Philosophy (PHIL)

Courses

PHIL 121   Introduction to Philosophy (3 Hours)  

Students will examine the basic questions of philosophical inquiry, such as the nature of being, and the ways humans acquire knowledge and moral, social, religious and political values. Emphasis is on the application of the study of traditional problems of philosophy to the study of contemporary society. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 121H   HON: Introduction to Philosophy* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PHIL 124   Logic and Critical Thinking (3 Hours)  

This course examines the basic elements of formal and informal reasoning. Topics include the elements of argumentative discourse, informal fallacies, inductive and deductive arguments, and propositional logic. The class also focuses on the analysis and evaluation of argumentative discourse in a variety of everyday and academic contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 124H   HON: Logic and Critical Thinking* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PHIL 128   Environmental Ethics (3 Hours)

This course provides a survey of environmental ethics. It focuses on the emergence of environmental issues as a topic of careful philosophical study and its connection to the political and legal considerations of environmental problems. It also examines various theories and traditional approaches developed in Western and Eastern philosophy as well as major world religions to understanding the value and status of nature. Lastly, this course looks at specific controversies pertaining to the conservation, use and value of natural resources. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 138   Business Ethics (1 Hour)

This course applies classical and contemporary theories of morality to problems, questions and dilemmas arising in business. Using the major concepts and principles of deontological, consequentialist and perfectionist theories, it examines and analyzes cases involving such areas as employer/employee relations, corporate responsibility, truth telling in business and workplace diversity. Emphasis is on the development of moral reasoning skills that allow for meaningful analysis and evaluation of moral situations. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

PHIL 140   Business Ethics (3 Hours)

Business Ethics is a branch of applied ethics that attempts to understand, evaluate and critique business practices in the light of moral principles and values. This course introduces students to important elements of moral theory as well as main topics in Business Ethics, including the fiduciary duty of managers, outsourcing, corporate responsibility, whistleblowing, income smoothing, insider trading, sole-source procurements and kickbacks, conflicts of interest, legitimate vs. illegitimate write-offs, deception in advertising and marketing, responsibility to the environment, pay for corporate personnel, and interpersonal relationships in the workplace, among others. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 142   History of Asian Philosophy (3 Hours)

This course provides a thorough exploration of the philosophical traditions of Asia with a focus on the classical philosophies of India and China. Covered are the origins of Indian philosophy in the Vedas and Upanishads, the development of various Vedic schools of thought. The origins of Buddhism and Jainism are also explored. The development and influence of Confucianism, Daoism and Chinese Buddhism are covered as well, as is the lasting influence of Asian philosophy outside of both India and China including its increasing relevance in the West. In the process, the class provides a comprehensive understanding of the distinctive philosophical foundations of the Asian world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 143   Ethics (3 Hours)  

This course provides a systematic and critical study of values related to human conduct. It focuses on both traditional standards of ethical conduct and qualities of personal character. What we hold to be right or wrong, the basis for believing so, and what we consider to be virtues or vices are examined with an eye to understanding our current ethical situation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 143H   HON: Ethics* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PHIL 154   History of Ancient Philosophy (3 Hours)

This course provides a thorough exploration of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical thought from the original efforts of the Pre-Socratics to understand the fundamental operations of the natural world to concerns about the way a person might live successfully in nature and society. Also explored are the notable Athenians of the classical period, Protagoras, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, and the later schools of thought such as cynicism, skepticism, hedonism and stoicism. In the process, it provides a comprehensive understanding of the philosophical foundations of the Western world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 155   Bioethics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or high school biology with department approval.

This course introduces students to the scientific, ethical and legal issues relevant to the discipline of biology and those raised by the rapid development of new biological technologies. Students will examine the major theories of ethics, including deontology, utilitarianism, and select others. Topics include: beginning of life issues such as contraception, abortion, and nontraditional methods of human reproduction; end of life issues such as advance healthcare directives and physician-assisted suicide; and other issues such as experimentation on human and animal subjects and human environmental impacts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. BIOL 155 and PHIL 155 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

PHIL 176   Philosophy of Religion (3 Hours)

This course is an inquiry into the nature of religion, religious thought and religious language. It addresses philosophical topics such as the nature of religious belief, the apparent need of some people for religion, the arguments offered as proof for and against the existence of God, apparent contradictions between scientific and religious teachings, special problems raised by religious language, and the changes religion and philosophy of religion have made to accommodate a modern world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 210   History of Modern Philosophy* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PHIL 121 or PHIL 143 or HIST 125 or HIST 126.

This course takes a historical approach to the development of modern philosophy and covers the period from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. The course will cover the epistemological, metaphysical and relevant axiological issues of the major philosophers and philosophical movements of this period. The course will also examine the influence of modern philosophy on contemporary thought. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

PHIL 210H   HON: History of Modern Philosophy* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PHIL 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: The student must be currently enrolled in, or have successfully completed with a grade of 'C' or higher, any of the following core PHIL courses: PHIL 121, or PHIL 143.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of philosophy not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

PHIL 121

  • Title: Introduction to Philosophy
  • Number: PHIL 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Students will examine the basic questions of philosophical inquiry, such as the nature of being, and the ways humans acquire knowledge and moral, social, religious and political values. Emphasis is on the application of the study of traditional problems of philosophy to the study of contemporary society. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with and understanding of basic philosophical terminology and concepts.
  2. Identify, analyze and explain classical theories of metaphysics, epistemology and ethics.
  3. Identify the major historical figures in the development of classical theories of metaphysics, epistemology and ethics, as well as important figures in contemporary debates in these areas.
  4. Demonstrate an ability to develop and evaluate philosophical analyses and arguments, showing an appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of alternative points of view.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the issues, problems and practices involved in our effort to make philosophic sense of our beliefs about reality, knowledge and values.
  6. Demonstrate habits of character contributive of academic and philosophical excellence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Nature of Philosophy

A. Defining philosophy and its areas of inquiry

1. Explain the Socratic understanding of wisdom.

2. Define metaphysics, epistemology, ethics and logic.

B. The Critical Tradition

1. Explain the Socratic model of inquiry.

2. Explain the search for meaning.

II. Reality

A. The natural world

1. Explain the mind/body problem.

2. Identify and explain the philosophical significance of classical and modern theories of space and time.

3. Identify and explain the philosophical problems associated with matter and causality.

B. Transcendent reality

1. Explain the classical philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God.

2. Identify and explain the philosophical issues surrounding theism and atheism.

C. Consciousness

1. Explain the problem of free will.

2. Explain the problem of personal identity.

3. Identify and explain the philosophical problems associated with death.

III. Knowledge

A. Skepticism

1. Explain sophism.

2. Explain Cartesian skepticism.

B. The Rational Tradition

1. Explain classical rationalism.

2. Explain Cartesian rationalism.

C. The Empirical Tradition

1. Explain classical empiricism.

2. Explain the modern empiricism of Locke and Hume.

IV. Values

A. Problems of ethics

1. Explain egoism.

2. Explain moral relativism.

B. Theories of duty and value

1. Explain deontology.

2. Explain utilitarianism.

3. Explain virtue ethics.

4. Explain existentialism’s critique of modern moral theory.

NOTE: Individual instructors may vary the order of the outline as it appears here and may emphasize some subtopics of the outline to the exclusion of others. What is assured is that this list of major topics represents the topics that will be covered in the course.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-70%    Written exams
30-60%    Papers
0-30%      Quizzes
0-30%      Class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 121H

No information found.

PHIL 124

  • Title: Logic and Critical Thinking
  • Number: PHIL 124
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course examines the basic elements of formal and informal reasoning. Topics include the elements of argumentative discourse, informal fallacies, inductive and deductive arguments, and propositional logic. The class also focuses on the analysis and evaluation of argumentative discourse in a variety of everyday and academic contexts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Recognize the difference between arguments and non-arguments.
  2. Identify and explain the components of informal reasoning
  3. Identify and apply the basic concepts of logical discourse.
  4. Recognize the basic concepts of propositional logic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Arguments

A. Distinguish arguments from non-arguments.

1. Identify the differences between an argument and an explanation, report, narration or illustration

2. Identify both premises and conclusions in arguments

3. Put arguments into standard form argument structure

B. Recognize components of language and language use relevant to reasoning.

1. Explain meaning as understood in logic

2. Distinguish the different types of definitions and describe the differences between each

3. Explain emotive force

4. Distinguish between vague language and ambiguous language

5. Distinguish denotation and connotation

6. Distinguish primary and secondary connotation

7. Distinguish prescriptive and descriptive language

II. Informal Reasoning

A. Understand the nature of both an informal fallacy and the types of argumentation that give rise to such fallacies.

B. Recognize common informal fallacies.

1. Distinguish between fallacies of relevance and fallacies of credibility

2. Identify common fallacies of relevance such as:

a. Appeal to force

b. Appeal to pity

c. Arguments from authority

d. The genetic fallacy

e. Ad hominem arguments

3. Identify common fallacies of credibility such as:

a. Amphiboly

b. Equivocation

c. False dilemma

d. Biased statistics

e. Circular reasoning

f. False analogy

g. Hasty generalization

h. Incomplete evidence

i. Slippery slope

j. Post hoc

k. Ignoring common cause and confusing cause and effect

l. Composition

III. Inductive Reasoning

A. Describe the salient features of inductive arguments.

1. Distinguish forcefulness (strength) and cogency

2. Explain the relationship between forcefulness (strength) and cogency

B. Identify and evaluate the force (strength) and cogency of Inductive Arguments in different types of discourse.

1. Evaluate the cogency of different types of inductive arguments such as:

a. Analogical arguments

b. Generalizations

c. Causal inferences

d. Probabilistic argument

2. Evaluate the cogency and merits of arguments in specialized areas such as:

a. Legal reasoning

b. Moral arguments

c. Scientific reasoning

d. Aesthetic reasoning

IV. Deductive Logic

A. Distinguish formal and informal arguments.

B. Describe the salient features of deductive arguments.

1. Distinguish validity and soundness

2. Recognize and deploy basic deductive argument forms such as:

a. Modus ponens

b. Modus tollens

c. Disjunctive syllogism

d. Chain

C. Propositional logic.

1. Translate Englishinto propositional form

2.Identify the symbolic connectors

3. Identify the structure of propositional arguments such as:

a. Hypothetical syllogisms

b. Dilemmas

4. Use truth tables to evaluate propositional arguments for validity

5. Demonstrate familiarity with and the ability to use logical operators

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60-90%    Exams: At least three exams.
10-40%    Additional assignments which may include homework, quizzes, papers and graded discussions.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 124H

No information found.

