History (HIST)

Courses

HIST 120   Local and Kansas History (3 Hours)

This course introduces students to the history of Kansas from the beginning of the Late Ceramic Period (1500) to the present. Emphasis will be on the examination of the living patterns of the various peoples who have inhabited the region during this time. This course will also analyze the social and economic factors and political objectives that transformed the central plains from the domain of the bison-hunting Plains Indian to a society based in a market-agricultural economy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 125   Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance (3 Hours)

The course explores the major developments, ideas and personalities that have shaped Western civilization. Organized around a readings and discussion format, students engage some of the world's most provocative and influential literature. Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance begins with the ancient cultures of the Middle East, Greece and Rome and follows the development of Western thought from the medieval period to the Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. It is not necessary to take HIST 125 before HIST 126.

HIST 125H   HON: Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 126   Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age (3 Hours)

The course explores the major developments, ideas and personalities that, for the past 500 years, have shaped Western civilization. Organized around a readings and discussion format, the course allows students to engage some of the world's most provocative and influential literature. Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age begins with the three revolutions that define modernity the Scientific, French, and Industrial. The course also highlights the new ideologies of the 19th century and more recent themes of modernization and the cultural crisis of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. It is not necessary to take HIST 125 before HIST 126.

HIST 126H   HON: Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 128   Medieval History (3 Hours)

Medieval History is a detailed survey of the period from late Roman Antiquity to the early Renaissance. Primary and secondary texts and visual resources will be used to illuminate the period that saw first the decline into relative stagnation caused by barbarian onslaughts and then gradual reemergence of a powerful civilization that revitalized itself by renewing the insights of ancient times. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 129   Early Modern Europe 1500-1789 (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the economic, social and political developments that have shaped the modern world: the Renaissance; the Catholic and Protestant Reformations; the rise of nation-states; the new inter-cultural contact between Europe and the world; the Commercial Revolution and the Enlightenment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 129H   HON: Early Modern Europe 1500-1789* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 130   European History Since 1789 (3 Hours)

This course covers the major political, intellectual, and economic and social developments in Europe from the end of the 18th century to the present, including modern political ideologies, major wars, the growth of strong governments, the effect of modern science on social and political thought, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of large middle classes and the effect of modern technology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 130H   HON: European History Since 1789* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 132   History of Africa (3 Hours)

This course introduces students to the history of Africa until the present. It emphasizes the fundamental characteristics and long-term developments in the evolution of African political and socioeconomic institutions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 135   Eastern Civilization (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the societies and cultures of Asia. Through lectures, readings and discussions, the course will focus on aspects of the history, politics, art, literature and economics of China, Japan and India. The major traditional themes and concepts of these civilizations will be stressed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 135H   HON: Eastern Civilization* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 137   African American Studies (3 Hours)

This course surveys the major themes and developments in African-American culture and history from the colonial period to the present. The course is divided into three five-week segments. Each segment relates to a historical period: slave, post-emancipation and contemporary. Each segment also permits a flexible, interdisciplinary approach that will include literature, fine arts and the social sciences. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 140   U.S. History to 1877 (3 Hours)  

This survey course in U.S. history will emphasize developments and trends in American society from the early period of discovery and settlement through Reconstruction. Topics will include the Colonial era, the Revolutionary period, the Federalist era, the expansion of the Republic during the mid-19th century, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. The emphasis will be on analysis and interpretation of these developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 140H   HON: U.S. History to 1877* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 141   U.S. History Since 1877 (3 Hours)  

This survey course will emphasize developments and trends in American society from the 1870s to the late twentieth century. Topics will include the Reconstruction era, industrialization, immigration, reform movements, World Wars I and II, social and cultural trends, and foreign policy. Emphasis will be on analysis and interpretation of these developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 141H   HON: U.S. History Since 1877* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 143   Ancient Greece, the Near East and Egypt (3 Hours)

This course will present the background to the rise of Ancient Greece by examining first its Near-Eastern and Egyptian predecessors. Then it will examine Greece's historical development from the early Aegean phase through its Dark, Archaic, classical and Hellenistic phases. In addition to political, military, and social and economic developments, Greek literature and art will also be highlighted. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 145   History of Ancient Rome (3 Hours)

This course will cover Roman civilization and history from its emergence until the fifth century C.E. In addition to political, military, and social and economic developments, Roman literature and art will also be highlighted. Rome's significance for later western civilization will be noted. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 145H   HON: History of Ancient Rome* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 149   History of India (3 Hours)

This course is a broad and thematic introduction to the history of India. The course covers Indian culture and civilizations from the ancient Indus River Valley Civilization to the present nation state of India. Multiple modes of inquiry and source materials are important for historical analysis, and this course considers literature, art, architecture and other forms of cultural aesthetics in relation to political, economic, material, and religious developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 150   Islam: Religion and Civilization (3 Hours)

This course covers the context in which Islam arose; the career of the Prophet Muhammad; the main teachings and practices of the religion; the Qur'an and other early Islamic literature; subsequent political developments in the religion and its spread; its main religious branches; its history during the Middle Ages; the Christian crusades and their consequences; the major components of Islamic civilization, including law, the arts, literature, philosophy, science, and mathematics; Sufi; the effects of Western imperialism upon Islamic states; major developments in Islamic thought and practice since the seventeenth century; the Islamic diaspora and Islam today. HIST 150 is the same course as REL 150 and HUM 150; enroll in one only. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 150H   HON: Islam: Religion and Civilization* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 151   World History I: Traditional World (3 Hours)  

This course provides students an introduction to the history of the major world civilizations up to approximately 1500. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify the major political, social, economic and technical developments in the histories of Egypt, Mesopotamia, other Near Eastern civilizations, Rome, Greece, India, China, sub-Saharan Africa, pre-Colombian America and medieval Europe. Students will be able to define the concept of a traditional, as opposed to a modern, society. They will be able to compare these societies with each another and with the modern society of the contemporary United States. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 151H   HON: World History I: Traditional World* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 152   World History II: Modern World (3 Hours)  

This course provides students an introduction to the history of the world since approximately 1500. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe and analyze the development of modernism, which occurred first in the West, including the scientific revolution, secularism, industrialism and the rise of new political ideologies. They will be able to trace the expansion of modernization in both the Western and non-Western worlds and the response to modernism in non-Western countries. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 152H   HON: World History II: Modern World* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 160   Modern Russian History (3 Hours)

This course examines Russian history within a Eurasian context. It is a study of three centuries of the social, political, economic and cultural forces that shaped Russian history, beginning with a survey of the events that place Russia outside the Western historical tradition. 3 hrs. lecture/ wk.

HIST 160H   HON: Modern Russian History* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 162   Modern Latin America (3 Hours)

This course is an examination of the economic, social, political and cultural history of Latin America since independence. Regional identities, such as Central America, and independent national states, such as Cuba and Mexico, are explored. Literary and intellectual trends, together with contemporary popular culture, are featured in the course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 165   History of China (3 Hours)

This course will survey the history of China from its Neolithic origins until the twenty-first century by examining major overall themes, including political and military developments, social formations cultural trends and China's role in the larger world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 167   Introduction to History: Japan (3 Hours)

This course will provide an introduction to Japan from the earliest period of human settlement on the Japanese archipelago to the present. In so doing, it will explore political, economic, social, cultural and religious developments. Such an exploration will be useful for the further study of East Asian and Japanese history, as well as other aspects of Japanese language and cultural study. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 180   North American Indian History (3 Hours)

This course surveys the major themes of the history of Indigenous peoples (also known as American Indians and Native Americans) in North America from the emergence of human life on the continent through the present. Topics include Indigenous life prior to European migration, colonialism, adaptation and resistance to European and American expansion, and efforts to maintain sovereignty. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 195   History of the Middle East (3 Hours)

This course introduces students to the environmental, political, economic, religious and ethnic landscape of the Middle East and Northern Africa. Though its focus is historical, the course prepares students for an understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the region. Particular attention is paid to the Middle East and Northern Africa as the intersection of three monotheistic traditions, the central role of aridity and natural resources in its development, the interfacing of multiple cultures with Islam, the religious and ethnic diversity of the region today, and modern encounters with the nation-state system and western secularism. Students will also explore the contributions of the region to the larger world and the interactions of Middle Eastern and Northern African countries and people with Asia, Europe and the United States. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 195H   HON: History of Middle East* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

HIST 200   Eurasia: History and Cultures (3 Hours)

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the rich diversity of the often marginalized civilizations and tribal peoples that inhabit the Caucasus and Central Asia. Students will examine the ethnic, social, economic, religious, artistic and geopolitical influences shared by the inhabitants of these regions. The indigenous sedentary and nomadic populations located along the Silk Road and Eurasian Steppe were repeatedly subjected to conquest by the superior military powers that competed for domination of these trade arteries. Students will trace the succession of cultural influences that swept over the areas. Students will conclude their study with an examination of the post-Soviet development of these regions, investigating how these peoples define themselves within the modern nation-state system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 250   American West (3 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the cultural, geographical, and historical context of the Trans-Mississippi West. Students will explore through three conceptual lenses: as region, a specific place defined by unique physical characteristics; as frontier, a mobile line of settlement; and as a perception, a set of mythic stories and images that attempt to convey national morals and values. Special attention is paid to the ethnic and racial diversity of the region, and to the major historical changes from pre-European contact to the present. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

HIST 270   History Internship* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Permission of the History Internship Mentor; completion of 6 credit hours in history courses at JCCC or another college within the last two years, earning a minimum of a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in those history courses and a written recommendation from your history classroom instructor.

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate supervisors in state, local or national museum or research facilities or other not-for-profit organizations and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career or avocation in community service. The student spends the equivalent of 10 hours per week performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 150 hours.

HIST 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

HIST 292   Special Topics: (1-3 Hour)

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of history, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

HIST 120

  • Title: Local and Kansas History
  • Number: HIST 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces students to the history of Kansas from the beginning of the Late Ceramic Period (1500) to the present. Emphasis will be on the examination of the living patterns of the various peoples who have inhabited the region during this time. This course will also analyze the social and economic factors and political objectives that transformed the central plains from the domain of the bison-hunting Plains Indian to a society based in a market-agricultural economy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the major features of the physical geography of Kansas.
  2. Identify and describe the major population groups that have inhabited Kansas.
  3. Identify and relate the living patterns of the population groups to the physical geography of Kansas.
  4. Explain the evolution of and characterize the intercultural contact between Europeans and Plains Indians.
  5. Analyze the significance of Kansas in relation to political, social and economic issues within the United States of the 19th and 20th century.
  6. Explain the political, social and economic factors within Kansas, and the local region that contributed to the critical events in territorial and Civil War Kansas.
  7. Describe the patterns of settlement in Kansas after the Civil War.
  8. Explain the impact of the introduction of transportation and communications technology into Kansas in the years after the Civil War.
  9. Describe the evolution in economic conditions from the second half of the 19th century to the early 20th century Kansas.
  10. Analyze the political reforms in Kansas in the late 19th and early 20th century in relation to economic and environmental factors.
  11. Explain the impact of world war and global depression in Kansas.
  12. Explain the economic and political relationship of Kansas to the United States as a whole in the years since World War II. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Kansas:  The Land and People in the Late Ceramic Age (1500-1825)
   A. Identify the major regions that make up the physical geography of
Kansas.
   B. Describe the economics and cultures of the major population groups
of the region.
   C. Analyze the impact of physical geography on the economies and
cultures of regional population groups.
   D. Compare and contrast the economies and cultures of the peoples of
the region.

II. Europeans on the Central Plains (1540-1803)
   A. Identify the major European explorations of the Central Plains.
   B. Explain the respective objectives of the various explorations of the
region.
   C. Describe the political and economic relationships between the
various Europeans and Indian populations of the region.
   D. Analyze the economic and cultural impact of European exploration on
local Indian populations.

III. American Westward Expansion (1803-1854)
   A. Describe the assessment of early American exploration of the Central
Plains.
   B. Explain the Indian policy of the United States in relation to the
Louisiana Purchase.
   C. Analyze the historical significance of the Christian missions to the
Indians of Kansas.
   D. Describe the impact of the Santa Fe and Oregon Trails on American
perceptions of Kansas.
   E. Explain the effect of major political and territorial events within
the United States on the status of Kansas in the 1820s to 1850.

IV. Territorial and Civil War Kansas (1854-1865)
   A. Discuss the congressional debate surrounding the Kansas-Nebraska
Act.
   B. Summarize the legal status of the Indians in Kansas at the time of
the Kansas-Nebraska Act.
   C. Describe the settlement process of Kansas after the Kansas-Nebraska
Act.
   D. Discuss the historical factors that contributed to the image of
Bleeding Kansas.”
   E. Analyze the social and political events that led to a free soil
Kansas.
   F. Explain the policies and events that led to violent conflict on the
Missouri-Kansas border.
   G. Assess the significance of the border conflict on the Civil War and
the United States as a whole.

V. Post-War Settlement and the Transformation of Kansas (1865-1880)
   A. Identify the sources and reasons for post-war settlement in Kansas.
   B. Explain the pattern of settlement and living conditions for these
settlers.
   C. Describe the impact of the development of the railroad in Kansas.
   D. Identify and explain the significance of the cattle towns in
Kansas.
   E. Discuss the environmental challenges of farming on the Central
Plains.

VI. Economic and Political Reform Movements (1880-1916)
   A. Analyze the relationship between farmers and the railroads in
Kansas.
   B. Identify the goals of the Farmers’ Alliance movement in Kansas.
   C. Explain the political and economic agenda and success of the
Peoples’ Party.
   D. Discuss the reform goals of progressive Republicans in Kansas after
1900.
   E. Compare and contrast the respective agendas of the Populists and
Progressives.

VII. The Impact of World War and Global Depression in Kansas (1916-1941)
   A. Explain the effects of World War I on farming activity in Kansas.
   B. Analyze the relationship between war farm policies and early
depression.
   C. Describe the environmental conditions in Kansas in the 1930s.
   D. Explain the impact of the Depression on the relationship between
Kansas and the federal government in the policies of the New Deal.

VIII. World War II and the Post-War Transformation of Kansas
(1941-Present)
   A. Describe the major economic and social consequences of World War II
on Kansas.
   B. Discuss the post-war economic strategies of Kansas agriculture and
businesses.
   C. Analyze the factors leading to expanded urbanization in Kansas.
   D. Explain the impact of the global market on Kansas farming and
business.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. At least two essay examinations accounting for 40-60% of the course
grade.
2. Two book reviews or one research paper accounting for 30% of the course
grade.
3. Three or four quizzes based on multiple choice and short answers or
class discussion accounting for 10-20% of the course grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 125

  • Title: Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance
  • Number: HIST 125
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The course explores the major developments, ideas and personalities that have shaped Western civilization. Organized around a readings and discussion format, students engage some of the world's most provocative and influential literature. Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance begins with the ancient cultures of the Middle East, Greece and Rome and follows the development of Western thought from the medieval period to the Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. It is not necessary to take HIST 125 before HIST 126.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the major historical periods of Greco-Roman civilization.
  2. Identify, describe and evaluate some of the major contributions of Greece and Rome to Western philosophy, literature, science and religion.
  3. Trace the theological and institutional development of Christianity in its first five centuries.
  4. Describe the political, economic and social structure of Western Civilization in the Middle Ages and explain the values reflected in the medieval outlook.
  5. Evaluate the Renaissance and Reformation era as a point of transition between medieval and modern society.
  6. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in oral and written form.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Greek Civilization

A. Compare and contrast Greek culture in the Archaic, Classical and Hellinistic periods.

B. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Greeks to Western art.

C. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Greeks to Western philosophy.

D. Describe Greek society and politics in the polis, and analyze the relationship between democratic political life and the development of Greek philosophy.

II. Roman Civilization

A. Describe and analyze the transformation of Rome from a republic to an empire.

B. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Romans to Western art.

C. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Romans to Western philosophy.

D. Describe and analyze the decline of Roman imperial power in the fourth and fifth centuries.

III. Judaism – Christianity

A. Describe the general transformation of traditional religions and religious practices in the first centuries C.E.

B. Describe the political, social and theological context in Palestine from which Christianity emerged.

C. Identify and discuss the sources for the theology, characteristics and practices of early Christianity.

D. Describe and analyze the relationship between Christianity and the state in the late Roman Empire.

IV. Medieval Europe

A. Describe the general political, social and economic characteristics of Europe during the middle Ages.

B. Identify and analyze the legacy of Greco-Roman civilization in medieval Europe.

C. Compare and contrast medieval and modern outlook.

V. Renaissance and Reformation

A. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Renaissance to Western art.

B. Identify and evaluate the contributions of the Renaissance and Reformation to Western philosophy.

C. Discuss the role of the Renaissance and Reformation in the transformation of Western culture from medieval to modern.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30%-50%                         Discussions

50%-70%                         At least two written examinations

100%                                Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 125H

  • Title: HON: Western Civilization: Ancient World to the Renaissance*
  • Number: HIST 125H
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 126

  • Title: Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age
  • Number: HIST 126
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The course explores the major developments, ideas and personalities that, for the past 500 years, have shaped Western civilization. Organized around a readings and discussion format, the course allows students to engage some of the world's most provocative and influential literature. Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age begins with the three revolutions that define modernity the Scientific, French, and Industrial. The course also highlights the new ideologies of the 19th century and more recent themes of modernization and the cultural crisis of the 20th century. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. It is not necessary to take HIST 125 before HIST 126.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the origins, major developments and outcomes of the Scientific Revolution.
  2. Describe the contributions of the Enlightenment to the modern outlook.
  3. Describe the contributions of Romanticism to the modern outlook.
  4. Identify and evaluate the commentators on and critics of Western culture in the nineteenth century.
  5. Identify and analyze the crises and challenges confronting Western society in the twentieth century.
  6. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in oral and written form. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment

A. Describe the transformation of Western science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

B. Analyze the contribution of the Scientific Revolution to the modern outlook.

C. Describe and evaluate the Enlightenment as a political, social and economic commentary on Western society in the eighteenth century.

D. Discuss and evaluate the relationship between Enlightenment thought and the political and economic transformations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

II. Romanticism

A. Identify the major characteristics of Romanticism.

B. Compare and contrast Romanticism and Enlightenment thought.

C. Describe the contributions of the Romantic movement to Western culture.

D. Describe and evaluate the legacy of Romanticism for the modern world.

III. Nineteenth Century Western Culture and Its Critics

A. Describe the new scientific theories and innovations in the nineteenth century and their influence on Western society.

B. Describe the political theories and developments that define the nineteenth century as an "age of progress" for Western Civilization.

C. Identify the cultural dissenters and analyze and evaluate their critique of nineteenth century political, social and economic progress.

IV. From Western to World Civilization &

A. Identify and analyze the events and developments that define the cultural crisis of the twentieth century.

B. Describe and evaluate the legacy of Western Civilization for the modern world.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30%-50%             Discussions

50%-70%             At least two written examinations

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 126H

  • Title: HON: Western Civilization: Scientific Revolution to the Modern Age*
  • Number: HIST 126H
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 128

  • Title: Medieval History
  • Number: HIST 128
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Medieval History is a detailed survey of the period from late Roman Antiquity to the early Renaissance. Primary and secondary texts and visual resources will be used to illuminate the period that saw first the decline into relative stagnation caused by barbarian onslaughts and then gradual reemergence of a powerful civilization that revitalized itself by renewing the insights of ancient times. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the transformations of the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity.
  2. Examine the survival of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire.
  3. Describe the economic, political, cultural and religious challenges Western Europe faced in the age of post-imperial kingdoms.
  4. Examine the agrarian economy and feudal society of medieval Europe, and the beginnings of the economic renewal after the year 1000.
  5. Characterize medieval kingship in Germany, France and England.
  6. Trace and evaluate the revival of the Roman Catholic Church between 1000 and 1300.
  7. Describe the expansion of Christianity in northern and eastern Europe, its cultural consequences and the conflicts it generated, as well as the major developments in the Byzantine Empire.
  8. Discuss the revival of European trade and the subsequent growth of towns and cities and medieval intellectual life.
  9. Show how the demographic, economic, political and religious crises of the 14th century affected Europe.
  10. Explain the new ideas that arose in late medieval Europe and that led to the Renaissance.
  11. Explore the contemporary relevance of medieval topics, including the creation of medieval businesses, Christian religious forms and practices, and the Crusades as viewed by modern conservative Islamists. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Transformations of the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity
   A. Outline the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine.
   B. Evaluate the altered nature of Christianity’s relation to the
Roman state and its consequences for the church and non-Christians.
   C. Describe the patterns of barbarian interaction with Rome and explain
how their incursions into Roman territories weakened the Western empire.
   D. Examine the main intellectual trends and figures in the period of
Late Antiquity.
   E. Describe the transformation of the Mediterranean economy during this
period.

II. Survival of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire
   A. Describe the military threats faced by the Byzantines from the
barbarians and the rise of Islam.
   B. Trace developments in Roman law, art and history in early
Byzantium.
   C. Compare these developments with those in Ostrogothic and Lombard
Italy.

III. Economic, Political, Cultural and Religious Challenges in Western
Europe 
   A. Show how the Roman Catholic Church survived the barbarian onslaughts
and utilized monasticism to maintain civilization and convert barbarian
kings.
   B. Examine the history, government, culture and institutions of the
kingdom of the Franks.
   C. Describe the Islamic conquest of Spain and resulting civilization.
   D. Discuss the Slav and Magyar migrations into eastern Europe, the
Norse attacks and settlements in western Europe, and the challenges these
presented to Europe.
   E. Describe the Iconoclast Controversy in Eastern Christianity and the
Frankish-Papal Alliance in Western Christianity.
   F. Discuss the Carolingian Empire and “Renaissance,” and evaluate
their significance.

IV. Agrarian Economy and Feudal Society of Medieval Europe
   A. Describe medieval agriculture and the manorial system.
   B. Describe how the feudal bonds evolved from Roman times and discuss
controversies about the nature and extent of feudalism.
   C. Show how agricultural production increased after 1000 and led to
geographic expansion of settlements in Europe.
   D. Characterize the nature and quality of medieval rural life.

V. Medieval Kingship in Germany, France and England
   A. Describe the crumbling of the Carolingian Empire.
   B. Show how the Ottonian kings of Germany strengthened their grasp on
central Europe and Italy, and advocated a sacred theory of kingship.
   C. Discuss Saxon England and its government, and the Norman conquest
and its consequences.
   D. Compare the German and English patterns of government with each
other and with that of the Capetian monarchs of France.

VI. Revival of the Roman Catholic Church
   A. Characterize the medieval theology of redemption
   B. Chart the diocesan and parochial structures of the Church and the
recruitments of clergy, and evaluate their effectiveness.
   C. Discuss the economic and religious bases of medieval monasteries.
   D. Show how the Clunaic and Cistercian monastic reforms led to the
revitalization of the Roman Catholic Church.
   E. Discuss how Gregory VII and his successors reformed the medieval
church, helped to revive Roman law, created an effective bureaucracy and
challenged the sacral power of monarchs.
   F. Describe the medieval cycle of religious life, including the roles
of saints, mystics and pilgrimages.
   G. Describe the distinctive characteristics of Romanesque art and
architecture and compare it to the new Gothic style of the 12th century.

