Drafting/CAD/AutoCAD (DRAF)

Courses

DRAF 120   Introduction to Drafting (2 Hours)

This course should be taken by students without prior drafting experience. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and apply the essential, basic skills necessary to proceed through the drafting program, including, measuring, geometric construction, sketching, isometrics, orthographic views, section views, dimensioning and auxiliary views. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. 1hr. lecture, 2hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 123   Interpreting Machine Drawings* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 120 or department approval.

This course is a required course in the computer-aided drafting and design technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to interpret graphics used to fabricate, assemble, maintain and operate the equipment and products of industry. General detail and assembly prints will be evaluated for title block information, general notes, dimensioning, tolerance specification and symbology. Specialized drawings will include cams, gears, numerical control, plastics, sheet metal and instrumentation. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 129   Interpreting Architectural Drawings (2 Hours)

This beginning course will explain the fundamentals of interpreting (reading) architectural drawings. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to understand plan and elevation views, sections, details, schedules, specifications, symbols and abbreviations found on most residential and commercial construction drawings. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 130   Introduction to CAD Concepts - AutoCAD* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 120 or department approval.

This course provides a basic knowledge of AutoCAD. Students will learn to use CAD equipment, including input/output devices and microcomputers as drafting tools. Emphasis will be on a basic understanding of CAD terms and concepts as they are applied in the industry. Students will be provided an overview of many of the key features of a major microcomputer CAD package with hands-on experience at a workstation. Basic instruction will be provided on drawing setup, drawing commands, editing commands and screen control. The important concepts of layering, standard symbols and dimensioning will be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk. Drafting classes that have an additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

DRAF 132   Exploring AutoCAD (3 Hours)

This course is for non-drafting students/users who wish to casually use Autodesk’s AutoCAD (computer aided drafting) software. It provides a basic knowledge of how to manipulate AutoCAD commands on a Windows or Mac platform to create drawings. Covered topics include creating and setting up a drawing, using blocks and wblocks, editing a drawing, saving completed drawings, developing template drawings, printing from paper space, dimensioning, layering, drawing defaults and hatching. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

DRAF 135   Graphic Analysis* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 130 or department approval.

This course expands on introductory knowledge in drafting and CAD. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will solve descriptive geometry problems, locate intersections of geometric shapes, and produce developments of geometric shapes. Most assignments in this course will be completed using AutoCAD software. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 140   Topics in CAD I: (2 Hours)

This course provides training for a specific design application software. Students will learn software commands and terminology. Students will be provided with in-depth coverage of the selected software and be given hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on the application of software to industry projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 143   Introduction to BIM Building Information Modeling* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 129.

This course introduces students to the concepts and usage of BIM: Building Information Modeling in the building construction field. Students will use Building Information Modeling software to interact with a virtual building model. Upon successful completion of this course, students will manipulate the software interface to model, interpret, access data, and view the building model. The student will use the software to model and access plan views, elevations, sections, 3-D views, structural elements, schedules and support files found in a 3-D building model. The REVIT software package is currently used. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 145   Introduction to Parametric Design: Inventor* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 123 or Department approval.

This course is an introduction to parametric design. The course will cover parametric modeling fundamentals, solid geometry concepts, parametric constraints fundamentals and geometric construction tools. Basic software commands will also be covered to give the student ability to demonstrate parametric modeling knowledge. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 152   3D Modeling with SketchUp (2 Hours)

The course will teach how to model (draft in 3D) with SketchUp, a popular software program. Students will learn how to sketch their ideas for prototypes, floor plans and buildings, embellish a drawing for presentation purposes, make animations of their model, export the model into different file formats and 3D print the model. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 162   3D Printing and CNC Fabrication (2 Hours)

The course will teach how to model and fabricate prototype ideas using Autodesk 123D, a free suite of apps. Students will learn how to make solid, mesh and reality capture models, 3D print them and generate a file for a Computer Numeric Control (CNC) cutting machine. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 164   Architectural Drafting/Residential Interior Design (3 Hours)

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to interpret and draft residential architectural drawings and utilize industry references and resources. Drawings studied include floor plans, elevations, sections, reflected ceiling plans and schedules. Students will draft on a variety of relevant materials. This course is required in the Interior Design, Interior Entrepreneurship and Interior Merchandising AAS programs. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 164H   HON: Architectural Drafting/Residential Interior Design* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

DRAF 211   Engineering Design Problems* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 171 or MATH 173 or MATH 241 or department approval.