PHIL 128

  • Title: Environmental Ethics
  • Number: PHIL 128
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a survey of environmental ethics. It focuses on the emergence of environmental issues as a topic of careful philosophical study and its connection to the political and legal considerations of environmental problems. It also examines various theories and traditional approaches developed in Western and Eastern philosophy as well as major world religions to understanding the value and status of nature. Lastly, this course looks at specific controversies pertaining to the conservation, use and value of natural resources. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with and understanding of basic terminology and concepts used in the study of ethics and the analysis of environmental issues.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to develop and evaluate philosophical analyses and arguments at both the theoretical level and as they are applied in the study of the environment.
  3. Identify, analyze and explain the core ethical concepts relevant to the study of environmental issues.
  4. Identify the major historical figures and movements in Western philosophy, major world religions and Eastern philosophical traditions as they apply to and impact environmental ethics.
  5. Display habits of character contributive to academic and philosophical excellence, such as research and writing skills and critical thinking skills.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Explain the modern scientific understanding of the natural world

A. Review the emergence and tenets of modern scientific attitudes toward nature.

1. Explain the idea that the natural world can be understood mechanistically

a. Describe the historical setting for the emergence of mechanical philosophy in the 17th century

1) Explain the claim that the natural world is composed of basic matter and operates according basic laws of nature

2) Analyze Rene Descartes’ claim that animals are automata and only humans have minds

3) Formulate the implications of Descartes’ claim that animals do not have consciousness

2. Describe Bacon’s claims about the value of understanding nature

a. Review Francis Bacon’s claim that we must force Nature to reveal her secrets

b. Explain Bacon’s claim that knowledge of the natural world would work to the betterment of humanity

c. Formulate the modern understanding of the relationship between technology and knowledge

B. Review the assumptions of the modern scientific method.

1. Explain the idea of objectivity

a. Distinguish quantitative and qualitative research

b. Identify the fact/value distinction

2. Describe the role of experimental studies in modern science

II. Explain the basic features of environmental thought found in major world religions.

A. Review the basic features of the account of Creation in Genesis.

1. Explain monotheism and the idea that God is the transcendent source of all things

a. Describe essential features of the Judeo-Christian God

b. Describe the centrality of God as a moral authority in Judeo-Christian thought

2. Identify the image of human privilege in Genesis

a. Explain the idea that humans are unique in being made in God’s image

b. Describe the place of humans in the natural world according to Genesis

c. Formulate the implications of the idea that the natural world was created for human use

d. Locate the idea of stewardship as it appears in Judeo-Christian thought about the environment

B. Review the distinctive features of Islamic environmental thought.

1. Locate the foundation of Islamic thought in the Qur’an, Hadith and Sunnah

2. Explain the idea of Shariah law and its place in Islamic thought

3. Describe the essential conceptual elements of Islamic environmental thought

a. Explain the idea of Khalaifa, or human trusteeship of the natural environment

b. Explain the idea of tawhid, or the unity of created world as an expression of Allah’s perfect will

c. Explain the idea of fitra, or the perfection of creation

C. Describe the basic features of the natural world as understood in Buddhism.

1. Identify the core claims of Buddhism as expressed in the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path

a. Explain the idea of duhkha, or suffering, and its origin in cravings and ignorance

b. Describe the doctrines of dependent origination, karma and impermanence

2. Articulate the distinctive features of Buddhist environmental thought

a. Formulate the implications the idea of dependent origination for humans and our place in the natural world

b. Formulate the normative implications of the idea of karma as applied to our treatment of other animals.

c. Explain the relevance of the idea of impermanence to our understanding of the natural world

D. Review the basic features of the natural world as understood in Daoism.

1. Explain the idea of the Dao

a. Describe the image of the Dao as presented in the Dao De Jing and Zhuangzi

b. Formulate the normative implications of the image living in accordance with the Dao

2. Explain the origin of the ‘myriad things’ offered by Daoism

a. Describe the process of immanent creation in Daoism

b. Explain the place of humans in the world as understood in Daosim

1) Explain the image of humans as ‘straw dogs'

2) Describe Daoist emphasis on spontaneity, harmony and wu wei, or non-coercive action

c. Describe the prevalence of naturalistic images in Daoist texts

1) Explain the importance of the image of flowing water in Daoist thought

2) Explicate Zhuangzi’s use of stories of animals and plants in his moral texts

3) Describe the normative force given to natural processes Daoism

E. Discuss the basic tenets of Native American beliefs as they pertain to the natural world.

1. Explain the idea of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

2. Describe the Native American normative emphasis on holism and balance

III. Describe the Basic Ideas and Claims of Anthropocentrism

A. Identify the idea and influence of anthropocentrism.

1. Explain the idea that humans are morally more important than plants and other animals

2. Trace the idea of human uniqueness to its origins in earlier Christian and modern philosophical thought

3. Explain the idea that only humans are moral agents

B. Explain the difference between inherent and instrumental worth as applied to the natural world..

1. Explain Kant’s distinction between persons as ends in themselves and things as mere means

2. Explain the idea that the natural world is valuable only as it useful to humans

3. Formulate the implications of the idea the natural world has only instrumental worth

a. Explain the idea of maximal pollution

b. Discuss the idea that we should not preserve nature at the cost of human welfare

c. Discuss the anthropocentric defense of the use animals for research and food

C. Describe the philosophical challenges to anthropocentrism.

1. Explain the arguments against human uniqueness

a. Describe the biological continuities between humans and other species as revealed in the theory of evolution

b. Explain the idea of speciesism and the arguments against it

1) Assess the analogy between speciesism and sexism and racism

2) Formulate the implications of rejecting speciesism in regard to the use animals in experimentation and food

c. Explain non-utilitarian accounts of animal rights

2. Identify the non-anthropocentric tendencies of Buddhism, Daoism and Native American religions

IV. Explain the Basic Ideas and Claims of Egocentrism

A. Identify the proposed components of a land ethic.

1. Describe the concept of a biotic community

2. Explain the values of integrity, stability and beauty as values of biotic community

3. Distinguish conservation as the preservation of resource and as promotion of the health of ecosystems.

B. Identify the claims of deep ecology.

1. Explain the idea that ecological diversity is an inherent good

2. Describe the limits on human rights entailed by deep ecology

3. Trace the connections between deep ecology and concerns about human population growth

C. Identify the claims of ecofeminism.

1. Explain the feminist analysis of the structural and institutional oppression of women by men

a. Describe the idea of “patriarchy”

b. Explain the logic of domination that is said to underlie patriarchal institutions

2. Explain the claim there is a deep connection between patriarchy and the exploitation of the environment

a. Trace the historical connections made between reason and thought and masculinity

b. Trace the historical connections made between feelings and the body and femininity

c. Explain how the historical privileging of reason and culture has denigrated both women and nature

3. Describe the basic claims of the feminist spirituality movement

a. Describe the image of the earth as a mother and its role in ecofeminism

b. Explain the claim that women are closer to nature than men

c. Explain the claim that focusing on the experiences of women can lead to a deepened appreciation of nature

4. Describe the most prevalent challenges to ecofeminism

a. Discuss the charge that ecofeminism draws on and reinforces traditional gender stereotypes

b. Evaluate the charge that ecofeminist uncritically accept women’s roles and experiences as structured by patriarchy

V. Identify the Features of the Most Pressing Problems and Debates in Environmental Ethics

A. Describe the moral challenges posed by pollution.

1. Explain the implications of adopting an ecocentric and anthropocentric approaches to thinking about pollution

a. Explain the idea of optimal pollution

b. Describe the anthropocentric arguments in favor of limiting pollution

c. Formulate the ecocentric rejection of optimal pollution

B. Describe the moral challenges posed by climate change.

1. Explain the debate about the respective duties of developed countries and developing countries in combatting climate change

2. Trace the connections between the problems of anthropogenic climate change and human population growth

C. Explain the moral challenges posed by food production and consumption.

1. Describe the environmental impact of the cattle industry

2. Explain the moral arguments in favor of vegetarianism

a. Discuss the moral arguments against vegetarianism

b. Explain the moral controversies attached to genetically modified organisms

VI. Describe the Principle of Sustainability

A. Explain the argument that current patterns of economic development and production are unsustainable.

1. Describe the connections made between global economic trends and unsustainable consumption.

2. Discuss the argument that adopting sustainable practices will require radical changes in economic organization

B. Describe the problems and moral issues attached to unsustainable practices.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three written exams will constitute no less than 60% of the student’s grade.
Additional exams, papers, reports, projects and quizzes may be used at the instructor’s discretion to assess mastery of the competencies and to facilitate achievement of the course objectives.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 138

  • Title: Business Ethics
  • Number: PHIL 138
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This course applies classical and contemporary theories of morality to problems, questions and dilemmas arising in business. Using the major concepts and principles of deontological, consequentialist and perfectionist theories, it examines and analyzes cases involving such areas as employer/employee relations, corporate responsibility, truth telling in business and workplace diversity. Emphasis is on the development of moral reasoning skills that allow for meaningful analysis and evaluation of moral situations. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Distinguish moral reasoning from practical, legal and economic reasoning.
  2. Define utilitarianism, deontology, ethical relativism, virtue ethics and other terms used in moral discourse.
  3. Recognize and use the basic principles and concepts of utilitarianism, deontology, ethical relativism and virtue ethics.
  4. Use the principles and concepts of utilitarianism, deontology, ethical relativism and virtue ethics in the analysis and evaluation of business cases.
  5. Develop and articulate careful and informed ethical analyses and evaluations of business cases that distinguish moral claims from other kinds of claims, isolate the relevant facts, explain the sources of moral problems, and address methods for their resolution.
  6. Use standard moral theories to recognize and criticize styles and patterns of moral reasoning displayed in arguments about specific business cases.
  7. Use the principles and standards of philosophical 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Define ethics.
   B. Explain methods of justification.
   C. Distinguish types of agreement and disagreement.
   D. Explain basic moral concepts and terms.

