. Archaic Period

1. Discuss the development of democratic city-states and the concept that “man is the measure of all things.”

2. Summarize the Greeks’ religious beliefs and distinguish between the major deities.

3. Identify and describe the three Greek architectural orders.

4. Describe the characteristics and uses of temples including architectural sculpture.

5. Identify and describe freestanding sculpture and evaluate the theories about its use.

6. Compare and contrast the significant Greek vase shapes and styles of painted decoration.

B. Classical Period

1. Describe the evolution and development of both architectural sculpture and freestanding sculpture.

2. Discuss the stylistic development in vase painting.

3. Identify, describe and evaluate the architecture of Athens.

4. Describe and identify stela sculpture.

C. Hellenistic Period

1. Identify and describe the characteristics of Greek theaters.

2. Compare and contrast both freestanding and architectural sculpture with the two earlier stylistic periods.

3. Identify unfamiliar examples of architecture, sculpture and painting.

4. Summarize the Greek influence on art and architecture created presently.

VI. Etruscan Art

A. Compare and contrast an Etruscan city with its Greek counterpart.

B. Describe Etruscan temples and their decoration.

C. Identify and compare tombs with those of earlier cultures.

D. Evaluate the significance of artifacts made of bronze.

VII. Roman Art

A. The Republic and beginning of the Empire

1. Compare and contrast government, religious and domestic architecture in both Rome and the provinces and identify significant examples.

2. Identify the stylistic characteristics of Republican sculpture and compare those with Augustan sculpture.

3. Identify significant examples and distinguish between the various styles of wall painting.

B. The Empire

1. Identify and describe the significance of major architecture in Rome and throughout the Empire.

2. Distinguish between Roman building techniques and materials, and those of earlier cultures.

3. Identify significant examples and then compare and contrast relief sculpture, portrait sculpture and architectural sculpture with the Roman Republic and earlier cultures.

4. Describe and identify examples of wall paintings and mosaics.

C. The Late Empire

1. Discuss ways in which the last architecture of the Empire reflects the political changes within the Empire.

2. Identify and describe the significant portrait sculpture and wall paintings of the late period.

3. Evaluate ways in which Roman art and architecture have influenced Western aesthetics to the present era.

VIII. Early Christian Art

A. Discuss the impact of Dura Europas on Early Judaism and Early Christianity.

B. Describe the major events in the iconography of the life of Jesus.

C. Architecture

1. Identify and describe the characteristics of both basilican and central plan Early Christian churches.

2. Discuss the role of the church in the late Roman Empire.

D. Identify and describe major examples of painting, sculpture and mosaics.

IX. Byzantine Art

A. Early Byzantine

1. Discuss the role of the Emperor Justinian and the development of Byzantine architecture both in Constantinople and in Ravenna.

2. Describe the significance of pendentive construction.

3. Compare and contrast wall paintings and mosaics with those of the Early Christian style.

4. Describe and discuss the role and significance of manuscript illuminations.

B. Late Byzantine

1. Discern the significant differences between late architecture and the architectural style of the early period.

2. Compare and contrast the paintings, mosaics and manuscripts of the late period with examples of both the early Byzantine style and Early Christian.

3. Discuss the role of painted icons in late Byzantine art.

X. Islamic Art

A. Relate the life and teaching of the Prophet Muhammad to the architecture and decoration common in Islamic art.

1. Distinguish between the major architectural plans for mosques.

2. Identify the characteristics and discuss the significance of palace architecture.

3. Evaluate the role of calligraphy in Islamic architectural decoration and manuscript illumination.

B. Describe the secular artifacts from Islamic culture including textile arts, carpets and portable arts.

C. Discuss the influence of Islamic culture on the architecture and decorative arts of Western Europe during the Middle Ages.

XI. Early Medieval Art

A. Migration Period

1. Identify the artifacts created by the Vikings.

2. Discuss the development of monasticism in Western Europe and the role of the monasteries in creating artworks.

3. Describe and compare Hiberno-Saxon manuscript illumination and sculpture with Early Christian examples.

B. Carolingian Period

1. Discuss the emergence of monumental architecture and how it differs from Roman/Early Christian examples.

a. Evaluate the development of the Westwork as a major component of Christian architecture.

b. Describe and identify the parts of a typical Medieval monastery.

2. Identify the significant examples of manuscript illumination.

C. Ottonian Period

1. Describe and identify significant examples of church architecture.

2. Summarize the emergence of large-scale, freestanding sculpture.

3. Describe important examples of book illustration.

XII. Romanesque Art

A. France and Northern Spain

1. Discuss the meaning of “Romanesque” and evaluate how the phenomenon of Pilgrimage impacts architecture.

2. Identify the characteristics of French and Northern Spanish regional Romanesque architecture and architectural sculpture.

