Astronomy (ASTR)

Courses

ASTR 120   Fundamentals of Astronomy (3 Hours)  

This course is a study of the universe from the earth, moon and planets to the stars and the most distant galaxies. Topics include black holes, quasars, and the origin of the universe and the possibility of life on other planets. Current astronomical discoveries are discussed in class as they occur. Access to astronomical websites is available to students in this course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ASTR 122   Astronomy (4 Hours)  

This course is a study of the universe from the Earth, moon and planets to the stars and the most distant galaxies. Topics include black holes, quasars, and the origin of the universe and the possibility of life on other planets. Current astronomical discoveries are discussed in class as they occur. Access to astronomical websites is available to students in this course. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk., 5 nighttime telescope sessions are required.

ASTR 122H   HON: Astronomy* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ASTR 214   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher or appropriate score on the math placement test or department approval.

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. ASTR 214, MATH 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

ASTR 215   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design, and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

ASTR 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ASTR 120

  • Title: Fundamentals of Astronomy
  • Number: ASTR 120
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a study of the universe from the earth, moon and planets to the stars and the most distant galaxies. Topics include black holes, quasars, and the origin of the universe and the possibility of life on other planets. Current astronomical discoveries are discussed in class as they occur. Access to astronomical websites is available to students in this course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify and predict the characteristics of celestial objects.
  2. Explain the scientific method.
  3. Explain astronomical phenomena in terms of appropriate scientific models.
  4. Discuss the major contributions to astronomy made by scientists and mathematicians throughout history. 
  5. Discuss the process of formation and evolution of planets, stars, galaxies, and our Universe.
  6. Generate and communicate conclusions based on data and analysis of observation. 
  7. Interpret astronomical observations and demonstrate critical thinking and basic problem solving skills.
  8. Explain and critique science as presented in the media.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Observing the Universe Through the Sky Around Us

A. Use celestial coordinates for positions of objects in the sky.

B. Recognize constellations in the sky.

C. Compare the motions of the sun, moon, planets and stars in our sky.

D. Explain how seasons on Earth are determined.

E. Recognize the various phases of the moon.

F. Explain the conditions necessary for a lunar eclipse and a solar eclipse.

II. History of Astronomy

A. Give examples of ancient astronomical observations.

B. Contrast the geocentric and the heliocentric views of the universe.

C. Summarize the contributions made to astronomy by Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, Galileo and Newton in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.