This course introduces the student to a variety of engineering design concepts. Topics include structural loading conditions, steel member selection, pressurized fluid flow, open channel flow and stormwater/hydrology. Students apply these concepts to solve practical problems found in industry. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 222   Mechanical Design and Drafting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 123 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 245.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 172.

Students successfully completing this course should be able to draw details and assembly views of mechanical parts. The types of parts discussed in this class include castings, sheet metal pieces, jigs and fixtures, and gauges. Important concepts include dimensioning, form and position tolerancing, coordinate tolerancing, and calculations related to material allowances and manufacturing. Students will use the Machinery's Handbook and other technical publications to research and design projects. Project assignments will be completed using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. This course is typically taught in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 225   Civil Drafting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 244 and (MATH 131 or MATH 172).

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply drafting techniques used in civil engineering offices. Topics covered include the surveying process, property legal descriptions, topographic maps, plan and profile drawings, roadway cross sections and earthwork calculations. The student will use CAD software in drawing projects. This course is typically taught in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 230   Intermediate CAD: AutoCAD* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 130 or department approval.

This course provides an increased knowledge of AutoCAD as it is used in today's industries. Students will build on their CAD experience by learning new commands and techniques that increase system productivity. Special emphasis will be on developing construction techniques and command usage to increase CAD proficiency. Additional study of standard symbols, layers and editing functions will occur. Concepts covered will include dimensioning variables and styles, attributes and external referencing, as well as paper space and model space, as used in multiple-view drawings. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

DRAF 238   Architectural Design and Drafting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 129 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 243.

This course is an introduction to the production of architectural drawings for residential and commercial construction. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to design and draw floor plans, sections, elevations, dimensions and schedules. Industry standard code and reference books, such as the International Residential Code and Architectural Graphic Standards books, will be used in the research and design process. Projects will be completed using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 242   Topics in CAD II* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.

This course provides training for a specific CAD-related software. Students will learn software commands and terminology. Students will be provided with in-depth coverage of the selected software and be given hands-on experience. Emphasis will be on the application of the selected software to industry projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. For special topics, check the section note on the credit class search site.

DRAF 243   Advanced BIM: Revit* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 143 or department approval.

This course introduces the student to advanced Building Information Modeling (BIM) concepts used by many architectural and engineering design firms. Topics include advanced modeling and documentation tools, project setup and the design process. Students will model commercial buildings and produce architectural drawings. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the current software to industrial projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 244   Civil 3D* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 225 or department approval.

This course introduces the student to the Civil 3D software used by many land planning, civil engineering and surveying firms. Topics include software commands, project setup and the design process. Survey points, surfaces, topography, road layout and soil volumes are covered in this course. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the software to industrial projects. It is recommended that students have previous civil engineering design knowledge or are taking or have taken DRAF 225, Civil Drafting. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 245   Advanced Parametric Design: Inventor* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 145 or department approval.

This course uses the Inventor Parametric design software used by many industrial and mechanical design firms. Topics include software commands, project setup and the design process. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the software to industrial projects. It is recommended that students have previous mechanical design knowledge or have taken DRAF 145. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 246   MicroStation for AutoCAD users* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.

This course introduces the student to the MicroStation software interface and command structure. The course is intended for students who are familiar with the use of the AutoCAD software and need a transition to the use of MicroStation. Topics include basic operating fundamentals, AccuDraw, working with elements, references and printing. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

DRAF 252   Structural Design and Drafting* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 129 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 243 or department approval.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 172.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to produce structural drawings and details of steel, concrete and wood structures for manufacturing, construction, engineering and architectural firms. The student will use industry standard references and perform design calculations. Project work will be done using CAD. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

DRAF 264   CAD:Interior Design* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 164 and ITMD 121(both courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher), or department approval.

This course is an introduction to the use of computer-aided drafting (CAD) as used in the interior design field. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to draw floor plans and elevations of interiors using a computer-aided drafting system. AutoCAD LT software will be used. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. Note: Prerequisites DRAF 164 and ITMD 121 require a grade of "C" or higher.

DRAF 264H   HON: CAD: Interior Design* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

DRAF 271   Drafting Internship I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job- and career-related skills while in a work setting. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 15 hrs. min./wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

DRAF 272   Drafting Internship II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DRAF 271 and department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job- and career-related skills while in a work setting. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals.15 hrs. min./wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

DRAF 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

DRAF 120

  • Title: Introduction to Drafting
  • Number: DRAF 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 2

Description:

This course should be taken by students without prior drafting experience. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify and apply the essential, basic skills necessary to proceed through the drafting program, including, measuring, geometric construction, sketching, isometrics, orthographic views, section views, dimensioning and auxiliary views. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. 1hr. lecture, 2hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct lines, arcs, circles, and polygons.