II. Deontology
   A. Kantian ethics
      1. Explain the categorical imperative.
      2. Distinguish acting out of duty and acting out of inclination.
   B. Rawls' justice as fairness
      1. Explain the original position.
      2. Explain veil of ignorance.
   C. Application to business cases
      1. Apply deontological concepts to question of truth-telling in
business.
      2. Apply deontological concepts to question of whistle blowing.
   D. Critique
      1. Explain the counter-intuitive results of deontology.

III. Consequentialism and Utilitarianism
   A. Explain act utilitarianism.
   B. Explain rule utilitarianism.
   C. Application to business cases
      1. Use utilitarianism to offer moral defense of profit motive.
      2. Use utilitarianism to evaluate corporate responsibility for
environmental safety.
      3. Use utilitarianism to evaluate employer responsibility for
employee safety and welfare.
   D. Critique
      1. Explain counter-intuitive results of utilitarianism.

IV. Virtue Ethics
   A. Explain Aristotle’s definition of virtue.
   B. Explain use of ideals of virtue and human potential in evaluating
actions.
   C. Application to business cases
      1. Apply virtue ethics to questions of management styles.
      2. Apply virtue ethics to understanding nature and extent of
businesses’ responsibility to consumers and communities.
   D. Critique
      1. Explain limitations of virtue ethics.

V. Moral Relativism
   A. Define and explain appeal of moral relativism.
   B. Application to business cases
      1. Use moral relativism to evaluate business practices in other
countries.
      2. Use moral relativism to respond to dilemmas of adopting standards
of other cultures.
   C. Critique
      1. Explain the counter-intuitive results of moral relativism.

NOTE: Individual instructors may vary the order of the outline as it
appears here and may emphasize some subtopics of the outline to the
exclusion of others.  What is assured is that this list of major topics
represents the topics that will be covered in the course.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of two exams and evaluation of class participation.  In
addition, instructors may choose to use additional examinations or grading
methods which may include research papers, class presentations, projects or
case analyses.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 140

  • Title: Business Ethics
  • Number: PHIL 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Business Ethics is a branch of applied ethics that attempts to understand, evaluate and critique business practices in the light of moral principles and values. This course introduces students to important elements of moral theory as well as main topics in Business Ethics, including the fiduciary duty of managers, outsourcing, corporate responsibility, whistleblowing, income smoothing, insider trading, sole-source procurements and kickbacks, conflicts of interest, legitimate vs. illegitimate write-offs, deception in advertising and marketing, responsibility to the environment, pay for corporate personnel, and interpersonal relationships in the workplace, among others. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish moral reasoning from practical, legal and economic reasoning.
  2. Recognize and use the basic principles and concepts of utilitarianism, deontology, ethical relativism and virtue ethics.
  3. Apply the principles and concepts of utilitarianism, deontology, ethical relativism and virtue ethics in the analysis and evaluation of business cases.
  4. Identify conflicting interests and values between business organizations and their members, stakeholders and publics.
  5. Describe a few of the most important ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers today in each of the main functional areas of business.
  6. Analyze morally praiseworthy and morally reprehensible actions of individuals in the business world through a critical evaluation of case studies.
  7. Offer solutions to ethical dilemmas found in business case studies through arguments and evidence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Ethical Theory

A. Explain the key ideas of deontological moral theories.

1. Explain Kant’s understanding of duty.

2. Distinguish acting out of duty and acting out of inclination.

3. Explain the different formulations of the categorical imperative.

4. Analyze possible resolutions of business dilemmas using the categorical imperative.

B. Explain the key ideas of consequentialist moral theories.

1. Explain the Greatest Happiness Principle.

2. Explain J.S. Mill’s distinction between higher and lower pleasures.

3. Define act utilitarianism.

4. Define rule utilitarianism.

5. Analyze the differences between deontological and consequentialist thinking.

6. Analyze possible resolutions of business dilemmas using Act and Rule Utilitarianism.

C. Explain the key ideas of virtue ethics.

1. Explain the concept of virtue as understood in the Aristotelian tradition.

2. Define happiness as understood by Aristotle.

3. Explain Aristotle’s theory of human nature and its role in his theory of virtue.

4. Apply the Doctrine of the Mean.

5. Explain how Aristotle accounts for the development of character.

6. Analyze possible resolutions of moral dilemmas using virtue ethics.

D. Explain the key ideas of Confucianism.

1. Describe the ideal of the junzi, or morally exemplary person.

2. Define the Confucian virtues of ren (benevolence/consummate humanity), xiao (filial piety), zhi (wisdom) and yi (righteousness/propriety).

3. Explain li (ritual propriety) and its place in Confucian moral education.

4. Describe the lasting influence of Confucian moral thinking on East Asian cultures.

E. Explain the key ideas of moral relativism.

1. Identify examples of morally salient cultural diversity.

2. Explain the idea of universal objective moral standards.

3. Analyze the implications of rejecting the existence of objective, universal moral standards.

4. Analyze examples of morally salient cross-cultural disagreements using moral relativism.

II. Key Concepts in Business Ethics

A. Define the different types of businesses.

1. Explain sole proprietorship.

2. Distinguish general, limited, limited liability partnerships.

3. Distinguish government-owned, not-for-profit, privately owned, privately held for-profit, privately owned publicly held for-profit, and cooperative corporations.

B. Sources of moral tension in business.

1. Discuss the perceived conflict between the profit motive and moral obligation.

2. Identify the potential obligations of different kinds of businesses to:

a. Stakeholders

b. Employees

c. The community

d. The environment

e. Clients and customers

C. Analyze the obligations of businesses using the resources of the relevant moral theories.

D. Identify possible tensions between personal duties and duties attached to roles as defined with business.

III. Issues in Business Ethics

A. Identify ethical challenges arising from globalization.

1. Analyze the moral implications of cultural diversity in a business context.

2. Formulate standard moral objections to and defenses of outsourcing.

3. Use case studies to analyze ethical issues such as

a. Bribery

b. “Sweatshops”

c. Child Labor

B. Identify ethical challenges tied to the environment.

1. Explain the problem of pollution as a negative externality.

2. Describe the economic problem of public goods and its relevance to market based responses environmental issues.

3. Evaluate competing business ethical responses problems such as

a. Climate change

b. Resource depletion

c. Destruction of local ecologies

C. Identify ethical challenges arising in relations between businesses and consumers.

1. Analyze competing accounts of a company’s duty to be honest in areas such as

a. Marketing and advertisement

b. Pricing

c. Credit and interest rates

2. Analyze competing accounts of a company’s duty to guarantee product safety.

3. Analyze moral controversies in such areas as

a. Marketing medical necessities

b. Predatory lending

c. Marketing sex, alcohol, gambling, etc.

d. Influence of products on cultural attitudes regarding gender, race, class, etc.

e. Consumer privacy

D. Identify ethical challenges arising in relations between employers and employees.

1. Explain the concepts of exploitation and alienation.

2. Evaluate competing accounts of a business’s duties regarding:

a. Workplace safety

b. Fair labor practices

c. Management and supervising

d. Hiring and firing

3. Evaluate competing accounts of employee responsibilities regarding

a. Loyalty and whistleblowing

b. Corruption

c. Workplace civility

d. Fulfilling job duties

e. Bribes and kickbacks

4. Evaluate competing analysis of discrimination in hiring and business practices.

a. Identify historic patterns of discriminatory business practices.

b. Analyze competing ethical responses to workplace harassment.

c. Evaluate competing responses to the challenges of diversity in the workplace.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-50%    Minimum of three examinations
10-20%    Discussions
30-50%    Papers
0-20%      Additional assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 142

  • Title: History of Asian Philosophy
  • Number: PHIL 142
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a thorough exploration of the philosophical traditions of Asia with a focus on the classical philosophies of India and China. Covered are the origins of Indian philosophy in the Vedas and Upanishads, the development of various Vedic schools of thought. The origins of Buddhism and Jainism are also explored. The development and influence of Confucianism, Daoism and Chinese Buddhism are covered as well, as is the lasting influence of Asian philosophy outside of both India and China including its increasing relevance in the West. In the process, the class provides a comprehensive understanding of the distinctive philosophical foundations of the Asian world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the social and material conditions of ancient Indian and Chinese cultures that provided the context for the prevailing philosophical ideas of the period.
  2. Identify, describe, and explain the important philosophical positions of the major schools of classical Indian and Chinese philosophy.
  3. Display the ability to relate philosophical ideas from diverse traditions to ongoing philosophical controversies about the nature of the mind, knowledge and the good life.
  4. Display the ability to write expository and evaluative essays in a focused, informed, coherent, and thorough manner.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to read and interpret complex material. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

   I. Upanishadic and “Unorthodox” Schools of Indian Philosophy 
      A. Describe the social and material conditions of ancient India that
provided the context for the prevailing philosophical ideas of the period.

      B. Summarize the Vedic background to Indian philosophy and trace the
emergence of Indian philosophy in the Upanishads. 
      C. Discuss the basic concepts of Upanishadic philosophy.  
         1. Discern the previous meanings of the word karma and the
emergence of a new meaning in the Upanishads.  
         2. Discuss the meanings of the concept of Brahman. 
         3. Discuss the identity of Atman and Brahman as asserted in the
Chandogya Upanishad. 
         4. Explain the concept of liberation through the attainment of
true knowledge 
      D. Describe and evaluate the basic ontological and epistemological
contentions of Lokayata/Charvaka materialism.  
      E. Describe and evaluate the basic ontological and epistemological
contentions of Jaina philosophy. 
         1. Explain the Jain meaning of jiva/atman, karma, samsara,
dharma, pudgala, and skandha.  
         2. Analyze and evaluate the Jain concept of truth-values. 
         3. Describe the Jain method of ridding oneself of Karma and
attaining kaivalya or absolute independence. 
 