VII. Expansion of Christianity in Northern and Eastern Europe 
   A. Discuss the expansion of Christianity into northern, eastern and
southeastern Europe.
   B. Describe medieval Russia and show how Orthodox Christianity
facilitated the beginnings of a vibrant Russian civilization.
   C. Interpret the launching of the Crusades as a renewal of religious
zeal and an outlet for excess European population, and evaluate their
consequences for Byzantium, Islam and Europe.
   D. Trace the Christian reconquest of Spain.

VIII. Revival of European Trade, Growth of Towns and Cities, and Medieval
Intellectual Life
   A. Trace Italian trade contacts through the Mediterranean, noting the
significance of Venice, Genoa and Pisa, and describe the development of
double-entry bookkeeping from Arab sources, the forms of contract and
payment, as well as the problems of medieval commerce.
   B. Discuss the governance and freedoms of city life, and compare civic
government in the Italian city-states with that in northern European
cities.
   C. Trace the rise and development of the mendicant orders, and their
roles in shaping medieval religious developments and teaching.
   D. Show how the creation of cathedrals, cathedral schools and
universities strengthened civic culture.
   E. Show how the European discovery of Aristotle’s works reshaped
medieval philosophy.

IX. Demographic, Economic, Political and Religious Crises of the 14th
Century 
   A. Discuss the demographic crises of the early 14th century and trace
its effects on population numbers and late medieval culture.
   B. List the various popular rebellions that emerged in the wake of
falling population numbers and cite their successes and failures.
   C. Explain major developments in the French, English and Hohenstaufen
monarchies and the consequent warfare.
   D. Show how challenges to papal authority by monarchs and reformers led
to a crisis of confidence in the Roman Catholic Church during the 14th and
15th centuries.
   E. Describe the final centuries of the Byzantine Empire.

X. New Ideas in Late Medieval Europe
   A. Discuss the rise of vernacular literature about courtly love and
chivalry, and of narrative prose as exemplified by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
   B. Describe Greek influence on late medieval Italian painting and
sculpture, and the earliest rediscoveries of Classical styles in Italy and
northern Europe.
   C. Show how competition among the city-states of northern Italy
financed the revival of learning, literary and civic humanism, and early
Renaissance art.
   D. Trace the origins and consequences of gunpowder and printing in
Europe.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations          50% of grade
Projects/Assignments  50% of grade
  Total:             100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%   
  B = 80 -  89%  
  C = 70 -  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 129

  • Title: Early Modern Europe 1500-1789
  • Number: HIST 129
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the economic, social and political developments that have shaped the modern world: the Renaissance; the Catholic and Protestant Reformations; the rise of nation-states; the new inter-cultural contact between Europe and the world; the Commercial Revolution and the Enlightenment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, compare, and contrast the general characteristics of medieval and modern European society.
  2. Describe the culture created by the fifteenth-century Renaissance.
  3. Trace the growth of religious crisis within the Catholic Church to its culmination in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations.
  4. Describe the presence of Europe in the East during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the consequences of the inter-cultural contact between Europe and Asia.
  5. Describe the presence of Europe in the West during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the consequences of the inter-cultural contact between Europe and the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere and Africa.
  6. Summarize the wars of religion–1550-1648–and the process of state formation and disintegration in Europe.
  7. Examine how transformation in economic and religious life reshaped society and social relations in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
  8. Identify the scientific discoveries, theories, and intellectual crisis that characterize the Scientific Revolution of sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
  9. Describe how the monarchs of seventeenth-century France, Austria, Prussia, and Russia established royal absolutism in their respective states.
  10. Assess the causes and consequences of the English Civil War and the rise of Constitutional Monarchy.
  11. Describe the dynastic rivalries and the balance of power politics of eighteenth century Europe.
  12. Summarize the basic assumptions of Enlightenment thought, and identify the major ideas and their proponents that characterize this eighteenth-century intellectual movement. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General characteristics of medieval and modern European society
   A. Summarize the general social, economic, and political
characteristics of medieval Europe.
   B. Summarize the general social, economic , and political
characteristics of modern Europe.
   C. Compare and contrast the general characteristics of medieval and
modern Europe.

II. Culture created by the fifteenth-century Renaissance
   A. Identify the favorable geographical and political conditions for
economic and cultural development in fifteenth century Italy.
   B. Compare and contrast the sources of artistic patronage in medieval
and Renaissance Europe, and their influence on art and intellectual life.
   C. Summarize the intellectual and cultural transformation created by
the Renaissance.

III. Growth of religious crisis within the Catholic Church to its
culmination in the Protestant and Catholic Reformations
   A. Identify points of religious dissent in the fourteenth and fifteenth
centuries as exemplified by the Hussites, Devotio Moderna, Christian
Humanism, and the councilar movement.
   B. Explain the main theological points of contention between Martin
Luther and the Catholic Church.
   C. Describe Luther’s break with the Church and provide reasons for
the success of his  challenge to Church authority.
   D. Summarize  the contributions to Protestant theology made by Calvin
and Zwingli. 
   E. Elaborate on the policies and reforms enacted by the Church in
response to the Protestant Reformation.
   F. Identify the characteristics of Baroque art and assess the
Church’s use of this artistic style in  the Catholic Reformation.

IV. Presence of Europe in the East during the sixteenth and seventeenth
centuries and the consequences of the inter-cultural contact between
Europe and Asia
   A. Describe the events and developments that provided impetus for the
fifteenth- century maritime exploration from the Atlantic seaboard.
   B. Explain the manner in which the Portugese and Dutch established
their commercial interests in Africa and Asia.
   C. Summarize the economic and cultural impact on both sides of the
inter-cultural contact between Europe and Asia.

V. Presence of Europe in the Western Hemisphere during the sixteenth and
seventeenth centuries and the consequences of the inter-cultural contact
between Europe and the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere and
Africa
   A. Describe the extension of the Spanish control over areas of the
Western Hemisphere. 
   B. Distinguish between traditional forms of slavery and the slavery
introduced into the Western Hemisphere in the sixteenth century. 
   C. Locate the major colonial settlements in the Western Hemisphere.
   D. Summarize the economic and cultural impact on both sides of the
inter-cultural contact between Europe and the indigenous peoples of the
Western Hemisphere and Africa.

VI. Wars of religion–1550-1648–and the process of state formation and
disintegration in Europe
   A. Describe how religious issues and economic rivalry heightened
tensions between Spain and England.
   B. Describe the Protestant-Catholic conflict within the Spanish Empire
and the creation of an independent Dutch republic.
   C. Evaluate the policies of the French monarchs in dealing with
Catholic-Protestant conflict within France.
   D. Analyze the political and religious sources of wars and related
conflicts in the Holy Roman Empire and results of the conflicts for the
major states and territories of central Europe.

VII. Transformation in economic and religious life reshaped society and
social relations in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
   A. Summarize the transition from a “subsistence culture” to the
beginnings of a “consumer culture”.
   B. Identify the political, economic, and religious sources of the
“witchcraft craze” of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
   C. Compare and contrast the condition of the peasantry in the western
and eastern Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
 
VIII. Scientific discoveries, theories, and intellectual crisis that
characterize the Scientific Revolution of sixteenth and seventeenth
centuries
   A. Describe the intellectual climate of the sixteenth century and the
way it which it contributed to new learning and dissent.  
   B. Identify the scientific discoveries and new theories that challenged
traditional sources of intellectual authority in sixteenth-century Europe.
   C. Summarize the theories of knowledge developed in the sixteenth and
seventeenth centuries to address the intellectual crisis created by the
Scientific Revolution.
   D. Define “Newtonian science” and identify the philosophical
assumptions and values embodied in this science that carried over into
intellectual life of the eighteenth century. 

IX. Monarchs of seventeenth-century France, Austria, Prussia, and Russia
established royal absolutism in their respective states
   A. Compare and contrast Royal Absolutism in the seventeenth and
eighteenth centuries with traditional monarchical rule.
   B. Analyze the new ideas on state and state sovereignty that provide
the intellectual justification for royal absolutism.
   C. Describe the political culture created by Louis XIV and its
influence on Europe.
   D. Evaluate the policies of Peter the Great in his efforts to
consolidate power and “modernize” Russia.
   E. Compare and contrast the Hapsburg and Hohenzollern monarchs in
building and governing their respective states.

X. Causes and consequences of the English Civil War and the rise of
Constitutional Monarchy
   A. Identify the economic, social, and political characteristics of
England that militated against the development of Royal Absolutism in the
seventeenth century.
   B. Trace the growing religious and political tensions under the Stuart
monarchs to the outbreak of civil war in England.
   C. Evaluate the foreign and domestic policies of Cromwell’s
government. 
   D. Analyze the Restoration politics of Charles II and James II and the
victory of Parliament in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

XI. Dynastic rivalries and the balance of power politics of eighteenth
century Europe
   A. Summarize the Anglo-French rivalry from the wars of Louis XIV to the
Seven Years War.
   B. Identify the territorial points of contention between Austria,
Prussia, and Russia.
   C. Assess the foreign and domestic policies of Austria and Prussia that
establish their dominance in central and eastern Europe.

XII. Basic assumptions of Enlightenment thought, and identify the major
ideas and their proponents that characterize this eighteenth-century
intellectual movement
   A. Describe the salon culture and new modes of disseminating ideas and
information in the eighteenth century.
   B. Identify the institutions, policies, and practices that were
particularly subject to criticism by the Enlightenment thinkers.
   C. Evaluate the contribution of the Enlightenment to the shaping of the
modern world. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations         50% of grade
Projects/Assignments 50% of grade
  Total:            100%
Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 - 100%   
  B = 80 -  89%  
  C = 70 -  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 129H

No information found.

HIST 130

  • Title: European History Since 1789
  • Number: HIST 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the major political, intellectual, and economic and social developments in Europe from the end of the 18th century to the present, including modern political ideologies, major wars, the growth of strong governments, the effect of modern science on social and political thought, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of large middle classes and the effect of modern technology. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe pre-revolutionary Europe, and the transforming effects of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire.
  2. Identify the causes and effects of the first Industrial Revolution.
  3. Identify and describe European Conservatism, Romanticism, Nationalism and Liberalism from the Congress of Vienna to the Revolutions of 1848.
  4. Discuss mid-century reforms in major European nations and the unification of Italy and of Germany.
  5. Explain European social, political and intellectual responses to science and industrialization during the later nineteenth century.
  6. Analyze the causes and show the effects of European imperialism in the nineteenth century inside Europe and abroad.
  7. Present the causes, character, and consequences of World War I.
  8. Describe Europe in the 1920s.
  9. Identify the causes and effects of the Great Depression and totalitarianism.
  10. Present an overview of World War II.
  11. Describe post-war Europe and life during the Cold War.
  12. Discuss New Europe, the end of the Cold War and the re-emergence of ethnic rivalries. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Pre-Revolutionary Europe and the Transforming Effects of the French
Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire
   A. Describe the general character of the social and political
structures of Europe prior to the French Revolution of 1789 and prevailing
styles in the arts and literature.
   B. Describe the major causes of the French Revolution of 1789, the
course of the revolution, the revolutionary wars and the rise of French
nationalism.
   C. Describe the career of Napoleon Bonaparte, the major characteristics
of his regime, his conquests and defeats, and their effects on Europe.

II. The Causes and Effects of the First Industrial Revolution
   A. List the causes of the first Industrial Revolution and compare the
British experience with that of the European nations.
   B. Discuss the rise of the bourgeoisie.
      1. Describe their way of life, and the literature, art and music
they enjoyed.
      2. Contrast these with the conditions of the agricultural and
working classes of industrializing nations.
      3. Analyze the radical and socialistic political ideologies that
developed in response to the disparities between the bourgeoisie and
working classes.

III. European Conservatism, Romanticism, Nationalism and Liberalism from
the Congress of Vienna to the Revolutions of 1848
   A. List the components of the balance-of-power ideal that molded
European diplomats at the Congress of Vienna in 1815.
   B. Describe the conservative ideologies and regimes that dominated most
of Europe during this period and the means the latter used to enforce their
rule.
   C. Illustrate how romantic nationalism combined with liberalism to
create revolutionary movements throughout Europe, culminating in the
revolutions of 1848.

IV. Mid-Century Reforms in Major European Nations and the Unification of
Italy and of Germany
   A. Discuss mid-century reform efforts in Great Britain, France, the
Austro-Hungarian Empire and Russia.
   B. Describe the unification of Germany and Italy, compare the roles of
nationalistic ideals, German and Italian leaders, international diplomacy,
war and the press in these processes.
   C. Analyze the effects of the creation of Germany upon the European
balance of power.

V. European Social, Political and Intellectual Responses to Science and
Industrialization During the Later Nineteenth Century
   A. Discuss Marxism and the formation and evolution of working-class
movements during this period.
   B. Describe the major components of the second Industrial Revolution
and the effects of improving economic consumption upon the bourgeois and
working classes.
   C. Illustrate the mass-European emigration movements that resulted from
famine, industrialization and political revolutions from the mid-nineteenth
century onward.
   D. Identify the effects of scientific and technological advances, and
of Social Darwinism on European thought, literature, the arts and major
political ideologies.

VI. European Imperialism in the Nineteenth Century
   A. Present an overview of the empires several European nations had
created on other continents by the nineteenth century and the means
imperialist powers used to maintain control and their effects on India,
China and Japan.
   B. Compare colonialism with imperialism, citing nationalism, the growth
of democracy and literacy, the press and other tensions inside European
nations during the late nineteenth century that led to imperialism.
   C. Describe how imperialism  led to the partitioning of Africa during
the late nineteenth century and to conflicts among European nations.

VII. The Causes, Character, and Consequences of World War I
   A. Discuss late-nineteenth century European nationalism, the alliance
system and other causes of World War I, the war’s main military and
technological developments, and its effects on civilians.
   B. Discuss how World War I destabilized the German, Austrian, Russian
and Ottoman Empires and list the aims, successes and failures of the
Versailles Peace Conference.
   C. Describe the Communist revolution of 1917 in Russia and the
subsequent civil war.
            
VIII. Europe in the 1920s
   A. Describe the effects of peace upon European economies of the early
1920s.
   B. Characterize the types of political movements that arose in the
aftermath of the war and show how Mussolini gained power in Italy.
   C. List and describe the major movements in philosophy, literature and
the arts that characterized post-war Europe.

IX. The Causes and Effects of the Great Depression and Totalitarianism
   A. Describe the Crash of 1929 and the economic effects of the Great
Depression that followed.
   B. Compare Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany and Communist USSR.
   C. List the steps by which World War II broke out in 1939.

X. World War II
   A. Outline the major military and diplomatic events of the war.
   B. Describe the war’s major technological developments and their
effects.
   C. Describe how the war affected civilians generally and Nazi efforts
to exterminate the Jews and other populations.

XI. Post-War Europe and Life During the Cold War
   A. Describe the new world order that emerged by 1945 and list the major
causes and crises of the Cold War.
   B. Discuss the social, economic and political conditions in a Europe
dominated by Cold War.
   C. Show how European worldwide empires dissolved between 1945 and the
1960s.

XII. New Europe and the End of the Cold War, and the Re-Emergence of
Ethnic Rivalries
   A. Describe efforts at European economic and political unity during the
post-war decades.
   B. Discuss the collapse of Communism and the re-emergence of ethnic
rivalries in post-Cold War Europe.
   C. Describe European ways of life in the age of global markets and
Europe’s new role in the world.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The successful completion of at least 60% of the elements described
above, demonstrated during a minimum of three examinations that include
essay responses and other written assignments at the instructor’s
discretion during the semester. See the instructor’s syllabus for the
percentage of grade assigned to each.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 130H

No information found.

HIST 132

  • Title: History of Africa
  • Number: HIST 132
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces students to the history of Africa until the present. It emphasizes the fundamental characteristics and long-term developments in the evolution of African political and socioeconomic institutions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Present an overview of the African continent and its people.
  2. Identify and explain the traditional African institutions.
  3. Describe the political evolution in historic Africa.
  4. Explain the impact of colonialism on the African experience.
  5. Describe the rise of African nationalism and the struggle for freedom.
  6. Analyze the independence movements in Africa.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of Africans’ struggle for national identity through a specific case study: South Africa.
  8. Discuss Africa’s role in world affairs since independence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Africa:  The Continent and Its People
   A. Describe the myths and stereotypes relating to the African continent
and its people.
   B. Compare and contrast these myths and stereotypes with the historical
reality.
   C. Describe the geography and demography of the African continent based
on a variety of perspectives from which descriptions have been drawn.
   D. Identify specific themes that have characterized geographical and
demographical study of the African continent.
   E. Illustrate the diversity of languages spoken across the African
continent.
   F. Describe the ethnic groupings and cultures on the continent.
   G. Describe the rural/urban linkages that characterize intranational
and international relations on the continent.

II. African Traditional Institutions
   A. Explain the principal cultural forms and institutions traditional to
African nations.
   B. Define the traditional kinship patterns and forms of marriage across
Africa.
   C. Explain typical models of family life and methods of socialization.
   D. Identify the traditional religious concepts in African society and
note distinguishing characteristics among them.
   E. Present an overview of politics and government in traditional
Africa, identifying common as well as unique elements of them.

III. Political Evolution in Historic Africa
   A. Identify the characteristics and historical trends in the political
evolution of Africa.
   B. Describe political traditions in prehistoric and ancient Africa,
specifically within the Kingdoms of Egypt, in early and late prehistory,
and during the Iron Age and Bantu migrations.
   C. Identify the changes and ongoing elements of political tradition
from the prehistoric and ancient to the Medieval African period
specifically in the Trans-Saharan trade and Islamic states and eastern,
central and southern Africa to 1600 A.D.
   D. Discuss the indicators and significance of the further evolution of
political tradition during the early modern African period (focusing on
the Atlantic slave trade and eighteenth-century Africa in general) and in
nineteenth-century Africa.

IV. Colonialism and the African Experience
   A. Describe and analyze the European rationale for colonialism on the
African continent.
   B. Examine the consequences of colonial imperialism in Africa in terms
of its impact on European empires.
   C. Translate British, French, and Portuguese concepts of race into
practical manifestations during the period of colonial rule.
   D. Identify the basic elements of the philosophy that supported
colonial rule in Africa.
   E. Describe the common experiences of African peoples under colonial
rule.

V. African Nationalism and the Struggle for Freedom
   A. Explain the factors contributing to the rise of modern African
nationalism.
   B. Identify the conditions that made possible the emergence in Africa
of disaffection and resistance to colonial oppression.
   C. Relate the characteristics and manifestations of African
resistance.
   D. Explain the role of missionary churches and World Wars I and II in
the development of resistance to colonialism.
   E. Discuss the emergence and characteristics of the Pan-Africanism
independence movements.
   F. Relate the significance of the League of Nations and the United
Nations to African resistance.

VI. African Independence
   A. Trace the decolonization process and the transfer of power in the
wake of colonial withdrawal.
   B. Explain the processes of centralization of power, regional
identification, and separatism that accompanied independence movements.
   C. Discuss the basic obstacles and challenges to these independence
movements.
   D. Analyze the causes and results of the attendant political
instability.
   E. Note the post-independence policy choices that characterized the end
of colonialism and the rise of independent African nations.
   F. Identify and explain the failures that accompanied independence.
   G. Characterize the triumphs that independence brought the African
people.
   H. Discuss the economic and political reforms that accompanied
independence.

VII. South Africa:  A Case Study
   A. Present a historical overview of South Africa from 1652-1910.
   B. Define apartheid.
   C. Identify the foundations established to enforce apartheid.
   D. Describe the forms of African resistance to apartheid that emerged.
   E. Explain the international significance that apartheid assumed,
especially the role of the United States in opposing it.
   F. List the sanctions imposed on the South African government and
describe their effect on the dismantling of apartheid.
   G. Describe the negotiation and election processes that facilitated the
transfer of power from the white minority to the black majority.

VIII. Africa in World Affairs Since Independence
   A. Analyze African nations’ role in international affairs in the
aftermath of independence, particularly during the Cold War.
   B. Explain the non-aligned movement and its significance in
post-independence Africa.
   C. Describe the creation and significance of the Organization of
African Unity (OAU).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grades will be based on a minimum of the following:

 1. At least three examinations stressing written responses.
 2. One book review or other writing assignment.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 135

  • Title: Eastern Civilization
  • Number: HIST 135
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an introduction to the societies and cultures of Asia. Through lectures, readings and discussions, the course will focus on aspects of the history, politics, art, literature and economics of China, Japan and India. The major traditional themes and concepts of these civilizations will be stressed. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Summarize the key intellectual and cultural concepts of Eastern Civilization as found in Japanese, Chinese and Indian Societies.
  2. Compare and contrast the major Asian philosophical, religious and intellectual approaches to the questions of human existence, politics, society, family life, art and education.
  3. Outline the history of important eras in India, China and Japan in terms of major rulers, social structure and institutions, economic development, government organization, systems of religion and philosophy and achievements in arts and literature.
  4. Select examples in art and literature which reflect the predominate values of each culture and examine and evaluate the examples in relation to these values.
  5. Evaluate the extent to which Eastern Civilization can be discussed apart from other specific cultures such as those of Western Europe, Anglo-American, Islamic and African.
  6. Construct commonalities in the world views of the three Asian cultures.
  7. Evaluate the extent to which and the reasons why traditional values of Asia have changed over time.
  8. Define and analyze changes in the attitude toward gender, social and legal equality in India, China and Japan.
  9. Compare and contrast the major differences between Eastern and Western thought and the impact of each upon the other.
  10. Compare and contrast, based on the readings, attitudes within and between the three cultures toward the relationship of humans with the physical environment.
  11. State and briefly define the major principles of Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam, Shintoism and Zen Buddhism.
  12. Locate major geographic features, regions and cities of India, China and Japan and explain how physical geographic features influenced the history of these countries. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. India
   A. Foundations of Indian culture to 400 B.C.  
      1. Locate the major physical geographic features, regions and cities
of the Indian sub-continent and explain how physical geographic features
influenced the history  of  India.
      2. Describe the major characteristics of the Indus Valley
Civilization and of Vedic (Aryan) culture.
      3. Outline the development of Hinduism in terms of major gods, major
principles and the caste system.
      4. Compare and contrast the concepts of karma and dharma common to
Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.
      5. Describe the development Brahminism in Hinduism and the reforms
represented by Mahavira (Jainism) and Siddartha Guatama (Buddhism).
   B. Ancient India to 700 A.D.
      1. Identify the major rulers and their accomplishments of the
Mauryan Empire (313-200 B.C.).
      2. Examine the role of Ashoka Maurya in Indian history in terms of
imperial unification, moral philosophy and the development of Mahayana
Buddhism.
      3. Identify the major rulers and their accomplishments of the Gupta
Empire  (325-650 C.E.).
      4. Evaluate the significance of Ashoka (r. 272-232 B.C.E.) and Gupta
Sanskrit culture on the development of the cultures of India.
   C. The Age of Diversity (700-1500)
      1. Outline the development of Deccan India Kingdom including the
Pallavahs and Cholas, in terms of major rulers, trade and military
expansion, temple building and achievements of Tamil culture.
      2. Explain the major ideas of the Hindu Revival and Bhakti in North
and South India.
      3. State the major principles of Islam.
      4. Outline the history of the Moslem Kingdoms of northern India,
including the Delhi Sultanate in terms of major rulers, religion and
cultural and intellectual achievements.
      5. Examine the roles of Kabir (Sufi Moslem) and Nanak (Sikhs) in
building reconciliation in Bengal.
   D. The Moghul Empire and the British Raj (1500-1900)
      1. Outline the history of the Moghul Empire, 1526 to 1707, in terms
of major rulers, military expansion, government organization, social
structure and influence on arts, literature, and culture.
      2. Evaluate the role and importance of the policies and actions of
Akbar the Great and Augrangzeb (Almajir) in the problems of unity and
religious conflicts in India. 
      3. Trace the development of British rule in India in terms of the
roles of the British East India Company, 18th Century Anglo-French wars,
Robert Clive, the Maratha rebellions and Viceroy Dalahousie.
      4. Explain the major issues and identify the major movements and
leaders of early Indian nationalism before M.K. Gandhi as seen in the
Sepoy Rebellion, the Indian National Congress, regional Hindu nationalist
movements, Moslem nationalist movements and the revival of Hindu and
Moslem culture and education.
   E. Modern India (1900 to the Present)
      1. Describe the ideas and actions about the independence of India
advocated by M.K. Gandhi (1915-1947).
      2. Describe the policies and reforms of J. Nehru as Prime Minister
of India, 1947-1964).
      3. Describe the policies and actions of Indira Gandhi as Prime
Minister of India, 1966-1977 and 1980-1985.
      4. Evaluate the roles, significance and success of M. K. Gandhi and
J. Nehru in the independence of India.
      5. Describe and evaluate the rise of militant Hindu nationalism in
India.