3. Enumerate the stylistic characteristics of freestanding sculpture, wall painting and book illumination.

B. Britain and Normandy

1. Compare and contrast the architecture of Normandy and Norman England with that of the Pilgrimage routes in France and Spain.

2. Identify the important examples and stylistic characteristics of manuscript illumination.

3. Discuss the techniques and subject matter in creating textiles and embroidery.

C. Germany

1. Discuss the regional differences found in German Romanesque architecture.

2. Identify significant examples of metalwork and book illustrations.

D. Italy

1. Evaluate the important similarities and differences between Italian Romanesque and Early Christian architecture.

2. List the stylistic characteristics and building forms of Italian Romanesque architecture and architectural sculpture.

XIII. Gothic Art

A. French Gothic

1. Discuss the emergence of the Gothic style in the Île de France and the reasons for the stylistic changes.

2. Identify and explain the significance of the architectural decoration and stained glass windows of Gothic cathedrals.

3. Discuss the development of independent sculpture and identify ways in which Gothic sculpture leads to the Renaissance.

4. Identify the major artifacts from Gothic books.

B. English Gothic

1. Determine ways in which church architecture differs from that created in France.

2. Describe and distinguish the characteristics of castle architecture.

C. Determine the regional characteristics of Spanish Gothic architecture.

D. German Gothic

1. List the regional characteristics of German Gothic architecture.

2. Identify and describe major works of freestanding sculpture.

E. Determine ways in which Italian Gothic architecture falls outside of the mainstream of the Gothic style and ways in which it is similar.

F. Proto-Renaissance

1. Ascertain the importance of the outbreak of the Bubonic Plague on Western Europe and its artistic development.

2. Evaluate the evolution of relief and freestanding sculpture and identify specific ways in which these works forecast the coming of the Renaissance.

3. Determine the role of Giotto and other fourteenth century Italian painters in making significant breaks with the painting traditions and techniques of the Middle Ages.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Tests: A minimum of three hour exams will be given. In addition, testing may include quizzes and a comprehensive final exam.

20-40%    Writing Assignments: These may include response papers, research assignments or daily/weekly exercises.

5-15%      Individual Assignments/Class Participation/Attendance   

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARTH 180H

No information found.

ARTH 182

  • Title: Art History: Renaissance to Modern
  • Number: ARTH 182
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas of Western cultures from the beginning of the Italian Renaissance to the present. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of art and architecture of selected Western civilizations from the Early Italian Renaissance to the present.
  2. Identify and describe the artistic, cultural and historical importance of selected works of art within their cultures.
  3. Recognize and describe the aesthetic elements which mark selected periods and artists.
  4. Discuss how cultural values are communicated through works of art.
  5. Recognize and describe the function and stylistic elements of selected works of art.
  6. Define and demonstrate use of the terminology, classifications and methods used in the study of art history.
  7. Explain the interdisciplinary role of art within the humanities and its relationship to current cultural issues.
  8. Discover the implications of the course material for understanding oneself by creating personal connections with selected artifacts which liberate and stimulate the imagination.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Early Renaissance Art in Europe

A. Review the Late Middle Ages to provide a background for the emergence of the Renaissance.

B. Describe the use of the International Style in manuscript illumination, painting and sculpture.

C. Flemish Art.

1. Identify the works of both the first- and second-generation panel painters

2. Compare the new oil painting technique with the techniques of fresco and tempera

D. Describe the differing ways in which Flemish art spread to Spain, Portugal, France and Germany.

E. The Italian Renaissance in Florence.

1. Compare secular architecture including Renaissance palace facades with religious architecture

2. Evaluate the impact of new subject matter, materials and techniques in both sculpture and painting

F. Discern ways in which the Florentine style is adopted and/or modified in the architecture, sculpture and painting of other 15th century Italian cities.

III. Renaissance Art in 16th Century Europe

A. Describe the effects of the Reformation on art in Europe in the 16th century.

B. Evaluate the changing status of artists.

C. Italian Art.

1. Compare and contrast paintings and sculpture created in Florence and Northern Italy with paintings and sculpture created in Rome

2. Identify the architecture in Rome and its environs including the 16th century work on St. Peter’s Basilica

3. Describe the Venetian painting style and changes in technique of painting

4. Compare and contrast the architecture in Venice and the Veneto with that of Rome

D. Identify the characteristics of Italian Mannerism in painting, sculpture and architecture.

E. Identify important examples of painting, architecture and the craft arts created in the French court.

F. Compare and contrast Netherlandish painting with painting and prints from Germany and the Holy Roman Empire.

G. Discuss the role of court painters in England and Spain and compare the architecture, sculpture and painting created by each.

