Sociology (SOC)

Courses

SOC 122   Introduction to Sociology (3 Hours)  

Introduction to Sociology introduces students to sociology, the "science of society," and its approach to human social life. The course shows students how sociologists conduct research and describes the basic concepts and theories sociologists use to explain the social world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 122H   HON: Introduction to Sociology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

SOC 125   Social Problems (3 Hours)  

Selected social problems will be analyzed. Problems associated with race, gender, class, deviance, crime and ecology will be examined as perennial issues in contemporary society. In addition, other topics will be analyzed as they arise or as the instructor and students determine them to be significant. The history and development of each problem, as well as possible solutions, will be examined from a variety of perspectives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 125H   HON: Social Problems* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

SOC 127   Criminology (3 Hours)

This class will identify the major criminology theories. Various explanations for criminal conduct will be explored and society's responses to crime will be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. ADMJ 127 and SOC 127 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

SOC 131   Sociology of Families (3 Hours)

This is a sociological examination of marriage and the family as a social institution. It will emphasize social theory, changing roles, family formation, socialization, domestic conflict, interaction among family members and marriage partners, and the role of marriage and the family in society. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

SOC 131H   HON: Sociology of Families* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

SOC 146   Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare (3 Hours)  

This course will introduce the student to the profession of social work and to the history and development of social welfare and social service systems in the United States. This is a required introductory course in the sequence of study leading to a professional degree (BSW, MSW or DSW) in social work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 147   Social Work and Social Justice (3 Hours)

The history of social movements in the United States will be integrated into exploration of current economic, political, religious and psychosocial issues, at micro and macro practice levels, relevant to the professional practice of social work at the BSW or MSW level of practice. This course is designed to support the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) requirements for culturally competent practice. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 152   Perspectives on Aging (3 Hours)

Social aspects of aging will be identified. Areas of special interest will include research themes and demographic trends; aging and its relationship to family, the economy, politics, religion and education; the effect of cultural values on behavior; and the future of the elderly. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 165   Contemporary Chinese Society (3 Hours)

A survey of major issues and changes in Chinese society since 1949, this course focuses on social change while analyzing both continuity and change in social forces and historical processes. Social movements, political and economic change, social conflict and globalization are examined and analyzed through competing narratives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically offered in the spring semester.

SOC 180   Inequality and Diversity in The United States (3 Hours)

In modern American society, the issue of diversity is increasingly and vigorously debated. Topics like race, gender, class, sexuality are ever-present in the media and in public discourse. But what does the word "diversity" actually mean, and why does it matter? In this course, students will explore issues of inequality and diversity with attention to how power structures shape and reproduce existing systems of stratification. The course will critically examine the historical and social developments in cultural diversity and the challenges of multiculturalism. By understanding the tensions created by the social dynamics of inequality and diversity, students can begin to identify the resulting implications for capitalism and democracy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 205   Sociology of Food (3 Hours)

Through this exploration of food in society, students will discover the fundamental significance of the relationships between people and food. In studying the ways food is produced and consumed, we will also discover the ways food shapes and expresses relationships among people. This most basic of human needs is easily taken for granted by those who have plenty, while the causes of hunger are easily dismissed or misunderstood. This course will address such misunderstandings, as well as issues of culture, meaning, identity, power, and ecology, all through a focus on food. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 240   Sociology of Community (3 Hours)

In a world of instantaneous and mobile communication, many social observers and scholars suggest that community is being lost, and increasing numbers of Americans report feeling increasingly alienated from the people with whom bonds were traditionally the strongest. Taking this apparent paradox as its starting point, this course will examine the impact of macro-social forces such as economic transition, globalization, and technological advance on American communities, focusing especially on the post-Great Depression era. Students will explore the various bases on which communities are formed, as well as assessing threats to community solidarity. In its final analysis, this course will ask: Is community truly being lost, or is it simply changing form? 3hrs. lecture/wk.

SOC 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

SOC 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Sociology, not normally taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

SOC 122

  • Title: Introduction to Sociology
  • Number: SOC 122
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Introduction to Sociology introduces students to sociology, the "science of society," and its approach to human social life. The course shows students how sociologists conduct research and describes the basic concepts and theories sociologists use to explain the social world. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Show evidence of a sociological imagination.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic sociological concepts and theories.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic methods of sociological investigation and analysis.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of social structure, status, roles, groups, organizations, institutions and societies, and how they change.
  5. Recognize the role of race, ethnicity, gender and class in society.
  6. Analyze the importance of culture and cross-cultural variations. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Development of Sociological Thought

A. Outline the history of sociology.

B. Recognize and describe major sociological perspectives.

C. Recognize and describe sociological research methods and related ethical issues.

II. The Individual, Culture and Society

A. Recognize the components of both material and non-material culture.

B. Define norms and values.

C. Recognize the significance of language, cultural variation and cultural change.

D. Analyze the components of social structure and their significance, including status, role, groups, organizations and institutions.

E. Describe the process of socialization.

F. Identify the key agents of socialization.

G. Analyze social interaction in everyday life.

H. Distinguish the various types of groups and other collectivities.

I. Identify significant sociological explanations of deviant behavior.

III. Social Stratification

A. Differentiate among systems of social stratification such as caste and class.

B. Recognize aspects of social mobility.

C. Demonstrate knowledge of major theories of social stratification.

D. Describe the American class system.

E. Recognize race as a social construction.

F. Appreciate the significance of ethnicity.

G. Differentiate between prejudice and discrimination.

H. Identify patterns of racism in social structure and ideology.

I. Differentiate between sex and gender.

J. Identify gender roles.

K. Identify patterns of sexism in social structure and ideology.

L. Identify patterns of ageism in social structure and ideology.

IV. Social Institutions

A. Recognize the variations in marriage and family forms.

B. Recognize the various sociological approaches to religion.

C. Analyze the variations of the economic structure.

D. Analyze the structures of power and political systems.

E. Describe features of other major institutions, such as education, mass media and medicine.

V. Social Change

A. Describe the processes of urbanization and population change.

B. Differentiate major theories of collective behavior and social movements.

C. Describe other major theories of social and cultural change.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

33-80% of grade:    Exams
10-33% of grade:    Writing Assignments
0-33% of grade:      Attendance and/or Participation
0-33% of grade:      Projects and/or Other Assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 122H

No information found.