II. China
   A. Foundations of Chinese Culture (to 700 C.E.)
      1. Locate the major geographic features, regions and cities of China
and explain how physical geographic features influenced the history of
China.
      2. Define the major historic themes of Chinese history (i.e.,
nomadic invasions from four frontier areas; expansion into Yang-tze area
and into the West; the Mandate of Heaven and cycles of history and unity
vs. disunity).
      3. Apply these themes to the periods and dynasties of Chinese
history.
      4. Outline the history and achievements of the Shang and Zhou eras
(1600-700 B.C.E.).      
   B. The First Empires 
      1. Outline the development of the first empires (Ch’in 221-206
B.C.E. and Han 206 B.C.E.- 9 C.E. and 25-220) in terms of major rulers,
systems of religion and philosophy, government organization, social
structure, economic development and arts and culture.
      2. Explain the major ideas of Confucianism, Legalism and Taoism.
      3. Examine the significance of Confucian Philosophy and Confucian
socio-political organization in Chinese history.
      4. Evaluate the contributions of Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism to
Chinese religion.
      5. Examine the cultural and intellectual influences of Mahayana
Buddhism and Taoism to religion, art and literature in China.
      6. Apply the Four Themes of Chinese History to the Han Dynasty. 
(See A-3).
   C. Tang and Sung China (618-1279) - The Establishment of Traditional
China
      1. Outline the history of Tang China in terms of major rulers
(including Taizong, Empress Wu and Xuanxong), the influence of Mahayana
Buddhism, imperial expansion, government organization, Tang poetry and the
restoration of the Confucian social-political system.
      2. Outline the history of Sung China in terms of Five Emperors
(960-1100), reforms of Wang An-Shih, Sung Landscape painting, Zhuxi and
the Neo-Confucian revival, Sung foreign policy, Sung Confucian Civil
Service, Southern Sung (1127-1279), Sung economic development and foreign
trade.
      3. Apply the four themes of Chinese history to the Tang and Sung
dynasties. (See A-3.)
      4. Examine the synthesis of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism during
the Tang and Sung era and its effect on society, arts, literature and
systems of religion and philosophy.
   D. Ming and Manchu China (especially 1644-1800)
      1. Explain the re-establishment of traditional, native Chinese
institutions during the Ming Dynasty under Hung Wu (r.1368-1398) and
Yong-lo (r. 1405-1426).
      2. Explain the major ideas and contributions to Confucian thought of
Wang Yang-ming.
      3. Outline the history of the Ch’ing (Manchu) Dynasty in terms of
Nurhachi and Taizong; The Kang-hsi Emperor (r. 1662-1722) the
Ch’ien-lung Emperor (r. 1735-1795), Manchu social structure, Manchu
ethnic policy, Confucian scholars and government administration, South
China and dominance of economy and culture.
      4. Examine the economy of the Manchu era in terms of the roles of
agriculture, urban commerce, and foreign trade.
      5. Evaluate the influence of economic development on the cultural
achievements of the Manchu era and evaluate the importance of the
intellectual, literary and artistic achievements of the Manchu era.
      6. Examine the gradual disintegration of Imperial China caused by
over population, rebellions, and Western Imperialism.
   E. Modern China since 1911
      1. Describe the major events and ideas of Sun Yat-sen and the
Nationalist Revolution of 1911 including the Three People’s Principles,
the “New Learning” and rejection of Confucianism, the May 4th Movement
and the role of Chiang Kai-shek.
      2. Describe the major ideas of Mao Zedong and the history of the
People’s Republic of China (PRC) including ”the Long March,” Civil
War and Revolution, 1945-1949; the first Five Year Plan, the “Great Leap
Forward;” agricultural and industrial communes and the Cultural
Revolution.
      3. Describe China since the reforms of Deng Xiaoping.

III. Japan
   A. Early Japan: From Myth to History (600 A.D.)      
      1. Locate the major physical geographic features, regions and cities
and explain influence on history.  
      2. Describe the archaeology at Jomon, Yayoi, Tomb Period and the
Yamato state sites.
      3. Describe the major themes of Japanese mythology in terms of the
Sun Goddess, Storm God, creation myths, the Divinity of the Emperor and
Shin to historic shrines.
   B. The Coming of Buddhism and the Courtly Era (552-1185)
      1. Describe Nara culture in terms of Buddhism, temples and art,and
Prince Shitoku.
      2. Examine the parallel development of Buddhism and Shinto during
the Courtly era.
      3. Outline the Tahio reforms and emergence of the Fujiwara Regents.
      4. Explain the aesthetics and the emphasis on elegance and
refinement on the arts and literature of the Courtly era.
   C. The First Shoguns (1185-1600)
      1. Describe the Kamakura Period including Yoritomo, the First
Samurai and Early Feudalism.
      2. Describe the Ashigaga Period in terms of Daimyo government, wars
and decentralization.
      3. Explain Pure Land and Zen Buddhism in terms of their major
ideas.
   D. Tokugawa Shogunate (1600-1868)
      1. Outline the politics, administration and economy which supported
Tokugawa rule.
      2. Examine the Tokugawa idealization of Samurai as a synthesis of
Bushido, Zen, Shinto, haiku poetry, and Noh theater in armor.
      3. Explain urban culture or “the Floating World” in terms of
poetry, teahouse culture, Japanese prints and Kabuki theater.
   E. Modern Japan
      1. Describe the Meiji Restoration including modernization,
militarism and expansion to 1931.
      2. Examine the effect of World War II and Japanese economic
development in the post-war period.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The successful completion of at least 60% of the elements described
above will be Demonstrated during a minimum of three examinations that
include essay responses and other written assignments at the
instructor’s discretion during the semester. (See the instructor’s
syllabus for the percentage of grade assigned to each.)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 135H

No information found.

HIST 137

  • Title: African American Studies
  • Number: HIST 137
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course surveys the major themes and developments in African-American culture and history from the colonial period to the present. The course is divided into three five-week segments. Each segment relates to a historical period: slave, post-emancipation and contemporary. Each segment also permits a flexible, interdisciplinary approach that will include literature, fine arts and the social sciences. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Evaluate the legacy of African religion, mores, and social customs in African-American life and culture, and show their connections in the global African Diaspora.
  2. Understand the impact of slavery on African-American families and communities, both historical and contemporary, and explain that impact as reflected in arts, music, and literature.
  3. Defend an interpretation of U.S. History that shows a continuing tension between theoretical rights-- as embodied in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution--and the actualization of those rights in real practice, as seen in those significant laws, court rulings, and social conventions that affected African Americans.
  4. Analyze the origins, character, and defining ideologies of the twentieth-century civil rights movement, and discuss the movement’s successes and limitations in contemporary life.
  5. Assess the contributions that African Americans have made to contemporary popular culture.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. literature, art, anthropology, etc., as a way of comprehending the past, and be able to examine that past from the perspectives of multiple racial groups.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Slave Era
   A. Develop an understanding of the geographical context in which the
Atlantic slave trade originated. Identify and explain the significance of
the major subregions of West Africa, North America, the Caribbean, and
South America.
   B. Contextualize the history of slavery within the broader experience
of European expansion in the western hemisphere, and distinguish ancient
slavery from the modern system practiced in the Americas.
   C. Explain the significance of the major ethnic groups and empires of
West Africa, and trace their cultural legacies in African-American
communities of the New World.
   D. Compare and contrast the ways that slavery differed in colonial
North America, Brazil, and the Caribbean islands.
   E. Discuss how colonial Americans socially constructed their views of
“race,” and how corresponding concepts of “whiteness” and
“blackness” have evolved since.
   F. Defend an interpretation of U.S. history that places slavery at the
center of important events and movements prior to 1865.
   G. Develop an appreciation for the ways in which African Americans
maintained stable families and communities during the slave experience.
   H. Discuss the development of free black communities in the United
States during the colonial and antebellum eras.
   I. Develop an appreciation for the roles that free blacks and slaves
played in the antislavery movement, and in the emancipation process.
   J. Compare and contrast the ways that slavery ended in the United
States as opposed to other slave owning nations in the western hemisphere,
and analyze how those differences continue to affect race relations in
each.

II. Post-Emancipation Era
   A. Evaluate the efforts of the U.S. government to assist freedmen
during Reconstruction, and explain the successes and failures of
Reconstruction policies.
   B. Analyze the leadership strategies of the black middle class during
the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
   C. Contextualize the “Jim Crow” segregation laws within the broader
historical tension of state vs. federal authority, and explain the legal
acts and public policies that kept segregation in place.
   D. Develop an appreciation for the successes of African Americans in
the post-emancipation era with regard to increasing literacy, building
communities and institutions 
building, and maintaining their culture in the face of segregation and
racial violence.
   E. Explain the reasons for the Great Black Migration to the North, and
how urbanization and industrialization changed African-American society.
   F. Compare and contrast the teachings of Booker T. Washington and
W.E.B. Du Bois as different paths toward equality, and explain the class
and regional origins of both.
   G. Develop an understanding of African Americans’ cultural
achievements in art, music, and literature during the Jazz Age and Harlem
Renaissance.

   I. Contextualize African Americans’ growing activism and demands for
racial reform within the experiences of the two world wars, and of changes
in the social sciences.
   J. Explain the ideologies of black nationalism and the Pan-African
movement, and their significance for African Americans.

III. African Americans and the Contemporary World
   A. Evaluate the roles of the leading institutions, e.g. legal,
religious, educational, that shaped the black civil rights movement.
   B. Explain the significance of global affairs during the post-WWII era
and how these created a favorable climate for racial reform in the United
States.
   C. Discuss the meaning of civil disobedience and how Martin Luther King
and other activists applied the concept during the 1950s and 1960s.
   D. Compare and contrast the moderate phase of the civil rights movement
to the later, more radical phase, and explain the origins and ideologies of
both.
   E. Assess the accomplishments of the civil rights movement, e.g.
significant laws, policies, etc., that abolished legal segregation, as
well as the movement’s limitations with regard to poverty and economic
segregation.
   F. Develop an understanding of the ways that African-Americans have
impacted post-1960s popular culture, e.g. films, television, music, books,
journalism, etc.
   G. Recognize the legacies of slavery and segregation in continuing
patterns of racism and racial discrimination.
   H. Evaluate the efforts of government policies such as affirmative
action to reverse historical trends toward racial inequality, and explain
the political context in which such policies have operated.
   I. Gain an awareness of recent growths in the U.S. multiracial
population, and how interracial marriages and families challenge
conventional racial categories.
   J. Explain the efforts of literary scholars and authors to create a
“black aesthetic” in fictional works and poetry that touch on the
African-American experience.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three examinations, ten graded in-class discussions, written work in
the form of book reviews, personal journals, or research assignments.  At
least one-half of the final grade will be based on the written
examinations.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 140

  • Title: U.S. History to 1877
  • Number: HIST 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This survey course in U.S. history will emphasize developments and trends in American society from the early period of discovery and settlement through Reconstruction. Topics will include the Colonial era, the Revolutionary period, the Federalist era, the expansion of the Republic during the mid-19th century, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. The emphasis will be on analysis and interpretation of these developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare and contrast major figures and movements from the periods of American history under study.

  2. Recognize the important developments and trends that shaped American society prior to 1877.

  3. Use various types of history – biographical, political, diplomatic, constitutional, intellectual, social, and cultural – to provide a more complex understanding of United States history to 1877.

  4. Analyze a variety of historical materials and relate these materials to key issues covered in the course.

  5. Demonstrate an understanding of American history at this survey level through tests, writing assignments and projects. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Colonial Origins and the New Republic
   A. Analyze and discuss the “clash of cultures” in the New World.
      1. Assess the contributions of pre-Columbian (1492) peoples in the Western Hemisphere.
   B. Trace the journey made by black African slaves from western Africa to the Caribbean and South America.
   C. Discuss the conquest of the Western Hemisphere by Europeans.

II. Comparison of the Three Major Colonizing Powers
   A. Analyze the rise of the Spanish colonial empire.
   B. Explain the founding of New France by France.
   C. Trace the layout of the British empire in North America.

III. Examples of Colonial Life and Development
   A. Explain the rise to prominence of the Southern colony of Virginia.
   B. Analyze the development of the Massachusetts Bay Colony as the dominant New England colony.
   C. Discuss the role of Pennsylvania as a middle colony.

IV. The American Revolution
   A. Through careful reading and writing, analyze the Declaration of Independence as an important document in 1776.
   B. Describe the alliance between the United States and France.
   C. Describe the major military clashes between the United States and Great Britain between 1776 and 1783.

V. The Confederation Period
   A. Explain the importance of the Northwest Ordinances.
   B. Compare the United States Constitution to the Articles of Confederation.
   C. Learn the parts and amendments of the U.S. Constitution.

VI. A Growing America
   A. Identify and explain the precedents developed during the Federalist era (1789-1801).
   B. Describe the impact the Federalist era had on the three branches of federal government: legislative, executive and judicial.
   C. Describe the foreign policy developed under the Federalists, particularly with regard to Great Britain, France and Spain.

VII. The Republicans
   A. Describe the two-term presidency of Thomas Jefferson in terms of the growth of a major political party and Jefferson’s domestic policies.
   B. List the accomplishments of the Republicans in foreign policy, particularly Thomas Jefferson and the Louisiana Purchase.
   C. Identify the causes, the key military events and treaty-making for the War of 1812 under President James Madison.

VIII. The Development of Nationalism and Unity
   A. Identify the accomplishments of Secretary of State John Quincy Adams: the Transcontinental Treaty, Florida Purchase treaty and Monroe Doctrine.
   B. Describe the United States Supreme Court under John Marshall.

IX. Sectional Differences in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century
   A. Identify the components - and consequences - of the Missouri Compromise in 1820.
   B. Describe the presidency of Andrew Jackson including the nullification crisis with South Carolina, the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation and the war between Jackson and the Second Bank of the United States.

X. The Mid-Nineteenth Century Reform Era
   A. Specify the various types of reform: religion, utopian communities, temperance, women’s rights, humanitarian rights, and abolitionism.

XI. Expansionism and Foreign Policy in the 1840s
   A. Explain how the Oregon question between the United States and Great Britain was resolved.
   B. State the relationship between the annexation of Texas and the outbreak of the Mexican-American War.
   C. Analyze the impact that the California Gold Rush in 1848 and the Compromise of 1850 had on expansionist plans for the United States.

XII. The Decade of National Crises
   A. Explain how the Kansas-Nebraska Act created “bleeding Kansas” and drastically altered the debate between “free” and “pro-slavery” forces.
   B. Describe how the Dred Scott case of 1857 provoked additional
controversy instead of calming the debate over the expansion of slavery.

XIII. The Civil War Period
   A. Analyze the conditions that eventually led to civil conflict in 1861.
   B. Identify the military turning points in the war.
   C. Describe the role of Abraham Lincoln as president and the Emancipation Proclamation.

XIV. Reconstruction
   A. Describe the role of the assassination of President Lincoln and the direct effect it had on the struggle between the executive and legislative branches of the federal government.
   B. Trace the passage of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments.
   C. Describe the influence “Radical Republicanism” had on the post-1865 South.
   D. Describe federal policy toward the freedmen.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Students should successfully complete a minimum of 60% of the competencies indicated above on at least three major exams and other written assignments at the instructor’s discretion during the semester.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 140H

No information found.

HIST 141

  • Title: U.S. History Since 1877
  • Number: HIST 141
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This survey course will emphasize developments and trends in American society from the 1870s to the late twentieth century. Topics will include the Reconstruction era, industrialization, immigration, reform movements, World Wars I and II, social and cultural trends, and foreign policy. Emphasis will be on analysis and interpretation of these developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compare and contrast major figures and movements from the periods of American history under study.
  2. Recognize the important developments and trends that shaped American society from 1877 to the present.
  3. Use various types of history – biographical, political, diplomatic, constitutional, intellectual, social, and cultural – to provide a complex understanding of United States history from 1877 to the present.
  4. Analyze a variety of historical materials and relate these materials to key issues covered in this course.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of American history at the survey level through tests, writing assignments, and projects. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Aftermath of Reconstruction
   A. Discuss the Compromise of 1877 in terms of the circumstances preceding it, the elements that comprised it and its political, economic and social consequences.
   B. Define the term "Jim Crow."
   C. Trace the results of the end of Reconstruction on black civil rights and the emergence of "Jim Crow" laws at the turn of the century.
   D. Identify the meaning and manifestations of the "New South."

II. Industrialization and Its Impact
   A. Give examples of technological advancements and inventions that fed the rapid industrial growth in the post-Reconstruction era.
   B. Explain the reasons for technological advancement, the volume of new inventions, and rapid industrial growth in the late nineteenth century.
   C. Discuss the social, economic and political impact of rapid industrialization on the United States within the context of international markets.
   D. Identify the major industrial/business figures who led the transformation of the United States from a rural/agrarian to an urban/industrial nation.
   E. Describe the types of new business organizations that emerged and their impact on the industries within which each operated.
   F. Portray working and living conditions for the industrial worker in the late nineteenth century.
   G. Trace and explain the emergence of labor organizations in the nineteenth century.
   H. Give examples of the major strikes in that period and their consequences.
   I. Explain the rationale and techniques that business operators used to defeat strikes and unionization efforts and the role that federal and state governments played in assisting them.
   J. Discuss the reasons for the emergence of reform efforts in the late nineteenth century.
   K. Describe the make-up, principles and practical manifestations of the reform movements in the late nineteenth century.
   L. Explain the role of the federal and state governments in regulating the economy in the late nineteenth century.

III. The Close of the Frontier
   A. Describe the events and conditions that produced the mining, cattle and farming frontiers in the late nineteenth century.
   B. Describe the economic, social and political significance of each of these frontiers.
   C. Describe the decline of each of the frontiers and the results.
   D. Describe the background to the conflict on the frontier between white settlers and the U.S. Army and Native American populations in the late nineteenth century.
   E. Explain the reasons for the decline of Native American peoples as white settlement in the West increased.
   F. Describe Federal Indian legislation.

IV. Populism and the Progressive Era
   A. Enumerate the reasons for the Populist revolt in the South and Midwest in the late nineteenth century.
   B. List and explain the social, political and economic reforms proposed by activist farm-based groups.
   C. Analyze the reasons for the early successes and subsequent defeat of the Populist Party.
   D. Explain the significance of the Populist movement within the context of a nation undergoing a transition from primarily agrarian/rural to urban/industrial.
   E. Identify the nineteenth-century roots of the Progressive movement and the make-up of that movement’s proponents.
   F. Trace the evolution of Progressive thought.
   G. Identify the reforms that Progressives proposed at the local, state and federal levels.
   H. Analyze the nature of Progressivism and its short- and long-term social, economic and political impact.

V. Overseas Expansion and Intervention in Europe
   A. Identify and explain the causes of U.S. expansion overseas in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
   B. Discuss the causes of the Spanish-American War and the significance internationally for the United States.
   C. Describe the major military episodes during the war, the reasons for the U.S. victory, the peace treaty that ended the conflict and the short-term and long-term consequences of the United States’ defeat of Spain.
   D. Identify the "new" foreign policy the United States practiced in the wake of the Spanish- American War and its implication in the Caribbean, the Far East and in the Pacific.
   E. Present an overview of the circumstances which led to war in Europe in 1914.
   F. Enumerate and discuss the events that led to American entrance into the First World War.
   G. Explain the elements of Wilsonian diplomacy and its significance in the First World War and the negotiations for peace.
   H. Discuss the elements of the Treaty of Paris that ended the war.

VI. Between the Wars: 1919-1930s
   A. Trace the political trends in the 1920s in the Harding, Coolidge and Hoover administrations.
   B. Explore the 1920s as a transition era.
   C. Identify the major events that best reflected the notions of a return to "normalcy" and a  revolution in "manners and morals."
   D. Explain the economic and social warning signs that foretold the
nation’s economic collapse.
   E. Identify the basic causes of the Great Depression.
   F. Relate the immediate impact of the collapse of the stock market in 1929 and the Hoover administration’s response to it.
   G. Evaluate the results of Hoover’s actions to cope with the economic difficulty.
   H. Discuss the election of 1932 and the reasons for Franklin Roosevelt’s victory in the presidential contest.
   I. Trace the political, economic and social policies that characterized the first period of New Deal programs.
   J. Distinguish between the purpose of the initial New Deal programs and the intent of legislation and presidential action that followed.
   K. Assess the success of the New Deal in terms of social and economic conditions.
   L. Identify the long-term political, economic and social consequences of New Deal politics.

VII. The Post-1945 Period
   A. Enumerate and explain the origins of the Cold War.
   B. Explain the Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations’ Cold War politics and other foreign policy crises in each administration.
   C. Identify the common threads that run through these responses and the unique features of each.
   D. Discuss the causes of the Korean War and the nature and significance of the conflict as limited war.
   E. Trace the historical background of the conflict in Southeast Asia.
   F. Compare the policies that American presidents from Truman through Nixon implemented to deal with the Vietnam situation.
   G. Analyze the United States’ failure militarily and politically in its longest war.
   H. Discuss the social and political impact of American withdrawal from the conflict in the 1970s and future foreign policy ramifications.
   I. Trace the major social, economic and political issues in the post-1945 presidential administrations and the political programs that resulted.
   J. Describe the Watergate scandal.
   K. Characterize the Ford, Carter, Reagan and Bush domestic and foreign policies.
   L. Discuss the major events and domestic and foreign policy trends of the Clinton presidency.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Students should successfully complete a minimum of 60% of the competencies indicated above on at least three major exams and other written assignments at the instructor’s discretion during the semester.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 141H

No information found.