IV. Baroque, Rococo and Early American Art

A. Roman Baroque.

1. Evaluate the impact of the Counter-Reformation, the impact of new scientific discoveries on the arts and the new role of patrons

2. List and evaluate the important ways in which Baroque painting, sculpture and architecture differs from that of the Renaissance

3. Identify and describe the role of illusionistic ceiling painting in Roman Baroque art

B. French Baroque.

1. Describe palace architecture and its decoration

2. Compare and contrast the stylistic difference between the sculpture and painting of France with that of Rome

3. Discuss the development of the French Academy

C. Demonstrate ways in which Spanish Baroque architecture and painting mimics and differs from French and Roman Baroque styles.

D. Flemish Baroque.

1. Identify the differences between the Poussinistes and the Rubenistes by comparing French and Flemish Baroque styles

2. Discuss ways in which patronage impacts Flemish Baroque painting

E. Dutch Baroque

1. Evaluate the impact of the Reformation on the Dutch art market

2. Identify and describe the categories of paintings and prints which emerged in the Netherlands during the 16th century

F. Compare and contrast English Baroque architecture with the architecture created on the continent.

G. Describe important examples of German and Austrian Baroque architecture and sculpture.

H. The Rococo Style.

1. Compare and contrast architecture and its decoration in Germany and Austria with that created in France

2. Describe examples of Rococo decorative arts and how these artifacts reflected social values of the era

I. Identify important examples of architecture and painting in Colonial America before 1776.

IV. Neoclassicism and Romanticism in Europe and the United States

A. Evaluate the significance of the French Revolution, the Enlightenment and the concept of the Grand Tour on European society.

B. Discuss Neoclassicism and Romanticism in English painting.

C. Evaluate the role of Gothic revival architecture in England.

D. French Neoclassicism and Romanticism.

1. Compare and contrast French Neoclassical painting with the English giving special emphasis to the work of Jacques Louis David and his students

2. Identify examples of French Romantic sculpture and painting and evaluate the influence of Romantic literature on the visual arts

E. Identify and compare Neoclassical and Romantic architecture in Germany and Spain.

F. Neoclassicism and Romanticism in the United States.

1. Describe the influence of Neoclassicism on the so-called Federal style of architecture in the U.S.

2. Distinguish American Romantic painting from that of England and France

V. Realism to Impressionism in Europe and the United States

A. Explain the influence of the age of Positivism and the Industrial Revolution on the visual arts.

B. Evaluate the impact of the France Academy on painting.

C. Describe the advent of photography as an art form and identify the photographic pioneers and their works.

D. Naturalism and Realism

1. Discuss the movements of Naturalism and Realism in France.

2. Identify the ways in which Naturalism and Realism spread beyond France.

E. Art in the United States from 1850 to 1880

1. Compare and contrast Neoclassical sculpture with Civil War sculpture.

2. Explain the importance of Civil War photography on painting and vice versa.

F. Discuss painting in England from 1840 to 1880 including the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the arts and crafts movement.

G. Impressionism.

1. Compare and contrast the stylistic differences between early French Impressionism and later French Impressionism.

2. Identify the characteristics and influence of Japonisme on Impressionism.

VI. The Rise of Modernism in Europe and the United States

A. Develop definition for “Modernism.”

B. Post-Impressionism.

1. Describe ways in which Post-Impressionism both documents modern life and alternatives to modern life

2. Differentiate between the Post-Impressionists who were interested in examining form with those interested in expressionism

3. Identify the ways in which Auguste Rodin is considered the father of modernist sculpture

C. Compare and contrast the Expressionist movements of Fauvism, Die Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter.

D. Cubism.

1. Explain the late 19th century origins of Cubism

2. Compare and contrast Analytic Cubism with Synthetic Cubism

3. Identify the various responses to Cubism including those in France, Italian Futurism and Russian Suprematism

E. Architecture Before World War I.

1. Identify examples of American Beaux-Arts architecture to compare with the early skyscrapers

2. Evaluate the impact of the early work of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie Style

3. Describe the characteristics of Art Nouveau architecture

F. European Art and Architecture Between the Wars.

1. Compare and contrast postwar classicism with Russian utilitarian art forms and the De Stijl movement in the Netherlands