SOC 125

  • Title: Social Problems
  • Number: SOC 125
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Selected social problems will be analyzed. Problems associated with race, gender, class, deviance, crime and ecology will be examined as perennial issues in contemporary society. In addition, other topics will be analyzed as they arise or as the instructor and students determine them to be significant. The history and development of each problem, as well as possible solutions, will be examined from a variety of perspectives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain how social problems are constructed and defined from a sociological perspective.
  2. Differentiate between what constitutes a "social" problem versus an individual problem.
  3. Analyze the micro and macro dimensions of social problems utilizing sociological theories and methods.
  4. Describe how social problems are associated with patterns of social inequality.
  5. Evaluate the relationships between social problems and the policies and practices of social institutions.
  6. Assess the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to a social problem utilizing a sociological perspective.
  7. Demonstrate an ability to think critically about social problems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Race and Ethnic Issues

A. Define and discuss the concept social construction of race.

B. Apply sociological perspectives to the social dynamics of racism and racial oppression.

C. Recognize the social dynamics of inter-ethnic/racial relations.

D. Analyze race and ethnic issues in global context.

E. Critically analyze solutions to identified racial and ethnic issues.

II. Issues of Gender and Sexuality

A. Define and discuss the concept of social construction of gender.

B. Define and discuss the concept of social construction of sexuality and sexual orientation.

C. Apply sociological perspectives to the social dynamics of sexism and heterocentrism.

D. Recognize aspects of gender liberation and the gay rights movement.

E. Analyze issues of gender and sexuality in global context.

F. Critically analyze solutions to identified issues of gender and sexuality.

III. Issues of Class and Caste

A. Define and analyze the social class system.

B. Distinguish between caste and class systems.

C. Apply sociological perspectives to the social dynamics of poverty.

D. Analyze social class issues in global context.

E. Critically analyze solutions to identified issues of class and caste.

III. Deviance and Crime

A. Apply sociological perspectives to the social dynamics of deviance.

B. Define and discuss crime as a specific form of deviance.

C. Analyze problems associated with crime and the criminal justice system.

D. Apply sociological perspectives to the social dynamics of substance abuse.

E. Critically analyze solutions to identified issues of deviance and crime.

IV. Ecological Issues

A. Define and analyze problems associated with urbanization.

B. Identify social problems and ecological issues associated with population growth.

C. Examine problems associated with environmental degradation.

D. Critically analyze solutions to identified ecological issues.

V. Other social problems

A. Define and analyze other issues as social problems by applying a sociological perspective.

B. Critically analyze solutions to identified social problems.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  1. Between two and four exams stressing analytical and evaluative
    approaches to course content.
  2. From one to several research, topical or responsive papers.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Each full-time faculty member individually selects her or his own required text(s).
  2. Adjunct faculty members must choose one of the required texts used by full-time faculty members.
  3. Individual instructors may select supplemental texts or materials to complement the principal text(s) in their assigned sections. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 125H

No information found.

SOC 127

  • Title: Criminology
  • Number: SOC 127
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This class will identify the major criminology theories. Various explanations for criminal conduct will be explored and society's responses to crime will be examined. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. ADMJ 127 and SOC 127 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the major theories of criminology.

  2. Discuss current methodologies for measuring criminal conduct.

  3. Categorize criminal conduct using criminological theories.

  4. Debate the causation of criminal conduct using the major theories of criminology.

  5. Examine types of crime.

  6. Explore cultural issues relating to crime.

  7. Identify ethical issues in criminology.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Criminology and Crime

   A. Describe the historical foundation of criminology.

      1. Explain the classic approach to criminology.

      2. Describe the Marxist/conflict tradition.

      3. Explain biological positivism.

      4. List the sociological contributions to criminology.

   B. Identify the forms of crime data.

      1. List the different methods of measuring criminal conduct.

      2. Evaluate the methodologies used to measure crime.

      3. Analyze trends in the crime data.

   C. Describe factors that influence crime rates

   D. Analyze gender, racial and cultural patterns in crime.

   E. Analyze chronic offending and its causes.

   F. Victimology

     1. Discuss theories of victimization.

     2. Relate the victim’s role in the crime process.

     3. Explain the cycle of violence.

II. Theories of Crime Causation

   A. Explain rational choice theory.

      1. Distinguish between general and specific deterrence.

      2. Explain the policy implications of choice theory.

   B. Describe the trait approach.

      1. Discuss crime from a biological perspective.

      2. Identify the psychological theories of crime.

      3. Evaluate the relationship between intelligence and criminal conduct.

   C. Identify social structure theories.

      1. Explain the theories of social structure.

      2. Evaluate the link between social structure theories and social

         policy.

   D. Discuss social process theories.

      1. Classify the branches of social process theory used in criminology.

         a. Analyze crime from the perspective of social learning theory.

         b. Relate social control theory as an explanation of crime.

         c. Defend labeling theory as an explanation of crime.

      2. Explain the relationship between social process theories of

         criminology and social policy.

   E. Examine social conflict theories.

      1. Identify the basic elements of Marxist theory.

      2. Discuss the variations of the Marxist approaches to criminology.

      3. Explain modern conflict theory.

      4. Trace the development of social conflict theory in criminology.

   F. Describe developmental theories.

   1. Explain the history of developmental theory.

   2. Summarize the principles of the life course approach to

      developmental theory.