  2. Measure geometric shapes and primitive features.

  3. Interpret orthographic drawings.

  4. Sketch orthographic views.

  5. Sketch isometric views and identify perspective views.

  6. Identify the different types of engineering section drawings and views.

  7. Sketch engineering section drawings.

  8. Create a primary auxiliary view.

  9. Identify Mechanical drawing standards.

  10. Identify Architectural drawing standards.

  11. Identify different types of drafting methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Lines, Arcs, Circles and Polygons.
  A. Define and sketch an object line.
  B. Define and sketch a center line.
  C. Define and sketch a hidden line.
  D. Define and sketch a cutting plane line.
  E. Define and sketch a phantom line.
  F.  Construct a line bisector.
  G. Construct an angle bisector.
  H. Construct and arc tangent to other arcs.
  I. Construct an arc tangent to lines.
  J. Define and construct the involute for a square or a rectangle.
  K. Define and construct the involute for a circle.
  L. Construct a triangle.
  M. Construct a square.
  N. Construct a pentagon, hexagon, octagon, dodecagon.
  O. Define and construct parabolic curves.
  P. Define and sketch hyperbolic curves.

II. Geometric Shapes
  A. Measure features using an architectural scale.
  B. Measure features using an engineering scale.
  C. Measure features using a metric scale.
  D. Measure angles with a protractor.

III.  Orthographic Drawings
  A. Define and identify linetypes.
  B. Interpret dimensions.
  C. Interpret symbols.

IV. Orthographic Views
  A. Explain the three Principal Planes.
  B. Explain the six Principal Views.
  C. Define the different types of lines and planes.
  D. Describe and sketch in Third Angle/Quadrant.
  E. Explain First Angle/Quadrant.

V. Isometric and Perspective Drawings
  A. Identify and sketch isometric lines.
  B. Identify and sketch isometric circles.
  C. Define non-isometric lines.
  D. Define non-isometric surfaces.
  E. Identify a one-point perspective
  F. Identify a two-point perspective.

VI. Section Drawings
  A. Define a full section.
  B. Define a half section.
  C. Define an aligned (rotated) section.
  D. Define an offset section.
  E. Define a revolved section.
  F. Define a removed section.
  G. Define a broken out section.

VII.  Section Views 
  A.Sketch section details.
  B. Define and draw section lines.
  C. Identify material symbol section lines.
  D. Explain and draw Web/Rib/Standard Convention.

VIII. Primary Auxiliary Views
  A. Explain the point views of lines.
  B. Identify the edge views of surfaces.
  C. Define the true length of a line.
  D. Define the true size and shape of a surface.
  E. Sketch a primary auxiliary view.
  F. Explain dimensions for a primary auxiliary view.
  G. Define and label auxiliary reference lines.

IX. Mechanical Standards
  A. Name the standard ANSI sheet sizes A through D.
  B. Identify common drawings.
  C. Identify dimension standards
  D. Apply dimensions to objects using standards.
  E. Identify common symbols.

X. Architectural Standards
  A. Name the standard AEC sheet sizes A through D.
  B. Identify common drawings.
  C. Identify dimension standards.
  D. Apply dimensions to objects using standards.
  E. Identify common symbols.

XI. Types of Drafting Methods
  A. Identify standard manual drafting methods.
  B. Identify common computer drafting methods.
  C. Identify common product output methods.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab/Daily Work/Homework       60-70% of grade
Exams                                      30-40% of grade
 Total:                                        100% 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 123

  • Title: Interpreting Machine Drawings*
  • Number: DRAF 123
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 120 or department approval.

Description:

This course is a required course in the computer-aided drafting and design technology program. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to interpret graphics used to fabricate, assemble, maintain and operate the equipment and products of industry. General detail and assembly prints will be evaluated for title block information, general notes, dimensioning, tolerance specification and symbology. Specialized drawings will include cams, gears, numerical control, plastics, sheet metal and instrumentation. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Measure industrial products using calipers and micrometers.
  2. Identify thread symbols and nomenclature.
  3. Identify boring and machining processes given on a production drawing.
  4. Calculate mating part fits from a dimensioned view.
  5. Define geometric tolerance symbols.
  6. Interpret casting drawing.
  7. Identify tolerance block elements.
  8. Explain a drawing note.
  9. Explain a local note.
  10. State the effect of a drawing revision.
  11. Interpret a cam drawing.
  12. Interpret gear drawings.
  13. Interpret a numerical control document.
  14. Interpret a plastic part drawing or mold part drawing.
  15. Interpret precision sheet metal drawings.
  16. Interpret a weldment drawing.
  17. Interpret an instrumentation document. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Measuring Tools
A. Measure interior and exterior features including depth using a
caliper.
B. Measure interior and exterior features using a micrometer.