2. Describe the emergence and impact of the German Bauhaus followed by the suppression of the avant-garde in Germany

3. Discuss the Dada movement both in Europe and America

4. Compare and contrast the various artists and sculpture of the Surrealist movement and the impact of their work

G. American Art from 1900 to 1945.

1. Describe the European influences and the competing Realist styles in pre-World War I America

2. Identify the American Scene painters and photographers

3. Compare and contrast the Regionists of the 1930s with the resurgence of modernism before World War II

VII. Art in the United States and Europe since World War II

A. Identify the key figures and their work in postwar European art.

B. Abstract Expressionism.

1. Describe the formative years and identify the precursors

2. Differentiate between Action Painting and Color Field Painting

3. Describe the role of women in Abstract Expressionism

4. Identify the ways in which the second generation of Abstract Expressionism differs from the first

C. Alternative Developments following Abstract Expressionism.

1. Discuss the role of artists who return to the figure

2. Describe “Happenings” and discuss the impact of transitory art

3. Distinguish ways in which Assemblage art differs from more traditional sculpture

4. Discuss the development and key figures in the Pop Art movement

5. Compare and contrast the movements of Minimalism and Conceptualism

D. From Modernism to Post-Modernism.

1. Identify key architectural buildings and ways in which they differ from pre World War II architecture

2. Discuss ways in which Post-Conceptual Art differs from the earlier movement

3. Determine the role of Earthworks in changing the venue for artworks

4. Discuss the development of Feminist Art and its impact

E. Post-Modernism.

1. Provide a definition for Post-Modernism

2. Identify the Neo-Expressionist artists and key examples of their work

3. Discuss the resurgence of European Art and its impact

4. Describe ways in which Graffiti Art and Post-Conceptual Art are similar and ways in which they differ

5. Art and Controversy.

a. Identify current trends and emerging artists

b. Provide a dialogue about the role of the National Endowment for the Arts, public art and public censorship

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Tests: A minimum of three hour exams will be given. In addition, testing may include quizzes and a comprehensive final exam.

20-40%    Writing Assignments: These may include response papers, research assignments or daily/weekly exercises.

5-15%      Individual Assignments/Class Participation/Attendance

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARTH 182H

No information found.

ARTH 184

  • Title: Art History: Twentieth Century
  • Number: ARTH 184
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces the student to the arts and ideas of Western Europe and the United States from the late 19th century to the present. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major movements in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of art and architecture of Western Europe and the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present.
  2. Identify and describe the artistic, cultural and historical importance of selected works of art.
  3. Recognize and describe the aesthetic elements which mark selected periods and artists.
  4. Discuss how cultural values are communicated through works of art.
  5. Recognize and describe the function and stylistic elements of selected works of art.
  6. Define and demonstrate use of the terminology, classifications and methods used in the study of art history.
  7. Explain the interdisciplinary role of art within the humanities and its relationship to current cultural issues.
  8. Discover the implications of the course material for understanding oneself by creating personal connections with selected artifacts which liberate and stimulate the imagination.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Modernism
   A. Define modernism and describe its characteristic elements.
   B. Trace the origins of modernism in the nineteenth century including
the  movements of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism.

II. Post Impressionism
   A. Explain the origins of abstraction and the contributions of Seurat
and Cezanne.
   B. Explain the origins of expressionism and the contributions of
Gauguin and Van Gogh.

III. The Turn of the Century
   A. Explain the impetus for the Art Nouveau movement and its application
in architecture and the decorative arts.
   B. Explain the revolutionary transformation which sculpture undergoes
from 1890 to 1914.
   C. Discuss the origins of modern architecture from 1880 to 1914
including the development of the skyscraper and the early work of Frank
Lloyd Wright.

IV. Expressionism
   A. Compare and contrast the stylistic elements of French Fauvism with
the German Expressionist movements of Die Brucke and Der Blaue Reiter.
   B. Discuss the emergence of printmaking as a major art form among the
German Expressionists.

V. The Cubist Revolution
   A. Identify and discuss Picasso's early works.
   B. Compare the stylistic elements of Analytic Cubism with those of
Synthetic Cubism.
   C. Identify the major Cubist sculptors and their pioneering works.

VI. Identify and examine  the impact of Cubism on the movement of Italian
Futurism, Russian Suprematism and the movement of De Stijl in
painting,sculpture and architecture.

VII. European Painting and Sculpture Between the Wars
   A. Evaluate the importance of the Dada movement on artists between the
two World Wars.
   B. Identify the key elements of Surrealism and identify the major
artists and sculptors of the movement.

VIII. Identify and examine  the major Innovations in Architecture Between
the Wars Including Expressionism, De Stijl, the International Style, the
Continued Evolution of Skyscrapers, and the Final Phases of the Career of
Frank Lloyd Wright

IX. The School of Paris Between the Wars
   A. Identify and describe the work of artists who return to
representation.
   B. Identify and compare the late works of Picasso, Matisse, and Miro
with their earlier works.

X. Evaluate the Development of International Abstraction in Painting and
Sculpture Including Constructionism and the Influence of the Bauhaus

XI. American Art: 1900-1940
   A. Identify the work of the so-called Ash Can School and compare it
with paintings from the same period being produced in Europe.
   B. Evaluate the impact of the Armory Show and the importance of Alfred
Steiglitz on the emergence of modernism in America.
   C. Compare and contrast the 1930s styles of Regionalism and Social
Realism.
   D. Identify the American Scene painters and their subject matter.
   E. Evaluate the work of the Mexican muralists and their influence on
American painters.