   3. Discuss the problem behavior syndrome. 

III. Crime Typology

      A. Examining violent crime.

        1. Differentiate criminology and deviance.

        2. Debate the root causes of violence in society.

        3. Distinguish the different forms of violent criminal behavior.

   B. Assessing public order crimes.

      1. Explain the term social harm.

      2. Discuss human trafficking and commercial sex workers.

      3. Debate the causes of substance dependence.

   C. Categorizing economic crimes.

      1. Compare white-collar and green-collar crimes.

      2. Discuss the different forms of theft.

   C. Explaining political crime.

      1. List the different types of political crimes.

      2. Identify the causes of political crime.

   D. Classifying terrorism.

      1. Discuss the motivations for terrorism.

      2. Identify the forms of terrorism.

   E. Describing cybercrime.

      1. List the different types of cybercrimes.

      2. Discuss efforts to control cybercrime.

   F. Assessing transnational organized crime.

      1. Describe the evolution of transnational organized crime.

      2. Discuss the activities of transnational organized criminals.

IV. Society’s Response to Crime

    A. Describe the criminal justice process.

    B. Discuss the different purposes of criminal law.

    C. Identify ethical issues in criminology.

    D. Review the linkage between the correctional system and the rule of law.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Assignments                         40%-50%

Examinations/quizzes          40%-50%

Attendance/participation       0%-20%

Total                                          100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Individual instructors of ADMJ 127 may select supplemental texts or materials to complement the principal text(s) in their assigned sections.
  2. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 131

  • Title: Sociology of Families
  • Number: SOC 131
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This is a sociological examination of marriage and the family as a social institution. It will emphasize social theory, changing roles, family formation, socialization, domestic conflict, interaction among family members and marriage partners, and the role of marriage and the family in society. 3 hrs.lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify basic sociological concepts and theories used to study the family.
  2. Describe the diversity of family structure. Demonstrate an understanding of the stresses created by the values of individuals and the requirements of modern marriage.
  3. Cite the relationship between gender roles and marital roles.
  4. Illustrate, using example, the social process and ritual connected with dating, courtship and mate selection.
  5. Explain sexual relationships and domestic intimacy.
  6. Explain problems of adjustment and conflict in the marriage and the growing family.
  7. Elaborate on modern patterns of bearing and rearing children.
  8. Analyze the aging process as it affects the family.
  9. Determine from the literature how social change in the wider society affects domestic institutions. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Comparative and Historical Perspectives
   A. Explain the family from a sociological perspective.
   B. Describe sociological approaches to studying the family.
   C. Explain social facts impacting life in families.
   D. Recognize the distinction between sex and gender.
   E. Describe the uses of a sociological view of the family.
   F. Describe the basic features of marriages and families.
   G. Analyze the family as a system of property and legal relations.
   H. Explain differences in forms of marriage and family.
   I. Recognize families within major types of societies that have existed
in various parts of the world in different historical periods.
   J. Describe the sociological theories explaining gender stratification
in societies.
   K. Recognize the importance of connecting love and marriage in making
what's called the modern family.
   L. Describe political and economic restrictions concerning love in the
selection of marriage partners.
   M. Appreciate the Victorian revolution and the creation of a sexual
double standard.

II. Diversity in Modern Families
    A. Analyze what is happening to the modern family from a sociological
perspective.
    B. Explain the sociological causes of long-term social changes.
    C. Analyze family forms in relation to social stratification and
wealth.
    D. Describe the mixture of social class systems in American society.
    E. Recognize and explain the different family forms among selected
racial and ethnic groups.

III. Love and Family
   A. Explain romantic love from a sociological perspective.
   B. Describe the importance of the marriage market in explaining who
marries whom.
   C. Analyze sex as an interaction ritual.

IV. Family Realities
   A. Identify, sociologically, who gets more out of marriage and explain why.
   B. Analyze the home as a workplace.
   C. Identify the social relations determining the distribution of power in the family.
   D. Identify sources of marital conflict.
   E. Describe the importance of good communication skills.
   F. Understand the impact of employment on the family.
   G. Identify the place of childhood using a historical and sociological perspective.
   H. Analyze the family as an organization of parenting.
   I. Explain historical changes in fertility rates from a sociological perspective.
   J. Describe the impact of children on marriages and partnerships.
   K. Discuss the impact of social class on parenting.
   L. Analyze social conditions influencing violence in American society.
   M. Describe the social realities of spouse, child and elder abuse.

V. Family Changes
   A. Identify the social facts influencing divorce in American society.
   B. Describe the features of single life after divorce.
   C. Explain the impact of divorce on children.
   D. Demonstrate familiarity with the social facts influencing re-marriage patterns in American society.
   E. Explain variations in the life course.
   F. Identify major transitions individuals experience in the life course and how those transitions are marked by rituals.
   G. Discuss the links across generations.
   H. Describe the main trends of family life in American society.
   I. Discuss the family relative to the state and social policy.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

  • Examinations: 1 to 4
  • Quizzes: Discretion of the instructor
  • Papers: 1 to 3

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 131H

No information found.

SOC 146

  • Title: Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare
  • Number: SOC 146
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will introduce the student to the profession of social work and to the history and development of social welfare and social service systems in the United States. This is a required introductory course in the sequence of study leading to a professional degree (BSW, MSW or DSW) in social work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and describe social work - what it is, what it does and with whom, in what areas of human functioning, in what context and with what focus.

  2. Compare and contrast social work from other helping professions (e.g., psychology, psychiatry, applied sociology).

  3. Identify common fields of generalist practice at the various levels of social work interventions (e.g., individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities).

  4. Identify major economic, political, social and religious factors in Euro-American history and current issues which impact social policy in the United States.

  5. Identify the core professional values and ethical principles of social work, as articulated by NASW code of ethics, and contrast them to one's personal values and ethics as well as those of broader society.

