Political Science (POLS)

Courses

POLS 122   Political Science (3 Hours)  

This course provides students the opportunity to explore the discipline of political science and to discover how political scientists study politics in the contemporary world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and online.

POLS 122H   HON: Political Science* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

POLS 124   American National Government (3 Hours)  

This course examines the components of the public policy-making process. Topics of study include American political culture, constitutional principles, intergovernmental relations, public opinion, political parties, interest groups, media, the influence of the constant campaign of candidate-centered politics, budget construction, bureaucracy, and decision-making institutions. 3 hrs./wk.

POLS 126   State and Local Government (3 Hours)

This course examines the executive, legislative, judicial and service functions of state and local government in the United States in general and in Kansas in particular. The course includes guest lectures by elected officials, government personnel and community activists. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 126H   HON: State and Local Government* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

POLS 132   Introduction to Comparative Government (3 Hours)

This course compares the different political structures of many of the world's most important countries, including economic development, patterns of government and administration, party structures and policy formation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 132H   HON: Introduction to Comparative Government* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

POLS 135   International Relations (3 Hours)  

This course analyzes the conflict and cooperation among nation-states. Students will study contemporary problems and how they relate to power, war, terrorism, diplomacy, international organizations and the future of the nation-state system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 135H   HON: International Relations* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

POLS 175   Environmental Policy and Law (3 Hours)

This is a survey course in environmental regulation and will provide an overview of key environmental laws and policies including major provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act (CWA),the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA),the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and The Endangered Species Act (ESA). 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 192   Political Theory (3 Hours)

This course examines the relationship between citizens and government, and competing justifications for political authority. We will focus on the Western political tradition, in particular Plato, Locke, Mill and Marx. Most of class work consists of participation in historical simulations involving Ancient Athens and Revolutionary America, with some attention to other periods. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 200   Model United Nations (3 Hours)

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning and understanding international organizations and participating in competitive intercollegiate Model United Nations. This course orients students with the history, structure and function of the United Nations and those facets of an assigned country. This orientation will assist students in their preparation for the Model United Nations (MUN) conference during the spring semester. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

POLS 200H   HON: Model United Nations* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

POLS 245   Introduction to Public Administration (3 Hours)

This course provides students the opportunity to explore public administration and public policy including institutional arrangements for the provision of public services and the study of those arrangements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

POLS 270   Political Science Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: By permission of the political science internship coordinator, completion of 6 credit hours in political science courses at JCCC or another college within the last two years, earning a minimum of a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in those political science courses, and a written recommendation from your political science classroom instructor. Students must complete all necessary arrangements for this program the semester prior to the internship.

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate supervisors in state, local or national government settings or not-for-profit organizations and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career or avocation in community service. The student spends the equivalent of 10 hours per week performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 150 hours.

POLS 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

POLS 122

  • Title: Political Science
  • Number: POLS 122
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students the opportunity to explore the discipline of political science and to discover how political scientists study politics in the contemporary world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and online.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Exhibit an understanding of the meaning of politics and how the political system differs from other aspects of society (culture, economics, religious).
  2. Explain the nature and characteristics of political science as a social science.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of the different specializations in political science.
  4. Understand the ideas and concepts that shape the study of political science.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Language of Political Science

A. Identify and define key concepts and terms important in the vocabulary of political science.

B. Apply, as appropriate, the vocabulary of political science to the subject matter of selected case studies.

II. The Fundamentals of Political Science

A. Distinguish among the major fields in political science:

1. Comparative Politics

2. International Relations

3. Political Theory

4. American Government and Politics

5. Public Policy

6. Additional subfields, such as political economy and political behavior

B. Evaluate the events under examination in selected case studies using appropriate concepts from the above fields of political science.

C. Discuss how political scientists examine the varieties of political systems and the roles of individuals and groups in the political system, including each of the following:

1. Decision-Making

2. Public Policy

3. Leadership

4. Conflict and Cooperation

III. The Craft of Political Science Research

A. Describe and explain the role of theory for understanding politics.

B. Evaluate the role of methodology by utilizing basic units of analysis.

C. Analyze and explain selected case studies utilizing the following analytical methods:

1. Thesis statement

2. Empirical analysis

3. Data collection

4. Hypothesis testing

D. Identify and discuss conclusions drawn from analyses.

IV. Political and Economic Systems

A. Describe the origin of the modern state.

B. Explain the development of the modern state.

1. The role of war in the development of the modern state

2. The role of ideology in the development of the modern state

C. Describe challenges to the state:

1. Challenges from above the state (such as globalization and terrorism)

2. Challenges from below (such as ethnic and nationalist movements)

3. How and why states are losing their ability to make economic policy

4. How and why globalization is affecting state policy

D. Discuss the relationship of culture to the modern state and its policies.

E. Identify the basic aspects of political economy.

1. Economic development

2. Distribution of economic resources and inequality

F. Compare and contrast, as appropriate, political and economic systems.

1. Capitalist

2. Socialist

3. Developing world

G. Describe the relationship between economic development and political systems.

V. The Role of Ideas and Enduring Questions for Political Science

A. Analyze and explain the motivators for political action (such as ideology, nationalism, religion) and apply representative examples of each category to case studies.