XII. The New York School:  Abstract Expressionism
   A. Compare and contrast Action/Gestural Painting with Color Field
Painting.
   B. Evaluate the significance of the major post-war American sculptors.

XIII. Postwar European Painting and Sculpture
   A. Evaluate the roles of CoBrA, Concrete Art, L’Art Informel on the
continent.
   B. Discuss the importance of British painters and sculptors in the
decade following World War II.

XIV. American Art of the 1960s
   A. Identify the key figures in the Pop Art movement and compare and
contrast their work with Happenings.
   B. Describe and identify key monuments of Assemblage and Environment.
   C. Compare and contrast the so-called Second Generation Abstract
Expressionists with the earlier proponents of this movement.
   D. Define the similarities and differences between Op Art, Hard-Edge
Abstraction and Minimalism.

XV. Compare and contrast Europe’s Major Movements of the ’60s: New
Realism, Pop Art and Optical and Kinetic Abstraction with the major
Movements in the U.S.

XVI. Architecture in Europe and America: 1950-1970
   A. Identify ways in which the International Style changes and is
diffused.
   B. Evaluate the late architecture of Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe
and Frank Lloyd Wright.
   C. Discuss the key issues of urban planning which emerge during this
period.

XVII. The Pluralistic Seventies
   A. Define and evaluate the meaning and impact of conceptual art.
   B. Describe key examples of Performance Art, Body Art and Video Art.
   C. Discuss the role of Earth and Site Works and how they differ from
Process Art.
   D. Examine the role of the Photo Realist artists and how their work
compares with figurative artists.
   E. Define the role of Pattern and Decoration and Feminist Art.


XVIII. The Retrospective Eighties and Post Modern Nineties
   A. Discuss the importance of both Neo-Expressionism and Appropriation
as major movements in the ’80s.
   B. Discuss the role of Graffiti and Cartoon artists.
   C. Identify ways in which Video and Electronic Art are shaping the art
of the future.
   D. Define the role of Installations in contemporary art.
   E. Identify ways in which the Neo-Abstraction of the ’80s differs
from abstract art created earlier in the century.

XIX. Identify the Major Monuments and Important Concepts of Post-Modern
Architecture

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Quizzes, Hour Exams and a Comprehensive Final Exam will constitute
50-70% of grade.

Writing/Research Assignments will constitute 20-40% of grade.

Individual Assignments/Class Participation/Attendance will constitute
5-15% of grade.

Grading Scale:  A = 100-90%
                B =  89-80%
                C =  79-70%
                D =  69-60%
                F =  59% or below

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARTH 184H

No information found.

ARTH 186

  • Title: Art History: Introduction to Asian Art
  • Number: ARTH 186
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will acquaint students with the arts and ideas that arose in India, China and Japan from the prehistoric to the early modern periods. The course will examine the aesthetic elements that mark the styles of major periods in two-dimensional, three-dimensional and architectural works. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between artistic elements and their various cultural and historical contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of art and visual artifacts of India, China and Japan from the prehistoric to the early modern periods.
  2. Identify and describe the artistic, cultural, historical import of selected works of art.
  3. Recognize and describe the function and stylistic elements of these works.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural values that these works communicate.
  5. Recognize and describe aesthetic elements which mark selected periods and/or artists.
  6. Define and demonstrate use of the terminology, classifications, and methods used in the study of art history.
  7. Explain the interdisciplinary role of art within the humanities and its relationship to current cultural issues.
  8. Discover the implications of the course material for understanding oneself.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Early Art in India, China and Japan
   A. Trace the development of the sociopolitical and technological
changes from the Paleolithic period through the first civilizations.
      1. List the characteristics of Paleolithic life in Japan.
      2. List the characteristics of Neolithic life in China.
      3. List the characteristics of life in the Indus Valley
civilization.
   B. Compare aesthetic elements differentiating early art.
      1. Recognize and describe the indigenous aesthetic elements which
mark Jomon period Japanese ceramics.
      2. Recognize and describe the indigenous aesthetic elements which
mark the ceramics of Neolithic China.
      3. Recognize and describe the aesthetic elements which mark low
relief and sculpture in the round of the Indus Valley Civilization.

II. Bronze Art from the Shang Through Han Dynasties
   A. Explain the change in function of bronzes.
      1. Compare the power structure of each dynasty.
      2. Compare religious/philosophical beliefs of each dynasty.
   B. Trace the stylistic development of bronzes.
      1. Recognize and describe the indigenous aesthetic elements which
appear in bronzes from the Shang dynasty onward.
      2. Identify new stylistic characteristics of bronzes of each
dynasty.
      3. Explain the processes used in the production of bronzes.