  6. Identify and critically examine the philosophical and historical roots of social work and Social Welfare.

  7. Identify and examine social and economic justice issues addressed by the social work and social welfare profession, especially those related to poverty, inequality, racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism and other forms of oppression at the micro, mezzo and macro levels.

  8. Identify core theories and research that guide social work and social welfare policies, frameworks, perspectives and generalist practice methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Definition of the Profession: A Values Based Profession

A. Identify the difference between professional social work, the institution of social welfare, social service delivery systems, charity, mutual aid, volunteering and service-learning.

B. Differentiate the profession of social work from other helping professions and occupations.

C. Identify the educational requirements to obtain a BSW, MSW or DSW.

D. Cite the requirements to obtain a clinical license to practice independently and do third-party billing.

E. Cite the requirements for continuing education (CE).

F. Explain the importance of the NASW Code of Ethics.

II. History of Social Welfare

A. Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of the English Statutes of Laborers (1346) and the Elizabethan Poor Laws (1601) to current social welfare policies.

B. Identify major historical milestones in the development of the institution of social welfare in the U.S.

C. Define the institutional and residual perspectives of social welfare.

D. Differentiate between public welfare, social insurance and universal provision of social services.

E. Differentiate between public sector and private sector social service delivery systems.

F. Identify major societal religious, political and economic factors that have preceded the current status of social welfare systems in the U.S.

III. History of the Profession

A. Identify and describe the historical, philosophical and ethical history of the profession.

B. Describe the historical context in which social work, as a profession, emerged in the U.S.

C. Cite the core values as stated in the NASW Code of Ethics.

D. Describe the centrality of the Code of Ethics in the practice of social work.

E. Define and identify micro, mezzo and macro levels of intervention.

F. Discuss systems theory and the ecological perspective.

IV. The Interface of Social Work, the Institution of Social Welfare, Polity, Economy and Religion in the U.S.

A. Identify at least five federally mandated social welfare programs and the general parameters for eligibility in the last year.

B. Describe the congruence and dissonance between the values and ethics of the profession and the development of the institution of social welfare in the U.S.

C. Discuss ethical dilemmas.

V. Current Social Issues and Fields of Social Work Practice

A. Recognize class, race, religion, marital status, ethnic background, gender, ability, age, sexual orientation, gender orientation, physical ability and mental ability issues for psychosocial assessment and intervention at micro, mid-level and macro levels.

B. Discuss ethical concerns related to work with diverse populations.

C. Identify at least 10 fields of social work practice.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20%    10-15 homework assignments/take-home quizzes 
20%    Participation in class discussions and projects 
20%    Service-Learning 
20%    One individual research paper, per APA format 
20%    Final project 

Total = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Service-Learning is a requirement. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 147

  • Title: Social Work and Social Justice
  • Number: SOC 147
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

The history of social movements in the United States will be integrated into exploration of current economic, political, religious and psychosocial issues, at micro and macro practice levels, relevant to the professional practice of social work at the BSW or MSW level of practice. This course is designed to support the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) requirements for culturally competent practice. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe the philosophical and historical roots of the profession of Social Work in relationship to cultural diversity and social justice movements in the United States.
  2. Identify major historical and current economic, political, social and religious factors, and current issues that impact public policy in the U.S.
  3. Identify major economic, political, social and religious factors in Euro-American history, current issues and the impact on diverse populations within the U.S.
  4. Recognize the impact of major social movements in the U.S., and the contributions of individual social activists and Social Workers to the current status of the profession of Social Work.
  5. Explain the centrality of the Social Work Code of Ethics in the development and current practice of the profession.
  6. Explain the centrality of ethical behavior in the profession and be able to describe the relevance of the Code of Ethics to Social Work concerns related to class, race, gender, ability, sexual orientation, age, marital status, religious preference and other factors which impact the "person in the environment" in which they live.
  7. Identify diversity issues within the context of the Strengths Perspective utilized by professional social workers.
  8. Identify diversity issues within the context of Systems Theory.
  9. Describe the Person-in-Environment assessment methodology. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Socialization to the Profession and the Profession's Commitment to
Culturally Competent Practice
   A. Describe the origins of the profession and the populations served.
   B. Identify the mission of the profession and the centrality of the
Code of Ethics to the profession.
   C. Identify the ethical principles and values of the profession as
stated in the Code of Ethics.
   D. Discuss the profession's concerns and ethical mandates related to
cultural and ethnic diversity, discrimination, oppression, poverty and
other forms of social injustice.

II. Framework for Practice with Diverse and Oppressed People
   A. Define the Strengths Perspective utilized by professional social
workers.
   B. Describe the Ecological Perspective.
   C. Describe Systems Theory.
   D. Recognize and describe the parameters of the Person-in-Environment
assessment model.
   E. Define culture, social identify development and cultural
relativism.
   F. Define micro, mezzo and macro level assessment and intervention
methods.
   G. Recognize and identify micro, mezzo and macro level intervention
methods in historical and current social justice movements.

III. Analyses of Social Institutions and Social Policy
   A. Define polity, economy, religion and social welfare.
   B. Identify social groups included in the U.S. Constitution, past and
present.
   C. Define: stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
   D. Differentiate between stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination.
   E. Describe the interplay between stereotypes, prejudice and
discrimination and the outcomes of each.
   F. Differentiate between individual and institutionalized
discrimination.   
   G. Identify the major provisions of the Civil Rights Law of 1964, the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Employment Non-Discrimination
Act, and hate crimes legislation.
   H. Identify federal, state and city level agencies designated to review
complaints of discrimination and enforce the provisions of civil rights
laws.