HIST 143

  • Title: Ancient Greece, the Near East and Egypt
  • Number: HIST 143
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will present the background to the rise of Ancient Greece by examining first its Near-Eastern and Egyptian predecessors. Then it will examine Greece's historical development from the early Aegean phase through its Dark, Archaic, classical and Hellenistic phases. In addition to political, military, and social and economic developments, Greek literature and art will also be highlighted. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze the conditions necessary for the rise of the ancient civilizations in the Near East and Egypt.
  2. Discuss and compare the political, religious, economic, and social components of the ancient Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian empires.
  3. Summarize developments among the civilizations of Anatolia and the Levant.
  4. Describe the rise of the Persian civilizations and its achievements and vulnerabilities.
  5. Analyze conditions in the eastern Mediterranean and its surrounding lands that gave rise to the Greek Aegean civilization and discuss the societies that resulted.
  6. Explain why historians have labeled the period c. 1150-750 B.C.E. the "Dark Age" of Greece.
  7. Summarize the demographic, political, social and cultural developments that created Archaic Greek civilization between c. 750 to 500 B.C.E.
  8. Analyze the political and social institutions of Sparta and account for its achievements and weaknesses.
  9. Examine the causes and consequences of the Persian Wars for Greek history.
  10. Discuss history of Athens and explain how it rose to prominence following the Persian Wars.
  11. Analyze the causes and consequences of the Athenian struggle for Greek hegemony through the Peloponnesian War, 431-404 B.C.E.
  12. Summarize Greek political, intellectual, literary, and artistic achievements during the age of Athenian dominance.
  13. Assess the political situation in Greece following Athens' defeat in the Peloponnesian War and describe the rise of Macedonia and Phillip II's conquest of Greece.
  14. Summarize the career of Alexander of Macedon, outline his conquests in west and south Asia, and show how the latter transformed Greek civilization and the civilizations of Egypt and the Near East. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Rise of Ancient Civilizations in the Near East and Egypt
   A. Describe the rise of Neolithic farming communities in Anatolia and
the Levant.
   B. Discuss how riverine civilizations rose along the Tigris and
Euphrates in Mesopotamia and the Nile in Egypt.
   C. Outline the political, religious, military, economic, social, and
cultural components of the early Sumerian and Egyptian civilizations.

II. Achievements of the Ancient Egyptian, Babylonian, Assyrian and
Neo-Babylonian Civilizations
   A. Display the varied patterns of intertwined religious and political
structures in the civilizations.
   B. Outline the economic components and social structures that allowed
these civilizations to maintain military prowess.
   C. Describe the role that writing and the arts played in creating and
maintaining these civilizations.

III. The Civilizations of Anatolia and the Levant
   A. Discuss the emergence of Iron Age technology in Anatolia and the
emergence of the Hittite, Phoenician, and Hebrew civilizations.
   B. Describe the rise and fall of the Hittite kingdom.
   C. Explain how the Phoenician and Hebrew kingdoms survived amid their
more powerful neighbors.
   D. Examine the economic social bases of their survival.
   E. Analyze their cultures and religions.

IV. The Persian Achaeminid Civilization
   A. Outline the career and conquests of Cyrus the Great and his son
Cambyses.
   B. Analyze the military and political components of Persian rule.
   C. Discuss early Persian religion and culture.
   D. Explain the long-term cultural and military significance of the
Persian joining of South Asia, the Near East, Egypt, and southeastern
Europe into a single political Europe.

V. The Earliest Greek Civilizations
   A. Describe Bronze Age patterns of migration and trade in the eastern
Mediterranean.
   B. Analyze the components of the palace civilizations that arose in
Crete and on the Greek mainland.
   C. Examine the historicity of the Trojan War.

VI. The Dark Age of Greece
   A. Examine hypotheses historians have offered to explain the decline of
Aegean Greek civilizations.
   B. Discuss Greek art and literature during the Geometric Age.
   C. Show how Greek business people were able to develop an alphabet
based on a Phoenician original.
   D. Discuss historians' theories about migrations and the emergence of
Iron tools and weaponry.

VII. The Creation of Archaic Greek Civilization
   A. Discuss the components of the Greek "polis" or city-state, their
social structure, and the political institutions that resulted.
   B. Compare the new military tactics that emerged in the period with
those described in the Illiad and why inter-polis warfare was endemic.
   C. Compare and contrast the lives of Greek men and women throughout the
social structure.

VIII. Archaic Greek Intellectual, Cultural, and Artistic Innovations
   A. Summarize and evaluate early Greek achievements in science and
philosophy.
   B. Discuss Greek literary, artistic, and architectural innovations
during this period and how they reflected the emerging Greek institutions
of this period.
   C. Explain why the Greeks invented sports, how they resembled or
differed from our own, and the role of the gymnasium on Greek male life.
   D. Name and explain the significance of developing Greek panhellenic
institutions for Greek civilization.

IX. Sparta's Achievements and Vulnerabilities
   A. Analyze and evaluate Sparta's economic, social, and political
systems.
   B. Show how Sparta and its Peloponnesian League were able to maintain
military dominance of Greece at this time.
   C. Examine role that the idea of Sparta played in the Greek
imagination.

X. Causes and Consequences of the Greco-Persian Wars
   A. Evaluate our sources of information about the Persian Wars.
   B. Review the rise of the Achaeminid Empire in Persia.
   C. Describe the reactions of the Ionian Greek poleis of Anatolia to
Persian rule.
   D. Summarize the Persian invasion of Greece by Darius in 490 B.C.E. and
the results.
   E. Summarize the Persian invasion of Greece by Xerxes in 480-79 B.C.E.
and the results.

XI. Athens and its Rise to Prominence
   A. Summarize stories about the early history of Athens down through the
career of Solon.
   B. Describe Athenian political institutions during the sixth century
B.C.E. and evaluate the Peisistratid tyranny.
   C. Examine accounts of the overthrow of the Peisistratids and
Cleitsthenes' establishment of the Athenian democracy.
   D. Describe the reasons for positive developments in the Athenian
economy during this period.
   E. Explain how Athens utilized the defeat of the second Persian
expedition strengthened the Athenian democracy and allowed Athens to
attempt to establish hegemony over the Aegean area.

XII. Causes and Consequences of the Athenian Struggle for Greek Hegemony
   A. Critically examine the career and achievements of the Athenian
leader Pericles.
   B. Describe the cause of the Peloponnesian War and its course before
415.
   C. Analyze the rise of the "New Men" in Athenian politics following the
death of Pericles.
   D. Critically examine the career of Alcibiades and the course and
consequences of the Sicilian expedition of 415 B.C.E.
   E. Describe the final decade of the Peloponnesian War, and the causes
and consequences of the Athenian defeat.

XIII. Greek Intellectual, Literary, and Artistic Achievements During
Athenian Cultural Prominence
   A. Show how the sophists rose to prominence in democratic Athens and
affected political and philosophical debates.
   B. Describe the extent of Pericles' public works program, its
inspiration, its source of income, and its components.
   C. Summarize Greek achievements in sculpture and painting during this
period.
   D. Evaluate the political role of Greek tragedy and comedy.
   E. Describe the emergence of Greek prose as epitomized in the works of
Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plato.

XIV. Greece Following Athens' Defeat in the Peloponnesian War and the Rise
of Macedonia
   A. Discuss reasons for the decline of Sparta and the rise of Thebes
during the fourth century B.C.E.
   B. Explain developments in the Athenian democracy during this period.
   C. Analyze political, military, and cultural developments in Macedonia
down to the reign of Phillip II.
   D. Describe the character and achievements of Phillip II of Macedon, in
particular, his conquest of Greece in 338 B.C.E.

XV. Alexander of Macedon and the Expansion of Greek Civilization
   A. Describe Alexander's youth and the circumstances of his accession to
the throne of Macedonia.
   B. Summarize and analyze Alexander's conquest of the Persian Empire,
and  his early death.
   C. Assess political and cultural conditions in Alexander's successor
kingdoms in Egypt and the Near East following Alexander's death.
   D. Define "Hellenism" and its effects and consequences on the politics,
languages, cultures, arts, and sciences of Greece, the Near East, and
Egypt.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least three examinations emphasizing written answers and additional
written papers or other work, at the instructor's discretion.

Examinations and written work ordinarily comprising at least two-thirds of
class credit.

Grades corresponding under most circumstances to the traditional academic
formula of:
90%-100% = A
80%- 89% = B
70%- 79% = C
60%- 69% = D
59% and less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 145

  • Title: History of Ancient Rome
  • Number: HIST 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will cover Roman civilization and history from its emergence until the fifth century C.E. In addition to political, military, and social and economic developments, Roman literature and art will also be highlighted. Rome's significance for later western civilization will be noted. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the early history of Rome from its legendary foundation through the monarchy and the early republic.
  2. Describe Rome's conquests of other Italian city-states, its victories over Carthage in the western-and Hellenistic monarchs in the eastern Mediterranean.
  3. Show how the rise of military strongmen led to civil wars and the disintegration of republican governance.
  4. Explain the success of Caesar Augustus in establishing the rule of one man and note the successes of the Roman Empire through the early third-century C.E.
  5. Describe and evaluate the state of Roman art and literature, during the late Republican and imperial periods, the empire's revival under Diocletian and Constantine, and its later disintegration in the West.
  6. Review the religious practices of early Rome, the triumph of Christianity in the 300's, and the subsequent success of the renewed Roman Empire in the East.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Legendary Foundation of Rome
   A. Describe and evaluate the limited sources available for the early
history of Rome, and compare and contrast it with the archaeological
evidence.
   B. Relate the legends of Rome's foundation by Romulus and Remus and
other stories from the Roman historian Livy and explain how they exemplify
the values of the later Roman aristocratic class.

II. The Social System and Political Constitution of the Roman Republic
   A. Explain Rome's mission to Athens to discover a model of civic
government.
   B. Describe in detail the social orders of republican Rome, their
struggles, the system of public offices and elections that evolved, and
the role of religion in it.

III. Roman Expansion up to the First Punic War
   A. Compare the city of Rome with its Latin and Etruscan neighbors.
   B. Explain Rome's system of exploiting its conquered neighbors for
soldiers and rewarding them with Roman citizenship.

IV. The Punic Wars and Rome's Triumph
   A. Describe Carthaginian civilization and Carthage's rise to dominance
in the western Mediterranean.
   B. Explain how Roman exploits in Sicily led to conflict with Carthage
and the First Punic War.
   C. Summarize and assess the military career of Hannibal of Carthage and
the threat that he represented to Rome during the Second Punic War.
   D. Summarize the defeat of Carthage in the Third Punic War and its
consequences for Roman power.

V. Rome's Involvement in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Consequences 
   A. Analyze and evaluate Polybius' portrait of Rome and its rise to
power.
   B. Explain how Rome's ferocious military reputation and its skilled
diplomacy with eastern Mediterranean kingdoms gradually allowed it to take
over the region by 67 B.C.E.

VI. Roman Art, Literature, and Thought Before and After Hellenistic
Influences
   A. Examine the artistic culture of Rome from the earliest phase through
the 300's B.C.E. and evaluate the consequences of Greek influence on Roman
architecture and art during subsequent centuries.
   B. Assess the effects of Hellenization on Roman writing thought and
rhetoric during the second and first centuries B.C.E.
   C. Describe the Roman legal system and the influence of Greek rhetoric
on it and Roman politics.

VII. Challenges to the Roman Republican Constitution
   A. Discuss the growing economic disparities among Rome's social orders
that led to the rise and demise of the Gracchus brothers.
   B. Describe and analyze the "Social War" and the consequences of the
struggle between Marius and Sulla.
   C. Analyze the causes of the Spartacus Rebellion and the nature of its
repression.
   D. Trace the career of Cnaius Pompeius and his victories, and analyze
the Roman political situation upon his return from the East.
   E. Trace the career of Marcus Tullius Cicero as a "new man," lawyer,
popularizer of Greek ideas, and Roman politician.

VIII. Julius Caesar and the Breakdown of the Roman Republic
   A. Trace the career of Gaius Julius Caesar through his alliance with
Pompeius, his first consulship, and his governorship of Gaul.
   B. Evaluate Caesar's literary and propaganda skills and describe his
relationship with Cicero.
   C. Explain the reasons for war between Caesar and Pompeius and the
consequences for the republic of Caesar's victory and subsequent murder.

IX. The Civil Wars and Octavian's Constitutional Arrangements
   A. Describe the triumvirate set up among Octavian, Antony, and Lepidus
and the proscriptions which followed.
   B. Explain how the relationship between Octavian and Antony gradually
eroded, leading to the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C.E.
   C. Show how, by 27 B.C.E. Octavian had consolidated all power under his
control in the name of "restoring" the Roman Republic.
   D. Describe the major events of the remainder of his reign.

X. Roman Imperial Administration, Politics, Society and Economy in the
First and Second centuries C.E.
   A. Analyze the political tensions among emperors, the senatorial class,
and the Roman military during this time.
   B. Analyze the military situation around the borders of the Roman
empire.
   C. Describe the condition of slaves, the working poor, the Roman "mob,"
and the wealthy classes and analyze the consequences of these during this
period.
   D. Survey and contrast the major geographic areas of the empire and
summarize the reasons for Roman economic prosperity during this period.

XI. Roman Literature, Art, and Religions During the First and Second
Centuries C.E.
   A. Discuss the works of the major Roman writers in poetry and history
during the late republic.
   B. Summarize the artistic and literary trends of the early empire.
   C. Analyze and evalute changes in Mediterranean religions during the
late-B.C.E. and early C.E. centuries.

XII. Third-Century Threats to the Roman Empire and Their Consequences
   A. Evaluate weaknesses in the process of Roman imperial succession, the
explosion of multiple emperors and civil wars at this time, and their
effects on the Roman economy and military threats from outside the
empire.
   B. Describe the rise of the Sassanid Empire, its ambitions on Rome's
eastern frontier, and its military challenge to Rome.
   C. Analyze the emergence of Eurasian migrations during the
third-century C.E., and their effects on Rome's northeastern frontiers and
the above struggles.

XIII. Stabilization and Renewed Challenges During the Fourth and Fifth
Centuries
   A. Describe the success of Diocletian in stabilizing the Roman Empire
his system of administration and imperial succession, and his economic
policies.
   B. Examine the career of Constantine, his struggle for imperial
succession, and his religious policies.
   C. Analyze the successes and failures of Constantine's successors
during the rest of the fourth century C.E.

XIV. The Gradual Collapse of the Roman Empire in the West and Concepts of
"Fall" versus "Evolution"
   A. Outline the movements of barbarian groups during the late fourth-
and fifth centuries C.E.
   B. Account for the continuing strengths of the eastern empire.
   C. Explain the breakdown of imperial rule in the western empire and
show how the latter gradually was replaced by "barbarian" kingdoms.
   D. Trace the role of the Christian church in both parts of the empire
during this period.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least three examinations emphasizing written answers and additional
written papers or other work, at the instructor's discretion.
Examinations and written work ordinarily comprising at least two-thirds of
class credit.
Grades corresponding under most circumstances to the traditional academic
formula of
90% - 100% = A
80% -  89% = B
70% -  79% = C
60% -  69% = D
59% and less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 145H

No information found.

HIST 149

  • Title: History of India
  • Number: HIST 149
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a broad and thematic introduction to the history of India. The course covers Indian culture and civilizations from the ancient Indus River Valley Civilization to the present nation state of India. Multiple modes of inquiry and source materials are important for historical analysis, and this course considers literature, art, architecture and other forms of cultural aesthetics in relation to political, economic, material, and religious developments. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the physical geography of the Indian subcontinent, and analyze the impact of this environment on the human inhabitants of South Asia.
  2. Explain the rise of the Harappan civilization, and discuss the relevance of this civilization's proximity to the Indus River Valley.
  3. Describe the hypothesis of the Aryan migrations into the Indus River Valley and further into the Ganges plain.
  4. Analyze the Vedic socio-religious thought and practices as presented in the Vedic textual corpus.
  5. Discuss the so-called "heterodox" traditions of Jainism and Buddhism in comparison to the "orthdox" Brahmanical Hindu tradition.
  6. Explain the ways in which the Mauryan empire consolidated power and expanded its influence.
  7. Analyze the rise of the Gupta empire and the impact of its patronage of Brahmanism and the classical arts.
  8. Describe the entry of Islamic influence into India, and discuss the impact of political Islam and religious Islam on the existing Indian populations.
  9. Differentiate the stages, agendas, and tactics of colonialist/imperialist ventures into South Asia.
  10. Discuss regional and worldwide events that led to the Indian Independence Movement.
  11. Identify the regional sovereign states created in the wake of Indian independence.
  12. Describe the social and political structures of Independent India.
  13. Analyze the economic impact of India in the current world economy.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Physical Geography and Environments
   A. Identify the mountain ranges that separate the Indian subcontinent
from their Asian neighbors to their north, west, and east.
   B. Describe the significance of consistent monsoon rains as an
essential water source.
   C. Identify and discuss the importance of the Indus and Ganges rivers
in relation to the rise of the Indus River Valley Civilization and to the
Aryan civilizations.
   D. Discuss the variances in regional environments in contextual
relation to political, linguistic, and cultural distinctions.
   E. Describe the ways in which the Arabian Sea, the Indian Ocean, and
the Bay of Bengal facilitated early human migration and settlement.
   F. Identify the contemporary political and national boundaries of South
Asia.

II. Indus River Valley Civilization (c. 3000-1500 BCE)
   A. Describe the events that led to the discovery of the Indus River
Valley Civilization in the early 20th century.
   B. Identify the major important cities of this civilization.
   C. Discuss the plausible structures of Indus River Valley society and
culture.
   D. Analyze the possible cause or causes for the demise of the Indus
River Valley Civilization.

III. Aryan/Vedic Dominance and Culture (c. 1500-500 BCE)
   A. Discuss the scholarly debate surrounding the Aryan migration
hypothesis from linguistic, archeological, and literary sources.
   B. Analyze the Vedic societal structure, material and aesthetic
cultures, religion, and developing metaphysical speculations as presented
in textual evidence from the Vedas, Brahmanas, and the Upanishads.
   C. Explain the socio-religious varna system as presented in the Vedas
and further codified in the Laws of Manu.
   D. Discuss the social history of the Aryan peoples of the Ganges plain,
and describe their slow shift from pastoral nomads to sedentary and
eventually urban-based agriculturalists.
   E. Describe the major deities of the Vedic pantheon, and compare and
contrast the qualities of these deities to other ancient cultures.
   F. Analyze the Vedic religious rituals (primarily the fire sacrifice),
and discuss the transformation of these sacrifices into ascetic practices
by Brahmanical Hindus, Jains, and Buddhists.

IV. Brahmanic Society
   A. Discuss the ways in which the competition of Aryan tribal kingdoms
reinforced and expanded support for Brahman exceptionalism and the Vedic
varna/caste system.
   B. Explain how the Brahmans utilized the Sanskrit language to their
socio-religious and economic benefit.
   C. Analyze the dominant social standards set forth in the Indian Epics,
Mahabharata and Ramayana.
   D. Describe the concern for caste purity and the issues of family
structure and gender roles in Brahmanic society.
   E. Discuss the concept of Dharma or "duty" as it is used in both
Brahmanical and Buddhist contexts.

V. Jainism (c. 6th century BCE)
   A. Discuss the life of Mahavira and his opposition to Brahmanical
socio-religious worldview.
   B. Analyze the concept of Ahimsa (or non-violence) as a social,
religious, and political tool.

VI. Emergence of Buddhism (c. 6th century BCE)
   A. Analyze the life and eventual enlightenment experience of the
historical Buddha.
   B. Discuss the ways that the teachings of the historical Buddha were a
challenge to Brahmanical dominance.
   C. Explain how Buddhist monasticism challenged the role and dominance
of Brahman priests, and analyze other Buddhist policies that overturned
Brahmanical cultural and political systems.

VII. The Mauryans: Political Unification and Dominance of the "Heterodox"
(322-185 BCE)
   A. List and explain the policies by which the Mauryans managed to
conquer and unify Northern India.
   B. Analyze the symbolic religious and political significance of
Chandragupta Maurya's conversion to Jainism.
   C. Discuss the ways Ashoka (268-232 BCE) further expanded and unified
Mauryan influence.
   D. Describe the complicated factors that contributed to the collapse of
the Mauryan empire.
   E. Explain how the demise of the Mauryans (and later the Kushans) gave
rise to the reassertion of Brahmanical Hinduism over Buddhism.

VIII. The Guptas: Brahmanical Hindu Resurgence (c. 300-500 CE)
   A. List and discuss the events and policies that gave rise to the
Guptan empire.
   B. Discuss the importance and impact of Guptan patronage of the arts
and sciences.
   C. Explain how a revived patronage of Brahman exceptionalism affected
caste and gender issues.
   D. Analyze the conditions of production and trade that aided in the
stability of the Guptans.
   E. List the Four Stages of Life that are stressed during this period.
   F. Describe the impact of both the Huns and client Hindu kingdoms in
the demise of the Guptan empire.

IX. Arabs in Sindh (711 CE)
   A. Describe the events that led to the earliest phase of Islamic rule
into the region of Sindh.
   B. Discuss the political and social policies that the Muslim rulers
imposed on their new subjects.
   C. Explain how Arab/Muslim presence in Sindh contributed politically,
materially, and culturally to the Ummayyad dynasty and to the greater
Islamic world.
   D. Analyze and discuss the reasons for the appeal of Sufi saints to the
populations of India in terms of religioius and socio-politics.

X. The Delhi Sultanate (1206-1526 CE)
   A. Explain the impact of Turk incursions into India's Ganges plain.
   B. Critically analyze the agendas and writings of the Delhi Sultanate
historians, and compare and contrast these sources to extant mosque
inscriptions by the Sultans and the responses by "Hindu" rulers.
   C. Discuss the role of the Delhi sultans in the context of the larger
Islamic world, and list the ways the sultans used the Abbasid caliphate
for legitimization while at the same time practicing great practicality
and autonomy in their policies.
   D. Describe the emergence of the word "Hindu," and further discuss the
interaction between Muslims and "Hindus" throughout the medieval period.
   E. List and discuss the social, economic, religious, and cultural
accommodations and innovations of the medieval period.