D. Describe Kepler’s Three Laws of Planetary Motion.

E. Identify the main characteristics of the elliptical motion of planets.

F. Describe the effects of Galileo’s telescopic observations on the existing view of the universe.

G. Describe Newton’s laws of motion and his law of gravitation.

III. The Solar System

A. Name and describe the various types of celestial bodies in our solar system.

B. Distinguish between terrestrial and Jovian planets.

C. Identify the major spacecraft involved in the exploration of each planet.

D. Explain the causes of tides on Earth.

E. Compare the orbital and physical properties planets, major moons and small bodies.

F. Differentiate between the formation processes of craters and of maria on the moon.

G. Explain the currently accepted theory of the origin of our moon.

H. List the distinguishing features of each of the planets and major moons.

I. Summarize the discoveries of the planets Uranus, Neptune and Pluto.

J. Describe the various types of asteroids in our solar system.

K. Explain what a comet is and compare its orbital motion to that of the planets.

L. Explain the currently accepted theory of planetary system formation.

M. Describe methods for finding exoplanets and techniques for measuring their properties.

IV. Light and Telescopes

A. Identify and rank domains of the electromagnetic spectrum with respect to wavelength, frequency and photon energy.

B. Identify and describe the particle-like and wave-like characteristics of light.

C. Explain the Doppler effect as it pertains to light.

D. Describe the processes by which an atom absorbs and emits light.

E. Describe Max Plank’s theory of blackbody radiation.

F. Differentiate between the two major types of optical telescopes.

G. Identify the focal length, objective and magnification power of a telescope.

H. Explain how CCD Cameras, Adaptive Optics, Space Telescopes and Radio Astronomy are used to study the universe today.

V. The Sun and the Stars

A. Compare the size and mass of the sun with the rest of the solar system.

B. Identify the different regions of the sun.

C. Explain the behavior and cause of the Sun’s sunspot cycle.

D. Describe the phenomenon of solar energy production.

E. Describe space weather and its various effects here on Earth.

F. Distinguish the two methods of finding distances to stars.

G. Explain the two methods of measuring a star's brightness:

1. Absolute magnitude

2. Apparent magnitude

H. List the spectral classes of stars and the dominant color of each class.

I. Construct an HR Diagram and describe its use.

J. Compute the stellar masses of stars in binary systems.

K. Indicate the relation between a star’s lifetime and its location on the main sequence.

L. Compare open clusters and globular clusters of stars.

M. Analyze the role of interstellar materials in the formation of stars.

N. Describe the formation and evolution of stars.

O. Distinguish between evolutionary outcomes of high mass stars and low mass stars.

P. Describe the composition of a white dwarf, a neutron star and a black hole.

Q. List the factors that cause nova and supernova explosions.

VI. Galaxies and Beyond

A. Discuss the process of discovering the size and shape of our galaxy.

B. Name the various regions of our galaxy and locate the Sun’s position in it.

C. Estimate the amount of matter in our galaxy.

D. Describe the content and shape of the four types of galaxies: spirals, barred spirals, ellipticals and irregulars.

E. Explain Hubble’s Law in connection with the galaxies in the universe.

F. Discuss dark matter and dark energy and their influence in the universe.

G. Explain what a quasar is.

H. List the assumptions contained in the cosmological principles.

I. Discuss the factors to be considered in determining the age of the universe.

J. Explain the concepts of bound universe and an unbound universe.

K. Describe the Inflationary Big Bang Theory and compare it to alternative scientific theories of the origin of the universe.

VII. Science and the Media

A. Summarize current findings and discoveries in the fields of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Flight.

B. Discriminate between scientific reporting and pseudoscience-based opinion writing.

C. Justify the importance of having basic scientific literacy in modern society.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Graded work for the course will include homework, tests, quizzes, written assignments, and a cumulative final exam.

Graded Work, Percentage of Course Grade
40-60%    Tests
5-15%      Chatroom/Discussion Participation
15-30%    Homework, Quizzes, Paper(s) and/or Project(s)
10-25%    Final Exam
Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASTR 122

  • Title: Astronomy
  • Number: ASTR 122
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a study of the universe from the Earth, moon and planets to the stars and the most distant galaxies. Topics include black holes, quasars, and the origin of the universe and the possibility of life on other planets. Current astronomical discoveries are discussed in class as they occur. Access to astronomical websites is available to students in this course. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk., 5 nighttime telescope sessions are required.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Locate, identify and predict the characteristics of celestial objects.
  2. Explain the scientific method.
  3. Explain astronomical phenomena in terms of appropriate scientific models.
  4. Discuss the major contributions to astronomy made by scientists and mathematicians throughout history.
  5. Effectively utilize the tools of observational astronomy. 
  6. Discuss the process of formation and evolution of planets, stars, galaxies and our universe.
  7. Generate and communicate conclusions based on data and analysis of observation. 
  8. Interpret astronomical observations and demonstrate critical thinking and basic problem-solving skills.
  9. Explain and critique science as presented in the media.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Observing the Universe Through the Sky Around Us

A. Use celestial coordinates for positions of objects in the sky.

B. Recognize constellations in the sky.

C. Compare the motions of the sun, moon, planets and stars in our sky.

D. Explain how seasons on Earth are determined.

E. Recognize the various phases of the moon.

F. Explain the conditions necessary for a lunar eclipse and a solar eclipse.

II. History of Astronomy

A. Give examples of ancient astronomical observations.

B. Contrast the geocentric and the heliocentric views of the universe.

C. Summarize the contributions made to astronomy by Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler, Galileo and Newton in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries.