IV. Socioeconomic Stratification and Class Status
   A. Describe socioeconomic stratification in the U.S.
   B. Recognize the interface of socioeconomic stratification and class
differentiation. 
   C. Identify at least two major social justice movements that have
changed national public policies regarding people in lower socioeconomic
classes. 
   D. Describe micro level assessment issues and intervention methods.
   E. Identify at least two current social justice issues related to class
stratification.

V. Religion and Spirituality
   A. Identify at least nine major religions.
   B. Define religeocentrism. 
   C. Differentiate between religion and spirituality.
   D. Describe the major tenets and most important/holy days of two
religions/spiritual beliefs.
   E. Appreciate the importance of examining one's own beliefs and
congruency with the Social Work Code of Ethics. 
   F. Describe the practice implication of self-awareness regarding one's
own belief system.

VI. Sexism and Gender Roles in Euro-American History
   A. Define and differentiate between biological gender, gender roles and
sexism.
   B. Describe the interplay of polity, religion and economics in relation
to differential gender roles, marital status and class status. 
   C. Identify levels of intervention and strategies used in the three
waves of the women's movement.
   D. Describe macro level issues related to the feminization of poverty
and violence against women.
   E. Describe micro level issues in the context of the Strengths
Perspective.
   F. Recognize current social justice issues. 

VII. Cultural Identification, Ethnicity and Race
   A. Define culture, race and ethnicity.
   B. Describe the interplay of polity, religion and economics in relation
to social roles and class status.
   C. Identify levels of intervention and strategies used in at least two
ethnic/racial/culturally based social justice movements in the U.S.
   D. Describe at least two current macro level issues.
   E. Recognize micro level issues within the context of the Strengths
Perspective.

VIII. Physical and Mental Ability
   A. Differentiate between functional ability and socially imposed
disability.
   B. Identify societal barriers to independent function.
   C. Recognize the relationship between self-identification and socially
imposed roles.
   D. Identify levels of intervention and strategies used in at least one
social justice movement. 
   E. Identify two current macro level issues.
   F. Recognize micro level issues within the context of the Strengths
Perspective.

IX. Gender and Sexual Orientation
   A. Define heterocentrism, heterosexism and homophobia.
   B. Differentiate between biological gender, gender identity and sexual
orientation.
   C. Recognize the historical interface of polity and religion and the
impact at the micro and macro levels.
   D. Identify two current macro level challenges.
   E. Recognize micro level issues within the context of the Strengths
Perspective.

X. Age
   A. Define ageism.
   B. Describe stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination in relation to
age.
   C. Recognize the historical interface of polity and religion and the
impact at the micro and macro levels.
   D. Recognize micro level issues within the context of the Strengths
Perspective. 
   E. Identify two current macro level challenges.

XI. Affirmative Practice
   A. Recognize practice implications in regard to cultural diversity and
environmental issues.
   B. Recognize worldviews re: polity, economy, religion and social
welfare.
   C. Appreciate global concerns related to the environment, polity,
economy, religion, social welfare and social justice.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   20% of grade   10-15 homework assignments and/or take-home quizzes
   20% of grade   Participation in class discussions and projects
   20% of grade   Service learning 
   20% of grade   Individual research paper (APA format)
   20% of grade   Final project

Grading Criteria:
   90% - 100 = A
   80% -  89 = B
   70% -  79 = C
   60% -  69 = D
    0% -  59 = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Service Learning is required. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 152

  • Title: Perspectives on Aging
  • Number: SOC 152
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Social aspects of aging will be identified. Areas of special interest will include research themes and demographic trends; aging and its relationship to family, the economy, politics, religion and education; the effect of cultural values on behavior; and the future of the elderly. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the various perspectives on aging which have been proposed by the fields of sociology, psychology and biology.
  2. Formulate informed ideas about the older population using current scientific research material.
  3. Discuss intelligently and pose possible solutions to the many issues and challenges an older population presents for the society at large.
  4. Be able to dispel the stereotypical myths about aging, particularly distinguishing between the effects of ill health and the effects of the aging processes.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge about the diversity of the older population.
  6. Demonstrate an ability to research a specific topic in aging, and orally, or in a written report, present the findings to the class in a professional and intelligent manner. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Emergence of Gerontology
   A. Trace demographic trends over time.
   B. Explain the challenges of an aging population.
   C. Contrast the myths in the public perception of aging with reality.

II. Theoretical Perspectives of Aging
   A. Examine the interplay between research and theory.
   B. Analyze and demonstrate knowledge of the following theories:
      1. Disengagement theory.
      2. Activity theory.
      3. Human development theories.
      4. Continuity theory.
      5. Age stratification theory.
      6. Exchange theory.
      7. Symbolic interaction labeling perspective.

III. Cross-Cultural and Historical Approach to Aging
   A. Explain the demographic transition and its relationship to the
world's aging population.
   B. Study aspects of Modernization theory.
   C. Recognize determinants of the status of the aged.
   D. Examine cross-cultural effects on the position of elders in
society.

IV. Physiology and Biological Correlates of Aging
   A. Demonstrate an awareness of changes in physiology due to aging.
   B. Compare and contrast biological theories of aging.
   C. Differentiate health-related changes from aging changes.
   D. Summarize the sociological aspects of health as related to the aging
process.

V. Psychological Variations in Elders
   A. Examine performance and psychological changes.
   B. Contrast personality stability with change in personality over
time.
   C. Describe age identity and its effects on self-perception in later
life.

VI. Norms, Constraints and Socialization in Later Life
   A. Describe the normative constraints for the aged.
   B. Examine societal attitudes toward old age.
   C. Differentiate adjustment to old age in various social classes.
   D. Explore gender differences in longevity.

VII. Minority Groups and the Aging Process
   A. Identify the demographic characteristics of various groups.
   B. Examine the subcultural and value differences in approaches to
aging.
   C. Describe the characteristics of aging for Asian Americans.
   D. Describe the aging process for Native Americans.