1. Political economic case

2. Political culture case

3. Conflict and cooperation case

4. Environmental and human rights case

B. Examine enduring questions of political science, such as:

1. Is politics essential for human beings?

2. Are matters resulting from family life justifiably political?

3. How is the public vs. private distinction best explained?

4. Can the private control of property produce order? Is the marketplace a legitimate political concern?

5. What ends should government serve? Are governments to be allowed to exceed ideas of right and wrong?

6. Are unjust governments still due obedience?

7. Are wars inevitable? Why and when do nation-states go to war?

8. Does the moral legitimacy of countries depend on their willingness and ability to protect human rights?

9. Who is responsible for the well-being of migrants and refugees?

10. Are the structures, rules and procedures of global society fundamentally just?

11. Who is responsible for protecting the environment, that is, the atmosphere, oceans and land shared by all?

VI. Active Learning Politics

A. Recognize and evaluate political assumptions and implications pertaining to government and politics.

B. Synthesize and apply information to given political situations and problems.

C. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various methods of conflict resolution to provided examples.

D. Synthesize knowledge about politics, including networking and bargaining, and the political factors shaping contemporary politics.

E. Review the connections between the academic studies of politics and apply to real-world issues.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50 % of grade         Examinations

50 % of grade         Projects/Assignments

100 %                      Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 122H

No information found.

POLS 124

  • Title: American National Government
  • Number: POLS 124
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines the components of the public policy-making process. Topics of study include American political culture, constitutional principles, intergovernmental relations, public opinion, political parties, interest groups, media, the influence of the constant campaign of candidate-centered politics, budget construction, bureaucracy, and decision-making institutions. 3 hrs./wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe, using examples, the constitutional foundations of American government, including constitutional government; the concepts of federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances and individual rights; the evolution of intergovernmental relations; and the expansion of individual and civil rights as a result of judicial review.

  2. Describe, using examples, the fundamentals of American political culture, including the not entirely compatible values upon which it rests, the interpretations of democracy embraced, and underlying ideological principles.

  3. Identify and explain the avenues open to the public to participate in the political decision-making process, including public opinion polling, political parties, elections, interest groups, and the media.

  4. Describe the working relationship among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government with reference to their respective powers, limitations on those powers, areas of friction, and points of public access.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamentals of American Government
   A. Describe, using examples, the constitutional foundations of American
government, including:
      1. The role played by a constitution in a political system both as a
source of and a limitation on the power of government.
      2. The role played by federalism, separation of powers, checks and
balances and individual rights, including:
         a. Distribution of power within the government.
         b. Limitations on the exercise of that power.
      3. The evolution of intergovernmental relations from dual federalism
through cooperative, creative and new federalism, including:
         a. The influence of grants-in-aid on the relationship between the
federal and state governments.
         b. The role of the Supreme Court in the evolution of the
relationship between federal and state governments.
      4. The role of judicial review in the evolution of both individual
rights and civil rights, including:
         a. The due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and the
expansion of individual rights.
         b. The equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and
the expansion of civil rights.
   B. Describe, using examples, the fundamentals of American political
culture, including:
      1. The core values upon which it rests and the tension inherent in
the relationship among these values.
      2. The different interpretations of democracy embraced:  response,
procedural and substantive.
      3. The basic principles of classical liberalism and their
application in the Declaration of Independence.

II. Avenues of Participation in the Political Process
   A. Describe, using examples, the sources of and influence of political
opinion, including:
      1. The key agents of the political socialization process.
      2. The major divisions within American public opinion, including
ideological currents.
      3. Relationship between socio-economic background and political
opinion.
      4. The socio-economic factors that influence rates of political
participation and voter turnout.
   B. Describe the role of public opinion polls in both the election and
policy making processes, including:
      1. The mechanical factors critical to the construction of accurate
measures of public opinion.
      2. The role of polling in the candidate-centered politics of the
constant campaign.
      3. The influence of public opinion on the policy-making process.
   C. Compare and contrast the traditional role of political parties in
competitive political systems with the role of political parties in the
American candidate-centered political system.
      1. Explain both the presence and the persistence of a two-party
system in the United States.
      2. Analyze how each of the following has diminished the role of
political parties in the election process:  candidate-centered politics,
the constant campaign, primary elections, polling, interest groups, PACs,
public financing, media-dominated campaigns, and the television media.
      3. Assess the effectiveness of elections as instruments of
accountability and channels of citizen influence.
   D. Evaluate the role of interest group activity in the policy-making
process with reference to Madison’s system of checks and balances as
well as his concept of general welfare described in Federalist #10.
      1. Compare and contrast the pluralist theory of interest group
activity with Ted Lowi’s interest group liberalism.
      2. Explain the role of interest groups and federal bureaucrats in
iron triangles and issue networks.
   E. Compare and contrast the normative role of the media in a
competitive political system with those of signaler, common-carrier,
watchdog, and public representative roles.  Evaluate the media’s
performance in each role.
      1. Explain how representatives of the media are held accountable for
their actions.
      2. Compare and contrast the legal protections accorded private
individual and public figures against libel and slander.