D. Describe Kepler’s Three Laws of Planetary Motion.

E. Identify the main characteristics of the elliptical motion of planets.

F. Describe the effects of Galileo’s telescopic observations on the existing view of the universe.

G. Describe Newton’s laws of motion and his law of gravitation.

III. The Solar System

A. Name and describe the various types of celestial bodies in our solar system.

B. Distinguish between terrestrial and Jovian planets.

C. Identify the major spacecraft involved in the exploration of each planet.

D. Explain the causes of tides on Earth.

E. Compare the orbital and physical properties of planets, major moons and small bodies.

F. Differentiate between the formation processes of craters and of maria on the moon.

G. Explain the currently accepted theory of the origin of our moon.

H. List the distinguishing features of each of the planets and major moons.

I. Summarize the discoveries of the planets Uranus, Neptune and Pluto.

J. Describe the various types of asteroids in our solar system.

K. Explain what a comet is and compare its orbital motion to that of the planets.

L. Explain the currently accepted theory of planetary system formation.

M. Describe methods for finding exoplanets and techniques for measuring their properties.

IV. Light and Telescopes

A. Identify and rank domains of the electromagnetic spectrum with respect to wavelength, frequency and photon energy.

B. Identify and describe the particle-like and wave-like characteristics of light.

C. Explain the Doppler effect as it pertains to light.

D. Describe the processes by which an atom absorbs and emits light.

E. Describe Max Plank’s theory of blackbody radiation.

F. Differentiate between the two major types of optical telescopes.

G. Identify the focal length, objective and magnification power of a telescope.

H. Explain how CCD Cameras, Adaptive Optics, Space Telescopes and Radio Astronomy are used to study the universe today.

V. The Sun and the Stars

A. Compare the size and mass of the sun with the rest of the solar system.

B. Identify the different regions of the sun.

C. Explain the behavior and cause of the sun’s sunspot cycle.

D. Describe the phenomenon of solar energy production.

E. Describe space weather and its various effects here on Earth.

F. Distinguish the two methods of finding distances to stars.

G. Explain the two methods of measuring a star's brightness:

1. Absolute magnitude

2. Apparent magnitude

H. List the spectral classes of stars and the dominant color of each class.

I. Construct an HR Diagram and describe its use.

J. Compute the stellar masses of stars in binary systems.

K. Indicate the relation between a star’s lifetime and its location on the main sequence.

L. Compare open clusters and globular clusters of stars.

M. Analyze the role of interstellar materials in the formation of stars.

N. Describe the formation and evolution of stars.

O. Distinguish between evolutionary outcomes of high mass stars and low mass stars.

P. Describe the composition of a white dwarf, a neutron star and a black hole.

Q. List the factors that cause nova and supernova explosions.

VI. Galaxies and Beyond

A. Discuss the process of discovering the size and shape of our galaxy.

B. Name the various regions of our galaxy and locate the Sun’s position in it.

C. Estimate the amount of matter in our galaxy.

D. Describe the content and shape of the four types of galaxies: spirals, barred spirals, ellipticals and irregulars.

E. Explain Hubble’s Law in connection with the galaxies in the universe.

F. Discuss dark matter and dark energy and their influence in the universe.

G. Explain what a quasar is.

H. List the assumptions contained in the cosmological principles.

I. Discuss the factors to be considered in determining the age of the universe.

J. Explain the concepts of bound universe and an unbound universe.

K. Describe the Inflationary Big Bang Theory and compare it to alternative scientific theories of the origin of the universe.

VII. Science and the Media

A. Summarize current findings and discoveries in the fields of astronomy, astrophysics and space flight.

B. Discriminate between scientific reporting and pseudoscience-based opinion writing.

C. Justify the importance of having basic scientific literacy in modern society.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Graded work for the course will include at least four unit tests, a
cumulative final exam; at least 12 weekly laboratory exercises; night-sky
observation; and a combination (determined by the individual instructor)
of homework, lecture quizzes, written article summaries and an article
quiz. The percentage of the total grade allotted to each of the above
kinds of course work will be within the following ranges:

Grade Work, Percentage of Course Grade
35-50%    Tests
20-30%    Observation, Quizzes, Homework
10-20%    Laboratory Exercises
5-10%      Articles
10-20%    Final Exam  

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. There will be five evening observation sessions.
  2. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASTR 122H

No information found.