II. Identify Thread Symbols and Nomenclature
A. Describe a schematic thread symbol.
B. Describe a simplified thread symbol.
C. Write thread nomenclature using Unified National thread codes.
D. Determine threads per inch for a fine, extra fine, and coarse
thread.
1. Calculate thread engagement in different types of material. i.e.
plastic, steel, aluminum, etc.
2. Designate a thread as internal or external.
3. Designate a thread class.
4. Designate a thread series.
E. Write thread nomenclature for metric threads.

III. Identify Boring Processes and Machining Processes
A. Specify a countersink for a specific fastener.
B. Specify a counterbore for a specific application.
C. Specify a reaming operation
D. Write a tapping process.
E. Explain surface finish.
F. Compare machining callout on an engineering drawing with capital
equipment used to produce the machining.

IV. Calculate Mating Part Information
A. Determine the tightest fit between two mating parts.
B. Determine the loosest fit between two mating parts.
C. Specify limit dimensions and coordinate dimensions with tolerances
for mating parts.

V. Identify And Define Geometric Form and True Position Tolerances.

VI. Interpret A Casting Drawing and Casting Machine Drawing.

VII. Identify Tolerance Block Values And Elements.

VIII. Explain a General Drawing Note.

IX. Explain a Local Note.

X. Explain a Revision
A. Interpret a drawing view and dimension revision.
B. Write the revision history of an engineering drawing.

XI. Interpret a Cam Drawing
A. Explain how a cam displacement diagram is interpreted.
B. Explain the drawing data and nomenclature of a cam manufacturing
drawing.
C. Identify the integral features of a cam.

XII. Interpret a Gear Drawing
A. Explain the drawing data and nomenclature of a gear manufacturing
drawing.
B. Explain the integral features of a gear.

XIII. Interpret a Numerical Control Document

XIV. Interpret a Plastic Part Drawing Or Mold Part Drawing
A. Explain the nomenclature of a plastic or molded part.
B. Explain components used to mold plastic parts.

XV. Interpret a Precision Sheet Metal Drawing
A. Explain the integral symbols and elements of a precision sheet metal
drawing.
B. Explain the considerations for bend allowance in sheet metal
components.

XVI. Interpret a Weldment Drawing
A. Explain the views of a weldment drawing.
B. Identify weld symbols on a weldment drawing.
C. Illustrate a weld on the profile of a weld-joint.

XVII. Interpret an Instrumentation Drawing
A. Identify symbols on an instrumentation drawing.
B. Distinguish between instrumentation and process components.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Class Assignments and homework            50%
Quizzes, tests, and or major examination 30%
Final Examination 20%
Total 100%

Grading criteria:
90 - Above = A
80 - 89 = B
70 - 79 = C
60 - 69 = D
Below 60 = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 129

  • Title: Interpreting Architectural Drawings
  • Number: DRAF 129
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This beginning course will explain the fundamentals of interpreting (reading) architectural drawings. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to understand plan and elevation views, sections, details, schedules, specifications, symbols and abbreviations found on most residential and commercial construction drawings. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the basic theory of multiview orthographic projection system as it relates to interpreting working drawings.
  2. Explain construction materials as they relate to interpreting working drawings.
  3. Explain and interpret written specifications.
  4. Interpret working drawings and written specifications used for light frame construction.
  5. Interpret working drawings and written specifications used for heavy construction. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interpreting Working Drawing
   A. Explain a drawing layout as it relates to multiview orthographic
projection; plan views, elevations, and sections.
   B. Define the alphabet of lines.
   C. Interpret dimensions.
   D. Interpret sections cuts as they relate to sections and/or details.
   E. Obtain information from schedules.
   F. Read and measure lines using an architectural scale.
   G. Interpret civil engineering scales and metric scales.
   H. Draw and identity common symbols used on working drawings.
   I. Explain common abbreviations used on working drawings.
   J. Use the proper terms relating to working drawings and written
specifications.

II. Materials of Construction
   A. Explain the different properties of dimension lumber, timber, and
engineered lumber.
   B. Identify the different steel shapes.
   C. Explain the properties of concrete.
   D. Explain steel reinforcement as it relates to concrete
   E. Identify the different concrete masonry units.

III. Written Specifications
   A. Explain contract documents.
   B. Explain bid and contract forms.
   C. Explain material standards.
   D. Explain technical specifications.