III. Governing Institutions
   A. Explain how the candidate-centered politics of the constant campaign
have influenced the Congressional election process.
      1. Discuss the role of primary elections, public opinion polling,
campaign finance reform laws, interest groups and PACs, media campaigns,
and television media in congressional election and re-election strategy.
      2. Analyze the role played by redistricting and gerrymandering, the
advantages of incumbency, and campaign finance reform legislation on the
re-election of incumbents.
   B. Explain how candidate-centered and entrepreneurial politics within
the framework of the constant campaign have reshaped the work of the
members of legislative branch, including congressional staff.
      1. Describe the organizational structure within which Congress
develops public policy.
      2. Compare and contrast party government with party-line voting.
      3. Compare and contrast the differing interpretations of a
representative’s role: trustee, delegate, politico and broker.
   C. Explain how the candidate-centered politics of the constant campaign
have influenced the presidential election process.
      1. Discuss the role of primary elections, public opinion polling,
public financing, interest groups and PACs, media campaigns, television
media, and the electoral college in presidential election and re-election
strategy.
      2. Identify and describe those factors outside the control of
campaign strategists that are critical of the success of a presidential
election campaign.
   D. Compare and contrast the role of the chief executive in a
presidential and parliamentary system of government.
      1. Identify those factors critical to a president’s ability to
provide leadership for the country and direction for the policy-making
process.
      2. Describe those factors that have affected the growth in power and
size of the executive branch.
      3. Compare and contrast the latitude of discretionary authority
exercised by the president in the formulation and conduct of foreign as
opposed to domestic policy.
   E. Distinguish among the following components of the federal
bureaucracy, describing the differing roles performed by each:
departments, regulatory agencies, independent agencies, government
corporations and commissions.
   F. Discuss the conflict inherent in a political system based on checks
and balances and popular sovereignty and our need for bureaucracy to
implement legislation in a large complex society.
      1. Compare and contrast Frederick W. Taylor’s bureaucratic theory
of neutral competency with the reality of bureaucratic practice.
      2. Identify and describe the origins of the bureaucracy’s
quasi-legislative and quasi-judicial powers.
      3. Describe and evaluate the effectiveness of legislative executive
and judicial branch oversight of bureaucratic agencies.
      4. Describe the role of agency personnel in issue networks and iron
triangles.
   G. Describe the U.S. dual court system, including:
      1. The structure of the federal court system and areas of
jurisdiction.
      2. Access to judicial decision.
      3. Method of judicial appointments and conditions under which
offices are held.
   H. Explain the Madisonian Dilemma  (the conflict inherent in the
practice of judicial review in a majority-rule democracy).
      1. Compare and contrast the following theories of judicial
policy-making authority: judicial activism and judicial restraint,
including the concepts of judicial review and stare decisis.
      2. Describe those factors that restrain the Court’s use of
judicial power.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  complete, concrete, correct and
clear writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 126

  • Title: State and Local Government
  • Number: POLS 126
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines the executive, legislative, judicial and service functions of state and local government in the United States in general and in Kansas in particular. The course includes guest lectures by elected officials, government personnel and community activists. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the environment within which local and state politics operate.

  2. Identify the powers given to the states under the U.S. Constitution.

  3. Explain the functions, power bases, and means of dispersing power at the state and local levels.

  4. Compare and contrast the different types of local governments, including that within your community.

  5. Discuss sources of state and local funding and the factors affecting taxing and spending decisions.

  6. Describe the major problems facing state and local governments and evaluate the policies addressing these problems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Constitutional Environment of State and Local Governments
   A. Discuss the problems with most state constitutions.
   B. Describe measures to reform state constitutions and the politics of constitutional reform.

II. The Intergovernmental Framework for State and Community Politics
   A. Explain the division of powers between the national and state governments.
   B. Describe the constitutional evolution from dual federalism through cooperative federalism to creative or New Federalism.

III. Financial Constraints on State and Local Government
   A. Identify the major purposes for which the state and local
governments spend your money.
   B. Describe the methods used by state and local governments to raise their revenue.

IV. Channels of Citizen Influence: Participation, Public Opinion, and Interest Groups
   A. Describe the major patterns of political participation and the attempts to increase participation of the poor and the racial minorities.
   B. Assess the influence of public opinion on government and public policy.

V. Channels of Citizen Influence: The Ballot Box, Parties, and Direct Action
   A. Assess the effectiveness of elections as instruments of accountability and as channels of citizen influence.
   B. Describe the organization and role of political parties in state and local government.

VI. The Institutions of Local Government
   A. Compare and contrast the different types of local governments and the functions they perform.
   B. Discuss machine-style politics and the reforms that emerged as a reaction.

VII. The Dynamics of Community Politics
   A. Compare and contrast the different theories for explaining who runs community politics.
   B. Discuss the changing role of urban mayors and the challenges they face.

VIII. State Legislatures and Public Policy
   A. Describe the three main functions performed by state legislatures.
   B. Assess the impact of legislative reform movements on state legislatures over the past two decades.

IX. Governors and the Challenge of Executive Leadership
   A. Describe the role of governors in policymaking.
   B. Discuss the major challenges to gubernatorial leadership and sources of strength for governors in coping with these challenges.