ASTR 214

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I*
  • Number: ASTR 214
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher or appropriate score on the math placement test or department approval.

Description:

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. ASTR 214, MATH 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Determine if teaching is a viable career path.

  2. Identify strategies for effective lesson planning and utilize these strategies to design and deliver inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.

  3. Demonstrate an awareness of personality and learning differences and discuss the implications for both teaching and learning.

  4. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students' acquisition of knowledge.

  5. Revise lesson plans to reflect the needs of learners based on field experience gained in cooperation with a practicing classroom teacher.

  6. Research  and identify relevant state and national teaching standards.

  7. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of technology for teaching, communicating, and collaborating.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Teaching as a Career

A. Determine suitability/interest in teaching as a career through thoughtful self-reflection.

B. Explore pathways to a career in teaching.

C. Identify personal learning styles and discuss their implications for classroom interactions.

II. Strategies for Practical Lesson Design

A. Design and deliver inquiry-based hands-on lessons.

B. Write performance objectives for each lesson, including mathematics and/or science connections, and appropriate assessments for those objectives.

C. Use technology and the Internet to enhance classroom lessons, collaborate, and communicate.

III. Concepts and Components of Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional strategies that meet the needs of diverse learners.

B. Distinguish between learner-centered and teacher-centered instructional strategies.

C. Discuss state and national science and mathematics standards and their implications for curriculum decisions.

D. Identify current issues in the theory and practice of teaching.

IV. Components of a Field Experience

A. Observe a math-science lesson taught by a cooperating teacher.

B. Interact with a population of diverse student learners in a school setting while teaching a lesson in an elementary school classroom.

C. Receive and synthesize feedback from a cooperating teacher as a peer and mentoring colleague in order to improve techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20%     Active classroom participation

20-30%     Lesson planning and associated activities

30-40%     Completion of field experience and associated activities

20-25%     Related assignments/homework

Grade Criteria:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89% = B
75-79% = C
70-74% = D
0-69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a "C" in the prerequisite course(s) or earn an appropriate score on a placement exam. If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASTR 215

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II*
  • Number: ASTR 215
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design, and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Design inquiry-based middle school lesson plans, utilizing resources from exemplary inquiry-based science and mathematics lessons.
  2. Implement effective middle school teaching strategies based on the unique attributes of adolescents.
  3. Construct effective classroom learning activities using appropriate technology.
  4. Analyze data gained from pre- and post-assessments to evaluate student learning as a basis for revising lesson plans and teaching strategies.
  5. Employ techniques that offer educational equity among a population of diverse learners.
  6. Identify personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Practical Lesson Design

A. Design inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.

B. Write measurable performance objectives for each lesson.

C. Develop applicable pre- and post-assessments for the performance objectives.

D. Analyze student data acquired through pre- and post-assessments to improve future lesson planning.

E. Incorporate technology into at least one lesson in a manner that encourages enhanced student interaction and learning.

II. Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional approaches that meet the needs of diverse middle school learners.

B. Develop questioning strategies to effectively interact with students with varying abilities and learning styles in a middle school classroom.

C. Develop achievable solutions to preserve instructional equity in the classroom environment.

III. Field Experience

A. Reflect upon observations of lessons taught by an experienced math/science teacher.

B. Teach 3 inquiry-based lessons to a middle school math or science class.

C. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students’ acquisition of knowledge.

D. Synthesize feedback from both mentor teachers and master teachers in order to improve teaching techniques.

E. Reflect on teaching experiences in order to enhance future classroom interactions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25%    Active classroom participation and attendance
20-30%    Lesson planning and preparation
30-40%    Field experiences, reflections and associated activities
10-20%    Other assignments

100%        Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
75 – 79% = C
70 – 74% = D
0 – 69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a “C” in the prerequisite course(s).  If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASTR 291

No information found.