  II. Buddhist Philosophy and Practice 
      A. Discuss the life and career of the Buddha, and describe and
evaluate the basic ontological and epistemological contentions of early
Buddhist philosophy. 
         1. Briefly recount the life and career of the Buddha. 
         2. List and evaluate the Four Noble Truths and the steps of the
Eightfold Path as the means of attaining enlightenment. 
         3. Compare and contrast the ontological status of samsara and
nirvana. 
         4. Analyze and evaluate the Buddhist contention that all things
are impermanent. 
         5. Analyze and evaluate the Buddhist denial of self and its
account of what constitutes rebirth. 
         6. Analyze and evaluate the concept of Dependent Origination as
the cause of samsara. 
         7. Analyze and evaluate the Buddhist concepts of the five
skandhas/khandas; how these account for perception; how they constitute
dukkha, or suffering; and how they are affected by Dependent Origination.

      B. Mahayana Buddhist Schools of Philosophy. 
         1. Explain and evaluate the Mahayana concepts of Sunyata, or
Emptiness; Non-Dualism; Tathagata, or universal Buddha Nature; the
Buddha’s Three Bodies; and the Bodhisattva. 
         2. Describe and evaluate the basic ontological and
epistemological contentions of the madhyamaka School of Nagarjuna. 
         3. Describe and evaluate the basic ontological and
epistemological contentions of the Yogacara School. 4. Explain the key
differences between Mahayana and “Hinayana” schools of Buddhism. 
 
 III. Confucian Thought in Chinese Philosophy 
      A. Describe the social and material conditions of ancient China that
provided the context for the prevailing philosophical ideas of the period. 

      B. Summarize the historical and cultural background of Confucianism
in the Zhou dynasty and Warring States Period.    
      C. Discuss the importance of Confucius’ teaching in the Lunyu, or
Analects. 
         1. Describe what we know of Confucius’ life.  
         2. Identify Confucius’ understanding of the dao or way as a
principle leading to social and natural harmony. 
         3. Discuss the emergence of the junzi, or exemplary person, as a
moral ideal in Confucianism. 
         4. Discern the significance of mastering li, or ritual propriety,
in Confucian moral education. 
         5. Discuss the centrality of xiao, or filial piety, and the
emphasis on social roles and tradition in Confucian thought.    
            a. Identify the use of familial relations as a model for
social and political relations 
            b. Explain the importance of the Wu Lun, or Five Relations of
parent/child; husband/wife; older sibling/younger sibling; ruler/subject;
and friend/friend in establishing and maintaining social hierarchies. 
         6. Discuss the centrality of jiao, or education, in Confucian
ethics. 
         7. Discuss Confucius’ understanding of ren, or humanity or
benevolence, or humaneness, yi, or righteousness, and zhi, or wisdom, and
their roles in his moral thinking. 
         8. Discuss the role of the sheng, or sage, as the highest
manifestation of humanity in Confucian thought. 
      D. Discuss the development of Confucian thought in the Daxue, or The
Great Learning. 
         1. Explain what is meant by ‘inborn luminous virtue’ and how
it is preserved according to the Daxue. 
         2. Discuss the interplay of care for learning, thought, the mind,
self-cultivation, family harmony, and good government in the Daxue. 
      E. Discuss the development of Confucian thought in the Zhongyong or
The Doctrine of the Mean. 
         1. Explain cheng, or integrity, as it is understood in the
Zhongyong. 
         2. Discuss meanings of xing, or nature, and renxing, or human
nature, in the Zhongyong. 
         3. Identify the contention of the Zhongyong that meaning in life
is found in the moral practice of everyday affairs. 
      F. Identify and explain the contributions of Mengzi (Mencius) in the
development of Confucianism. 
         1. Discuss Mengzi’s account of renxing, or human nature. 
            a. Explain his defense of the essential goodness of humans. 
            b. Discern his account of the origins of evil.       c.
Discuss Menzi’s criticisms of Mozi’s ideal of ‘universal love’. 
         2. Discuss Mengzi’s moral psychology. 
            a. Identify the four duan, or ‘sprouts’ or
‘stirrings’, in the xin (heart-mind) that are the basis of moral
virtue as understood by Mengzi. 
            b. Explain Mengzi’s correlation of the four duan with the
virtues of ren (benevolence or humanity); yi (righteousness); li (ritual
propriety); and zhi (wisdom). 
         3. Explain Mengzi’s account of moral development as rooted in
xiao (filial piety) and li (ritual propriety). 
         4. Explain Mengzi’s theory of ‘good government’ as based on
moral example and benevolence rather than power or coercion. 
      G. Explain Xunzi’s challenge to Menzi’s optimistic theory of
human nature 
         1. Discuss Xunzi’s claim that humans are inherently selfish and
desire to enjoy pleasure and avoid pain. 
         2. Explain Xunzi’s contention that morality was invented by the
ancient sages and is achieved through education. 
            a. Discuss Xunzi’s distinction between renxing, or nature,
and wei, or human artifice. 
            b. Explain his claim that morality stems from wei, or
“conscious striving”, and not renxing, or human nature.  
         3. Explain Xunzi’s account of the role of li (ritual propriety)
in the development of ren (benevolence). 
         4. Discuss Zunzi’s view of Tian. 
         5. Show why the Rectification of Names is important in Zunxi’s
thought. 
      H. Explain the challenges to Confucianism presented by Mozi and the
Legalists. 
         1. Discuss Mozi’s utilitarian philosophy and his idea of
universal love. 
         2. Discuss the Legalists insistence on strict rules and harsh
punishment in maintaining social harmony. 
 
  IV. Daoism and its Influence on Chinese Thought 
      A. Describe the emergence of Daoist thought as a response to the
violence and uncertainty of the Warring States Period. 
      B. Discuss traditional accounts of the life of Laozi and the
authorship of the Daodejing. 
      C. Explain the processional metaphysics and immanent cosmology of
the Daodejing and contrast it with the essentialism and transcendent
cosmology more typical of Western philosophy. 
         1. Explain the Daodejing’s naturalistic understanding of dao 
         2. Discuss the role of yin and yang processes in the emergence of
the individual objects. 3. Explain the role of a thing’s de, or power, in
the Daodejing’s metaphysics. 
      D. Explain the Daodejing’s account of language. 
         1. Explain the claim that the dao that can be spoken of is not
the eternal dao. 
         2. Analyze the claim that the named is the mother of the myriad
things. 
         3. Describe the interdependence of opposites such as beautiful
and ugly, good and bad in Daoist thought. 
         4. Evaluate the Daodejing social constructivist account of
morality and its claim that conventional morality is corrupting. 
         5. Analyze the Daoist critique of Confucian ethics. 
      E. Discuss the importance of the ideas of wuwei, or non-coercive
action, wuzhi, or non-conceptualized knowing, and wuyu, or objectless
desiring, in Daoism. 
         1. Discuss the importance of spontaneity and the processes of the
natural world in Daoist aesthetics. 
         2. Discern the daoist endorsement of minimalist government. 
         3. Analyze the suggestion that renouncing political ambition and
material wealth leads to greater happiness and social harmony. 
      F.  Discuss the Zhuangzi’s contributions to Daoism. 
         1. Describe the traditional claims about the life of Zhuangzi and
the origins of the work that bears his name. 
         2. Describe and evaluate the skeptical attitude in the Zhuangzi
regarding human knowledge and understanding. 
            a. Explain the Zhuangzi’s skeptical argument based on the
conflicting claims of Confucianism and Mohism. 
            b. Explain the Zhuangzi’s skeptical argument based on the
interdependence of all conceptual distinctions. 
            c. Explain the Zhuangzi’s epistemological skepticism based
on our limited perspectives when grasping reality as illustrated by the
parable of Zhou dreaming he is a butterfly. 
         3. Discuss the Zhuangzi’s recommendations for alleviating the
fear of death by recognizing the constant transformation of things. 
 
  V. Neo-Confucianism 
     A. Describe the innovations of Chinese Buddhism and its challenge to
Confucianism. 
        1. Explain how the rich metaphysics of Buddhism revealed a lacuna
in Confucian thought. 
           a. Discuss the idea of Buddha Nature as understood in Huanyan
Buddhism. 
           b. Explain the idea that the illusory objects of everyday
experience share the same fundamental Buddha nature. 
           c. Discuss the claim that Enlightenment is the process by which
we rediscover Buddha nature. d. Describe the focus on meditative techniques
as route to sudden Enlightenment in Chan Buddhism. 
      B. Describe the neo-Confucian response to the Buddhist challenge to
Confucianism. 
      C. Describe the neo-Confucian appropriation of Chinese Buddhist
concepts and their translation into a Confucian idiom. 
         1. Explain Zhou Dunyi’s account of the origins of yin and yang
in the Taiji, or Great Ultimate and his account of the origins of the five
agencies or phases in the interaction of yin and yang. 
         2. Explain the significance of Zhang Zai’s The Western
Inscription and the idea of human goodness. 
         3. Explain Zhang Zai’s understanding of qi as a psychophysical
substance his account of the transformation of yin and yang according to
li, or principle. 
         4. Describe Zhang Zai’s account sagehood as realizing the unity
of all things in li, or principle and the role of ren understood as
universal love as the means by which this unity is realized. 
      D. Describe the development and central claims of the Cheng-Zhu or
li xue school of neo-Confucianism 
         1. Discuss Cheng I’s emphasis on learning and knowledge of li
or principle as the route to sagehood. 
         2. Discuss the significance of Zhu Xi’s synthesis of
neo-Confucius ideas and his establishment of a Confucian canon. 
            a. Explain Zhu Xi’s emphasis on intensive reading of the
Classics 
            b. Discuss Zhu Xi’s distinction between lesser and greater
learning 
            c. Describe Zhu Xi’s account of the unity of action and
learning 
         3. Describe Zhu Xi’s idea of ge wu, or the investigation of
things. 
         4. Explain Zhu Xi’s account of human goodness in li, or the
principle of humanity, and the origins of evil in its embodiment in qi, or
psychophysical substance. 
      E. Discuss the development of the Lu-Wang or xin xue school of
neo-Confucianism 
         1. Explain Wang Yangming’s slogan that mind is principle. 
         2. Explain Wang Yangming’s claim that learning involves
overcoming selfish impulses and the recovery of our liangzhi, or original
(innate) knowledge. 
         3. Describe Wang Yangming’s account of the ultimate unity of
knowing, acting, love and ren, or benevolence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written Examinations 50% of grade 
Critical Paper/Assignments 50% of grade 
Total 100% 
Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 – 100% 
B = 80 – 89% 
C = 70 – 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = 0 – 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 143