X. Administrators and the Implementation of Policy
   A. Explain the perennial tensions between administrators and executives.
   B. Assess administrative reorganization as an approach to state government reform.

XI. Courts, Crime, and Corrections in American States
   A. Explain how courts play important roles establishing and implementing public policy.
   B. Discuss how politics is inherently embedded in the judicial process in American states.

XII. Poverty and Social Welfare Policies
   A. Compare and contrast conservative, liberal and radical values in understanding and developing poverty policy.
   B. Describe the roles of federal, state and local governments in carrying out social welfare policy.

XIII. Education
   A. Discuss how state, local and federal governments work together in providing public education.
   B. Describe how state and local governments responded in the 1980s and 1990s to the demands for educational reform.

XIV. Infrastructure Policies: Transportation, Housing, and Community Development
   A. Discuss the major elements of transportation policy, including public transportation options.
   B. Describe the basic problems of housing and programs to make housing more readily available to the middle class and the poor.

XV. Regulating The Environment
   A. Describe the national environmental policy for managing water and air pollution.
   B. Discuss the reciprocal relationship between state and local governments and regulation on the one hand and the political economy of states on the other.

XVI. State and Community Economic Development Policies
   A. Discuss how changes in the national economy and foreign competition have affected states and communities.
   B. Describe the economic development strategies that states and communities follow to improve their economic situation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grades will be based on a minimum of the following:

 1. Three exams stressing short essay written responses indicating
understanding of the basic terms and concepts indicated in the above
course objectives.
2. One class discussion leadership project displaying the ability to
verbally interpret and discuss an important issue in state government.
3. One written paper displaying the ability to research and analyze an
important state or local government issue.

See individual instructor’s syllabus for grading scale.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 126H

No information found.

POLS 132

  • Title: Introduction to Comparative Government
  • Number: POLS 132
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course compares the different political structures of many of the world's most important countries, including economic development, patterns of government and administration, party structures and policy formation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain how and why comparative analysis is undertaken and the concepts and methods used in comparing different systems of governments including general approaches such as most similar systems” and most different systems” designs.
  2. Discuss the common pitfalls of comparative political analysis including such problems as level of analysis, overgeneralization, the ecological fallacy, and ethnocentrism.
  3. Explain the concept of political culture and the major differences in political cultures among important Western and non-Western political cultures and among developed and under-developed states.
  4. Discuss constitutions as both a source of and a limitation on the power of the state.
  5. Identify the major processes and functions common to all types of governments.
  6. Compare and contrast the differing systems of government, their environment, and their policy-making processes. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Comparative Political Analysis
   A. Explain why we study comparative politics and the major methods used
in comparing different systems.
   B. Explain the importance of constitutions as both a source of and a
limitation on the power of the state.
   C. Discuss the interrelationship of political development and political
economy.
   D. Compare and contrast the different legislative structures, the
distribution of power within the legislature, and the relationship of the
legislature to other governmental institutions.
   E. Describe the role of the executive in presidential and parliamentary
systems of government.
   F. Compare and contrast the role of interest groups and political
parties in the formation of public policy and the distribution of
political power.
   G. Compare the different types of electoral systems and their effect on
political parties and democratic representation.
   H. Discuss the sources of political socialization and the development
of political attitudes.

II. Area Studies
   A. Compare and contrast the following for the governments of Great
Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Canada, Russia, Mexico and Nigeria:
      1. The political background and culture.
      2. The governmental structure and the distribution of power among
the major governmental branches.
      3. The role of political parties and electoral systems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grades will be based on a minimum of the following:

 1. Three exams stressing short essay written responses reflecting
understanding of the basic terms and concepts indicated in the above
course objectives.
 2. One class discussion leadership project displaying the ability to
verbally interpret and discuss an important issue in state government.
 3. One paper indicating the ability to research and analyze an important
state or local government issue.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 132H

No information found.

POLS 135

  • Title: International Relations
  • Number: POLS 135
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course analyzes the conflict and cooperation among nation-states. Students will study contemporary problems and how they relate to power, war, terrorism, diplomacy, international organizations and the future of the nation-state system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the predominant perspectives on the study of world politics.
  2. Identify the major actors in international politics and the changing relationship among them.
  3. Discuss the politics of global welfare including the effects of colonialism, impediment to development in the Global South, major threats to environmental security and prospects for sustainable development.
  4. Evaluate the causes of global conflicts and methods for its management.
  5. Discuss the major issues facing our global society as we enter the new century. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studying World Politics
   A. Describe the major forces of continuity and changes in today’s
global system
   B. Discuss how perceptions influence images of reality.
   C. Compare and contrast the rival theoretical interpretations of world
politics.

