Honors Program (HON)

Courses

HON 100   Honors Seminar* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

This course will introduce students to the theory and practices of interdisciplinarity, the skills and tools required for honors coursework, and undergraduate collaborative and individual research. While closely examining a specific topic, students will develop their skills in research, reading, writing and in-depth discussion.

HON 250   Honors Forum: In Search of Solutions (3 Hours)

This course will focus on two topics during the semester and how those topics affect the local, national and global communities. The course complements other courses in the curriculum by applying the dual emphases of specific content and skill development to the areas of interaction, analysis, synthesis and conflict resolution. Students will study each issue in a historical and contemporary context, develop a greater understanding of the issues, and take a position on the issues. This position will be subjected to further challenge and dialogue. In this course, the process of reflecting, researching, analyzing and evaluating are as important as content. As points of view concerning the issue are developed, the students must articulate and defend these viewpoints as they are challenged by others and make judgments among alternative options. The first topic is selected by the faculty members, then midway through the semester, the students will select the second topic. This course will require students to use many forms of research, including the Internet and electronic databases. In addition, students will be expected to use e-mail for sharing information with classmates and instructors.

HON 250H   HON: Honors Forum: In Search of Solutions (1 Hour)

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. Prerequsite: Honors department approval.

HON 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites : 3.5 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

HON 292   Special Topics:* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites : Department approval.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of honors pedagogy not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

HON 100

  • Title: Honors Seminar*
  • Number: HON 100
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course will introduce students to the theory and practices of interdisciplinarity, the skills and tools required for honors coursework, and undergraduate collaborative and individual research. While closely examining a specific topic, students will develop their skills in research, reading, writing and in-depth discussion.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply critical thinking skills to an interdisciplinary issue

  2. Synthesize a broad range of knowledge through the study of primary sources

  3. Develop effective presentation skills including oral and poster presentations

  4. Demonstrate research and evaluation skills

  5. Function effectively in a collaborative environment

  6. Explore honors program requirements

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interdisciplinarity and Critical Thinking

A. Define essential terms for interdisciplinary studies.

B. Discuss techniques of critical thinking.

C. Function effectively in group discussion.

II. Research

A. Differentiate between reliable and unreliable sources.

B. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.

C. Discuss research types in different academic fields.

D. Develop a thesis.

E. Compile a literature review.

F. Perform research on an interdisciplinary topic.

G. Synthesize research into a written format.

III. Leadership

A. Research leadership opportunities.

B. Assess leadership qualities.

IV. Service Learning

A. Define service learning.

B. Perform service.

C. Reflect on service experience.

V. Cultural and Global Awareness

A. Develop an awareness of individual biases and reactions to people who are of significantly different cultures and backgrounds.

B. Explore the impact of cultural events on society.

VI. Presentation

A. Create an oral presentation on an interdisciplinary topic.

B. Create a poster presentation on an interdisciplinary topic.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-50%    Discussion and class participation
50-60%    Projects and assignment

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HON 250

  • Title: Honors Forum: In Search of Solutions
  • Number: HON 250
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will focus on two topics during the semester and how those topics affect the local, national and global communities. The course complements other courses in the curriculum by applying the dual emphases of specific content and skill development to the areas of interaction, analysis, synthesis and conflict resolution. Students will study each issue in a historical and contemporary context, develop a greater understanding of the issues, and take a position on the issues. This position will be subjected to further challenge and dialogue. In this course, the process of reflecting, researching, analyzing and evaluating are as important as content. As points of view concerning the issue are developed, the students must articulate and defend these viewpoints as they are challenged by others and make judgments among alternative options. The first topic is selected by the faculty members, then midway through the semester, the students will select the second topic. This course will require students to use many forms of research, including the Internet and electronic databases. In addition, students will be expected to use e-mail for sharing information with classmates and instructors.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Develop the critical thinking abilities necessary to explore the issues and be able to:
  2. Identify the basis of the issues under consideration and their various parts.
  3. Demonstrate research and evaluation skills necessary to complete the course requirements.
  4. Trace specific issues from a historical perspective noting the significant turning points.
  5. Describe the extent to which these issues are problematic in the world, various nations and the local community.
  6. Present cogent and plausible solutions to specific problems.
  7. Verbally and in writing, critically evaluate the presentations and ideas of guest speakers.
  8. Evaluate possible solutions from the standpoint of viable implementation and possible consequences.
  9. Function effectively in group discussion.
  10. Learn to use the Internet as a research resource.
  11. Learn to use electronic databases as a research resource. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction and Overview of the Course 
  A. The forum concept 
     1. Describe how to prepare for the seminars.  
     2. List and describe discussion group techniques. 
  B. The forum project 
     1. List and describe research skills. 
     2. Describe the project design, including its elements and evaluation criteria.