XI. The Mughals (1526-1857 CE)
   A. List the similarities between the Mughals, Ottomans and Safavids as
successful and contemporary Islamic empires, and discuss the reasons why
each empire became so dominant.
   B. Explain how Babur, the founder of the Mughals, attained and secured
power over Northern India.
   C. Discuss the political and religious tensions between Humayan and
Sher Shah Ser.
   D. Describe and analyze the policies of Akbar in terms of military
reforms, culture, religion, administration, and social reforms.
   E. Discuss the cultural and aesthetic expressions during the reigns of
Jahangir and Shah Jahan.
   F. Describe the shift in agenda and policies during the reign of
Aurangzeb and further discuss the effects of his policies on his direct
subjects, his allies, and his rival "Hindu" kingdoms in Southern India.
   G. List the key reasons that contributed to Mughal decline and the
subsequent rise of western influence in India.

XII. Socio-religious and Socio-political Reforms (c. 16th century)
   A. Explain how the promotion of Akbar's Divine Religion illustrates
both greater socio-religious tolerance and greater political control.
   B. Describe how devotional Bhakti movements were new religious
expressions for many low-caste Hindus and a challenge to the varna
system.
   C. Discuss why so many scholars consider Sikhism to be a syncretism
between Islam and Hinduism, and further list the ways that Sikhs mobilized
as an important poilitical force in Northern India.

XIII. Colonial and Imperial Pursuits
   A. Examine the causes, stages, and consequences of European imperialism
into India in terms of both economic opportunism and religious fervor.
   B. Discuss the impact of trading-company imperialism on India's natural
resources, local markets, and ultimately the world economy.

XIV. The British Raj
   A. Explain the practical and ideological motivations that led to the
rise and dominance of the East India Company in Bengal.
   B. Describe the reasons for the formation of the Asiatic Society of
Bengal, and list the contributions and practical outcomes of this academic
society.
   C. Examine the complicated relationship between the East India Company
as a trading company and the British Parliament as a legislative body.
   D. List and discuss the many reforms imposed on Indian populations that
were described by Company officials as "Indian social and religious
abuses."
   E. Summarize the causes for the 1857 Sepoy Rebellion, and discuss the
consequences for the military, Indian social and professional mobility,
and the economy.
   F. Discuss the "divide and rule" policy of the British Raj, and further
examine the political, religious, and social implications and consequences
of this policy of communalism.
   G. Explain the ways the British Raj developed the infrastructure of
India, and further discuss the motivations for improvements in
infrastructure.

XV. Indian Independence Movement
   A. Discuss the emergence and the importance of the new western-educated
Indian middle class in the movement toward eventual Indian independence.
   B. List and analyze the policies of the British Raj that would garner
support against them and attract Indian followers toward the independence
movement.
   C. Describe the agendas and policies of Tilak, Gandhi, Nehru, and
Jinnah, and further consider the nexus of religion, secularism, and
non-alignment in each vision of an Independent India.
   D. Summarize the ways in which Gandhi utilized the ancient Jain concept
of ahimsa (or non-violent resistance) in his campaign for independence.
   E. Discuss the fundamental importance of WWI and WWII to the
decolonization of India by the British.

XVI. Independent India
   A. Examine the ways in which British Raj policies all but required the
partition of India into a Hindu majority in India and a Muslim majority in
Pakistan.
   B. Discuss the formation of the Indian Constitution, and further
discuss the inherent contraditions within this document.
   C. Describe the major issues that have led to political tensions and
war between India and Pakistan.
   D. Explain how Nehru and his children and grandchildren have been able
to dominate the Congress Party and the Indian government for nearly all of
India's independence.
   E. List the major Hindu nationalist parties, and analyze the campaigns
by the BJP in the 1980s and 1990s that led to their rise to political
influence and power.
   F. Assess the political successes and failures of India's past sixty
years, and discuss the impact of political policies on social, cultural,
and economic realities.
   G. Summarize the world economic conditions that have created new
economic and social mobility for millions of India's young and rising
middle class, and discuss how this phenomenon is forcing Indians to
renegotiate cultural and religious traditions.  
   H. Analyze the economic impact of India in the current world economy.

XVII. The Indian Diaspora
   A. Discuss the historical contexts that led to the first major Indian
diasporic communities in the Middle East, Africa, UK, and the USA.
   B. Examine how Indian diasporic communities maintain their cultural and
religious identities in new surroundings and broader communities.
   C. List some major and identifiable ways in which Indian communities
impact their new communities.
   D. Analyze the social and economic benefit to Indians in diaspora, and
further consider the residual and reciprocal economic and political
impacts to India.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50% Exams
50% Projects and Discussions

Grading Criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89%  = B
70-79%  = C
60-69%  = D
0-59%   = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 150

  • Title: Islam: Religion and Civilization
  • Number: HIST 150
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the context in which Islam arose; the career of the Prophet Muhammad; the main teachings and practices of the religion; the Qur'an and other early Islamic literature; subsequent political developments in the religion and its spread; its main religious branches; its history during the Middle Ages; the Christian crusades and their consequences; the major components of Islamic civilization, including law, the arts, literature, philosophy, science, and mathematics; Sufi; the effects of Western imperialism upon Islamic states; major developments in Islamic thought and practice since the seventeenth century; the Islamic diaspora and Islam today. HIST 150 is the same course as REL 150 and HUM 150; enroll in one only. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze the religious and political dynamics of the Near East just prior to the rise of Islam.
  2. Discuss the life of the Prophet Muhammad in its Arabian context.
  3. Explain the main teachings and practices of Islam, and the status and textual history of the Qur’an.
  4. Describe the history and significance of the Qur’an, the earliest written biography (sira) of Muhammad, and the Hadith.
  5. Assess the political significance of Islam in its Arabian context and summarize early succession struggles; describe subsequent Islamic conquests, and the establishment of the Ummayad and Abbasid caliphates.
  6. Identify and compare the main branches of Islam.
  7. Describe political developments during the Abbasid caliphate, its disruption by Turks and Mongols, the spread of Turkic and Persian Muslim rule to India, and the Christian Crusades and their consequences.
  8. Identify the major developments in Islamic civilization during its classical period: law, the Arabic language, calligraphy, architecture, art, literature, philosophy, medicine, science, and mathematics.
  9. Explain the role and significance of Sufi practices and literature.
  10. Describe Islamic civilization in Persia, Central Asia, The Caucuses, India, and Southeast Asia.
  11. Describe the significance of the Mamluks and the Ottoman Empire; and identify and assess the impacts of western imperialism on Islamic civilization.
  12. Discuss and evaluate the major developments in Islamic thought and practice from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries C.E. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  The religious and political dynamics of the Near East just prior
to the rise of Islam.
   A. Analyze the struggle of the Byzantine Empire and the Persian
Sassanid Empire for control of the Near East
   B. Discuss the emerging close relationships between religion and the
state during the early Common Era.
      1. Compare the relationship of the Orthodox Church and the Byzantine
Empire to that of the Zoroastrian religion and the Sassanid Empire.
      2. Examine parallel movements in near-eastern Judaism.
   C. Explain the significance of the pro-Byzantine Ghassanid and the
pro-Sassanian Lakmid kingdoms on the northern edge of the Arabian
Peninsula.
   D. Consider the significance of the term “holy war,” as used by the
Byzantine emperor Heraclius in his successful struggle against the
Sassanids.
   E. Describe the campaigns of the Ethiopians, the pro Byzantine Kinds
tribe, and the Sassanids around Mecca in the period of Muhammad’s
birth.
   F. Examine the pockets of Jewish influence in the Arabian Peninsula.
   G. Explain the religious situation in Mecca prior to Muhammad’s
Prophecy.
 
II. The life of the Prophet Muhammad in its Arabian context.
   A. Describe the context of Muhammad’s birth, youth, and early
career.
   B. Discuss the revelation of the Qur’an to Muhammad and how this was
recorded in the later text.
   C. Explain the reasons for and the consequences of Muhammad’s Hejira
(flight) to Yathrib (henceforth Medina) in 622.
   D. Describe the struggle for the control of Mecca, 624-630.

III. The main teachings and practices of Islam, and the status and textual
history of the Qur’an.
   A. Define “Islam” and “Muslim.”
   B. Identify the Five Pillars of Islam and explain the significance of
each.
      1. The Shahadah.
      2. Salah
      3. Zakat
      4. Sawm
      5. The Hajj
   C. Define and explain the significance of the following Islamic
concepts:
      1. “shirk”
      2. “jihad”
      3. “umma”
      4. The names of God: tanzih versus tashbih
      5. The Night Journey and the Seventh Heaven
      6. The Jinn
      7. Paradise and Hell
   D. Evaluate the significance of the prior Prophets and Maryam (the
Virgin Mary), and their roles in Qur’anic narrative and Islam
   E. Summarize Muhammad’s “Night Journey.”
   F. Discuss the history and role of Mecca and the Ka’ba in Islam.

IV. The history and significance of the Qur’an, the earliest written
biography (sira) of Muhammad, and the Hadith.
   A. Delineate various views as to the oral transmission and writing down
of the Qur’an
   B. Describe the status and authority of the Qur’an in Islam.
   C. Summarize the arguments used for the Qur’an’s
“inimitability.”
   D. Discuss the significance of Ibn Ishaq’s life of Muhammad (sira)
and other early texts on the subject.
   E. Compare the several versions of hadith and describe their
significance as sources for the life of Muhammad and Islamic law.

V. The political significance of Islam in its Arabian context, early
succession struggles, subsequent Islamic conquests, the establishment of
the Ummayad and Abbasid caliphates.
   A. Analyze Muhammad as prophet, military leader, and statesman, and
show how Islam created a new identity for the Arabian tribes.
   B. Explain the significance of Muhammad’s wives, children, and cousin
Ali, in the development of Islam.
   C. Show how the Caliph Abu Bakr ultimately united the rival Arabian
tribes and, under Caliph Omar, Damascus and the Byzantine Middle East were
seized.
   D. Describe the struggles for succession that occurred upon the murder
of the Caliph Othman, the subsequent establishment of the Ummayad
caliphate at Damascus, and the significance of the death of Husayn at
Karbala.
   E. Outline the subsequent Islamic conquests of North Africa, Spain,
Persia, and beyond in the late 600’s and early 700’s, and offer
reasons for their success.

VI. The main branches of Islam.
   A. Identify the theological positions of Khawarij and other Islamic
movements of the eighth century C.E. and show their significance to the
formation of subsequent Islamic identity. 
   B. Relate the development of Shia and Sunni branches of Islam to
rebellions against the Ummayad caliphate.
   C. Discuss the significance of the establishment of the Abbasid
caliphate to theological developments within Islam.
   D. Show how Sunni emerged in reaction to Shia identity.
   E. Contrast the differences between Shia and Sunni theology, practice,
and institutions.
   F. Compare the doctrinal differences among the several branches of Shia
Islam:  the Zaydi (“Fiver-Imam”), the Ithna ‘ashariyyah
(“Twelver-Imam”), and the Ismaili (“Seveners”).

VII. Political developments during the Abbasid caliphate, its disruption
by Turks and Mongols, the spread of Turkic and Persian Muslim rule to
India, and the Christian Crusades and their consequences.
   A. Discuss the establishment of the Abbasid caliphate.
      1. Analyze the Abbasid theory of kingship, the significance of the
construction of Baghdad as the capital, and the administration of
government.
      2. Describe Baghdad during the reign of Harun al-Rashid.
   B. Show how Islam spread into Central Asia and China.
   C. Outline the challenges to Abbasid rule provided by the Fatimids,
various Turkic peoples, the Mongolians, and Tamerlane.
   D. Summarize the effects of the Christian crusades on the Near East and
their continuing impact on Islamic-Christian relations.
   E. Outline the major Islamic political concepts of rulership and
society.
   F. Define the role the ulama in Islamic learning and politics.

VIII. Major developments in Islamic civilization during its classical
period: law, the Arabic language, calligraphy, architecture, art,
literature, philosophy, medicine, science, and mathematics.
   A. Describe the development of Islamic law, and show its significance
for Muslim lives.
      1. Analyze the relationship between Islamic law and previous legal
systems.
      2. Identify the four main schools of Islamic law, show their
geographical distribution, and contrast their major differences. 
   B. Discuss the early history of the Arabic language.
      1. Evaluate the significance of the rise of Islam for the spread and
development of Arabic.
      2. Assess the influence of Arabic on other western languages,
including English.
   C. Explain the significance of calligraphy in Islamic civilization and
its religious role.
   D. Survey the major developments of Islamic architecture in the
following areas:
      1. Jerusalem and Syria
      2. North Africa and Spain
      3. Persia
      4. Central Asia
      5. India
   E. Describe the impact of Islam on the pictorial arts.
      1. Review modern theories of Islamic aesthetics and the issue of
icons.
      2. Show the significance of decoration in Islamic art and
architecture.
      3. Survey Islamic pictorial art.
   F. Trace the origins of Arabic literary forms and describe their
Islamic developments.
   G. Summarize the achievements of Ibn Khaldun.
   H. Discuss the background of Islamic philosophy, identify its major
schools, and indicate the basic outlook of each; summarize developments in
medicine, science, and mathematics.
      1. Summarize the heritage of ancient Greek philosophy on Islamic
thought.
      2. Show the role of the Mu’tazilites (rationalists) in
transmitting Greek philosophy before and during the Abbasid caliphate and
its influence on Twelver-Imam Shia.
      3. Assess the influence of neo-Platonism and Gnosticism on the
theology of the Seveners.
      4. Describe the issue of God and “the created,” and its
significance for Muslim philosophy.
      5. Describe the issue of universalism versus nominalism and its
significance for Muslim philosophy.
      6. Summarize the synthesis of Plato and Aristotle in the
philosophies of al-Kindl and al-Farabi.
      7. Briefly summarize the philosophical achievements of Ibn Sina
(Avicenna), Algazel, and Averroes.
      8. Summarize the major Islamic achievements in medicine, science and
mathematics.

IX. The role and significance of Sufi practices and literature.
   A. Discuss the philosophical background and origins of Sufi.
   B. Identify the purpose and major ritual practices of the Sufi.
   C. Describe the establishment of Sufi orders and their spread
throughout the Islamic world.
   D. Summarize the relationship between Sufi and the main branches of
Islam.
   E. Identify the attitudes of various Islamic governments towards Sufi.
   F. Show the significance of the following Sufi authors in the
movement’s history:  al-Hallaj, Attar, Ibn Arabi, and Rumi.

X. Islamic civilization in Persia, Central Asia, the Caucasus, India, and
Southeast Asia.
   A. Show the impact of Islam on Persian history and civilization.
      1. Briefly trace the heritage of Persian civilization prior to the
arrival of Islam.
      2. Describe the architecture, art, philosophy, and literature of
Islamic Persia.
      3. Assess Persian civilization during the reign of Shah Abbas I.
   B. Show the impact of Islam on India.  
      1. Outline the gradual Islamic conquest of India.
      2. Analyze the special challenges Islam has faced in India and how
they have been addressed.
      3. Describe the intellectual, architectural, and artistic
accomplishments of Mughal India.
   C. Trace the spread of Islam throughout Southeast Asia, the special
challenges it faced, and how they were addressed.

XI. The significance of the Mamluks and the Ottoman Empire; the impacts of
western imperialism on Islamic civilizations.
   A. Characterize Mamluk rule and civilization in Syria and Egypt.
   B. Trace the rise and expansion of the Ottoman Empire, its conflict
with Safavid Persia, and its conquests in Christian Europe.
   C. State the Ottoman structure of political and religious authority,
and note the role of Sufi in maintaining it.
   D. Describe the architectural and artistic achievements of the
Ottomans.
   E. Summarize the political consequences of the military conflicts
between the Ottoman Empire and developing European nations, and the
gradual breakup of the empire.
   F. Discuss how western “Orientalism” viewed Islam.

XII. The major developments in Islamic thought and practice from the
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries C.E.
   A. Outline the main tenets of Wahhabi Islam and note its significance
today.
   B. Contrast the differences between modernist, secular-nationalist,
revivalist, and Pan-Islamic movements in the following Islamic dominions:
      1. The Ottoman Empire
      2. Iran
      3. Egypt
   C. State and evaluate the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948
on Muslims and Islamic states.
   D. Show the roles of Islamic nations in the Cold War and the Arab
political concepts that emerged from that conflict.
   E. Outline the causes and course of the Islamic revolution in Iran, and
discuss its consequences throughout Islam.
   F. Analyze the causes and consequences of the Islamic diaspora,
including that to the United States.
   G. Discuss the challenges Islam faces in the post-Cold War period and
the state of Islam today.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations 50% of grade
Projects/Assignments 50% of grade
   Total 100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%    

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 150H

No information found.

HIST 151

  • Title: World History I: Traditional World
  • Number: HIST 151
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students an introduction to the history of the major world civilizations up to approximately 1500. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify the major political, social, economic and technical developments in the histories of Egypt, Mesopotamia, other Near Eastern civilizations, Rome, Greece, India, China, sub-Saharan Africa, pre-Colombian America and medieval Europe. Students will be able to define the concept of a traditional, as opposed to a modern, society. They will be able to compare these societies with each another and with the modern society of the contemporary United States. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate historical literacy by navigating library and other information systems, prioritizing, analyzing and synthesizing historical materials and ideas; writing and otherwise communicating clearly; and demonstrating an understanding of chronology and change over time.
  2. Describe the major events and developments in the history of the traditional world up to 1500.
  3. Describe and discuss the principal characteristics of each traditional society studied, including Egypt, Mesopotamia, other Near Eastern civilizations, Rome, Greece, India, China, sub-Saharan Africa, pre-Columbian America and medieval Europe.
  4. Describe the major long-term social, political and economic trends in each of the societies studied.
  5. Compare and contrast the principal characteristics and long-term trends of the societies studied with each other.

           6. Describe the characteristics and trends of the traditional societies studied, and compare and                 contrast them with those of modern societies.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Origins and Characteristics of Prehistory

A. Identify the stages of human evolution.

B. Describe the characteristics of Paleolithic societies.

II. The Neolithic Revolution and the Beginnings of Civilization

A. Identify the distinguishing characteristics of Neolithic societies.

B. Explain the characteristics of early Near Eastern civilizations.

C. Identify the important Near Eastern cities and civilizations during the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, including Egypt, the Mesopotamian nations and the Hebrews.

D. Identify the important Near Eastern cities and civilizations during the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, including Egypt, the Mesopotamian nations and the Hebrews.

E. List the major social, political and economic characteristics of each of these civilizations.

F. Compare and contrast these civilizations with each other.

III. Early Indian Civilization

A. Describe the origins of Indian civilization and the Aryan invasion.

B. Describe the development of the characteristic features of Indian civilization.

C. Describe the development and characteristics of Hinduism.

IV. The Formation of Chinese Civilization

A. Delineate the important continuities of Chinese history and show how Chinese history in the early dynasties exemplified these trends.

B. Describe the major events and characteristics of early Chinese civilization from the Shang Dynasty through the Period of Warring States.

C. Describe the major Chinese religions of Confucianism, Mohism, Taoism and Buddhism and the major characteristics and beliefs of each.

V. Persia and India

A. Persia.

1. Describe the rise of Persian civilization and the Persian empire

2. Delineate the expansion of the Persian empire and its relations with Mediterranean societies

B. Classical India.

1. Describe the social, economic, and political characteristics of classical India

2. Describe the early development and salient characteristics of the arts in classical India

3. Compare classical Indian civilization with other traditional cultures

VI. Classical Civilizations of the Mediterranean

A. Greece.

1. Describe the geography of Greece and explain its significance in Greek history

2. Trace the history of early Greece, including the Minoans and Mycenaeans, the Dark Ages, the development of the hoplites and phalanx, the democratization of Athens, the Persian War and the Peloponnesian War

3. Describe Greek innovations in politics, philosophy, sculpture and architecture

B. The Hellenistic World.

1. Define Hellenism

2. Trace its origins and development

3. Characterize its political, intellectual and artistic traits

4. Discuss its importance in world history

5. Compare and contrast Hellenism and classical Greek civilizations

C. Rome.

1. Trace the early history of Rome

2. Describe the institutions of the Roman Republic

3. Analyze the Roman acquisition of an empire and describe that empire’s characteristics

4. Trace the political developments that resulted in Augustan monarchy

5. Describe the Augustan monarchy and the political developments under Augustus’ successors

6. Describe the crisis of the third century and the transition to the Byzantine Empire

7. Describe the development of early Christianity

8. Analyze the relationship between early Christianity and the social and political developments of the late Roman Empire.

VII. Imperial China and Southeast Asia

A. Han China.

1. Identify the characteristics of classical China associated with the Han Dynasty

2. Describe the relationships and connections between Han China and other societies of Central Asia

B. Tang Dynasty.

1. Describe the economic developments and cultural characteristics of Tang China

2. Elaborate on the relationship between Tang China and the Turkic nomads of Central Asia

C. Song Dynasty.

1. Compare and contrast China during the Song and Tang dynasties

2. Analyze the revival of Confucianism and its influence on the arts and culture of Song China

D. Southeast Asia.

1. Describe the process of cultural assimilation the characterized the relationship of Vietnam and Korean with China

2. Explain the ways in which Vietnam and Korea, while tributary states to China, maintained their own cultural and political identity

VIII. Traditional Japan

A. Trace the origins of Japanese civilization.

B. Elucidate the characteristics of traditional Japanese civilization.

C. Describe its social, economic and political developments.

D. Delineate the major developments in art, literature, and other aspects of culture.

IX. The Rise of Islam and the Islamic World

A. Trace the origins of Islamic civilization on the Arabia Peninsula.

1. Trace the emergence of Mohammed and the Islamic religion

2. Describe the major Muslim conquests in the Near East and the establishment of Islamic civilization

B. Delineate the characteristics of Islamic civilization as it developed in the seventh century C.E. in the following areas:

1. Society, economics and politics

2. Philosophy and religion

3. Art, literature and other aspects of culture

X. The Impact of the Central Asian Nomads

A. Outline the characteristics of Asian nomadic society and politics on the eve of its expansion.

B. Delineate the nomadic expansion and the development of new nomadic empires in:

1. China

2. Europe

3. Turkey

4. Persia and other parts of the Islamic world

XI Africa

A. Outline the origins and anthropological groupings of African peoples.

B. Describe the principal sub-Saharan African societies and their characteristics.

C. Trace the major developments in sub-Saharan African history up to 1500 C.E.

XII. Indigenous American and Pacific Oceanic Societies

A. Early human settlement.

B. Delineate the principal theories of human settlement in the Americas.

C. Describe the earliest peoples as revealed by investigations of their settlement sites.

1. The Incas

a. Trace the origins of the Incan empire

b. Delineate its political, economic, and social characteristics

c. Outline the important developments of Inca history

d. Describe the other major indigenous South American civilizations

2. The Mayas

a. Trace the origins of the Maya empire

b. Delineate its political, economic and social characteristics

c. Outline important developments in Maya history

3. The Peoples of Central Mexico

a. Trace their origins

b. Delineate the political, economic, social, and religious characteristics of their societies

c. Outline the important developments in their history

4. Oceania

a. Identify the major Oceanic societies

b. Describe the characteristics of these societies

XIII. Medieval Europe

A. Trace the major developments of the early Middle Ages (c. 600-900).

1. Describe the Viking, Moslem and Magyar invasions and analyze their significance

2. Explain the development of feudalism and other major medieval institutions.

B. Describe important historical developments of the High Middle Ages.

1. Describe the medieval agricultural revolution

2. Discuss the growth of cities and commerce

3. Outline the main features of medieval religion and culture

a. Delineate the main features of medieval Christianity

b. Trace the birth of the university

c. Recall the main characteristics of medieval art

4. Outline the characteristics of medieval government

C. Elaborate on and explain the problems of the late Middle Ages.

1. Describe the demographic disasters resulting from the plague, famine and war of the late Middle Ages

2. Summarize the resulting economic and political changes

D. Describe the trade networks connecting Eurasian societies.

XIV. Europe and the World

A. Describe the development and changes of the Eurasian trade networks on the eve of European exploration.

B. Identify the reasons for European exploration and the major voyages.

C. Explain the initial development of slavery in the Americas.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. At least three examinations emphasizing written answers.
2. One book review or other paper.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 151H

No information found.