II. The Actor and Their Relations
   A. Describe the international and internal determinants of states’
foreign policy behavior.
   B. Define the rational actor decision making model.
   C. Explain the constraints of foreign policy making and why the foreign
policy decision making process often deviates from the rational actor
model.
   D. Identify the major causes of misperceptions in foreign policy
decision making.
   E. Describe the principle explanations of the causes of World Wars I
and II and the Cold War.
   F. Discuss European Imperialism and its impact on the Global South.
   G. Compare and contrast the theories attempting to explain the lack of
development in much of the Global South.
   H. Discuss the most important international organizations and the major
factors limiting their effectiveness.
   I. Assess the impact of multinational corporations on global society

III. The Politics of Global Welfare
   A. Compare and contrast the theories of mercantilism and capitalism.
   B. Describe the role of an economic hegemon.
   C. Explain the effects of the globalization of finance, trade,
production and labor.
   D. Identify current global demographic population patterns and trends.
   E. Compare and contrast the optimistic and pessimistic demographic
outlook for the future.
   F. Explain the major threats to environmental security and the
preservation of the global commons.
   G. Discuss the concept of sustainable development and the measures
necessary for the global society to achieve that goal.

IV. Global Conflict and its Management
   A. Identify the continuities and changes in armed conflicts in the
world.
   B. Compare and contrast rival theories of the causes of armed
conflict.
   C. Discuss the causes of and the issues involved with reducing the
amount of armed conflict within states.
   D. Describe the changing nature of power in the international system.
   E. Identify the current trends in military spending and the economic
consequences of military preparations for war.
   F. Discuss the value of nuclear weapons as deterrence and defense.
   G. Assess the effectiveness of the major instruments of coercion.
   H. Describe alliances and their impact on national and global
security.
   I. Discuss the concept of collective security and the factors in the
global system precluding establishment of an effective collective security
institution.
   J. Compare and contrast principles and structures international law
with the principles and structures of national law.
   K. Describe the major elements of the United Nations and the impact of
the end of the Cold War on its effectiveness.
   L. Assess political integration as a potential path to peace.
   M. Discuss the theory of the democratic peace.

V. Toward the Twenty-first Century
   A. Summarize the major issues facing the global society in the coming
century and assess the prospects for peace, security and continued
development.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Grades will be based on a minimum of the following:

 1. Three examinations stressing short essay written responses indicating
understanding of the basic terms and concepts indicated in the above
course objectives.
 2. One class discussion leadership project displaying the ability to
verbally explain and defend a position on an important international
issue.
 3. One written paper displaying the ability to:
    a. Research the history of an important international issue. 
    b. Track and summarize events occurring throughout the semester
concerning that issue.
    c. Define United State policy concerning the issue.
    d. Evaluate whether U.S. policy is working and how it might be
improved.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 135H

No information found.

POLS 175

  • Title: Environmental Policy and Law
  • Number: POLS 175
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This is a survey course in environmental regulation and will provide an overview of key environmental laws and policies including major provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act (CWA),the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA),the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and The Endangered Species Act (ESA). 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify environmental issues and problems which underpin environmental policy and laws.

  2. List various methods for understanding environmental policy and law.

  3. Describe and differentiate among the various principles of environmental policy and law.

  4. Examine environmental policy development and the legal process.

  5. Identify the legal foundations of environmental law.

  6. Distinguish procedural versus substantive law.

  7. Outline the major provisions of key environmental laws and policies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sources of Policy and Law

A.Identify legal databases and online policy resources.

B. Engage in the use of legal databases and policy resources.

II. Policy and Legal Cases

A. Review and analyze policy and brief legal cases.

B.Identify and evaluate arguments raised in prepared case briefs and policy statements.

III. Legal Foundations

A. Describe the historical foundations of environmental policy and law.

B. Examine sources of policy, law and legal procedures.

IV. Procedural versus Substantive Law

A. List procedural aspects of key environmental policies and laws.

B. Identify detailed substantive provisions of selected environmental policies and laws.

V. Provisions of Key Environmental Policies and Laws

A. Outline major provisions of selected environmental policies and law.

B. Identify the key provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

C. Identify the key provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA).

D.List the elements of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RRCA).

E.List the elements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA).

F.Recognize the key provisions of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

VI. Emerging Environmental Policies and Law

A. Provide examples of current local, state, and national environmental policies and laws.

B. Identify possible environmental law and policy solutions to emerging problems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60%    Exams and Quizzes
10-20%    Case Briefs and Class Participation
10-20%    Legal and Policy Research Paper
10-20%    Legal and Policy Research Assignments

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 192

  • Title: Political Theory
  • Number: POLS 192
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines the relationship between citizens and government, and competing justifications for political authority. We will focus on the Western political tradition, in particular Plato, Locke, Mill and Marx. Most of class work consists of participation in historical simulations involving Ancient Athens and Revolutionary America, with some attention to other periods. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare selected major authors in the Western political tradition.

  2. Recognize fundamental political concepts.

  3. Discern the assumptions and values that underlie political theory.

  4. Relate aspects of political theory to current political problems.

  5. Appraise concepts and principles of political thought.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concepts of Political Theory

A​. Compare and contrast key concepts of political theory such as “Authority,” “Justice,” and “Democracy.”