III. Funerary Art and Architecture from the Zhou Through Han Dynasties
   A. Explain the ways in which religious and political factors influenced
the development of funerary art and architecture.
      1. Evaluate the reign of Chin Shihuangdi.
      2. Evaluate the effect of the Great Wall of China.
   B. Explain the ways in which popular and formal systems of religious
thought were depicted in funerary art and architecture.
      1. Interpret the motifs from the Mawangdui banner and the Wu
shrine.
   C. Explain the ways in which indigenous aesthetic elements appear in
funerary art and architecture.
      1. Identify and describe significant artifacts including banners,
relief sculpture and ceramic tile.

IV. Expansion of Chinese Culture into Japan
   A. Compare indigenous Japanese architecture with continental methods of
construction.
      1. Identify and describe the great shrine complexes.
      2. Evaluate the role of nature in shrine architecture.
   B. Compare indigenous Japanese funerary art and architecture with
continental models.
      1. Identify and describe the great tomb complexes.
      2. Evaluate the role of the emperor system in tomb archaeology

V. Buddhist Art in India
   A. Summarize the major events in the iconography of the Buddha’s
life.
      1. List the ways the Buddha was depicted aniconically.
   B. Trace the development of Buddhist architecture. 
      1. Identify and describe the components of chaitya halls and
stupas.
   C. Trace the development of the major Buddhist images.
      1. Distinguish between the Buddha and Bodhisattva images.
      2. Distinguish between Mathuran, Gandharan and Gupta styles.

VI. Expansion of Buddhist Art and Architecture into China and Japan 
   A. Evaluate the impact of Buddhism on Chinese and Japanese culture.
      1. Summarize significant literary, sociopolitical and religious
changes.
   B. Explain the ways in which indigenous aesthetics changed Buddhist art
and architecture in China and Japan.
      1. Identify and describe significant painting, sculpture and
temples.

VII. Hindu Art in India
   A. Summarize the religious beliefs comprising Hinduism and distinguish
between the major deities.
      1. Identify significant sculptural examples of each deity.
   B. Identify and describe the aesthetic elements marking Hindu art.
      1. Compare and contrast early Hindu and Buddhist art.
   C. Identify and describe the characteristics and uses of Hindu
temples.
      1. Differentiate between northern and southern styles of temples.
   D. List the theories concerning the use of architectural sculpture on
Hindu temples.
      1. Evaluate the colonial response to Hindu architectural sculpture.

VIII. Chinese Secular Art 
   A. Explain the theory of painting recorded in the  Six Principles” by
Xie He.
      1. Evaluate the works of Gu Kaizhi in light of the  Six
Principles.”
      2. Compare and contrast Western attitudes toward original artworks
with the value of copying embodied in the  Six Principles.”
   B. Explain the ways in which religious and political factors influenced
the development of landscape painting.
      1. Identify and describe major motifs in painting prior to the
popularization of landscape.
      2. Compare Northern and Southern Song dynasty styles of landscape.
      3. Compare professional and literati styles of landscape.
   C. Explain the ways in which Dong Qichang influenced landscape
painting.
      1. Compare the styles of Orthodox and Individualist painting.
   D. Evaluate Western influences on Chinese painting and painting
theory.

IX. Japanese Style Painting ("Yamato-e")
   A. Explain the ways in which religious and political factors influenced
the development of yamato-e.
      1. Trace the stylistic development of yamato-e.
      2. Explain the techniques used in the production of yamato-e.
   B. Identify and describe indigenous aesthetic elements in yamato-e.
      1. Identify and interpret the differences between yamato-e and
Chinese figurative painting.

X. Zen Art and Architecture  
   A. Summarize the religious beliefs comprising Zen Buddhism and contrast
them with other major Buddhist traditions.
      1. Explain the influence of Taoism and Shintoism on Zen.
      2. Explain the ways in which Zen matched the needs of the samurai.
      3. Explain the role of monasteries in creating artworks.
   B. Define Zen art.
      1. Identify and describe the relationship between Chinese Southern
Song dynasty painting and Zen art.
      2. Identify and interpret motifs in Zen painting.
      3. Explain how Zen gardens are three-dimensional paintings.
   C. Identify and describe the aesthetic characteristics of tea ceremony
art and architecture.
      1. Identify and describe significant examples of tea huts and
bowls.
   D. Justify the benefits of the tea ceremony.
      1. Evaluate the Western response to the tea ceremony.