HIST 152

  • Title: World History II: Modern World
  • Number: HIST 152
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides students an introduction to the history of the world since approximately 1500. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe and analyze the development of modernism, which occurred first in the West, including the scientific revolution, secularism, industrialism and the rise of new political ideologies. They will be able to trace the expansion of modernization in both the Western and non-Western worlds and the response to modernism in non-Western countries. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the major events and trends in modern world history.
  2. Discuss the concept of modernization as it developed in the West.
  3. Describe the origins of modernization in the West and discuss the conditions surrounding its birth and development.
  4. Describe the paths to modernization taken by the principal non-Western societies, the impediments to modernization, and progress achieved by these societies.
  5. Compare and contrast the modernization of the societies studied and derive generalizations about modernization from them. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Traditional Societies on the Eve of the Modern World
   A. Describe the major developments and trends in East Asia, 1500-1800.
      1. Identify Ch’ing Dynasty China and delineate the major
developments and trends of its history.
      2. Identify Tokugawa Japan and delineate the major developments and
trends of its history.
   B. Describe the major developments and trends in Africa, the Middle
East, and India in the period 1500-1800.
      1. Describe the major developments and historical trends in Safavid
Persia.
      2. Describe the major developments and historical trends in the
Ottoman Empire.
      3. Describe the major developments and historical trends in Mughal
India.
      4. Describe the major developments and trends in Sub-Saharan
Africa.
   C. Describe Europe’s traditional societies and the European
explorations and expansion in the early modern period.
      1. Describe the characteristics and major developments of the
traditional societies in Europe in the early modern period.
      2. Trace the development of absolutism in early modern Europe and
delineate its characteristics.
      3. Describe the major developments and characteristics of the
Renaissance.
      4. Describe the major developments and ideas of the Protestant
Reformation.
      5. Describe the major developments in the European explorations and
conquests of the 15th and 16th centuries.
      6. Describe the major developments of the scientific revolution of
early modern Europe.
      7. Describe the European-American syntheses as they emerged in Latin
America and English North America.

II. The Revolutionary West and the World
   A. Discuss how the West revolutionized itself.
      1. Describe the political revolutions of the 18th and early 19th
centuries.
         a. Delineate the main events of the American Revolution and
discuss its significance for world history.
         b. Delineate the main events of the French Revolution and discuss
its significance for world history.
         c. Describe the new political ideologies of liberalism,
democracy, and socialism.
      2. Describe the major developments of the Industrial Revolution.
   B. Describe the British conquest of India and the development of modern
institutions in that country.
   C. Delineate the main events in the European division of Africa and
compare the principal interpretations of that development.
   D. Delineate the main events of 19th century Chinese history and
describe the Western intrusion and the Chinese reaction.
   E. Describe Japan’s response to the Western challenge as manifested
in the Meiji Restoration and Japan’s modernization in the second half of
the 19th century.
   F. Describe the special case of Thailand and show how its modernization
resembled Japan’s.
   G. Describe the unstable synthesis of traditional and modern elements
in 19th century Latin America.
   H. Compare and contrast the response of each of these countries to the
challenge of the modernized West.

III. The Re-Emergent World and the West
   A. Describe the principal challenges to modernized European society and
culture in the 20th century.
      1. Discuss the crisis in modern European thought in the works of
such thinkers as Freud and his followers, modern physicists, and
socialists.
      2. Describe the main events of the First World War and that war’s
effect in shaking the self-confidence of liberal Western societies.
      3. Describe the main ideas of Lenin and delineate the major events
of the Bolshevik revolution in Russia.
      4. Trace the main developments in the rise of Fascism and Nazism;
delineate the most important events of World War II.
      5. Recount the European loss of world dominance following the Second
World War.
   B. Describe the decolonization of the non-Western world.
      1. Describe the development of the major anti-colonial ideologies.
         a. Describe the principal ideas, figures, and events of
non-Western nationalism.
         b. Describe the major socialist movements in the non-Western
world and analyze their effect on the decolonization process.
      2. Describe the decolonization of the following areas:
         a. The Arab World
         b. India
         c. Africa
      3. Describe the Chinese and other Leninist revolutions in the
non-Western world.
   C. Describe the principal developments in the non-Western world since
decolonization.
      1. Discuss the problems of development, including population growth,
agricultural adjustments, attempts to industrialize, and struggles for
stable political institutions.
      2. Describe recent developments in:
         a. Japan
         b. The most rapidly modernizing Pacific Rim countries
         c. China
         d. Southeast Asia
         e. The Indian Subcontinent
         f. The Middle East
         g. Africa
         h. Latin America
   D. Describe the major trends in the Western world since World War II,
including the following areas:
      1. Eastern Europe
      2. Western Europe and the English-speaking countries outside
Europe

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. At least three examinations emphasizing written answers.  

2. One book review or other paper.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 152H

No information found.

HIST 160

  • Title: Modern Russian History
  • Number: HIST 160
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines Russian history within a Eurasian context. It is a study of three centuries of the social, political, economic and cultural forces that shaped Russian history, beginning with a survey of the events that place Russia outside the Western historical tradition. 3 hrs. lecture/ wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the premodern historic and cultural events of Rus and Muscovy that are the foundation for modern Russian historical development.

  2. Identify and describe the major historic figures, issues, and events of Imperial and Soviet Russia that have shaped the course of Russian history.

  3. Describe and explain the major foreign policy objectives pursued by Russian governments since the reign of Peter the Great.

  4. Define the distinguishing political, social and economic characteristics of Czarist, Soviet and post-Soviet Russia.

  5. Trace the development of the relationship between Russian and the West from the time of Peter the Great to the present.

  6. Discuss the development of Russia as a Eurasian empire, interacting within a Eurasian or European-Muslim cultural content. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Premodern Historic and Cultural Foundations of Russian Historical
Development
   A. Identify and describe the role of each of the following historical
events in shaping modern Russian history:
      1. Old Rus: Kiev and Novgorod
      2. The Mongol subjugation
      3. The rise of Muscovy and the beginning of empire
      4. The Time of Troubles and the establishment of the Romanov
dynasty
   B. Explain the influence of the following philosophical and
intellectual developments on modern Russian history:
      1. The Orthodox world view
      2. The Third Rome Theory
      3. The Great Schism
II. Imperial Russia
   A. Describe Peter the Great’s program of aggressive westernization of
Russia, including his social, political and economic goals and foreign
policy objectives.
   B. Assess the influence of Peter the Great’s program of aggressive
westernization on Russian social, economic and political institutions and
their modernization.
   C. Identify the role of each of the following domestic and foreign
policies or events in the development of Russian history:
      1. The transfer of the capital from Moscow to St. Petersburg
      2. Peter the Great’s defeat of Charles XII of Sweden in the Great
Northern War
      3. The Pugachev Rebellion
      4. The partitions of Poland
      5. Russification
      6. The Great Patriotic War
      7. The Decembrist Uprising
      8. Aleksandr III’s emancipation of the serfs
      9. The annexation of the Caucasian and Central Asian regions
      10. The industrialization program of Sergei Witte
      11. Bloody Sunday
      12. The agrarian policy of Pyotr Stolypin
      13. World War I
   D. Explain the influence of the following philosophical and
intellectual developments on the course of Imperial Russian history:
      1. The conflicting view of Russia’s past, present and future
offered by the Slavophiles and the Westerners.
      2. The Official Nationality developed under Nikolai I.
      3. The writings of Aleksandr Herzen and Nikolai Chernyshevskii.
      4. The opposing viewpoints of the Social Revolutionaries and the
Social Democrats.
   E. Trace the growth of the Russian empire and describe the traditional
policy of cultural assimilation, including its ramifications.
   F. Identify and describe significant contributions of Imperial Russia
to the Russian cultural tradition from the media of literature, art,
music, theater, ballet and opera.
III. Soviet Russia
   A. Describe the role of each of the following historical events in the
evolution of Soviet Russian history:
      1. War Communism (1918-1922)
      2. Industrialization and Collectivization drives
      3. Great Purge (1930s) and the Gulag
      4. World War II
      5. Subjugation of Eastern Europe
      6. Khrushchev’s Secret Speech at the 20th CPSU Congress
      7. Vietnam and Afghanistan Wars
      8. Perestroika and glasnost (1986-1991)
      9. The collapse of the Berlin Wall
   B. Explain the influence of the following philosophical and
intellectual developments on the evolution of Russian historical
development:
      1. Socialist Realism
      2. The Thaw under Khrushchev and the publication of Aleksandr
Solzhnitsyn’s [One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich]
      3. Andrei Sakharov’s thoughts on the use of nuclear weapons and
his leadership of the Helsinki Watch Group on Human Rights
      4. Samizdat
   C. Trace the growth of the Soviet empire and describe the Soviet policy
toward the nationalities, including its ramifications.
   D. Identify and describe significant Soviet era contributions to the
Russian cultural tradition from the media of literature, art, music and
film.
IV. Post-Soviet Russia
   A. Describe the social, economic and political context in which a  new
Russia” is emerging.
   B. Explain the nationalities problems which the Russian Federation has
inherited from the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 1. A minimum of three exams which will constitute at least 50% of the
final grade.  The exams will include questions of a factual, analytical and
evaluative nature.
2. Written research, analytical or evaluative assignments which will
constitute at least 25% of the final grade.
3. The remaining percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion
for such items as participation in class discussion, group activities,
etc.
4. Evaluation criteria for writing:  Complete, concrete, correct and
clear writing is a major goal for each project assigned.  In addition,
incorporation of the elements and characteristics of the specific type of
writing is expected.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 160H

No information found.

HIST 162

  • Title: Modern Latin America
  • Number: HIST 162
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an examination of the economic, social, political and cultural history of Latin America since independence. Regional identities, such as Central America, and independent national states, such as Cuba and Mexico, are explored. Literary and intellectual trends, together with contemporary popular culture, are featured in the course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish the particular development, problems and cultural uniqueness of each country studied.
  2. Identify those events, issues and trends common to most Latin American nations.
  3. Analyze the historical relationship between the U.S. and Latin America.
  4. Discuss major literary and cultural movements in Latin America since independence.
  5. Describe the social problems that are specific to Latin America.
  6. Analyze the important roles of the Catholic Church and military in the political life of Latin America.
  7. Explain the development of national fronts, land reform organizations and guerilla movements in Central and Latin America.
  8. Illustrate the degree of dependency of Latin American nations upon U.S. and European economic and foreign policies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. From Colony to Nation
   A. Introduction
      1. List five reasons for studying Latin America.
      2. Identify all of the countries of Latin America and its major
rivers on a blank map.
      3. List four common myths about Latin American nations and describe
how they square with reality.
      4. Explain the major interpretations of Latin America and select
which one matches your current understanding of these nations.
   B. Colonial foundations and legacy
      1. Describe the native peoples of the Americas during the Age of
Discovery.
      2. Summarize how Europeans, especially Columbus and his crews, are
characterized by Kirkpatrick Sale’s essay (handout).
      3. List and define the colonial institutions of the Spanish and the
Portuguese in the New World.
      4. Explain the causes of the wars of independence.
   C. Independence and its aftermath
      1. Show how the independence movements varied across Latin America
and in the Caribbean.
      2. List the impact of the wars of independence upon the nations of
Latin America.
   D. The heritage of independence
      1. Describe how political independence led to economic, religious
and cultural independence from Spain and Portugal.
      2. Trace the legacy of the wars for independence upon the new
nations.
   E. The search for order
      1. Analyze how caudillismo affected the search for political order
in Latin America.
      2. Trace the development of political parties in Latin America and
define their differences.

II. Nation Building
   A. Discuss the key ideas that supported nationalism in the new states.
   B. Ways of life
      1. Compare and contrast rural and urban lifestyles in
nineteenth-century Latin America.
      2. Characterize slavery in Latin America and compare it to slavery
in the U.S.
      3. Discuss the role of women.
      4. Trace the influence of the nineteenth-century Catholic church.
   C. Mexico and Central America
      1. Describe the leadership of Benito Juarez and the elements of La
Reforma.
      2. Identify the major themes of the Porfiriato.
      3. Explain the influence of coffee, bananas and canals on Central
America.
   D. South America
      1. List those influences common to the political, social and
economic development of Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile
and Argentina.
      2. Trace the impact of the War of the Pacific.
      3. Evaluate the influence of the monarchy in Brazil and explain its
longevity.
   E. Culture
      1. Explore the development of an independent Latin American
culture.
      2. Define modernism, positivism, indigenism and other cultural
currents popular at the turn of the century.
   F. Latin America and the U.S.
      1. Select the key events forming the relationship between the U.S.
and Latin America at the turn of the century.
      2. Discuss  dollar "diplomacy", Pan-Americanism and American
interests in the Caribbean in 1900.

III. The Early Twentieth Century
   A. Populism in South America
      1. Define populism and describe some of its examples in South
America.
   B. Dictators of the Caribbean
      1. Summarize the careers of selected Caribbean dictators.
      2. Trace the U.S. role in supporting dictatorships in the Caribbean,
especially Cuba.
   C. Panama, Brazil and Peru
      1. Illustrate the U.S. role in the creation of the canal.
      2. Discuss the decline of Brazil’s Old Republic.
      3. Summarize the changes in Peruvian political life in the 1920s.
   D. Revolutions in Mexico, Brazil and Nicaragua
      1. Describe the various Mexican revolutionaries and their different
agendas.
      2. Trace the course of the Mexican Revolution and list the key
components of the Constitution of 1917.
   E. Depression and Latin America
      1. Discuss the impact of economic nationalism in Argentina and
Brazil.
      2. Describe how Batista and Trujillo maintained power.
   F. Race, culture and gender
      1. Discuss the various theories of race.
      2. Analyze the popularity of indigenismo in Peru.
      3. Explore the role of gender in Latin American culture.
   G. Latin America in World War II
      1. Trace the impact of World War II on Latin America.
      2. Characterize the relationship between Latin American countries
and the U.S. in World War II.

IV. Revolutionary Populism and Anti-Communism
   A. Analyze the populist elements of Getulio Vargas, Juan and Eva Peron,
Haya de la Torre and Juscelino Kubitschek.
   B. Columbia
      1. Describe the period known as "La Violencia."
      2. Discuss the development of the drug trade and show its domestic
and international importance.
   C. Central America/Caribbean Basin
      1. Outline how Costa Rica obtained its unique political legacy.
      2. Trace how Haitian politics have impoverished a nation.
      3. Describe the continuing influence of canal issues in Panamanian
politics.
   D. The Cuban Revolution and its aftermath
      1. Define the U.S. concept of containment.
      2. Outline Castro’s rise to power and his turn toward socialism.
      3. Trace the global impact of the Cuban Revolution.
      4. Describe the place of Cuba in U.S. hemispheric policy.
      5. Assess the success of the Cuban Revolution by century’s end.
   E. Military rule
      1. Discuss the rise of military states in Chile, Argentina, Brazil
and Uruguay.
      2. Evaluate the influence of the U.S. in these military
governments.
   F. Conflict since 1980
      1. Describe the group known as Sendero Luminoso.
      2. Analyze the elements of guerilla movements in Central America.
      3. Discuss the conflict between the contras and the Sandanistas.
      4. Evaluate Cuba’s role in Latin America in the 21st Century.
   G. Latin America in the new century
      1. Sketch the potential impact of economic consortiums, such as
NAFTA, upon Latin America.
      2. Illustrate the influence of Latin American culture upon the U.S.
and Europe.
      3. List the continuing problems that Latin America brings to the new
century.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

1) Two short examinations plus a midterm and a final
2) Project paper and presentation

See individual instructor’s syllabus for grading scale.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 165

  • Title: History of China
  • Number: HIST 165
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will survey the history of China from its Neolithic origins until the twenty-first century by examining major overall themes, including political and military developments, social formations cultural trends and China's role in the larger world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Trace the emergence of Chinese civilization and governance from the Neolithic through the Warring States periods.
  2. Review the rise and fall of Chinese imperial dynasties from the Qin through the Qing, noting competing patterns of centralized strength versus disintegration.
  3. List the outstanding achievements of Chinese civilization in religion, writing, and the arts.
  4. Describe the gradual disintegration of Chinese rule during the nineteenth-and early twentieth centuries, and the re-emergence of China as a strong power since the 1980's.
  5. Reflect on the significance of Chinese civilization for world history past and present. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Four Major Themes of Chinese History: Ancestor Veneration,
Geography, Political Autocracy, and Cultural Control
   A. Describe the traditional Chinese concern with dead ancestors, and
its social and political manifestations.
   B. Explain the geographical notion of China as the Middle Kingdom
surrounded by barbarians and cite manifestations of it in China's past.
   C. Discuss the ramifications of the centrality of the concept of a
strong ruler.
   D. Show how Chinese rulers have, often successfully, sought control of
language, religion, and philosophy.
  
II. Chinese Neolithic Cultures, Legendary Rulers, and the Impact of the
Shang and the Zhou Dynasties
   A. Discuss the evidence for Neolithic cultures in China and what can be
concluded from it.
   B. Outline the legendary history of early China as the Chinese describe
it.
   C. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of Shang and Zhou feudalism.
   D. Explain the significance of the bone oracles as a tool of political
authority and for the role of writing in Chinese Civilization.

III. The Later Zhou and the Warring States Period
   A. Show how hereditary lords in the Zhou kingdom emerged as dominant
actors, relegating the Eastern Zhou king to a figurehead as they struggled
for hegemony.
   B. Discuss the competition among the warring states, led to the
emergence of philosophical, legal, and military schools and their
numerous, as well as striking technological achievements.
   C. Outline the main concepts of early Confucian, early Daoist, and
Legalist thought.

IV. The Qin Creation of a Unified China
   A. Describe the personality and exploits of Qin Shi Huang-di, the first
emperor.
   B. Evaluate the successes and failures of his reforms.

V. Early Han Dynasty Rule and Civilization
   A. Discuss in detail the structure of Early Han government and analyze
how the Han learned from the mistakes and successes of the Qin.
   B. Explain the cosmological competition between early Daoist and
Confucian philosophers, and the consequences of the Confucian victory for
Chinese Civilization.
   C. Show how the Han dealt with tribes on the borders of China and
attempted to expand in the south.

VI. Wang Mang Interval the Latter Han Dynasty
   A. Discuss the idealist usurpation by Wang Mang, and the weakening of
imperial rule that was required for the Later Han to re-establish the
dynasty.
   B. Describe the rebellions that weakened the later and the rise of the
Daoist Religion as a virtual replication of Han government.

VII. The Period of Division and the Growth of Religious Daosim and
Buddhism
   A. Discuss Cao Cao's attempt to reunite the empire in 220 C.E. and the
marks it has left on subsequent Chinese literature.
   B. Show how frequent dynastic turnover and barbarian incursions
weakened central political authority during this period.
   C. Describe how Buddhist and Daoist leaders attached themselves to
various kingdoms during this period and so strengthened their influence.

VIII. The Government and Civilization of Reunified of the Sui and Tang
Dynasties
   A. Describe the Sui efforts to reunify China prior to their overthrow
by the Tang.
   B. Explain how Tang government worked, and opened up trade on the Silk
Road.
   C. Outline the achievements of Tang civilization in city planning,
painting, porcelain, sculpture, and literature.
   D. Explain how the Wang Anshi rebellion arose and weakened the Tang
Dynasty.

IX. Achievements of the Northern and Southern Song Dynasties
   A. Show how the Song Dynasty emerged after a short period of disunity.
   B. Describe the innovations of Song government, the dynasties strengths
and weaknesses against surrounding peoples, and the Song flight to South
China.
   C. Outline Song technological achievements and the emergence of Chinese
business.
   D. Discuss developments in Buddhism and Daosim in the Song, and the
emergence of Neoconfucianism.

X. The Mongol Takeover and the Ming Dynasty
   A. Analyze the rise of the Mongols, their military prowess and their
takeover of China.
   B. Describe the fall of the Mongol (Yuan) dynasty because of peasant
rebellions, and the establishment of the Ming Dynasty.
   C. Outline the governmental, military, and naval achievements of the
early Ming.
   D. Examine the significance of the construction of the Forbidden City.
   E. Describe development in Chinese business during the Ming and China's
connection to world markets in the age of exploration.

XI. Weaknesses of the Late Ming Dynasty, the Manchu Takeover, and the
Early Qing Dynasty
   A. Discuss the power of court eunuchs during the late Ming. 
   B. Describe the rise of the Manchu in the northwest their invasion and
takeover of China, and their subsequent conquest of Tibet.
   C. Contrast the privileges of the Manchu banners during the Manchu
(Qing) dynasty.
   D. Show how the Kangxi and Qianlong emperors absorbed and influenced
Chinese Civilization at the height of the Qing.
   E. Analyze European influences on Chinese astronomy and art.

XII. Factors Leading to Destruction of the Qing Dynasty
   A. Examine changes in Chinese agriculture during the early Qing and the
resultant population explosion during the nineteenth century.
   B. Describe European attempts to win trading rights in China, the
importation of opium and the wars that resulted, and further European and
Japanese incursions on Chinese territory during the remainder of the
nineteenth century.
   C. Analyze the influence of European missionaries on nineteenth-century
China, and the resultant Taiping and Boxer Rebellions.
   D. Examine the reasons for the Qing dynasty's inability to resist
European and Japanese imperialism.

XIII. Republican China and the Growth of Chinese Nationalism
   A. Show how the establishment of the Chinese Republic in 1912 resulted
in the rise of warlord governments.
   B. Examine the "New Thought" that developed in early twentieth-century
China and its promotion of modernization.
   C. Describe the May 4, 1919, and its role in creating twentieth-century
China.
   D. Examine the development of the Guomindang under Chiang Kai-shek
(Jiang Jieshi) and the rise of the Communist Part of China (CPC) during
the 1920's.

XIV. Civil War and the Japanese Invasion
   A. Describe the outbreak of the civil war in 1927 and the resulting
"Long March."
   B. Describe the Japanese takeover of Manchuria in 1931 and its invasion
of China in 1937.
   C. Explain how the CPC and Guomindang came to sign a temporary truce in
order to fight the Japanese until 1945.