B. Identify the competing definitions of human nature.

II. Origins and Historical Developments of Thought

A. Assess the significance of Plato’s Ring of Gyges.

B. Assess the importance of political thought on the French and American Revolutions.

C. List the impact of political theory on the industrial revolution.

III. Common Core of Values and Principles

A. Recognize the common core of values and principles important to an ideology.

B. Examine the ideologies of liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism, fascism and anarchism.​

IV. Political Theorists

A. Outline the key arguments developed in Plato.

B. Identify the theories of Niccolo Machiavelli, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and John Locke.

C. Identify the meaning of utilitarianism developed by John Stuart Mill.

D. Describe the different key arguments made by Karl Marx.

V. Substantive Questions

A. Articulate an answer to the question, "How did the Ancients, in particular Athenians in the time of Socrates, understand the relationship between citizens and government?"

B. List possible answers to the question, "What are competing visions of democracy and individual rights, and how were they contested during the American Revolution?"

C. Discuss the question, "What is the American understanding(s) of democratic politics, and how is that understanding challenged by ideas like radical democracy and Marxism?"

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60%    Exams and Quizzes
10-20%    Class Participation
10-20%    Paper
10-20%    Assignments

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 200

  • Title: Model United Nations
  • Number: POLS 200
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed for students who are interested in learning and understanding international organizations and participating in competitive intercollegiate Model United Nations. This course orients students with the history, structure and function of the United Nations and those facets of an assigned country. This orientation will assist students in their preparation for the Model United Nations (MUN) conference during the spring semester. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the basic concepts used in international relations and diplomatic negotiations.
  2. Identify and explain international organization and international cooperation as it is applied to the United Nations.
  3. Define and explain parliamentary procedure as practiced by the United Nations.
  4. Demonstrate effective research, writing, public speaking and leadership skills.
  5. Describe the foreign policy of a selected member state.
  6. Explain policy statements on given topics under discussion at the "real" United Nations.
  7. Discuss and debate international issues.
  8. Participate as delegates at Model United Nations Conferences.
  9. Participate in planning and directing the Metro Kansas City Model United Nations Conference for area high schools hosted by JCCC. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Language of International Relations and International
Organizations
   A. Identify and define key concepts and terms important in the
vocabulary of international relations and international organizations
   B. Apply, as appropriate, the vocabulary of international relations and
international organization to the subject matter of selected case studies

II. International Organizations and the United Nations
   A. Identify the institutions that characterize the international
system
   B. Explain the structure and functions of United Nations 
   C. Discuss the principles of the United Nations
   D. Identify the World Trade Organization
   E. Identify the World Bank and International Monetary Fund
   F. Describe a non-governmental Organization
   G. Describe the activities of multinational corporations

III. International Cooperation and the United Nations
   A. Identify complex interdependence
   B. Explain the concepts of regime and global governance 
   C. Discuss types of conflict resolution
   D. Identify peacekeeping and international security 
   E. Identify economic and social problems
   F. Discuss human rights
   G. Discuss problems regarding the natural environment
   H. Discuss arms control, limitation, and disarmament
   I. Discuss trade and economic development

IV. Researching and Understanding the Topic Area
   A. Develop fundamental research techniques and critical thinking
skills
   B. Research general background
   C. Explain united nations involvement 
   D. Describe a country’s foreign policy and position on an issue

V. Writing the Position Paper
   A. Develop a thesis
   B. Define concepts and terms
   C. Arrange sentences in an organized fashion
   D. Provide sufficient detail and support
   E. Employ correct grammar and usage

VI. Understanding and Developing United Nations Resolutions
   A. Identify the form of the resolution
   B. Outline the procedures and process of resolutions

VII. Participating in Public Speaking
   A. Communicate the significance of facts, concepts, and ideas in spoken
and written English which is clear, precise, and logical
   B. Design and present an opening speech
   C. Present speech on a country’s position 

VIII. Understanding the Rules of Procedure 
   A. Discuss Rules of Procedure
   B. Participate using Rules of Procedure

IX. Model United Nations Competition
   A. During a given semester, the student will participate in a minimum
of one intercollegiate Model United Nations Conferences
   B. Following an intercollegiate Model United Nations Conference, the
student will evaluate performance by critiquing specific experience

X. Active Learning
   A. Recognize and evaluate political assumptions and implications
pertaining to international politics
   B. Synthesize and apply information to given political situations and
problems
   C. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various methods of
conflict resolution to selected issue areas
   D. Synthesize knowledge about politics, including networking and
bargaining, and the political factors shaping international politics
   E. Review the connections between the academic studies of international
politics and apply to real-world issues
   F. Practice the art of diplomatic negotiation and mechanisms of
diplomacy.

XI. Developing Leadership Qualities
   A. List core planning and organizing goals
   B. Direct meetings and involve members in making decisions
   C. Develop coaching and training skills
   D. Discuss facilitating team learning
   E. Discuss team building, recruiting and selecting team members

XII. Conference Planning and Directing 
   A. Develop instructions for helping high school students understand the
Model United Nations Simulation (MKCMUN)
   B. Judge quality of high school student participation at MKCMUN

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Papers                30% 
Participation         50%
Projects/Assignments  20% of grade
Total                100%

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 - 100 % 
 B = 80 -  89 % 
 C = 70 -  79 % 
 D = 60 -  69 % 
 F = 59 or below  

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Prior to travel students are required to attend preparation meetings, fundraise and participate in a Metro Kansas City Model United Nations Conference.
  2. Students will be required to travel to the Model United Nations Conference. Students will contribute to the cost of this experience; the amount will be determined based on fund raising efforts.
  3. All participants will abide by the JCCC Students Rights and Responsibilities Student Code of Conduct and the guidelines set forth by the agency being served.
  4. This course requires research and public speaking skills, Internet navigation and use of e-mail. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 200H

No information found.