XI. Japanese Decorative Painting and Prints
   A. Trace the development of a decorative style of painting on folding
screens and sliding doors in the Momoyama and Edo periods.
      1. Explain the influence of castle architecture on this
development.
   B. Compare the decorative style with the Chinese ink painting tradition
as practiced in Japan.
      1. Explain the influence of the merchant class on this development.
   C. Trace the development of popular culture themes in painting and
prints. 
      1. Explain the influence of sumptuary laws on this development.
   D. Summarize the introduction of Japanese prints to the West.
      1. Evaluate the Western response to Japanese prints.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests (50-70% of grade) - A minimum of three hour exams will be
given.
 In addition, testing may include quizzes and a comprehensive final exam.

Writing Assignments (20-40% of grade) - These may include response
papers,
research papers or daily/weekly exercises.

Individual Assignments/Class Participation/Attendance (5-15% of
grade)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARTH 186H

No information found.

ARTH 188

  • Title: History of Photography
  • Number: ARTH 188
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the history of photography. Students will examine the aesthetic and technological evolution of photography as an art form, as a visual tool for and influence upon other artistic disciplines, and as a statement of perceived reality. The course will examine the elements that distinguish various aesthetic movements, the styles of major periods and the influences of individual photographers. Attention will be paid to the relationship between photographic imagery and various cultural and historical contexts. Recommended prior course is PHOT 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define terms in the vocabulary of photographic imaging and history.
  2. Trace the technological evolution of the use of light-formed images from the ancient Phoenicians and the influences of Greece and Rome, through the Renaissance and photography’s development in France in the 1800s, to the modern era.
  3. Describe the influence of painting and sculpture on the evolution of the photographic print.
  4. Describe the influence of photographic images on the evolution and style of painting and sculpture.
  5. Recognize and describe the aesthetic elements which characterize selected periods and styles, such as: Pictoralism, Straight Photography and the “f/64 Group,” and Documentary and Social Photography.
  6. Recognize and describe the elements which characterize the work of selected photographers. Describe their artistic, cultural, and historical importance and influences.
  7. Discuss the evolution of photography from being merely a tool for “copying nature” to a powerful means of visual expression in its own right.
  8. Distinguish major branches of photography, such as: photojournalism, artistic expression, social and political statements, architectural, documentary, and commercial.
  9. Discover the implications of the course material for understanding oneself by creating personal connections with selected artifacts and images which can stimulate and liberate the imagination.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Elusive Image
   A. Trace the history of the camera obscura and its relationship to the
search for accurate perspective rendering and the attempt to copy
reality.
   B. Explain the first uses of light to alter things and form images. 
   C. Describe the Romans’ use of the pinhole camera. 

II. Invention
   A. Describe “sun prints” and the first attempts to fix an image.
   B. Explain Niepce’s early experiments with heliographs.
   C. Describe the collaboration of Niepce and Daguerre and the
“official birth” of photography.
   D. Explain the invention of the calotype by William Henry Fox Talbot
and its importance.
   E. Describe the experiments of Sir John Herschel and explain the
importance of the discovery of “hypo” for “fixing” images.

III. The Daguerreotype: The Mirror with a Memory
   A. Describe the daguerreotype, its process and characteristics. Explain
the problem with speed.
   B. Explain John Goddard’s solution to the speed problem and its
effect: the popularization of portraits.
   C. Describe the impact of the daguerreotype in America and subsequent
mechanical improvements.
   D. Describe Southworth’s and Hawes’ contributions to American
portraiture.
   E. Explain why the daguerreotype’s popularity faded.  Some reasons:
one of a kind, fragile, expensive.

IV. The Calotype: The Pencil of Nature
   A. Describe William Henry Fox Talbot’s invention of the talbotype
process and its underlying principle: the development of the latent
image.
   B. Describe the work of Hill and Adamson, the first artists successful
with the calotype.
   C. Explain the influence of painting on photography.
   D. Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the competing
photographic processes: calotype, daguerreotype, and talbotype. Analyze
the effect of Talbot’s legal action of claiming rights to the process.

V. Portraits for the Millions
   A. Describe the wet collodion process, its advantages over
daguerreotypes and calotype, and its inconveniences.
   B. Describe improvements in lens technology.
   C. Describe alternative processes and their characteristics: albumen
prints, salt prints, carbon prints, and tintypes.
   D. Explain carte-de-visite vs. Nadar.

VI. Art Photography
   A. Describe the nature of the early debate about the question of
“Photography as Art.”
   B. Explain the use of photographs as allegory: telling stories with
photographs.
   C. Describe the work of Rejlander and Robinson and their use of
combination printing.
   D. Explain the evolution of the acceptance of photography as an art in
its own right.