XV. The Communist Victory of 1949 and the Development of China Until the
Death of Mao Zedong
   A. Analyze the reasons for the CPC victory in the renewed civil war
from 1946-1949.
   B. Describe how communist rule was established in China through 1956
and efforts at collectivization and industrialization of the economy.
   C. Examine Red China's foreign policy with regard to Taiwan, the Soviet
Union, Korea, and the United States in the post-World War II era, its
involvement in the Korean War and other Cold War tensions.
   D. Show how the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution periods
devastated China until the death of Mao Zedong in 1976.

XVI. Economic, Social, and Cultural Developments in China Since the
1980's
   A. Describe the way in which the CPC adopted capitalism as an economic
system while retaining one-party rule.
   B. Evaluate the social, regional, and economic gains and disparities
that have resulted.
   C. Describe China's current prominence in world business and the issues
China now faces.
   D. Look for trends in developing Chinese culture.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least three examinations emphasizing written answers and additional
written papers or other work, at the instructor's discretion.
Examinations and written work ordinarily comprising at least two-thirds of
class credit.
Grades corresponding under most circumstances to the traditional academic
formula of
90% - 100% = A
80% -  89% = B
70% -  79% = C
60% -  69% = D
59% and less = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 167

  • Title: Introduction to History: Japan
  • Number: HIST 167
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will provide an introduction to Japan from the earliest period of human settlement on the Japanese archipelago to the present. In so doing, it will explore political, economic, social, cultural and religious developments. Such an exploration will be useful for the further study of East Asian and Japanese history, as well as other aspects of Japanese language and cultural study. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the main periods of Japanese history and describe the major developments of each.
  2. Discuss the distinctive aspects of Japanese historical development, especially as it contrasts with that that of the West.
  3. Identify important historical aspects of Japanese society, culture, and religion
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of important documents and artifacts and their relation to Japanese history.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of Japanese history through tests, writing assignments and projects. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Earliest Periods
   A. Identify and describe the primary developments of each of the early
periods.
      1. The pre-Jomon epoch.
      2. The Jomon period.
      3. The Yayoi Period
   B. Compare and contrast the characteristics of each period with those
preceding it.
   C. Compare and contrast political, economic, and social characteristics
of each of these periods to those in the United States.
   D. Analyze how the characteristics of these Japanese societies may have
produced distinctive viewpoints among the people.

II. Kofun-Yamato Period 
   A. Describe the major developments of this period.
      1. The rise of the Yamato monarchy
      2. The introduction of Chinese culture, including
         a. Written language
         b. Buddhism.
         c. Chinese political ideas.
      3. Prince Shotoku’s  Seventeen-Article Constitution
      4. Demographic and other social developments
   B. Compare and contrast this period to those preceding it.
      1. Continuities 
      2. Discontinuities
   C. Compare and contrast the political, economic, social, and cultural
characteristics of this society to those of the United States.
   D. Analyze the attitudes historical developments may have produced in
Japanese of this period, and compare and contrast it to that of
Americans.

III. The Nara Period
   A. Describe the major developments of this period.
      1. The design and building of Nara.
      2. Developments within the Japanese bureaucracy.
      3. Cultural trends
      4. Social structure and peasant life.
   B. Compare and contrast this period to those preceding it.
      1. Continuities 
      2. Discontinuities
   C. Compare (and contrast) the following Japanese developments of this
period with similar institutions in the modern United States.
      1. City development.
      2. The structure and function of government.
      3. Social structure and the life of the people.
      4. Culture, such as literature.
        
IV. The Heian Period
   A. Describe the major developments of this period.
      1. The building of Heian and characteristics of this capital.
      2. Developments in government structure.
      3. Cultural developments.
      4. Civil War.
   B. Analyze the continuities and discontinuities in Japanese history in
the following areas:
      1. Government.
      2. Culture and religion.
   C. Compare and contrast the Japanese institutions of this period with
those in the contemporary United States:
      1. City planning and urban life in Heian.
      2. Structure and function of government.
      3. Economic and social structure, especially the life of the
people.
      4. Cultural characteristics

V. Kamakura Period (1185-1333)
   A. Describe the major political developments of this period.
      1. The policies of Minamoto no Yoritomo.
      2. Developments in feudalism.
      3. Other political and military developments.
      4. Everyday life, especially of the peasants.
   B. Describe other major developments
      1. Religious
      2. Cultural.
   C. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it.
      1. Continuities 
      2. Discontinuities
   D. Compare and contrast major historical developments of this period
with institutions in the United States. 

VI. Muromachi Period (1333-1568)
    A. Describe major political developments
       1. Civil War
       2. Decline of shogunal power.
    B. Describe other major developments
       1. Religious
       2. Cultural.
    C. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it.
       1. Continuities 
       2. Discontinuities
        
VII. Azuchhi-Monoyama Period (1568-1600)
     A. Describe the major political developments
        1. Activities of Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, and Ieyasu.
        2. Developments in national and local government.
     B. Describe other major developments
        1. Religious
        2. Cultural.
     C. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it.
        1. Continuities 
        2. Discontinuities
        
VIII. Tokugawa Period (1600-1868)
      A. Describe the major political developments
         1. Ieyasu’s consolidation of power.
         2. Developments in national and local government.
      B. Describe other major characteristics of this period:
         1. Urbanization and social and economic results
         2. Other social and economic developments, especially class
structure and peasant life.
         3. Religion.
         4. Culture.
      C. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it.
         1. Continuities 
         2. Discontinuities.
      D. Compare and contrast the following aspects of Japanese society of
this period with those in the contemporary United States:
      E. Social and economic, especially urban and peasant life
      F.  Religious
      G.  Cultural.
        
IX. Meiji Restoration (1868-1912)
    A. Describe the major political developments, including 
       1. Restoration of the emperor.
       2. Creation of the modern Japanese state.
    B. Describe important military developments, including
       1. Creation of a modern Japanese army.
       2. Development of a modern navy.
       3. Wars against China and Russia.
    C. Describe other major developments
       1. Economic, especially the industrialization of the Japanese
economy.
       2. Social, especially changes in the power structure and the
development of a modernized class system, including industrial workers and
new middle classes.
       3. Religious.
       4. Cultural.
    D. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it.
       1. Continuities 
       2. Discontinuities.
    E.  Compare and contrast major Japanese developments of this period
with comparable developments in the United States, especially
       1. Economic..
       2. The power structure and life of the people.
       3. Religion.
       4. Culture.
 
X. The Early Showa Period and the Wars of Expansion (1912-1945)
   A. Describe the major political developments
      1. Increasing militarization of the government.
      2. Role of the emperor.
   B. Describe important military developments, especially the
      1. Chinese War
      2. Pacific War (against the United States and its Western allies) 
   C.  Describe other major developments
      1.  Economic, especially the continued modernization of the Japanese
economy and the effects of the world-wide economic depression. 
      2. Social: the modern class structure and the life of the people
      3. Religious
      4. Cultural.
   D. Discuss the relationship of this period to those preceding it:
      1. Continuities 
      2. Discontinuities.
   E. Compare and contrast the major developments of this period with
those of the contemporary United States.
   F. Analyze the political and social perspectives of the Japanese people
and discuss their relationship to historical developments. Compare these
attitudes to common American viewpoints during this period.

XI. Post-World War II Japan
    A. Describe the major political developments, including the
      1. Acceptance of the new constitution.
      2. Emergence of the modern party system.
    B. Describe important military developments, especially 
      1. Neutrality 
      2. Cooperation with the United States.
   C. Describe the major economic and social developments with particular
attention to
      1. Rapid postwar growth and recent stagnation.
      2. Social structure.
      3. Developments in standard of living and work patterns.
      4. Demographic changes.
   D. Describe other major developments
      1. Religious
      2. Cultural.
   E. Compare and contrast the major characteristics of this period to
those preceding it:
      1. Continuities 
      2. Discontinuities
   F. Compare and contrast the major developments of this period with
those in the United States.
   G. Analyze the political and social perspectives of the Japanese people
and discuss their relationship to historical developments. Compare (or
contrast) these attitudes to common American viewpoints during this
period.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least three examinations emphasizing written answers and additional
written papers or other work, at the instructor’s discretion.
Examinations and written work ordinarily comprising at least two-thirds of
class credit.
Grades corresponding under most circumstances to the traditional academic
formula of 90%-100%=A, 80%-89%=B, 70%-79%=C, 60%-69%=D, and 59% and
less=F.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 180

  • Title: North American Indian History
  • Number: HIST 180
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course surveys the major themes of the history of Indigenous peoples (also known as American Indians and Native Americans) in North America from the emergence of human life on the continent through the present. Topics include Indigenous life prior to European migration, colonialism, adaptation and resistance to European and American expansion, and efforts to maintain sovereignty. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate understanding of diverse Indigenous communities.
  2. Explain purpose and impact of colonization.
  3. Describe Indigenous efforts to preserve culture and identity and resist colonization.
  4. Identify Indigenous efforts to maintain sovereignty as nations within a nation.
  5. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Pre-colonial North American Indigenous Civilizations

A. Explain creation stories and migration theories.

B. Discuss regional and cultural diversity.

1. Describe various subsistence methods (e.g. hunting, fishing, gathering, agriculture) employed by Indigenous peoples to survive in their respective environments.

2. Identify various political organizations used in Indigenous North America.

3. Explain the sexual division of labor and role of gender in Indigenous societies.

C. Describe human impact on the environment.

D. Explain migrations and merging of Indigenous societies.

E. Demonstrate understanding of diverse Indigenous communities.

F. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

II. Colonial Invasions, 1492-1680

A. Describe the historical context of terms such as "Indian", "Native American", and "Indigenous peoples".

B. Explain purpose and impact of European colonization.

C. Demonstrate how the Columbian Exchange changed life in the New and Old World.

1. Describe exchanges of plants.

2. Explain how livestock transformed North American life.

3. Identify the role of disease in Indigenous communities.

D. Analyze Indigenous peoples' experiences with colonists from various European empires (e.g. Spain, France, England, etc.).

E. Demonstrate understanding of diverse Indigenous communities after European contact.

F. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

III. Indigenous Life in Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1680-1783

A. Analyze the impact of the cross-cultural contact and trade on Indigenous communities and the environment.

B. Explain the role of the Indigenous slave trade.

C. Demonstrate the role of Indigenous peoples in European imperial competitions over North American territory.

D. Identify the relationship of various Indigenous nations with the growing English colonies.

E. Describe the role of Indigenous people in the American Revolution.

F. Describe Indigenous efforts to preserve culture and identity and resist colonization.

G. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

IV. Indigenous Peoples' Experiences with the Early United States, 1783-1838

A. Explain the development of U.S. Indian and land policy.

B. Discuss how Indigenous groups resisted expansion.

1. Analyze how people united for common defense.

2. Explain how various communities accommodated some aspects of U.S. Indian policy to preserve culture, homeland, or population.

C. Analyze removal.

1. Describe how policy became removal.

2. Identify how Indigenous groups violently and non-violently resisted removal.

3. Explain how removal was carried out and the immense toll it took on human life and Indigenous cultures.

D. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

V. The Indigenous Experience West of the Mississippi River, 1830-1890

A. Discuss the various interactions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

B. Identify changes in U.S. policy, including rise of the reservation system.

C. Explain the impact of removal, both for newcomers and for established Indigenous communities.

D. Describe how violence characterized cross-cultural interaction, leading to extreme loss of Indigenous life.

E. Discuss resistance to continued expansion.

1. Describe militaristic resistance.

2. Analyze prophetic movements and how they were misunderstood by the larger U.S. society.

3. Explain how various communities accommodated some aspects of U.S. Indian policy to preserve culture, homeland, or population.

F. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

VI. Efforts to Assimilate Indigenous Peoples, 1870s-1930

A. Describe policies of detribalization.

1. Identify the purpose and impact of allotment.

2. Demonstrate the scope of the educational assault on children.

B. Explain adaptation and maintenance of Indigenous culture during assimilation efforts.

1. Discuss the rise of new leaders within Indigenous communities.

2. Explain the experiences of Indigenous peoples serving in the armed forces.

C. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

VII. The Changing Experiences of Indigenous Peoples Corresponding with Policy and Social Changes, 1930-1980

A. Identify the impact of various U.S. policies.

1. Explain the role of the Indian New Deal and the Indian Reorganization Act.

2. Describe the effects of termination policy.

3. Discuss the impact of self-determination policy.

B. Explain adaptation and resistance during this period.

1. Analyze the experiences of urban Indigenous peoples.

2. Demonstrate the significance of rising Indigenous militancy and activism.

C. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

VIII. The Existence of Nations within a Nation, 1980 to the Present

A. Describe the changing nature of Indigenous sovereignty.

1. Discuss the changes in rights and emergence of Indigenous "nations" in conjunction with state and federal power.

2. Explain the criteria used to determine "Who is an Indian" and if an Indigenous nation is "recognized" by the federal government.

3. Explain how new legislation and court cases redefined Indigenous sovereignty.

B. Analyze the varied outcomes of efforts to produce economic growth, including gaming.

C. Demonstrate how Indigenous peoples preserve culture and identity in the new millennium.

D. Analyze historical material using different disciplinary methodologies, e.g. Indigenous peoples studies, anthropology, literature, art, etc.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%                  Essays and Exams

40-60%                  Projects and Discussions

100%                      Total                                                                     

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 195

  • Title: History of the Middle East
  • Number: HIST 195
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course introduces students to the environmental, political, economic, religious and ethnic landscape of the Middle East and Northern Africa. Though its focus is historical, the course prepares students for an understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the region. Particular attention is paid to the Middle East and Northern Africa as the intersection of three monotheistic traditions, the central role of aridity and natural resources in its development, the interfacing of multiple cultures with Islam, the religious and ethnic diversity of the region today, and modern encounters with the nation-state system and western secularism. Students will also explore the contributions of the region to the larger world and the interactions of Middle Eastern and Northern African countries and people with Asia, Europe and the United States. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain geographical and cultural constructs of "the Middle East" and Northern Africa, with emphasis on the limitations of the natural environment, particularly aridity and water.
  2. Describe the historical origins and development of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and how these intersect in the contemporary world.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the region's ethnic and national diversity, particularly being able to distinguish between "Muslim," "Arab," "Bedouin," and "Persian."
  4. Analyze the applicability of the modern nation-state system and secularism to the region.
  5. Explain the origins of Zionism and subsequent efforts to establish a Jewish state in Israel, and the effects this has had on regional politics, particularly on the rise of Palestinian nationalism.
  6. Discuss the region's contemporary challenges such as rapid urbanization, recognition of human rights, the role of women, and natural population increase.
  7. Describe the history of US foreign policy in the region and how this has been influenced by cross-stereotypes held both by Americans and Middle Easterners.
  8. Analyze the rise of radical Islam. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Role of the environment on the Rise of Ancient Civilizations.
   A. Defining "the Middle East."
      1. Identify major eco-systems, rivers, deserts, etc. and their
effects on agriculture and trade routes.
      2. Identify contemporary political/national boundaries.
   B. The Early Fertile Crescent.
      1. Describe the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt, c. 3100 BCE,
and Old Kingdom to 2300.
      2. Explain the centralization of Mesopotamian city-states under
Sumer, 3rd millenium BCE.
      3. Describe the persistence of nomadic subsistence and tribalism.
   C. Origins of Monotheism.
      1. Explain the decline and restoration in Egypt's Middle and New
Kingdoms and Intermediate periods, c. 2300 to 1000 BCE.
      2. Describe the cultural flourishing of Babylon, c. 2000 to 1500
BCE.
      3. Explain the biblical traditions of the ancient Hebrews, from
Abraham of Ur to the settlement of Palestine.
   D. Iron Age and splintering of ancient states.
      1. Explain the rise and fall of Israel and Judea, from King David to
the Babylonian Captivity.
      2. Describe the expansion of the Assyrians and Babylonians.
      3. Explain re-unification of the region under the Persian Empire.
   E. Classical Era and Greco-Roman influences.
      1. Describe the Hellenistic Period from Alexander to Cleopatra, 332
to 30 BCE.
      2. Explain the history of the Roman Empire, from Augustus to
Constantine, 30 BCE to 313 CE.
      3. Describe the cultural merging of East and West in the Classical
Era, e.g. the Bibliotheque Alexandria, recording of Torah, and
Zoroastrianism.
      4. Explain the causes and process of the Jewish revolt and
destruction of the Second Temple, and the beginning of the Jewish
Diaspora.
   F. Development of Christianity.
      1. Describe Messianism, the Essenes, Jesus Christ & the first
Christian ministries, 1st BCE to 2nd century CE.
      2. Explain early Christian divisions, e.g. Roman Catholic, Greek
Orthodox, and Copts.
      3. Explain the period of centralization and codification, and the
impact of the Edict of Milan and the Council of Nicaea, 4th century.
      4. Analyze the continuing presence of Christianity in the region,
e.g. Byzantine Empire, Egypt and Palestine.
   G. Life of the Prophet Muhammad, 570-632 CE.
      1. Explain the Qu'ranic revelations in the context of 7th century
Arabic culture and society.
      2. Describe the significance of the Hegira, the flight from Mecca to
Medina.
      3. Identify the basic teachings of Islam, e.g. the Five Pillars, and
the significance of the Hadiths.
      4. Explain Islam's transformation of tribal and familial Arab
cultures.

II. Accomplishments and Challenges of the Islamic Middle East and the
Subsequent Period of Western Colonialism
   A. The "Golden Age" of Islam.
      1. Explain the territorial conquests under the Righteous Caliphs
through Mesopotamia, Persia, Africa, and Spain, and the establishment of
religious pilgrimage sites.
      2. Explain the historical origins of Shi'ism and the formation of
the Shi'ite diaspora.
      3. Identify the accomplishments of the Umayyad, Abbasid, and Abbuyid
caliphates.
      4. Describe the flourishing of Islamic Civilization, particularly in
education, literature, and Sufism, with special focus on Baghdad.
      5. Describe the rise of the Fatimid dynasty of Egypt and the
establishment of Cairo.
   B. External Invasions.
      1. Describe the Christian Crusades, 1096-1212, the conquest of
Palestine, and the recovery of Jerusalem by Saladin & the Fatimids.
      2. Explain the Mongol invasions of the 12th & 13th centuries.
      3. Analyze the cultural impact of the Crusades, particularly the
retrieval of classical philosophy, the stimulation of Medieval Europe, and
scholasticism's influence on Judaism and Christianity.
      4. Describe the post-Crusades consolidation that occurred under the
Mamlukes.
   C. The Ottoman Empire, 1521-1914.
      1. Explain Turkish expansion into Eastern Europe and the Middle East
from the 15th to 17th centuries.
      2. Describe Ottoman governance, law, and economics.
      3. Explain the period of decentralization, debt and decline in the
18th & 19th centuries.
   D. Western "Re-discovery" of the Middle East.
      1. Explain 18th-century Orientalism and the 
Napoleonic invasion.
      2. Describe the accomplishments of Egypt under Mahomet Ali in the
early 1800s.
      3. Explain the significance of the British and French archeological
excavations.
      4. Describe European investments in railroads and the Suez Canal.
      5. Analyze Zionism, Theodor Herzl, and 19th century Jewish
settlement of Palestine.
   E. Origins of the Modern Middle East.
      1. Explain the influence of World War I and the collapse of the
Ottoman Empire.
      2. Describe the role of Kemal Attaturk and his westernization of
Turkey.
      3. Analyze the British and French mandate period, particularly the
establishment of Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan.
      4. Describe the triumph of Zionism, the Balfour Declaration,
kibbutzim movement, and the effects of Shoah.
      5. Describe the emergence of Arab nationalism, the Palestinian
revolts, and the Egyptian rebellion.

III. Role of the Middle East and Northern Africa in the Modern World.
   A. The "In-Gathering of the Exiles" and the experiment of a Jewish
state.
      1. Explain the UN partition plan of 1947, the creation of Israel,
and the War for Independence.
      2. Analyze the Jewish political tradition, the consensus model of
the Knesset, and the merging of Ashkenazi and Sephardic societies and
traditions.
      3. Explain the significance of the wars of 1967 and 1973, and
Israeli expansion into the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights.
      4. Describe the significance of the Camp David accords and the
normalization of Arab relations to 1981.
      5. Analyze the role of Israel in the Twenty-first century,
particularly focusing on immigration from Russia and Ethiopia, and the
secular/religious and Arab/Jewish cleavages.
   B. The rise and fall of Arab nationalism.
      1. Describe the importance of World War II and the post-1945 decline
of European empires.
      2. Explain the Algerian revolution against France in the 1950-60s.
      3. Analyze the history of Egypt from Nasser to Mubarek, including
the 1952 overthrow of the dynasty, socialism, the establishment of the
Arab League, privatization under Sadat, and the influence of the Muslim
Brotherhood.
      4. Describe regional politics and regime changes, particularly
Qadaffi in Libya and Hussein in Iraq.
      5. Analyze the triumph of political Islam, focusing on Iran from
Pahlavi to Khomeini, Iran's fundamentalist revolution, and its capture of
the US embassy, 1950s to 1980s.
   C. The problem of Palestine.
      1. Describe the dilemma of Palestinians in Israel and the diaspora
since 1948.
      2. Explain the effects of the Six-Day War, Israeli absorption of
East Jerusalem, Palestinian flight to and eviction from Jordan, and the
rise of Yasser Arafat and the Palestinian Liberation Organization.
      3. Describe the reasons for Israel's intervention in Lebanon, and
the first intifada in the 1980s.
      4. Analyze the new hope for peace that emerged in the 1990s with the
Oslo accords, and the subsequent assassination of Rabin and rise of the
Likud party.
      5. Describe Israel-Palestine conflict since 2000, especially the
second intifada and growth of the West Bank settlements.
   D. Radical Islam.
      1. Identify radical Islam's ideological, economic and cultural
roots, particularly Wahhabism, Qutb, and reactions to westernization.
      2. Describe the etymological history of "terrorism" and
"radicalism."
      3. Describe radicalism in the political sphere, especially the
Taliban in Afghanistan, Hamas in the Palestinian Authority, and Hezbollah
in Lebanon.
      4. Explain the prevalence of extremist cells, particularly Al-Qaida,
bin Ladin, and the 9/11 attacks.
   E. The future of the Middle East.
      1. Explain the consequences of US occupation of Iraq, its overthrow
of Hussein, and the problem of Sunni/Shi'a factionalism.
      2. Describe the status of women's rights and their roles under Islam
and in practice.
      3. Analyze the effects of oil development, increasing class
disparity, and the empowerment of the Gulf states.
      4. Describe the problems of modern Egypt, especially urbanization,
water issues, and new technology.
      5. Analyze Muslim and Arab immigration to the US, Europe, and
Southeast Asia.
   F. Regional stereotypes.
      1. Explore depictions of Middle Easterners and Muslims in American
film and television.
      2. Explore newspapers and other media coverage.
      3. Analyze misunderstandings and generalizations about the United
States in the Middle East and Northern Africa.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations                50% of grade
Projects/Assignments     50% of grade
  Total                    100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%        
  B = 80 –  89%               
  C = 70 –  79%               
  D = 60 -  69%         
  F =   0 –  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 195H

No information found.