  • Title: Ethics
  • Number: PHIL 143
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a systematic and critical study of values related to human conduct. It focuses on both traditional standards of ethical conduct and qualities of personal character. What we hold to be right or wrong, the basis for believing so, and what we consider to be virtues or vices are examined with an eye to understanding our current ethical situation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with and understanding of basic philosophical terminology and concepts.
  2. Explain the core concepts of important classical and contemporary theories of ethics.
  3. Identify the major historical figures in the development of classical and contemporary theories of ethics, as well as important figures in contemporary moral debates. 
  4. Develop and evaluate philosophical analyses and arguments, showing an appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of alternative points of view.
  5. Display habits of character contributive to academic and philosophical excellence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify and Explain the Three Main Divisions of Ethics

A. Identify and explain the differences between meta-ethics, normative ethics and applied ethics

1. Identify the questions addressed by meta-ethics

2. Identify the questions addressed normative ethics

3. Identify examples of issues in applied ethics

II. Identify the Main Claims of and Debates Surrounding Moral Relativism

A. Describe the role of folkways and social customs in shaping the moral beliefs and practices of individuals and societies.

B. Outline the range of cultural diversity in moral beliefs and practices

1. Identify examples of diverse moral beliefs and practices

2. Identify examples of putatively universal moral standards

C. Analyze the idea that customs are what make actions right or wrong.

1. Explain the argument from cultural differences used to support ethical relativism and evaluate the argument’s adequacy.

2. Evaluate the objection that moral relativism entails tolerating demonstrable evil

III. Identify the Major Tenets of Religiously Grounded Moral Traditions

A. Explain and evaluate the basic claims of Divine Command Theory

1. Explain the idea that morality is determined by God’s will.

2. Describe the Euthyphro Dilemma and the problems it raises for Divine Command Theory

3. Identify and evaluate possible responses to the Euthyphro Dilemma

B. Describe and evaluate the basic claims of Natural Law Theory

1. Explain St. Thomas Aquinas’ understanding of the Law as a rule that tends a community toward its natural end.

2. Describe the Eternal Law and the Natural Law

3. Explain the fundamental precept that we should do good and avoid evil

a. Describe the four basic moral values of life, procreation, sociability and knowledge that emerge from the Natural Law, and their implications

b. Explain the two Qualifying Principles of the Natural Law

i. Describe the Principle of Forfeiture and the kinds of behaviors it would allow

ii. Describe the Principle of Double Effect and the kinds of acts it would allow.

4. Identify common objections to Natural Law Theory

C. Explain the basic components of Buddhist Ethics

1. Identify the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eight Fold Path

2. Describe the Doctrines of No Self and Interdependent Arising

3. Evaluate the normative implications of Buddhist teachings

IV. Explain and Evaluate the Basic Claims of Kantian or Deontological Ethics

A. Explain Kant’s account of duty

1. Explain the difference between actions done in accordance with duty and actions done out of duty

2. Outline the difference between hypothetical and categorical imperatives.

3. Explain the difference between perfect and imperfect duties

B. Explain the Categorical Imperative

1. State and describe the application of the formulation of the Categorical Imperative in terms of willing our maxims to be a universal law.

a. Define what Kant means by “maxim” and “universal law.”

b. Explain and evaluate Kant’s claim the immoral acts cannot be willed to be universal laws.

C. State and describe the application of the formulation of the Categorical Imperative in terms of treating humanity as an end in itself.

1. Explain what Kant means by treating humanity as an end as opposed to a mere means.

2. Discuss the difference between persons and things

3. Describe what Kant means by acting as though we were constructing a Kingdom of Ends

V .Explain and Evaluate the Basic Claims of Consequentialist Moral Theories

A. Explain John Stuart Mill’s version of utilitarianism

1. Explain the Greatest Happiness Priniciple

2. State Mill’s definition of “happiness” and “unhappiness"

a. Analyze the objection that utilitarianism is a "doctrine worthy of swine"

b. Discuss the difference between higher and lower pleasures

c. Explain how the difference between higher and lower pleasures is supposed to show utilitarianism is not a doctrine worthy of swine.

B. Discuss the Difference between Act and Rule Utilitarianism

1. Define Act Utilitarianism

2. Define Rule Utilitarianism

3. State the objection that Utilitarianism is unable to allow for the protection of individual or minority rights

4. Explain the argument that holds that Rule Utilitarianism can allow for the protection of individual and minority rights.

C. Summarize some of the major differences between Consequentialist and Deontological Theories

1. Contrast consequentialist and deontological justifications of punishment.

2. Contrast consequentialist and deontological analyses of applied ethical questions such as the permissibility of euthanasia, embryonic stem cell research, abortion, etc.

VI. Describe the Emergence and Main Claims of Feminist Ethics

A. Explain the influence of Carol Gilligan’s work in moral development on feminist philosophers.

1. Discuss Gilligan’s distinction between a justice perspective on morality and a care perspective.

2. Analyze Gilligan’s charge that traditional moral thinking was dominated by a focus on justice and ignored issues of care.

B. Describe the natural sentiment of care as understood by care ethicists.

1. Explain the claim that basic human moral sentiments become ethical mandates.

2. Explain the importance of relationship in Care Ethics

a. Discuss the idea of a caring relationship

b. Describe the special importance of the mother/child relationship in Care Ethics

C. Identify and evaluate the challenges to care ethic

1. Explain the claim that the need to resist evil might pose a problem for an ethic based on care.

2. Explain the objection that moral responsibility toward strangers poses a problem for care.

3. Explain why some feminist ethicists see care as potentially limiting and exploiting of women.

VII. Explain and Evaluate the Basic Claims of Virtue Ethics

A. Describe the emergence of classical Virtue Ethics in Greek Philosophy

1. Discuss Aristotle’s definition of "eudaimonia" (“happiness” or “flourishing”)

2. Summarize how Aristotle derives an account of virtue in terms of human functioning.

a. Explain what Aristotle means by a thing’s "ergon" or “function”

b. Identify what Aristotle says is the function of humans

c. Describe how virtues and vices are understood in relation to a thing’s function

3. Identify the two types of virtue Aristotle defines

4. Explain the role the mean plays in Aristotle’s account of virtue and how it is to be determined.

a. Explain how Aristotle uses the idea of a mean to explain particular virtues such as bravery or temperance and vices such as cowardice or intemperance.

b. Describe the role of habituation in the acquisition of moral virtues.

B. Explain the basic tenets of Confucianism

1. Describe the "junzi," or exemplary person, and the role of this ideal in Confucain thought

a. Identify the virtues that describe the "junzi": "ren" (benevolence, consummate humanity), "yi" (appropriateness), "li" (propriety), and "zhi" (wisdom)

2. Summarize the basic elements of Confucian moral education

a. Explain the importance of "li" (ritual propriety) in Confucian moral education

b. Explain the importance of "xiao" (filial piety) in Confucian moral education

C. Describe the revival of Virtue Ethics as an alternative to Deontological and Consequentialist theories

1. Explain how an ethic of being differs from one of doing

2. Describe the advantages of virtue ethics over conduct-centered ethics.

D. Identify common objections to virtue ethics.

1. Explain how indeterminacy is a problem for virtue ethics.

2. Analyze the claim that virtue ethics must be assisted by law which requires some other ethical foundation than virtue.

3. Explain how changes in character count against virtue ethics.

VIII. Explain and Evaluate the Claims of Modern Social Contract Theories of Morality

A. Explain the basic claims of egoism.

1. Describe the differences between psychological and ethical egoism.

2. Identify arguments offered in favored of psychological and ethical egoism

3. Discuss the emergence of our duties to others according to egoism

a. Describe Glaucon’s account of the origins of justice in Book II of "Plato’s Republic"

b. Describe Hobbes' account of the emergence of civil society in "Leviathan."

4. Analyze the popular arguments against psychological and ethical egoism.

B. Summarize the Social Contract Theory of John Locke

1. Identify Locke’s account of the State of Nature and its role in this theory

2. Analyze the idea that we enjoy basic natural rights

3. Describe Locke’s claim that the function of government is to protect our basic rights

C. Explain John Rawls’ contemporary Social Contract Theory

1. Summarize the basic claims of Justice as Fairness

a. Explain the Liberty Principle

b. Explain the Difference Principle

2. Evaluate Rawls’ rejection of Utilitarianism and possible responses.

IX: Demonstrate an Ability to Apply Different Normative Ethical Theories to Applied Ethical Controversies

A. Evaluate the challenges to traditional moral thinking raised by contemporary research in evolutionary psychology, genetics and developmental psychology.

1. Discuss the relevance of current research into the biological and psychological sources of our moral intuitions to moral theory

2. Analyze arguments from the biological origins of our “moral sense” to anti-realist conclusions

3. Apply some combination of moral theories to moral problems such as abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, embryonic stem cell research, GLBT issues, animal rights, obligations to the environment, world poverty, torture, etc.

4. Identity the divergent conclusions that deontological, consequentialist and virtue ethical theories tend toward on applied ethical questions

5. Discuss the philosophical merits of competing positions in current controversies in applied ethics

B. Contrast the judgments of different theories when applied to specific moral problems.

C. Evaluate the adequacy of the moral judgments of different moral theories when applied to specific moral problems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three essay exams, which are primarily written, will constitute no less than 60% of the student’s grade. Additional exams, papers, reports, projects and quizzes may be used at the instructor’s discretion to assess mastery of the competencies and to facilitate achievement of the course objectives.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 143H

No information found.