VIII. Changing Roles in Later Life
   A. Analyze the following life situations:
      1. The marital relationship.
      2. Intergenerational relations.
      3. Grandparenthood.
      4. Widowhood.
      5. Second marriages and alternative life-styles.
      6. Retirement.

IX. Effects of Living Environments on Elders
   A. Debate the residential segregation of the aged issue.
   B. Explore factors of design and environment in housing for elderly.
   C. Ascertain residential choices for the aged.
   D. Analyze the effects of institutionalization and relocation on
elders.
   E. Construct sociability with isolation for elders.

X. The Economics of Aging
   A. Summarize the needs of older Americans.
   B. Ascertain the sources of income for elders.
   C. Analyze the relationship between poverty and aging.
   D. Describe the effects of inflation on the income of elders.

XI. Exploitation of the Aged
   A. Examine the criminal victimization of elders.
   B. Identify confidence games and frauds which exploit elders.
   C. Demonstrate knowledge of abuse of elders.

XII. Politics and the Aged
   A. Review the political participation of elders.
   B. Analyze intergenerational conflict.
   C. Examine the correlation between political conservatism and age.
   D. Learn about social services available for older Americans.
   E. Explore the future direction of service programs.

XIII. Religion and Aging
   A. Identify the relationship between church attendance and age.
   B. Compare religious ritualism with private devotionalism.
   C. Explore the relation between religiosity and life satisfaction.
   D. Clarify the role of the aged in churches.

XIV. Future Issues of the Aged
   A. Examine the future of the gerontological discipline in the following
areas:
      1. Theory of aging.
      2. Health-related issues.
      3. Retirement issues.
      4. Family issues.
      5. Post-industrial society.
      6. Values.
      7. Government services.

OPTIONAL CONTENT:

Guest speakers on relevant issues.

Field trips to various institutions or agencies providing services for the
older population.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. Three exams that will include multiple choice and short essay
questions.  (50% of total grade)
2. A final exam.  (25% of grade)
3. A research project presented in class (including a typed detailed
outline and page of references) or a 7-10 page typed research paper.  (25%
of grade)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 165

  • Title: Contemporary Chinese Society
  • Number: SOC 165
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

A survey of major issues and changes in Chinese society since 1949, this course focuses on social change while analyzing both continuity and change in social forces and historical processes. Social movements, political and economic change, social conflict and globalization are examined and analyzed through competing narratives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. This course is typically offered in the spring semester.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify traditional aspects of Chinese social structure and culture, and trace continuity and change in these since 1949.
  2. Summarize significant events in Chinese history that have shaped contemporary development.
  3. Outline the major social conflicts characterizing the Maoist and Reform periods.
  4. Discuss the effects of globalization on contemporary Chinese society.
  5. Analyze contemporary China's position with respect to democracy and human rights, including the special rights of minority nationalities.
  6. Evaluate the effects of developments in the social structure, state and economy on the daily lives of individuals, as well as the impact of social practice at the micro level on issues at the macro level, such as the rural/urban divide, gender, corruption and democracy.
  7. Assess the prospects for future developments in China, focusing on corruption, globalization, minority nationalities and the environment.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Tradition and History: China Before the Contemporary Period

A. Trace significant geographical influences on Chinese history.

B. Outline historical developments leading up to the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, including the growth of nationalism in response to domination by foreign powers.

C. Summarize major conflicting social relations, both internal and external, in Chinese society culminating in the Communist Revolution.

II. Social Movements and Change in the State and Economy in the Early Periods of Contemporary China

A. Outline the structure of the Chinese Communist Party and the State.

B. Describe and evaluate the causes and consequences of the two major periods of contentious politics during the Maoist period.

1. Great Leap Forward

2. Cultural Revolution

C. Discuss the initiation of political and economic changes when Deng Xiaoping rose to power (the Reform period).

D. Describe the social responses to the early Reform period, leading up to and culminating in the Tiananmen Square movement.

III. China Today and the Contradictions of Globalization

A. Describe China's entry into the global economy as a result of the development of "socialism with Chinese characteristics" and market socialism in the Reform period.

B. Discuss the social tensions resulting from rising inequality in the Reform period.

C. Analyze the causes and effects of the "floating population" in contemporary China.

IV. China, Democracy and Human Rights

A. Analyze expressions of desire for greater democracy in the post-Tiananmen movement period.

B. Explain the position of the Chinese Communist Party with respect to democracy and human rights in socialism.

C. Discuss issues of human rights, the special status of minority nationalities and Chinese relations with the global community of nations with respect to these issues.

V. Social Change and Everyday Life in Contemporary China

A. Identify aspects of traditional Chinese culture in contemporary life.

B. Evaluate the growing disparity between rural and urban areas and its impact on the daily lives of the Chinese people.

C. Contrast the status of women in the Reform period with that in the Maoist and pre-revolutionary periods.

D. Examine ways in which the everyday practices of Chinese people reproduce policies and social change at the macro level, such as

1. Attacks on authority and opportunism in the Cultural Revolution

2. Entrepreneurship and hyper-consumerism in the Reform period

E. Discuss the growing significance of the Internet and media in daily life and as a vehicle for contentious politics.

F. Compare and contrast examples of intergenerational conflict in the Maoist and Reform periods.

G. Evaluate the paradox that rebellion is a traditional bulwark of macro-stability in China, but revolution is rare.

VI. Prospects for the Future of Chinese Society

A. Assess the future development of tensions resulting from corruption at the local and higher levels.

B. Discuss likely resolution of continuing conflict over the status of minority nationalities and semi-autonomous areas, including Xinjiang and Tibet, and compare and contrast these issues with the question of Taiwan.

C. Describe the position of China in the process of globalization and the effects of Chinese development on globalization.

D. Explain the effects of the One Child Policy on demographic structure in China today and the likely impacts on generational tensions in the next few decades.