POLS 245

  • Title: Introduction to Public Administration
  • Number: POLS 245
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students the opportunity to explore public administration and public policy including institutional arrangements for the provision of public services and the study of those arrangements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define, using examples, the basic concepts used in political administration and public policy.
  2. Describe each of the major components of public administration and public policy.
  3. Explain, using examples, various methods for understanding and explaining public policy.
  4. Describe and differentiate among the various theories and models of public administration and public policy.
  5. Examine the policy process.
  6. Identify and explain policy issues.
  7. Apply political knowledge to examples of “real world” politics. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Language of Public Administration and Public Policy
   A. Identify and define key concepts and terms important in the
vocabulary of public administration and public policy
   B. Apply, as appropriate, the vocabulary of public administration and
public policy to the subject matter of selected case studies

II. The Fundamentals of Public Administration and Public Policy 
   A. History and trends in public administration
      1. Outline the ideas of Max Weber
      2. Describe how to be a “neutral” public administrator
      3. Discuss how public administrators are policymakers
   B. Public organizations
      1. Outline different models of organizations
      2. Identify the characteristics of control, power, and authority in
Organizations
   C. Public management
      1. Explain problems of public management
      2. Identify performance measurement and public program evaluation
   D. Ethics
      1. Describe public sector ethics
      2. Discuss practicing ethical public administration
   E. Leadership
      1. Identify who are public administrators
      2. Discuss public personnel systems
   F. Administrative law
      1. Identify elements of administrative law
      2. Discuss consequences of administrative law

III. The Craft of Public Administration and Public Policy Research
   A. Describe and explain the role of policy analysis for understanding
public administration
   B. Evaluate the role of methodology 
   C. Analyze and explain selected case studies utilizing the following
analytical methods
      1. Thesis statement
      2. Empirical analysis
      3. Data collection
      4. Hypothesis testing
   D. Identify and discuss conclusions drawn from analyses
   E. Discuss how political scientists examine the varieties of public
policy, including each of the following:
      1. Decision making
      2. Policy process
      3. Leadership
      4. Conflict and cooperation

IV. Theories and Paradigms of Public Administration and Public Policy
   A. Describe different public management systems
   B. Identify public management behavior

V. Policy Process
   A. Agenda setting
      1. Identify different interest groups
      2. Discuss the career-political interface
   B. Discuss the formulating of policy
   C. Identify policy legitimation
   D. Explain elements of policy implementation
   E. Discuss policy evaluation

VI. Public Personnel Systems
   A. Civil service/merit systems
      1. Discuss recruitment
      2. Discuss promotion
   B.  Identify the compensation system
   C.  Discuss different cases of labor relations

VII. The Role of Ideas and Enduring Questions for Public Policy
   A. Analyze and explain the motivators for political action (such as,
ideology) and apply representative examples of each category to case
studies
   B. Examine different policy issues, such as
      1. Public opinion
      2. Criminal justice
      3. Heath and welfare
      4. Education
      5. Economics 
      6. Environment
      7. Human and civil rights

VIII. Active Learning Politics
   A. Recognize and evaluate political assumptions and implications
pertaining to government and politics
   B. Synthesize and apply information to given political situations and
problems
   C. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various methods of
conflict resolution to provided examples
   D. Synthesize knowledge about politics, including networking and
bargaining, and the political factors shaping contemporary politics
   E. Review the connections between the academic studies of politics and
apply to real-world issues

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          50 % of grade
Projects/Assignments  50 % of grade
Total                100 %

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 - 100 %  
 B = 80 -  89 %  
 C = 70 -  79 %  
 D = 60 -  69 %  
 F = 59 or below 

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 270

  • Title: Political Science Internship*
  • Number: POLS 270
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 150
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 150

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: By permission of the political science internship coordinator, completion of 6 credit hours in political science courses at JCCC or another college within the last two years, earning a minimum of a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in those political science courses, and a written recommendation from your political science classroom instructor. Students must complete all necessary arrangements for this program the semester prior to the internship.

Description:

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate supervisors in state, local or national government settings or not-for-profit organizations and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career or avocation in community service. The student spends the equivalent of 10 hours per week performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 150 hours.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply the academic study of political science to the type of duties performed and observations made during the course of the internship.
  2. Demonstrate the successful integration of academic study in political science classes into work in state, local or national government settings or not-for-profit organizations.
  3. Successfully perform internship tasks and functions under direct supervision in a mature and professional manner.
  4. Apply skills acquired during the internship application process to future career-related employment, volunteer work or community service.
  5. Prepare documentation, both personally and professionally, for a career choice, avocation or community service in the field of government. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Apply skills acquired during the internship application experience
to future career-related employment, volunteer work or community service.
   A. Prepare to find an appropriate internship setting. 
      1. Write a resume. 
      2. Successfully complete a mock interview.
      3. Identify appropriate internship sites. 
   B. Apply for and secure an internship site in an appropriate setting
confirmed by a letter of acceptance.
      1. Develop learning objectives, strategies, tasks, and strategies
appropriate to the internship in consultation with Internship Coordinator
and site supervisor.
      2. Complete a contract between JCCC & internship agency or
representative signed by the Political Science Internship Coordinator,
student and site supervisor.