PHIL 154

  • Title: History of Ancient Philosophy
  • Number: PHIL 154
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a thorough exploration of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical thought from the original efforts of the Pre-Socratics to understand the fundamental operations of the natural world to concerns about the way a person might live successfully in nature and society. Also explored are the notable Athenians of the classical period, Protagoras, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, and the later schools of thought such as cynicism, skepticism, hedonism and stoicism. In the process, it provides a comprehensive understanding of the philosophical foundations of the Western world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the social and material conditions of ancient Greek and Roman cultures that provided the context for the prevailing philosophical ideas of the period.
  2. Identify, describe, and explain the important philosophical positions of this period.
  3. Relate ideas and issues contained in ancient philosophy to later philosophical and cultural ideas.
  4. Display the ability to write expository and evaluative essays in a focused, informed, coherent, and thorough manner.
  5. Display the ability to read complex material interpretively.
  6. Display habits of character contributive to academic and philosophical excellence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Pre-Socratic Philosophy
   A. The Milesians
      1. Thales
         a. Explain the basis for regarding Thales as the first
philosopher in the West.
         b. Describe what is known of Thales’ account of nature.
      2. Anaximander
         a. Explain how Anaximander responded to Thales’ teachings in
terms of what he accepted, what he rejected, and his basis for rejecting
it.
         b. Describe Anaximander’s account of what exists and how change
occurs.
      3. Anaximenes 
         a. Explain Anaximenes’ amendments to Anaximander’s account of
nature.
         b. Identify the advancement Anaximenes is credited with
introducing into natural philosophy.
      4. The coherence and contributions of the Milesians.
         a. Identify the presuppositions made by all three of the early
Milesians.
         b. Identify the conceptual innovations each of them contributed.
   B. The Transition Philosophers
      1. Pythagoras and Pythagoreanism
         a. Explain the connection between mathematics and the soul made
by the Pythagoreans.
         b. Explain the Pythagorean cosmology as summarized by their
claim, "All things are numbers."
         c. Evaluate the adequacy of this account in explaining the origin
of physical things.
         d. Connect Pythagorean cosmological beliefs with their ethical
and political practices.
         e. Identify the innovations introduced in natural philosophy by
this movement.
         f. Explain why the discovery of irrational numbers produced a
crisis for Pythagoreanism.
      2. Xenophanes
         a. Describe the scientific discoveries Xenophanes is credited
with making.
         b. Explain Xenophanes’ religious views.
      3. Heraclitus
         a. Explain the basis for Heraclitus’ rejection of Milesian
accounts of what exists and how it undergoes change.
         b. Explain Heraclitus’ account of permanence and change.
         c. Assess the significance of Heraclitus’ contributions to
philosophy.
   C. The Eleatics
      1. Parmenides
         a. Explain the controversy regarding whether Parmenides should be
seen as reacting to Heraclitus or Pythagoreanism.
         b. Explain how Parmenides’ poem may be read as a rejection of
Pythagorean dualism.
         c. Explain how the Eleatics introduced logic to advance
rationalism beyond its Pythagorean form.
         d. Explain how Parmenides finds a place for Pythagoreanism in his
‘Way of Opinion’ section of his poem.
         e. Formulate an explanation for Parmenides’ use of the poetic
form in putting forth his account of reality.
      2. Zeno
         a. Connect Zeno’s paradoxes with the issue between Parmenides
and Pythagorean cosmology.
         b. Explain what a ‘reductio ad absurdum’ form of argument is
and show how Zeno can be seen as reducing the Pythagorean account of space
to absurdity.
      3. Melissus
         a. Explain the two sides of the debate over the nature of being
expressed by Melissus and Parmenides.
         b.  Show how Einstein’s solution to this issue that he borrowed
from Riemann is an attempt to reconcile these two sides.
   D. The Pluralists
      1. Empedocles
         a. Explain how Empedocles uses four elements and two forces to
account for reality.
         b. Connect Empedocles’ account with Parmenides’ basis for
rejecting Pythagoreanism.
      2. Anaxagoras
         a. Trace Anaxagoras’ pluralism to the Ionian accounts of
reality.
         b. Identify the significant innovation Anaxagoras introduces in
his account.
      3. The Atomists
         a. Correlate Leucippus’ account of reality with Pythagorean
cosmology.
         b. Explain how the world of sensory objects issues from the
atoms.
         c. Explain how the Atomists’ account of knowledge led to the
basis for skepticism.
         d. Assess the significance of atomism on subsequent science and
philosophy.

II. The Athenian Apex
   A. The Sophists & Socrates
      1. Protagoras
         a. Trace Protagoras’ metaphysical agnosticism and
epistemological skepticism to its roots in Atomism.
         b. Describe Protagoras’ ethical position.
         c. Explain why the Sophists were highly regarded in Greek culture
during this period.
      2. Gorgias
         a. Explain and evaluate the three claims and their supporting
arguments that characterize Gorgias’ teachings.
         b. Compare Gorgias’ position with the modern period British
empiricists.
      3. Socrates
         a. Explain why the historical Socrates is an enigma based on the
sources we have about his life and teachings.
         b. Explain why it is necessary to separate the historical
Socrates from the character in Plato’s dialogues.
         c. Explain why Plato’s ‘Socrates’ has been so widely
accepted.
   B. Plato
      1. Euthyphro
         a. Identify the issue Plato is dealing with in the Euthyphro and
what he seems to be rejecting.
         b. Show how the Euthyphro exemplifies the dialectic process or
"Socratic method."
         c. Explain why the dialogue ends inconclusively.
      2. Apology
         a. Contrast the old accusations against Socrates with the formal
charges made by Meletus.
         b. Explain how Socrates acquired his divine mission and how this
led to the old accusations.
         c. Explain what Plato seems to be trying to accomplish by
manufacturing these old accusations.
         d. Summarize and evaluate Socrates’ defense against the formal
charges brought against him by Meletus.
         e. Describe the facts the jurors would have been aware of which
support the charge of corrupting the youth but which Plato omits any
response to.
         f. Identify the political basis for the charges Plato appears to
be emphasizing.
         g. Evaluate the reasonableness of the penalty Socrates proposed
in Plato’s account against other alternatives available to him.
      3. Crito
         a. Explain the reasons why Crito believes Socrates should escape
from prison and avoid the death penalty.
         b. Summarize Socrates’ argument showing it would be unjust to
avoid the penalty.
      4. The trial dialogues as a philosophical trilogy.
         a. Describe the philosophical problem Plato is posing in the
trial trilogy and explain how each dialogue contributes to the problem and
to his proposed solution.
         b. Explain how this interpretation helps us to understand the
apparently deliberate weaknesses in Socrates’ hypothetical defense in
the Apology.
         c. Evaluate the solution Plato is proposing to the problem of the
social value of the reformer.
      5. Meno
         a. Diagram the dialectic examination of virtue in the first
section of the dialogue.
         b. Describe the learner’s paradox and explain Socrates’
solution to it.
         c. Explain how the interrogation of the slave boy exemplifies the
two stage structure of dialectic inquiry.
         d. Summarize the argument Socrates uses to establish that virtue
cannot be taught, and explain why it must be seen as a satire of sophistic
reasoning.
         e. Explain the satire involved in the conclusion that virtue must
be acquired by divine dispensation.
      6. Theaetetus
         a. Map the dialectic structure of the definition of knowledge
through its three primary formulations and the key objections made to
each.
         b. Explain how Plato uses the reality versus appearances motif in
the dialogue.
         c. Identify the key error Plato believes is being made in
Protagoras’ view that knowledge is simply perception.
         d. Relate Plato’s objection to the modern period British
empiricists’ account of knowledge we examined in connection with
Gorgias’ arguments for skepticism.
      7. Republic
         a. Trace Plato’s justification in Book II for organizing the
ideal state into two classes of people.
         b. Explain why in Book III Plato sees it necessary to add a third
class and to employ a ‘noble lie.’
         c. Explain how Plato uses the harmonious reconciliation of the
tripartite soul to characterize justice in the ideal state in Book IV.
         d. Describe the ‘three waves’ that Plato sees threatening to
swamp his proposal for the ideal state in Book V.
         e. Diagram Plato’s metaphor of the divided line given in Book
VI, and identify the four states of mind he distinguishes along with their
objects.
         f. Summarize the main features of the Allegory of the Cave given
in Book VII, and explain what Plato uses it to accomplish.
      8. Plato’s achievement.
         a. Explain how Plato’s Theory of Forms constitutes a synthesis
of the pre-Socratic conflict over permanence and change.
         b. Explain how Plato’s philosophy constitutes a rejection of
the Sophists’ skepticism and relativism.
   C. Aristotle
      1. The Organon
         a. Identify the four areas of inquiry in Aristotle’s conception
of philosophical thought.
         b. Identify the three basic laws of thought.
         c. Explain the key elements in Aristotle’s syllogistic logic
that permits the determination of the validity of reasoning purely on a
formal basis.
         d. Explain how this logical system along with a theory of
rhetoric allowed Aristotle to confront the Sophists in a way not open to
Plato.
      2. Physics
         a. Explain Aristotle’s form-in-matter doctrine and relate it to
Plato’s Theory of Forms.
         b. Explain Aristotle’s basis for rejecting monism.
         c. Describe the four causes of change Aristotle identifies and
indicate which of these previous philosophers overlooked.
         d. Explain Aristotle’s account of nature.
      3. Metaphysics
         a. Explain why Aristotle’s analysis of the views of his
predecessors is both invaluable and unreliable.
         b. Summarize his objections to Plato’s Theory of Forms.
         c. Describe the four types of change Aristotle distinguishes and
the three elements that exist.
         d. Explain Aristotle’s entelechy doctrine in terms of
potentiality and actuality.
         e. Explain Aristotle’s argument for the existence of a prime
mover.
      4. On the Soul
         a. Distinguish the three types of souls Aristotle identifies.
         b. Explain the powers of the human soul in terms of these types
of souls.
         c. Explain how Aristotle ties reflection and knowledge to his
form-in-matter doctrine.
      5. Ethics
         a. Explain how Aristotle’s definition of the good is a result
of his empirical thesis on happiness and his metaphysical thesis on the
nature of humanity.
         b. Identify the two types of virtue he distinguishes and explain
how he believes each is acquired.
         c. Explain the role the mean plays in virtue for Aristotle and
how he believes it is to be determined. 
         d. Explain how his analysis of moral responsibility can be seen
as superior to Plato’s.
         e. Describe the general conditions Aristotle believes might be
morally excusing conditions for the responsibility of an act.
         f. Explain the influence Aristotle’s ethic has had on both
bio-ethics and natural law ethics.

III. Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy
   A. Conditions that changed philosophy.
      1. Describe the political and social conditions following the
break-up of the Alexandrian empire that caused the shift in philosophy to
an emphasis upon personal satisfaction.
   B. Cynicism
      1. Antisthenes
         a. Trace Antisthenes’ unconventional behavior to the example of
Socrates.
         b. Describe the key elements in Antisthenes’ ethic.
         c. Explain the basis for Antisthenes’ anti-intellectual
epistemology.
      2. Diogenes
         a. Illustrate how Diogenes carried out the message of his mentor
Antisthenes.
         b. Explain the claim that Diogenes was the second king of the
empire.
      3. Crates
         a. Describe the shift made in cynicism by Crates in his
interpretation of natural living.
   C. Skepticism
      1. Pyrrho
         a. Explain the claim that philosophical skepticism was originally
an ethical position using the concept of ataraxy.
         b. Identify the three things Phyrro believed the person who would
be happy ought to consider.
      2. Sextus Empiricus
         a. Describe the skeptics account of ‘the way things are’
according to Sextus.
         b. Explain the state of mind the skeptics strived to adopt and
how they proposed to achieve it.
         c. Identify the four things skeptics followed as operational
guides and the attitude they held toward them.
         d. Explain how the skeptics hoped to avoid the two main sources
of unhappiness.
   D. Hedonism
      1. Aristippus of Cyrene
         a. Trace Aristippus’ hedonism to the influence of Socrates.
         b. Explain the basis for Aristippus’ sensationalism and the
consequences this had for social conventions and theoretical knowledge.
         c. Explain why Aristippus’ view of pleasure requires him to
regard the neutral state of quietude as undesirable.
      2. Epicurus and Lucretius
         a. Explain why Epicurus was disinterested in science and
mathematics but interested in metaphysics.
         b. Explain how Epicurus’ atomism avoided the main sources of
unhappiness in people.
         c. Explain how Epicurus avoided the determinism in Democritus’
atomism and the advantage in doing so.
         d. Explain how he used Plato to avoid the subjectivism of
Aristippus and the Sophists.
         e. Identify the three main positions Epicurus took on ethics and
explain the consequences of each.
         f. Explain how the walled garden makes an apposite metaphor for
Epicurus’ ethic.
   E. Stoicism
      1. Early Stoa: Zeno, Cleanthes, and Chrysippus
         a. Identify the ideas the Stoics borrowed from other philosophers
and philosophies in their eclectic position.
         b. Describe the Stoic account of reality and change.
         c. Explain how the Stoics responded to the two major problems
with their world view; the existence of evil and determinism.
         d. Explain how these solutions lead to an ethic based on control
of our desires and emotions.
      2. Roman Stoics
         a. Describe the main contribution of Roman stoicism from
Epictetus to Marcus Aurelius.
   F. Neoplatonism
      1. Plotinus
         a. Identify the elements from Plato’s philosophy that Plotinus
combined with monotheism.
         b. Explain how Plotinus’ metaphor of ‘emanation’ accounts
for creation of things in succession and thus the creation of time
itself.
         c. Describe Plotinus’ accounts of the nature of the human soul
and of matter.
         d. Explain how Plotinus accounts for the existence of evil.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of three essay exams which will constitute no less than 60%
of the student’s grade. Additional exams, papers, reports, projects, and
quizzes may be used at the instructors’ discretion to assess mastery of
the competencies and to facilitate achievement of the course
objectives.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 155

  • Title: Bioethics*
  • Number: PHIL 155
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or high school biology with department approval.

Description:

This course introduces students to the scientific, ethical and legal issues relevant to the discipline of biology and those raised by the rapid development of new biological technologies. Students will examine the major theories of ethics, including deontology, utilitarianism, and select others. Topics include: beginning of life issues such as contraception, abortion, and nontraditional methods of human reproduction; end of life issues such as advance healthcare directives and physician-assisted suicide; and other issues such as experimentation on human and animal subjects and human environmental impacts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. BIOL 155 and PHIL 155 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe a selection of the major ethical issues raised by biological research and development.

  2. Compare and contrast relevant ethical theories.

  3. Analyze an appropriate case and prepare a case study.

  4. Develop a reasoned ethical argument.

  5. Describe his/her operative ethical stance.

  6. Describe the nature of science and scientific methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Biology
  A. Compare and contrast science, pseudoscience, and non-science.
  B. Describe the importance of scientific methodologies.
  C. Describe the characteristics of life.
  D. Describe the basic features of evolution and the importance of evolution to biology.

II. Introduction to Ethics
  A. Compare and contrast morals and ethics.
  B. Describe the basic motivations for reasoned ethical discourse.
  C. Discuss primary secular ethical theories.
  D. Describe deontology, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  E. Describe utilitarianism, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  F. Describe religious ethics, in terms of its major points, including its strengths and weaknesses.
  G. Compare and contrast religious ethics and secular ethics as they relate to biological issues.
  H. Compare and contrast natural law, virtue, natural rights, and feminist caring in terms of their major points, strengths and weaknesses.
  I. Describe the influence of religion on the analysis of current biological issues .

III. Introduction to Case Study Analysis
  A. Describe the use of case studies as a means of preparing a reasoned ethical argument .
  B. Prepare a detailed outline of the six step analysis of an issue.
  C. Examine and discuss the salient points of sample case studies using the six step analysis.

IV. Develop and Describe a Personal Ethical Stance for the Purpose of Examining the Provided Cases 

V. Case Studies (for each of the provided cases):
  A. Identify and describe the relevant biological facts.
  B. List the salient ethical issues.
  C. Describe the available non-biological facts.
  D. Identify and describe the stakeholders.
  E. Identify and describe the values at stake.
  F. Identify and describe the possible solutions.
  G. Choose and justify the best solution and probable outcomes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

1.  The semester grade will be determined as the points accumulated by the student as a percentage of the total points possible.
2. The values of assessments are as follows:

 30-50%    Examinations
 25-35%    Case study analyses
 15-25%    Explanation of the student’s personal ethical stance/worldview
 10-20%    Attendance and participation in discussions

   Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations:
    Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching
    skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 176

  • Title: Philosophy of Religion
  • Number: PHIL 176
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is an inquiry into the nature of religion, religious thought and religious language. It addresses philosophical topics such as the nature of religious belief, the apparent need of some people for religion, the arguments offered as proof for and against the existence of God, apparent contradictions between scientific and religious teachings, special problems raised by religious language, and the changes religion and philosophy of religion have made to accommodate a modern world view. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss a variety of religious concepts and define the vocabulary that is appropriate to each of these concepts.
  2. Analyze and explain the dynamics fundamental to religious institutions and explain how theological postulates may be defended through a reasoned analysis.
  3. Identify, analyze and explain philosophical arguments offered to prove the existence of God.
  4. Identify, analyze and explain philosophical arguments offered to disprove the existence of God.
  5. Identify and explain multiple concepts of the nature of evil.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to initiate and maintain dialog on religious questions while maintaining an interest in and appreciation for alternative views.
  7. Describe and apply the philosophical understanding needed to meet the challenge posed by personal religious concerns and fundamental religious commitments.
  8. Identify and explain the traditional and contemporary perceived conflicts between science and religion.
  9. Explain possible resolutions of the perceived science/religion conflict.
  10. Describe and explain the relationship between religion and morality, and identify and explain at least two religion-based ethical theories.
  11. Explain how ethical theories can be developed without reference to religious convictions, and identify and explain at least two such theories.
  12. Define free will, and explain attempts made to make the concept of free will consistent with the concept of an omniscient God. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion
      1. Identify questions which challenge the reasonableness of
religious belief and commitment.
      2. Formulate a working definition of religion.
      3. Establish legitimate parameters of philosophical inquiry into
questions related to religion. 
      4. Examine the nature of certainty and the reasonableness of  faith
based commitments.
      5. Identify problems associated with religious language and
critically evaluate proposed resolutions of those problems.
      6.  Compare the views of Aquinas and Hume on analogy.   

II. Arguments For and Against God’s Existence
   A. The Ontological Argument
      1. Review and explain Anselm’s Formulation.
      2. Review and explain the modal version of the ontological
argument.
      3. Critically examine weaknesses and strengths of both the
traditional and contemporary ontological arguments.
   B. The Cosmological Argument
      1. Explain and evaluate the validity of the principle of sufficient
reason.
      2. Review and explain the cosmological argument.     
      3. Explain and evaluate the concept of infinite regression.
      3. Examine weaknesses and strengths of the cosmological argument.
      4. Discuss the adequacy of uncaused first cause as definitive of
God.
   C. The Teleological Argument
      1. Traditional formulations
         a. Review and explain Paley’s Watch Analogy.
         b. Review Hume’s response and critically examine the measure
and extent of its validity.
   D. The Moral Argument
      1. Formulate and evaluate the Moral Argument for the existence of
God.
   E. The Pragmatic Argument
      1. Review Pascal’s Wager and evaluate its relevance.
   F. The Problem of Evil
      1. Distinguish and evaluate the concepts of moral and physical
evil.
      2. Explain and evaluate the following traditional concepts of evil:
         a. Privation 
         b. Punishment for sin
         c. Test of faith
         d. God’s warning
         e. A challenge necessary for the building of character
   G. The Argument from Miracles and Mystical Experience
      1. Define miracle and evaluate the possibility of the existence of
miracles.
      2. Examine and evaluate Hume’s criticisms of miracles.
      3. Evaluate the existence of miracles as a reasonable proof for the
existence of God.
   H. The Argument from Mystical Experience
      1. Review James’ explanation of mystical experience.
      2. Weigh the reasonableness of the existence of mystical experience.
 Evaluate the value of such experience as a proof for the existence of
God.