E. Analyze major ecological issues facing China in the 21st century, especially current and future impacts of global climate change.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-50% of grade:    Discussion
20-30% of grade:    Examinations
20-30% of grade:    Projects/Assignments
Total = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 180

  • Title: Inequality and Diversity in The United States
  • Number: SOC 180
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

In modern American society, the issue of diversity is increasingly and vigorously debated. Topics like race, gender, class, sexuality are ever-present in the media and in public discourse. But what does the word "diversity" actually mean, and why does it matter? In this course, students will explore issues of inequality and diversity with attention to how power structures shape and reproduce existing systems of stratification. The course will critically examine the historical and social developments in cultural diversity and the challenges of multiculturalism. By understanding the tensions created by the social dynamics of inequality and diversity, students can begin to identify the resulting implications for capitalism and democracy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the dimensions of diversity and inequality, including race, class, and gender, addressing its historical development, stratification, and distribution.
  2. Identify the dynamics of diversity and inequality in identity construction.
  3. Critically analyze the structural basis of inequality.
  4. Apply currently prevailing theoretical perspectives to understand contemporary issues.
  5. Critically assess how diversity occurs and how inequality exists in major social institutions (e.g., political, economic, and cultural).
  6. Articulate how inequalities shape social interaction, including the reproduction of inequality and the production of social movements and resistance challenging inequality.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dimensions of Inequality 
   A. Define inequality as a sociological concept.
   B. Discuss American values regarding equality and inequality.
   C. List important dimensions of inequality in the United States.

II. Economic Inequality and Class Stratification
   A. Identify trends in the distribution of wealth and income.
   B. Discuss the concept of class and identify theories of class structure.
   C. Identify the power structures of class.
   D. Discuss the various historical, economic, and political developments that have shaped US class dynamics.
   E. Discuss class inequality in other social institutions, including education, criminal justice, and the family. 

III. Racial Inequality
   A. Describe the demographics of race.
   B. Discuss the social construction of race in historic and linguistic terms.
   C. Discuss theories of racial stratification.
   D. Identify the power structures of race.
   E. Discuss white privilege and the invisibility of whiteness.
   F. Discuss the various economic, political, and cultural developments that have shaped US racial dynamics.
   G. Discuss racial inequality in other social institutions, including education, criminal justice, and the family.

IV. Gender
   A. Describe the demographics of gender.
   B. Discuss the history of the social construction of gender roles.
   C. Discuss theories of gender and gender stratification.
   D. Discuss the patriarchal structures of the United States.
   E. Discuss male privilege.
   F. Discuss the various economic, political, and cultural developments that have shaped US gender dynamics.
   G. Discuss gender inequality in other social institutions, including education, criminal justice, and the family.
 
V. Sexuality
   A. Identify trends in the social construction of sexuality in the United States.
   B. Describe the dimensions of sexes and sexuality.
   C. Explain the significance of power and violence in the social control of sexuality.
   D. Discuss the concept of heteronormativity and theoretical perspectives on sexuality such as queer theory.
   E. Discuss sexuality in culture and other social institutions, including education, criminal justice, and the family.

VI. Other Dimensions of Inequality
   A. Discuss issues and trends in structural inequality based on age.
   B. Discuss issues and trends in structural inequality based on ability.
   C. Discuss inequalities in other areas of social life, such as countercultural lifestyles, religious beliefs, and geographical location.

VII. Inequality and Diversity 
   A. Discuss the significance of social movements in the history of inequality in the United States.
   B. Explain the meaning of intersectionality and its theoretical significance in understanding the dynamics of inequality in American society.
   C. Explore the development of the concept of diversity and its role in the evolution of inequalities in the United States.
   D. Analyze the tensions between capitalism and democracy in the United States and their implications for further developments regarding inequality and diversity.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, exams, and other assignments. 
A minimum of 2 Exams (40% - 80%); one or more written assignments (10% - 40%); attendance, participation, group projects or other assignments (0% - 50%).

Grade Criteria: 
A = 90 - 100% 
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69% 
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 205

  • Title: Sociology of Food
  • Number: SOC 205
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Through this exploration of food in society, students will discover the fundamental significance of the relationships between people and food. In studying the ways food is produced and consumed, we will also discover the ways food shapes and expresses relationships among people. This most basic of human needs is easily taken for granted by those who have plenty, while the causes of hunger are easily dismissed or misunderstood. This course will address such misunderstandings, as well as issues of culture, meaning, identity, power, and ecology, all through a focus on food. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the fundamental significance of food in shaping the human species, cultures, and societies.
  2. Outline the history of food production in human societies.
  3. Discuss the social construction of food as a form of cultural expression.
  4. Identify the significance of food in the formation of individual identity.
  5. Compare and contrast popular and scientific explanations for the concurrent existence of epidemic hunger and obesity in the world today.
  6. Compare and contrast popular social constructions and scientific approaches to the relationship between food and health.
  7. Assess the ecological implications of the current global food system.
  8. Discuss the various social movements that have developed with a focus on the production and consumption of food. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Food, Culture and Society
   A. Explain the significance of diet in the evolution of the human
species.
   B. Discuss the development of agriculture and the domestication of
plants and animals as factors shaping human cultures.

II. Food and History
   A. Identify the processes shaping the transformation from subsistence
production to modern commodity centered agriculture.
   B. Discuss the role of colonialism in changing food production and
consumption patterns throughout the world.
   C. Explain the significance of food production in the structure of
modern society.
   D. Describe the globalized food system as it exists today.

III. Food and Identity
   A. Describe the role of food as a source of identity in four
contemporary cultures.
   B. Discuss the perceived and real differences in food consumption based
on social class.
   C. Identify and explore choices of diet as sources of personal identity
and ethics, such as vegetarianism.
   D. Compare and contrast the relationship between gender identity and
the production and consumption of food in traditional and contemporary
societies.