II. Defining the Issue 
  A. History and development of the issue 
     1. Describe the origins of the issue as problem. 
     2. Explain the contributing factors in history. 
  B. Early attempts at resolution 
     1. Explain any factors preventing early resolution of the problem. 
     2. Explain and illustrate the growth and changes in the issue. 
  C. The problem in a global context  
     1. Assess the intensity of the problem globally. 
     2. Outline the attempts at international solutions. 
  D. The problem at the national level 
     1. Assess the intensity of the problem nationally. 
     2. Outline the attempts at national solutions. 
  E. The problem at the local level 
     1. Assess the intensity of the problem locally. 
     2. Outline the attempts at local solutions.
 
III. Developing a Point of View 
    A. Develop one or more preliminary perspectives of the issue, reflecting initial research and discussion of the topic.
    B. Interpret data and related information.  
       1. Identify assumptions. 
       2. Explore alternatives. 
       3. Consider consequences. 
    C. Refine point of view into a formal thesis, argumentative position or hypothesis.

IV. Project Preparation 
    A. Describe the theoretical approaches to the issue, including:
       1. Deviance (individual)
       2. Value conflict (group)
       3. Social disorganization (structures)
    B. Describe the empirical approaches to the issue, including:
       1. Research experiments
       2. Surveys
       3. Case studies
       4. Participant observation
    C. Evaluate alternative possibilities
       1. Assess the evidence.
       2. Anticipate new problems.
       3. Describe the costs and benefits of proposed solutions. 
       4. Define any obstacles to implementation. 
    D. Preparation of the project  
       1. Create proposal/prospectus for the project.  
       2. Select the medium.
       3. Analyze available resources.

V. Project Presentation 
   A. Present the project orally and in writing.
   B. Defend the project, its conclusions, and its recommendations. 
   C. Reassess and reevaluate the project's position and support based on group and professors' feedback.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Both instructors will grade all students' works. Each will give an
individual grade and the two grades will be averaged to make the grade for
that assignment.

Class participation: Each student will be expected to actively participate
in a productive manner in the classroom discussions. This will include
preparing questions based over the week's readings for use during the
discussion. These questions will be turned in to the instructors. 25%

Sharing of research sources and other pertinent information. This includes
regular updating of useful websites and the basis for your evaluation of
these websites. This information will most often be passed along via
E-mail. You will also contribute titles of articles for a cumulative class
bibliography on the topics. 15%

Topic #1 Written work. Daily written work.   15%
Topic #1 Solution paper.                     15%
Topic #2 Written work. Solution paper.       15%
Final Project                                15%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. ALL PAPERS are expected to be word-processed! Please have a copy for each of the instructors and one for yourself. All work is expected to be handed in on time; failure to do so will result in at least a 5% reduction in grade. All papers are due on the first date of the assignment even though all papers may not be read and discussed on that day.
  2. The instructors expect that you will be in attendance at each of the class meetings. Because most of what is done in this class cannot be made up at a later date, being absent will adversely affect your grade!
  3. This course is offered by the Honors Program. If you would like more information about the Honors Program, stop by the Honors Office in GEB 237 or look up the Honors Program home page at www.jccc.net/acad/honors/ on the Internet, or talk to Ruth Fox, the director of the Honors Program. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HON 250H

No information found.

HON 291

No information found.

HON 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: HON 292
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to diverse areas of honors pedagogy not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Prepare complex readings and research in the designated topic.
  2. Define key terms, and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic.
  3. Utilize research and/or analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study.
  4. Formulate a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the special topic.
  5. Develop a personal point of view about the special topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research and other means.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course content outline and competencies will vary, depending on the special topic being offered. The Special Topics course outline must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course content outline and competencies must be written in outcomes-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Honors Director prior to its being offered. The Honors Advisory Committee and Honors Director will review each Special Topics course to be offered, and approve the course content.  The Honors Department will also determine when and if the course may be taught.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments, research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a four-semester sequence.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).