III. Alternatives to Theism
   A. Explain and evaluate arguments for the conclusion that religion is
an  opiate of the people” and exposes individuals to unreasonable
manipulation.
   B. Review the evolution of materialistic concepts fundamental to
humanism.
   C. Evaluate the reasonableness of the suggestion that religion is
possible without God and that non-theistic beliefs can satisfy religious
needs.

IV. Science and Religion
   A. Identify questions which have which have brought science and
religion into conflict.
   B. Examine the religious and scientific perspectives at the root of the
disagreements with a view to evaluating the compatibility of the apparently
conflicting religious and scientific answers.

V. Morality and Religion
   A. Explain the concept of free will and discuss the possibility logical
compatibility of free will and an omniscient God.
   B. Address the question of the relationship of free will to morality.
   C. Explain religion based morality.
      1. Explain and evaluate the divine command theory.
      2. Explain and evaluate the natural law theory.
   D. Show how morality can exist without religion and discuss moral
systems which deny the existence of God.

NOTE:  Individual instructors may vary the order of the outline as it
appears here and may emphasize subtopics of the outline to the exclusion
of others.  What is assured is that this list of major topics presents the
topics to be covered in the course.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Administration of a minimum of three exams which will require students
to write essays that demonstrate understanding of essential course
material.  These exams will determine at least 60% of the grade given in
this course.  In addition, quizzes, research papers, oral reports and
other forms of objective evaluation may be used at the instructor's
discretion.

See individual instructor’s syllabus for grading scale.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 210

  • Title: History of Modern Philosophy*
  • Number: PHIL 210
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHIL 121 or PHIL 143 or HIST 125 or HIST 126.

Description:

This course takes a historical approach to the development of modern philosophy and covers the period from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. The course will cover the epistemological, metaphysical and relevant axiological issues of the major philosophers and philosophical movements of this period. The course will also examine the influence of modern philosophy on contemporary thought. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe in detail the major issues of the modern period in philosophy and describe and explain the vocabulary in which those issues were discussed.
  2. Thoroughly describe the methods modern philosophers devised to try to resolve the major issues of their times.
  3. Trace historically the discussion of the main problems of modern philosophy as it develops from its origin in the Renaissance, through the major movements of the period, such as rationalism, empiricism, and idealism, to the influence of these movements on nineteenth century philosophy.
  4. Explain the relationship between modern philosophy and both twentieth century philosophy and the development of contemporary Western social, political, and religious institutions.
  5. Display the ability to write expository and evaluative essays in a focused, informed, coherent, and thorough manner.
  6. Display the ability to read complex philosophical material interpretively.
  7. Display habits of character which contribute to academic and philosophical excellence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concepts in the History of Philosophy
   A. Distinguish between the history of philosophy, the history of ideas
and philosophy of history.
   B. Distinguish these terms and their methodologies:  science, theology,
and philosophy.
   C. Explain in what sense there is "progress" in philosophy and in what
sense there is not "progress" in philosophy.
   D. Explain the basic features of Scholastic philosophy.

II. Francis Bacon 
   A. Define "idols" and identify Bacon’s types of idols described in
Novum Organum and describe the ways they "meet and trouble us."
   B. Describe the features of Bacon's Novum Organum that qualify his
writing as "modern" or analytical philosophy and not speculative
philosophy.
   C. Give specific instances of Bacon's idols of (1) the cave, (2) the
market place, (3) the theatre, and (4) the tribe. 

III. Rene Descartes
   A. Describe the features of Descartes’ rationalism and explain what
personal experiences of his led him to adopt rationalism.
   B. Skepticism
      1. Explain Descartes' dreaming argument.
      2. Explain Descartes' evil genius argument.
      3. Define Solipsism.
      4. Explain Descartes' test for the truth of an idea.
   C. God's existence
      1. Explain the cosmological argument.
      2. Explain the teleological argument.
      3. Explain the ontological argument.
   D. Explain the argument for the conclusion that material objects
exist.
   E. Describe Descartes' analysis of the piece of wax.
   F. Explain Descartes' conclusions regarding the origin of sensory
qualities (colors, smells, etc.) of material objects.
   G. Define substance and describe the types and number of substances in
Descartes' theory of the physical universe.
   H. Evaluate the strength of Descartes' analysis of physical objects.

IV. Baruch Spinoza
   A. Describe Spinoza’s two basic criticisms of Descartes’ cogito
argument from the second Meditation.
   B. Describe Spinoza’s concept of substance and explain how
Spinoza’s concept leads him to reject Descartes’ cogito and
Descartes’ concept of extension.
   C. Describe Spinoza’s concepts of attribute and mode.
   D. Explain Spinoza’s rejection of the concept of final causality.
   E. Describe the levels or stages of human knowledge.
   F. Describe these concepts in Spinoza’s ethics:  his account of human
emotions, both passive and active, conatus, servitude, and freedom.

V. Gottfried Leibniz
   A. Describe Liebniz’s theory of knowledge, including his thinking
about:  
      1. Truths of reason
      2. Truths of fact
      3. Analytical propositions
      4. Synthetic propositions
   B. Describe the relationships between Leibniz’s grammar of
propositions and his metaphysics.
   C. Describe Leibniz’s conception of substance and explain how this
conception differs from Descartes’ and Spinoza’s conceptions of
substance.
   D. Explain these principles:
      1. Principle of sufficient reason
      2. Principle of noncontradiction
      3. Principle of identity of indiscernibles
   E. Explain these concepts in Leibniz’s theory:
      1. God
      2. Freedom
      3. Determinism

VI. John Locke
   A. Define "empiricism."
   B. Describe the connection between the appearance of empiricism and the
development of a comprehensive theory of language.
   C. Compare Hobbes’ account ofmeaning with Locke’s theory of
linguistic meaning.
   D. Describe Locke’s disagreement with Leibniz over innate ideas.
   E. Describe Locke’s theory of abstract ideas and his account of how
we acquire knowledge of the external world.
   F. Describe Locke’s theories of substance, causation, and personal
identity.

VII. George Berkeley
   A. Describe Berkeley’s position on causal relations among objects in
the external world.
   B. Describe Berkeley’s theory of ideas and the theory’s
implications for Locke’s conception of abstract ideas, Locke’s
distinction between primary and secondary qualities, and Locke’s notion
of substance.
   C. Describe Berkeley’s arguments against the existence of material
substance.
      1. Explain Berkeley’s conviction that belief in material objects
entails skepticism.
      2. Describe the chief features of the materialism which Berkeley
sought to refute.
      3. Provide the details of Berkeley’s arguments which were designed
to refute each of these chief features.
   D. Describe Berkeley’s argument for God’s existence and the
relationship between my mind, other minds, and God.

VIII. David Hume
   A. Describe the principles of Hume’s empiricism and how Hume’s
empiricism differs from that of Locke and Berkeley.
   B. Describe and explain Hume’s analysis of causation and explain how
his analysis harms the classical conception of causality.
   C. Describe the problem of induction according to Hume.
   D. Relate Hume’s analysis of propositonal truths to this theory of
knowledge.
   E. Apply Hume’s epistemology to his analysis of the concepts of soul
and personal identity.
   F. Describe Hume’s arguments against God’s existence and the notion
of miracles.
   G. Outline the principal features of Hume’s ethics.

IX. Immanuel Kant
   A. Describe the basic goals of Kant's metaphysical system.
   B. Explain the meaning of the words "symthetic a priori knowledge."
   C. Explain the sense in which Kant's epistemology "transcendental."
   D. Define and explain the epistemological significance of Kant's
"categories" of understanding.
   E. Describe these concepts in Kant: the "Transcendental Unity of
Apperception" and "Transcendental Deduction."
   F. Describe Kant's distinction between "phenomena" and "noumena."
   G. Kantian ethics
      1. Explain what a moral law is.
      2. Define "categorical imperative." Give Kant's three formulations
of the imperative and explain the difference between the formulations.
      3. Distinguish hypothetical from categorical imperatives.
      4. Describe the characteristics which make up "humanity" according
to Kant.
      5. Explain Kant's formulation "treat humanity as an end."
      6. Distinguish between the concepts of "dignity" and "price."
      7. Distinguish between "beneficence" and "duty."
      8. Distinguish an act from duty from an act in accordance with
duty.
      9. Explain Kant's application of the categorical imperative to the:
         a. Suicide case
         b. Promising case
         c. Comfortable circumstances case
         d. Each-for-himself case

X. G.W. F. Hegel
   A. Describe the criticisms which Hegel makes of Kant’s theory of the
categories of understanding.
   B. Describe Hegel’s characterization of history as spirit.
   C. Discuss Hegel’s theory dialectic and the theory’s role
explaining the character of reality.
   D. Explain the development of self-consciousness and this
development’s relation to master-slave relationships.
   E. Explain the concept of the cunning of reason.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least one of the following methods: research paper, essay, short
written answer, multiple choice questions, problem solving, or classroom
presentations. A minimum of three examinations will be given  which will
constitute no less than 60% of a student’s grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHIL 210H

No information found.

PHIL 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: PHIL 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: The student must be currently enrolled in, or have successfully completed with a grade of 'C' or higher, any of the following core PHIL courses: PHIL 121, or PHIL 143.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of philosophy not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Undertake complex readings and research in the designated topic 
  2. Define key terms and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic 
  3. Utilize research and analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study 
  4. Engage in a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the Special Topic 
  5. Develop a personal point of view about the Special Topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research, and other means. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor, and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Philosophy and Religion faculty prior to its being offered. The Arts, Humanities and Social Science Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The AHSS Division will also determine when and if the course may be taught.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods: Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = below 60%Â

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to four-year institutions as elective credit. 
  2. A student cannot take more than two Special Topics in Philosophy courses that are not cross-listed with HUM, REL, or HIST. This does not include unique and non-cross listed Special Topics 
  3. A class offered as a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).