IV. Hunger and Obesity
   A. List and describe popular explanations for hunger in American
society, as found in the mass media.
   B. List and describe popular explanations for global hunger, as found
in the mass media.
   C. Explain the causes of hunger using social scientific analysis.
   D. List and describe popular explanations for obesity in rich societies
like the United States, as found in the mass media.
   E. Explain the relationship between hunger and obesity in contemporary
society.

V. Food and Health
   A. Discuss popular understandings of the relationships between
nutrition, diet, and health based on issues in the mass media.
   B. Explore current scientific understanding of the relationships
between nutrition, diet, and health.
   C. Identify and explore the connections between gender and diet in
American society.
   D. Contrast the causes of eating disorders with the causes of hunger.

VI. The Global Food System and Ecology
   A. Trace the impact of human food production on ecosystems through
history.
   B. Discuss current ecological crises, particularly global climate
change, and their relationship to food.
   C. Identify the components of a sustainable food system.

VII. Food Related Social Movements
   A. Describe the historical development of organic and sustainable
agriculture movements.
   B. Discuss the development of alternative food marketing systems,
including food coops, farmers markets, community gardens, and community
supported agriculture.
   C. Explore examples of these movements in your area.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

At least two take-home essay exams, 40-50%.
At least two projects, 10-20%.
Food journal, 10-20%.
Term paper, 30-40%.
Class participation, 10-20%.
 
Scale:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F = < 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 240

  • Title: Sociology of Community
  • Number: SOC 240
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

In a world of instantaneous and mobile communication, many social observers and scholars suggest that community is being lost, and increasing numbers of Americans report feeling increasingly alienated from the people with whom bonds were traditionally the strongest. Taking this apparent paradox as its starting point, this course will examine the impact of macro-social forces such as economic transition, globalization, and technological advance on American communities, focusing especially on the post-Great Depression era. Students will explore the various bases on which communities are formed, as well as assessing threats to community solidarity. In its final analysis, this course will ask: Is community truly being lost, or is it simply changing form? 3hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the significance of community in human social life.
  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of community as a social construct.
  3. Describe the internal dynamics of community, including diversity, identity, and structure.
  4. Analyze the social and global factors affecting community persistence and change.
  5. Evaluate the extent to which community is being lost in American social life.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Defining community
   A. Trace the history of sociological definitions of community with special attention to seminal contributions to this field of scholarship.
   B. Identify the different bases on which community is formed (community as shared space, community as interactional field, community as shared ideology, community as ritual).
   C. Explain how communities are formed with special attention to how this process can vary across different types of communities.
   D. Critically analyze the shortcomings of existing definitions of community and the challenges of developing a single unifying definition.

II. Community dynamics
   A. Explore the cultural tension between individualism and collectivism (and how this tension plays out in communities). 
   B. Describe various power structures within and between communities.
   C. Analyze various social dynamics of community including inequality, diversity, and identity.
   D. Examine marginalization within communities, especially as it relates to issues of race, class, gender, and age.
   E. Distinguish between material and symbolic forms of community.
       1. Identify the role of ritual in creating and maintaining community.
       2. Analyze community as a symbolic achievement.
       3. Assess the impact of macrosocial changes, such as technological advancement, economic restructuring, and demographic shift on community.

III. Community and society
   A. Describe the role of community in the lives of individuals.
       1. Summarize how communities function as enabling/constraining social structures at the macro and meso levels.
       2. Explain how communities offer a basis for identity formation at the micro level.
   B. Discuss the ways in which communities support the societies in which they exist.
       1. Analyze community as a social institution. 
       2. Analyze community as an agent of social control.
 
IV. Modern community forms
   A. Examine the structure and dynamics of rural, urban, and suburban communities, respectively.
       1. Identify the socio-historical and demographic shifts that gave rise to rural, urban, and suburban communities.
       2. Explain the cultural implications of homogenized versus heterogeneous conceptions of community.
       3. Describe rural familiarity, urban anonymity and suburban isolationism.
   B. Critically examine the American idealization of pre-urban community.
   C. Interrogate the notion of community as geographically bound.

V. Postmodern community forms
   A. Identify various forms of postmodern community.
       1. Define and describe communities of interest (i.e., online gamers)
       2. Define and describe communities of identity (i.e., the gay community)
       3. Define and describe communities of ideology (i.e., political parties)
   B. Discuss the role of technology in decoupling community and geographic space.
       1. Analyze the development of virtual communities in socio-historical context.
       2. Distinguish between mediated versus unmediated interaction.
   C. Assess the impact of continued globalization on postmodern community forms.

VI. Community persistence and change
   A. Identify threats to community solidarity and preservation.
   B. Describe how communities respond to threats. 
   C. Analyze the extent to which communities are simultaneously remote from and embedded in larger social structures.
   D. Evaluate the extent to which community has declined in contemporary American life.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation:
At least two exams = 40-60%
At least one analysis project = 20-40%
At least one written assignment = 10-20%
Class participation/discussion = 10-30%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SOC 291

No information found.

SOC 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: SOC 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of Sociology, not normally taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with seminal readings within the selected topic.
  2. Define and explain key terms within the selected topic.
  3. Employ research and analytical skills relevant to the area and issues of study.
  4. Analyze social structures and dynamics as related to the selected topic.
  5. Develop a critical understanding of the principal concepts and theories that organize thought and debate within the selected topic.
  6. Articulate and support empirically informed perspectives on the selected topic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. The Arts, Humanities and Social Science Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The AHSS Division will also determine when and if the course may be taught based on the instructional needs of both the department and the division. Individual faculty members are responsible for the creation of Special Topics courses and for seeking approval to teach them. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a 2 year sequence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89% 
C = 70 - 79% 
D = 60 - 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Course work may transfer to universities only as elective credit.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).