VII. A New Form of Communication
   A. Explain the nature of the belief in the authenticity of the
photograph as truth.
   B. Describe the stereograph process and its impact on society and
understanding of foreign locales.
   C. Describe the work of war photographer Roger Fenton and the impact of
his images of the Crimean War.
   D. Describe the work of society and war photographer Matthew Brady and
the impact of his images of the American Civil War.
   E. Describe the images and their effects of “expeditionary
photographers.” Example: the establishment of national parks and opening
of the wilderness.

VIII. The Conquest of Action
   A. Describe Eadweard Muybridge’s study of “animal locomotion” and
explain its significance.
   B. Compare Muybridge’s motion photographs with the work of Marray.
   C. Explain the importance of the development of the dry-plate process.
   D. Describe the significance of the establishment of Kodak and George
Eastman’s contributions to the popularization of “photography for the
masses.”
   E. Describe the impact of the development of small, hand-held cameras
and the “detective” camera.
   F. Explain the importance of Jacob Riis’ documentary projects and
their impact on society.

IX. Pictorial Photography
   A. Review the work of the early pictorialists Henry Peach Robinson and
Peter Henry Emerson. Explain their effect on the revision of the concepts
of photography as an art.
   B. Describe the organization “The Linked Ring” and its influence.
   C. Explain the importance and influence of Alfred Steiglitz, his
galleries and publications.
   D. Describe the influence of the photographer organizations the Photo
Secession and the Camera Club of New York.

X. Straight Photography
   A. List and describe characteristics of “straight” photography.
   B. Contrast straight photography with pictorialism.
   C. Discuss the influence of Steiglitz and Paul Strand.
   D. Describe the “f/64 Group.” Explain its philosophy and influence
on Western photography.

XI. In Conquest of Form
   A. Describe the influence of the other visual arts on photography.
   B. Review the interrelationship of movements like Cubism and Dadaism
and photography.
   C. Describe the contribution of Alexander Rodchenko and other Eastern
Europeans.
   D. Describe how photographers began expressing social and political
issues.

XII. Instant Vision
   A. Explain the impact of amateur photographers and the increasing
popularity of snapshots.
   B. Review the work of Jacques Henri Lartigue as a prime sample of the
dedicated amateur.
   C. Describe the beginnings of photojournalism, its importance and
influence.
   D. Review the photography of Erich Solomon and Andre Kertesz. Describe
their influence.
   E. Describe the work and philosophy of Henri Cartier-Bresson. Explain
the concept of “The Decisive Moment.”
   F. Describe the work of Harold Edgerton and his invention of the
electronic flash. Review his work with the flash to reveal previously
unseeable phenomena.

XIII. Documentary Photography
   A. List the characteristics of documentary photography.
   B. Review the work of early documentary photographers Lewis Hine and
Jacob Riis.
   C. Explain what the Farm Security Administration was and the impact of
the work of its photographers on society, American visual history, and on
other photographers.
   D. Review the work of European documentary photographers Eugene Atget
and August Sander.

XIV. Photojournalism
   A. Describe the characteristics of journalistic photography.
   B. Discuss the use by magazines such as Harper’s Weekly of
photographs as “proof.”
   C. Explain the importance of the invention of the half-tone printing
process.
   D. Review the rise of the “photo essay” and the impact of magazines
such as Life.

XV. In Color
   A. Describe how early photographers added color to photographs.
   B. Review the technological development of color films. Explain the
importance of Kodachrome.
   C. Describe the additive and subtractive color processes.
   D. Review the work of photographers who use(d) color as an integral
part of their aesthetic.

XVI. New Directions
   A. Describe the Polaroid process and its impact.
   B. Review technological improvements and their impact on imaging and
aesthetics.
   C. Identify the work and describe the influence of the major late 20th
century art photographers, such as: Uelsman, Callahan, Siskind, Arbus,
White, Larry Clark, Weston, Adams.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests: 2 to 4 written quizzes which stress factual knowledge. (25%
–
50%)

Slide recognition quiz(s): 1 to 3. (10% – 25%)

Paper(s): 1 or 2 written reports or essays on instructor assigned topics
or photographers. (25% – 50%)

Final exam: Comprehensive test derived from questions from the previous
quizzes. (10% – 25%)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ARTH 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: ARTH 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Art History not normally taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to: 1. Undertake complex readings and research in the designated topic 2. Define key terms and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic 3. Utilize research and analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study 4. Engage in a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the Special Topic 5. Develop a personal point of view about the Special Topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research, and other media.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor, and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Art History faculty prior to its being offered. The Arts, Humanities and Social Science Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The AHSS Division will also determine when and if the course may be taught based on the instructional needs of both the department and the division. Individual faculty members are responsible for the creation of Special Topics courses and for seeking approval to teach them. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a two-year sequence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

1. Course work may transfer to universities only as elective credit

2. A student cannot take more than two Special Topics courses in Art History.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).