II. Successfully perform internship tasks and functions under direct
supervision in a mature and professional manner.
   A. Identify responsibilities, tasks, and duties of the internship.
   B. Maintain a log of hours worked and major responsibilities
completed.
   C. Demonstrate ability to complete successfully the tasks assigned.
   D. Work systematically and logically through the various issues that
arise in the internship setting.
   E. Develop human relations skills needed for the position.
   F. Display sensitivity to the needs of the diversity of staff, clients
and/or constituents encountered in the internship setting.
   G. Adhere to policies and procedures of the internship site. 
   H. Respect the confidentiality of privileged information regarding
staff, clients, and/or constituents.

III. Demonstrate successful integration of classroom study and daily
internship work in journal entries, written reports, and discussions or
seminars.
   A. Outline the relationship between the student’s individual
education objectives and strategies and the internship duties and
activities.  
   B. Analyze the relationship between classroom knowledge and internship
related tasks.

IV. Prepare documentation, both personally and professionally, for a
career choice or avocation.
   A. Construct a portfolio that documents the steps in a successful job
search and successful job performance.
   B. Complete a self-assessment of personal growth in the selection of a
career or avocation based on internship experiences.
   C. Complete a self-assessment of professional growth in the selection
of a career or avocation based on observations made and duties
performed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Student Portfolio: Each student will maintain and keep a current
portfolio containing all documents developed during the course of the
internship experience. The portfolio will include, but is not limited to,
each of the following:
   a. Preparation Materials: Orientation materials, application materials
and resume.      
   b. Log: Each student must maintain a daily log signed by their site
supervisor documenting the equivalent of ten on-site hours worked per week
over a fifteen week period. 
   c. Report: Each student will complete three written reports outlining
the relationship between the specified internship educational objectives
and strategies and their internship activities.  
   d. Paper: Each student will write a 3-page (minimum) paper analyzing
their internship experience from an academic point of view.   
2. Discussions: The student will attend a minimum of three internship
seminars and/or meetings with the Political Science Internship
Coordinator. 
3. Supervisor Evaluation: The on-site internship supervisor will complete
two evaluations of the student intern’s progress and performance.
4. Self-Assessment: The student will complete a professional and personal
self-assessment based on the internship experience. 

All written assignments will be produced with considerable care and
attention to mechanical as well as intellectual content.  The quality of a
student’s writing will be taken into consideration when assigning grades.
 
In determining final grades, assignments are weighed as follows:  
  Log(or Journal) of Activities, reports–25-30% of final grade
  Supervisor evaluation/self-assessment–25-30% of final grade
  Discussions/seminars/final reflection paper–40-50% of final
grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. As a representative of JCCC, student behavior must adhere to the following standards: a) The JCCC Student Code of Conduct; b) Policies and procedures of the internship placement site; c)Confidentiality of privileged information regarding staff, clients, and/or constituents to which the student is privy.
  2. Transportation to the internship site is the responsibility of the student.
  3. The student must meet all “employment” requirements of the selected internship site. These requirements may include background investigation, records checks, statements of confidentiality, and/or specific prerequisites and/or physical requirements. SOME APPLICANTS MAY BE INELIGIBLE FOR SOME PLACEMENTS DUE TO INTERNSHIP AGENCY OR OFFICE CRITERIA.
  4. Failure of the student to complete requirements and/or dismissal by sponsoring internship agency or office site precludes successful completion of this course and award of college credit.
  5. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Visit with Political Science Internship Coordinator and JCCC Career Services Center regarding eligibility, credit-enrollment, appropriate internship sites, and job search procedures. Attend Internship Orientation session and complete Internship Program application process. Contact the selected site and satisfactorily complete the placement process, and secure a letter of acceptance. Complete course contact with Political Science Internship Coordinator and enroll in the course. Assume responsibility for securing and maintaining a portfolio of all necessary paperwork for the course. Perform required internship duties and responsibilities in keeping with JCCC and internship placement agency policies and procedures.
  6. JCCC RESPONSIBILITIES: Conduct pre-internship activities with student. Develop a contract describing internship responsibilities, expectations, and requirements signed by the student, internship site supervisor, and Political Science Internship Coordinator. Conduct three meetings and/or seminars with the student to review the student’s progress toward meeting student learning objectives for the internship and the relationship between the student’s academic work and internship activities. Maintain periodic contact with the designated internship site supervisor. Review the student daily logs to determine compliance with internship contact hour requirements.
  7. SITE REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNSHIP AGENCY: Conduct required pre-employment activities with student. Designate an internship site supervisor. Accept and sign student internship contract. Supervise all internship activities previously agreed upon by sponsoring agency and the Political Science Internship Coordinator. Complete a mid-term and final supervisory evaluation and submit to Political Science Internship Coordinator.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

POLS 291

No information found.