HIST 200

  • Title: Eurasia: History and Cultures
  • Number: HIST 200
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the rich diversity of the often marginalized civilizations and tribal peoples that inhabit the Caucasus and Central Asia. Students will examine the ethnic, social, economic, religious, artistic and geopolitical influences shared by the inhabitants of these regions. The indigenous sedentary and nomadic populations located along the Silk Road and Eurasian Steppe were repeatedly subjected to conquest by the superior military powers that competed for domination of these trade arteries. Students will trace the succession of cultural influences that swept over the areas. Students will conclude their study with an examination of the post-Soviet development of these regions, investigating how these peoples define themselves within the modern nation-state system. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the major cultural influences on the sedentary and nomadic peoples of the Caucasus and Central Asia and the ecological systems and resources of these two regions.
  2. Explain the impact of the Arab Conquest on the Sassanid Empire and the subsequent Islamic influence on the political, social and economic institutions of the Caucasus and Central Asia.
  3. Identify the Mongols and describe the impact on their 13th century conquest on the urban civilizations and tribal peoples of Central Asia and the Caucasus as well as the influence of the 13th - 14th century Mongol Empire on the conquered peoples of these regions.
  4. Describe the struggle for hegemony in the Caucasus and Central Asia among the great powers: the Iranian, Ottoman, and Russian Empires. Describe the goals and objectives behind the Great Game.
  5. Discuss the systematic penetration of the Russian Empire into the Caucasus and Central Asia and the resulting interaction between competing cultural practices and political interests.
  6. Describe the response of post-Soviet Central Asia and the Caucasus to the collapse of the Soviet Empire, Islam, radical Islam, and modernization.
  7. Illustrate the cultural achievements as well as the social patterns of the peoples of the Caucasus and Central Asia through the arts (prose, poetry, architecture, design, music etc.). 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Peoples, Places, Eco-Systems, and Cultural Influences
   A. Discuss the influence of geography and environment on the
inhabitants of these regions.
      1. Explain the strategic economic and geo-political importance of
the Caucasus and Central Asia regions within a contemporary context.
      2. Identify the post-Soviet states of Central Asia and the Caucasus
as well as the peoples of Russia's Northern Caucasus.
      3. Describe the ecological systems of both the Caucasus and Central
Asia, including the physical and climatic conditions and natural
resources.
      4. Explain the relationship between the eco-systems of the Caucasus
and Central Asia and both a semi-nomadic hunter-gatherer life-style and
sedentary agriculture and the rise of cities.
      5. Identify and describe the importance of the Silk Road as a trade
route between Asia and the Mediterranean to the development of these
regions.
   B. Describe the major cultural influences on the inhabitants of these
regions.
      1. Identify the major ethnic peoples inhabiting both the Caucasus
and Central Asia.
      2. Trace the major cultural influences on the peoples of these two
regions beginning with the 5th century BCE Achaemenid Empire and
concluding prior to the introduction of Islam.
      3. Discuss the major religious confessions of the region: Buddhism,
Zoroastrianism, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.
      4. Describe both the cultural patterns governing every-day life and
the cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia with
reference to the arts.

II. Impact of Islam
   A. Identify and locate on a map the ruling empires and major groupings
of indigenous peoples of the Caucasus and Central Asia prior to the Arab
Conquest of the Sassanid Empire.
   B. Identify the origins of Islam, the basic teachings (Five Pillars) of
Islam, and the significance of the Hadiths, and the relationship between
Islam and the 7th century Arab Conquest. In particular, identify Sufism
and explain the unique Sufi influence on Central Asia and the Caucasus.
   C. Describe the influence of Islam's transformation of indigenous
cultural institutions and identity, including Islam's affect on politics,
social relations, education and intellectual endeavors.
   D. Discuss the conflict between the Iranian world and the Turks over
control of these regions (10th - 13th centuries).
   E. Describe both the cultural patterns governing every-day life.
Discuss the cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia
with particular attention to the Golden Age of Central Asian culture,
800-1100, and the great cities associated with it.  Identify the cultural
contributions of al-Biruni, al-Farabi, Omar Khayyam. Explain theories for
the decline of this Golden Age.

III. The Mongol Conquest and Empire
   A. Identify and locate on a map the ruling empires and major grouping
of indigenous peoples of the Caucasus and Central Asia prior to the Mongol
Conquest.
   B. Identify and locate on a map the home territory of the Mongols.
   C. Describe the political aims of their great leader Temujin (Genghis
Khan), the military technology, strategy and tactics the Mongols used to
conquer and rule the world's greatest land empire, as well as their major
Asian conquests prior to moving into the Transoxania area of Central
Asia.
   D. Explain the impact of the 13th - 14th century Mongol Empire on the
conquered peoples of these regions.  Pay particular attention to the trade
routes between Asia, the Middle East and Europe and the human cost of
re-establishing secure international trade in goods and ideas.
   E. Discuss the fate of the states of the Mongol World Empire and
theories explaining its decline.
   F. Identify Timur (Tamerlane). Explain the role he played in the
collapse of the Mongol Empire. Describe the impact of Timur's conquests on
the Caucasus and Central Asia.
   G. Describe both the cultural patterns governing every-day life and the
cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia with reference
to the arts. Include the ancient city of Samarkand in your discussion.

IV. Struggle for Hegemony Among the Great Powers
   A. Identify the origins of the Shaybanid dynasty of Transoxania and
describe its relationship with the Safavid dynasty.
   B. Explain the origins of the Kazakhs.
   C. Discuss the alteration in the status of the 16th century Muscovy
state that laid the groundwork for Muscovy's movement into the Caucasus.
   D. List the major events in the struggle over the Caucasus between the
Ottoman Turks and the Safavid Dynasty of Iran, subsequently Nadir Shah.
   E. Cite the major turning points in the territorial competition among
the three empires: Iranian, Russian and Ottoman for domination of the
Caucasus.
   F. Compare and contrast the policies and practices of the Russians,
Ottomans, and Iranians in their relations with local peoples and cultures
of the Caucasus.  Discuss the Central Asian Khanates of Khiva and
Bukhara.
   G. Explain the effect of the early 17th century Kalmyk invasion of the
steppe on the empires and peoples of Central Asia and the northern
Caucasus.
   H. Explain how the ancient trade across the Silk Road was affected by
the advent of Europe's trans-oceanic shipping.
   I. Describe both the cultural patterns governing every-day life and the
cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia with reference
to the arts.

V. The Russian Conquest and Empire
   A. Identify the goals, objectives and strategy behind Great Britain's
Great Game with Russia in the Crimea, Caucasus and Central Asia.
   B. Compare and contrast Russian strategy and tactics for annexation of
Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan with those used in the conquest of the
Northern Caucasus.  Identify Sheihk Mansour, Imam Shamil, Hadji Murat and
the Murid Wars.
   C. Compare and contrast Russian social, economic and political policies
for the Northern Caucasus with those applied in Transcaucasia.
   D. Describe Russian military strategy and social policies that
systematically removed the nomadic Kazakhs from the Steppe and brought
Tashkent and Kokand as well as Khiva, Merv, and Panjdeh into the Russian
Empire, subduing and subjecting the peoples of Central Asia to St.
Petersburg's rule.
   E. Discuss the affect of World War I and the Civil War on the peoples
of the Caucasus and Central Asia, including the Ottoman Jihad against
Armenians on the Anatolian Peninsula and the 1916 revolt in Central Asia
that gave rise to the Basmachi Movement and resistance of 1918-1923.
   F. Explain the impact of the Soviet rule on Central Asia and the
Caucasus, including "indigenization" (korenizatsiiya), Sovietization and
the affect of Soviet socio-economic and political policies on these
Islamic and ancient Christian peoples.
   G. Describe the affect of Stalin's World War II policy of deportation
of peoples of the Northern Caucasus to Central Asia: Chechens, Ingush,
Karachai, and Balkars.
   H. Explain the influence of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan,
Perestroika and Glasnost in the development of national identities and
independence movements in these regions.
   I. Describe both the cultural patterns governing every-day life and the
cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia with reference
to the arts.

VI. Post-Soviet Developments
   A. Explain how the governments of the newly established states of the
Caucasus and Central Asia have come to terms with the requisites of the
modern state; address political, social, economic and educational
institutions.
   B. Describe the efforts undertaken by the peoples throughout the
Caucasus to reassert and reestablish their independent identities.
   C. Describe reform efforts undertaken to reclaim and restore culture
and religious traditions.
   D. Discuss the inroads of militant Islam and Wahhabism, in particular,
within Central Asia and the Caucasus and efforts of the Russians
Federation, the United States, and governments throughout the two regions
to circumscribe its influence.
   E. Identify efforts undertaken by the Russian Federation to reassert
its hegemony in both the Caucasus and Central Asia.  Analyze the position
of resource rich Central Asia in the "new" Great Game and its players.
   F. Describe both the cultural patterns governing everyday life and the
cultural achievements of both the Caucasus and Central Asia with reference
to the arts.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations           50% of grade
Projects/Assignments   50% of grade
Total                  100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 250

  • Title: American West
  • Number: HIST 250
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the cultural, geographical, and historical context of the Trans-Mississippi West. Students will explore through three conceptual lenses: as region, a specific place defined by unique physical characteristics; as frontier, a mobile line of settlement; and as a perception, a set of mythic stories and images that attempt to convey national morals and values. Special attention is paid to the ethnic and racial diversity of the region, and to the major historical changes from pre-European contact to the present. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Natural Environment

    A. Define "the American West."

        1. Describe the three conceptual frameworks of the West as place, process and idea.

        2. Explain how these frameworks have influenced historiography and popular culture.

        3. Demonstrate an understanding of the Turner, Webb, Bolton and Limerick theses.

    B. Identify the major features of western geography.

        1. Identify the major rivers, mountain ranges, and sub-regions.

        2. Identify the major political borders, both state and national.

    C. Develop an understanding of pre-contact Indian civilizations.

        1. Analyze terms like "Indian," "tribe," and "white."

        2. Explain the various linguistic and anthropological classifications of American Indians.

        3. Describe the various subsistence methods, e.g. hunting, fishing, agriculture, employed by Indians to survive within their respective environments.

        4. Explain the major migrations and mergings of Indian peoples prior to 1700.

    D. Explain the rise of the Spanish Empire in the West.

        1. Describe initial Spanish explorations of the Southwest in the sixteenth century.

        2. Explain Spanish colonization of New Mexico in the seventeenth century.

        3. Identify the causes and long-term legacies of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt.

        4. Describe Spanish colonization of Texas and California in the eighteenth century and its impact on Indian politics.

        5. Analyze the importation of horses and cattle and their impact on Indian economics.

 

II. Joining the U.S.

    A. Develop an understanding of early U.S. explorations.

        1. Describe the pro- and anti-expansion ideas that influenced early founders of the U.S.

        2. Explain the significance of Jefferson's Louisiana Purchase and of the Corps of Discovery, Pike, Long, and Fremont expeditions.

    B. Develop an understanding of initial Indian-United States relations.

        1. Describe Indian participation in the nineteenth-century fur trade and its significance for intercultural marriages and families.

        2. Explain the role of "mountain men" in furthering neo-Europeans' knowledge of the West.

        3. Identify the Oregon and Santa Fe Trails as thoroughfares of commercial and cultural exchanges.

        4. Analyze the impact of disease on relations between Indians and neo-Europeans.

        5. Explain the major cultural and religious differences between early U.S. and Spanish missionaries and Indians.

        6. Describe the rise of the Lakota-Cheyenne and Comanche empires.

    C. Explain the significance of Manifest Destiny.

        1. Explain the relative decline of Spanish and Mexican authority in the nineteenth century, particularly Texas secession and retreat from Comanche and Apache raiders.

        2. Describe American ideas about "manifest destiny" and their implications for racial and national identity.

        3. Identify the processes through which the U.S. annexed western lands in Oregon and Mexico during the 1840s.

        4. Explain the Mormon migration to Utah and how it anticipated Christian conceptualization and use of the West as "a promised land."

    D. Explain the causes of U.S.-Indian military conflict.

        1. Identify the stereotypes in popular culture about the U.S. Army and its soldiers in the West.

        2. Analyze the different meanings of warfare to neo-European and Indian cultures and their respective environmental adaptations.

        3. Identify the major battles, campaigns and leaders of the U.S.-Indian Wars prior to 1890.

 

III. Post-1848 Integration

    A. Explain the process of continental consolidation.

        1. Describe the importance of the Gold Rush and California's subsequent demographic explosion.

        2. Analyze how the Civil War challenged national consolidation, and how the failure of southern secession anticipated integration of the West.

        3. Identify the major railroads that linked western and eastern markets.

    B. Identify the region's major economic enterprises.

        1. Explain the brief "cattle drive" era from 1865 to the 1880s.

        2. Analyze the challenges faced by ranchers and farmers and how clashes of interest between them led to occasional violence.

        3. Identify the major mining centers and their exports.

    C. Explain the process of community-building.

        1. Explain the role of government legislation and private "boosters" in attracting immigrants.

        2. Identify the stereotypes in popular culture about women in the West and assess their role in "feminizing" western communities.

        3. Identify the major immigrant groups and their motives for settlement.

        4. Explain the development of the West as a "multiracial" region and the various types of de facto and de jure discrimination that emerged.

        5. Explain the political divisions of the West into town, county and state polities.

    D. Assess U.S. attempts at Indian assimilation and Removal.

        1. Explain the nineteenth-century reservation system, its relationship to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the cyclical struggle for control between military and civilian authorities.

        2. Analyze the ideas and policies designed to assimilate Indians to neo-European society.

        3. Identify the major Indian communities and reservations.

        4. Analyze the impact of the Dawes Severalty Act and the Ghost Dance.

    E. Imagining the West in the Nineteenth Century.

        1. Identify the major representations of the West in neo-European art and literature before 1840.

        2. Identify the major characters who dominated "folk hero" stories and assess the disparity between their actual lives and their fictional representations.

        3. Analyze the West's image as a place of extreme violence.

        4. Explain the significance of "the Wild West" as a source of entertainment in oral and printed tales.

 

IV. Post-consolidation.

    A. Develop an understanding of the role played by hydraulics control.

        1. Explain the importance of John Wesley Powell's research and findings regarding water use.

        2. Analyze the long-term impact of federal regulation of western resources, e.g. National Park Service, Reclamation Act, and National Forest Service.

        3. Identify the major thinkers and ideas that shaped western land use.

        4. Identify the major dams and irrigation systems that divert water for urban and agricultural use and assess their environmental impact.

    B. Explain the West as as an American colony and assess its challenges.

        1. Describe the extent to which westerners shared in the rise of a national culture after 1920.

        2. Explain the extent to which the West shared in the Great Depression of the 1930s, particularly in the "Dust Bowl" sub-region of the Plains.

        3. Describe how government conservation efforts introduced professional management techniques to western farms and forests.

        4. Explain how the Second World War increased economic prosperity, immigration and urbanization, as well as expanded the federal government's presence.

    C. Identify the major political and social movements.

        1. Identify the major immigrant groups, i.e. Asians, Hispanics, since the 1960s.

        2. Describe the Black civil rights movements in the West and how these differed from movements in the South and Northeast.

        3. Explain the termination policy, the new wave of Indian activism, and conditions on western reservations since World War II.

        4. Describe the growth of the Sunbelt and the origins of the modern environmenta movement.

        5. Explain the significance of the West both in terms of votes and cultural ideology for contemporary Conservatism.

    D. Imagining the West in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries.

        1. Analyze the West as the bastion of rugged individualism and masculinity in early twentieth-century literature.

        2. Explain how western stories made the transition from writing to film in the early twentieth century.

        3. Assess the depictions of Indians, women and other groups in American movies.

        4. Identify the use of "western" tropes and icons in national and international political discourse.

        5. Demonstrate an understanding of the American West in relation to other "hinterland" zones around the world, such as western China and western Australia.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

n/a

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 270

  • Title: History Internship*
  • Number: HIST 270
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Permission of the History Internship Mentor; completion of 6 credit hours in history courses at JCCC or another college within the last two years, earning a minimum of a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in those history courses and a written recommendation from your history classroom instructor.

Description:

Students augment their academic course work with an internship in an appropriate setting under instructional supervision. Internship projects are cooperative efforts between appropriate supervisors in state, local or national museum or research facilities or other not-for-profit organizations and college staff and students. Internships give students the opportunity to participate in the real-world application of their academic studies. In addition, this synthesis of classroom study with practical experience provides students with skills and insights useful in selecting a career or avocation in community service. The student spends the equivalent of 10 hours per week performing internship duties over the course of the semester or a total of 150 hours.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply the academic study of history to duties performed and observations made during the course of the internship.
  2. Demonstrate the successful integration of academic study in history classes into work in state, local or national research and museum settings or not-for-profit organizations.
  3. Successfully perform internship tasks and functions under direct supervision in a mature and professional manner.
  4. Apply skills acquired during the internship application process to future career-related employment, volunteer work or community service.
  5. Compile documentation to support or demur at a career, avocation or community service in the field of history. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Internship Application Experience
   A. Prepare to find an appropriate internship setting.
      1. Write a resume.
      2. Successfully complete a mock interview.
      3. Identify appropriate internship sites.
   B. Apply for and secure an internship site in an appropriate setting
confirmed by a letter of acceptance.
      1. Develop learning objectives, strategies, tasks, and strategies
appropriate to the internship in consultation with Internship Mentor and
site supervisor.
      2. Complete a contract between JCCC and internship agency or
representative signed by the History Internship Mentor, student and site
supervisor.

II. Internship Tasks and Functions
   A. Identify responsibilities, tasks, and duties of the internship.
   B. Maintain a log of hours worked and major responsibilities
completed.
   C. Work systematically and logically through the various issues that
arise in the internship setting.
   D. Demonstrate ability to apply academic knowledge to the successful
accomplishment of assigned tasks.
   E. Develop human relations skills needed for the position.
   F. Display sensitivity to the needs of the diversity of staff, clients
and/or constituents encountered in the internship setting.
   G. Adhere to policies and procedures of the internship site.
   H. Respect the confidentiality of privileged information regarding
staff, clients, researchers and/or donors.

III. Relationship Between Academic Study and Internship Duties
   A. Identify the relationship between the student's individual education
objectives and strategies and the internship duties and activities.
   B. Analyze and describe the relationship between classroom knowledge
and internship related tasks.

IV. Document a Career Choice or Avocation
   A. Construct a portfolio that documents the steps in a successful job
search and successful job performance.
   B. Complete a self-assessment of personal growth in the selection of a
career or avocation based on internship experiences.
   C. Complete a self-assessment of professional growth in the selection
of a career or avocation based on observations made and duties
performed.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Student Portfolio: Each student will maintain and keep a current
portfolio containing all documents developed during the course of the
internship experience. The portfolio will include, but is not limited to,
each of the following:
a. Preparation Materials: Orientation materials, application materials and
resume.
b. Log: Each student must maintain a daily log signed by their site
supervisor documenting the equivalent of ten on-site hours worked per week
over a fifteen week period.
c. Written work: Each student will complete reports, such as weekly blogs,
three written papers or three YouTube reports, that outline the
relationship between the specified internship educational objectives and
strategies and the internship activities.
d. Paper: Each student will write a 3-page (minimum) paper or utilize a
similar activity, such as YouTube videos, to analyze the internship
experience from an academic point of view.
2. Discussions: The student will attend a minimum of three internship
seminars, meetings or engage in weekly online discussions with the History
Internship Mentor.
3. Supervisor Evaluation: The on-site internship supervisor will complete
an evaluation of the student intern's progress and performance.
4. Self-Assessment: The student will complete a professional and personal
self-assessment based on the internship experience.

All written assignments will be produced with considerable care and
attention to mechanical as well as intellectual content.  The quality of a
student's writing will be taken into consideration when assigning grades.

In determining final grades, assignments are weighed as follows: 
Log (or Journal) of Activities, reports-25-30% of final grade
Supervisor evaluation/self-assessment-25-30% of final grade
Discussions/seminars/final reflection paper-40-50% of final grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. As a representative of JCCC, student behavior must adhere to the following standards: a) the JCCC Student Code of Conduct; b) Policies and procedures of the internship placement site; c) Confidentiality of privileged information regarding staff, clients, and/or constituents to which the student is privy.
  2. Transportation to the internship site is the responsibility of the student.
  3. The student must meet all "employment" requirements of the selected internship site. These requirements may include background investigation, records checks, statements of confidentiality, and/or specific prerequisites and/or physical requirements. SOME APPLICANTS MAY BE INELIGIBLE FOR SOME PLACEMENTS DUE TO INTERNSHIP AGENCY OR OFFICE CRITERIA.
  4. Failure of the student to complete requirements and/or dismissal by sponsoring internship agency or office site precludes successful completion of this course and award of college credit.
  5. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: Visit with History Internship Mentor and JCCC Career Services Center regarding eligibility, credit-enrollment, appropriate internship sites, and job search procedures. Attend Internship Orientation session and complete Internship Program application process. Contact the selected site and satisfactorily complete the placement process, and secure a letter of acceptance. Complete course contact with History Internship Coordinator and enroll in the course. Assume responsibility for securing and maintaining a portfolio of all necessary paperwork for the course. Perform required internship duties and responsibilities in keeping with JCCC and internship placement agency policies and procedures.
  6. JCCC RESPONSIBILITIES: Conduct pre-internship activities with student. Develop a contract describing internship responsibilities, expectations, and requirements signed by the student, internship site supervisor, and History Internship Mentor. Conduct three meetings and/or seminars with the student to review the student's progress toward meeting student learning objectives for the internship and the relationship between the student's academic work and internship activities. Maintain periodic contact with the designated internship site supervisor. Review the student daily logs to determine compliance with internship contact hour requirements.
  7. SITE REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNSHIP AGENCY: Conduct required pre-employment activities with student. Designate an internship site supervisor. Accept and sign student internship contract. Supervise all internship activities previously agreed upon by sponsoring agency and the History Internship Mentor. Complete a mid-term and final supervisory evaluation and submit to History Internship Mentor. 

Student Responsibilities:


Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

HIST 291

No information found.

HIST 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: HIST 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of history, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Undertake complex readings and research in the designated topic.
  2. Define key terms and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic.
  3. Utilize research and analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study.
  4. Engage in a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the Special Topic.
  5. Develop a personal point of view about the Special Topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research and other means.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the History faculty prior to its being offered. The Arts, Humanities and Social Science Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The AHSS Division will also determine when and if the course may be taught based on the instructional needs of both the department and the division. Individual faculty members are responsible for the creation of Special Topics courses and for seeking approval to teach them. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a four-semester sequence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods: Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = below 60%

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to four-year institutions as elective credit.
  2. A student cannot take more than two Special Topics courses in HIST (History) courses that are not cross-listed with HUM, PHIL or REL. This does not include unique and non-cross-listed Special Topics courses in HUM, PHIL or REL.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).