IV. Light Frame Construction
   A. Interpret and obtain information using residential drawings and
specifications.
   B. Interpret and obtain information using light commercial drawings and
specifications.

 V. Heavy Construction
   A. Explain heavy timber construction 
   B. Interpret and obtain information from structural steel plans,
sections, and specifications.
   C. Explain pre-engineered steel construction.
   D. Interpret and obtain information from reinforced concrete plans,
sections, and specifications.
   E. Explain pre-cast and pre-stressed concrete construction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests                         50% of grade
Class Assignments/Homework    15% of grade
Quizzes                       15% of grade
Final Exam                    20% of grade
   Total                     100%

Grading criteria:
   90-100%   = A
   80- 89%   = B
   70- 79%   = C
   60- 69%   = D
   Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 130

  • Title: Introduction to CAD Concepts - AutoCAD*
  • Number: DRAF 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 120 or department approval.

Description:

This course provides a basic knowledge of AutoCAD. Students will learn to use CAD equipment, including input/output devices and microcomputers as drafting tools. Emphasis will be on a basic understanding of CAD terms and concepts as they are applied in the industry. Students will be provided an overview of many of the key features of a major microcomputer CAD package with hands-on experience at a workstation. Basic instruction will be provided on drawing setup, drawing commands, editing commands and screen control. The important concepts of layering, standard symbols and dimensioning will be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk. Drafting classes that have an additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the parts of a computer graphics system and describe their function.
  2. Give the command language needed to construct entities.
  3. Give the command language needed to edit entities.
  4. Construct a drawing while keeping the drawing entities on separate layers.
  5. Answer specific questions about the size and location of entities.
  6. Copy, delete, list and rename files.
  7. Create symbols and use them in the same drawing.
  8. Create, maintain and plot drawing files.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Computer Graphics System Interface and Hardware

A. Software:

1. Describe the AutoCAD screen layout and user interface.

2. Describe the function of dialog boxes.

3. Identify the function of the AutoCAD DesignCenter and the Properties window.

4. Use HELP command for online assistance.

5. Define the use of function, control and shortcut keys.

6. Manipulate the screen display of drawing.

7. Use a template to start a new drawing.

8. Open an existing drawing.

9. Save a drawing.

10. Plan an AutoCAD drawing.

11. Use the AutoCAD wizard to begin a drawing.

12. Start a drawing from scratch.

B. Hardware:

1. Use the keyboard and an input device to select commands, enter text, and pick locations on the screen

2. Use the draw and modify commands to create and modify geometry

3. Use the proper commands to change drawing settings

II. Constructing Entities

A. Use the Cartesian Coordinate System to create accurate geometry.

B. Use the draw commands to create geometry.

C. Set, modify, and use drawing aids to create a drawing.

D. Use the PLINE command to draw objects.

E. Use object snapmodes to create precision drawings.

F. Manipulate the screen display of the drawing.

G. Duplicate objects using Mirror, Array and the Offset commands.

H. Add hatching to a drawing.

I. Modify existing hatching within a drawing.

III. Editing Drawings

A. Use modify commands to modify geometry.

B. Use commands to change drawing settings.

C. Make selection sets for selection objects.

D. Use the Properties window, CHPROP/DDCHPROP commands and Matchprop to change layers, colors, linetypes and lineweights.

E. Use GRIPS to modify objects.

IV. Dimensions, Text and Layers

A. Create and manage drawing layers.

B. Draw objects with different colors, linetypes and lineweights.

C. Use text and text editing commands to create and modify text in the drawing.

D. Create and edit Dimensions, and Dimension Styles.

V. Inquiry Commands

A. Use the List command to find an objects properties.

B. Use the Distance command to find length data.

C. Use the Area and ID commands to find drawing data.

VI. Drawing Files

A. Locate AutoCAD files using search functions.

B. Determine the status of drawing parameters.

VII. Blocks and Symbols

A. Create and manipulate Blocks.

B. Insert symbols into a drawing file.

VIII. Output

A. Set up a plotter or printer and plot a drawing.

B. Remove unused dimension styles, layers, blocks, linetypes, mlstyles and text styles.

C. Select a plotting device and modify a plotting device configuration.

D. Calculate scale factors based on drawing scale.

E. Plot a drawing from Paper Space at a designated scale.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-80%    Lab assignments, projects, and homework
20-50%    Quizzes/Final

Total = 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 132

  • Title: Exploring AutoCAD
  • Number: DRAF 132
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

This course is for non-drafting students/users who wish to casually use Autodesk’s AutoCAD (computer aided drafting) software. It provides a basic knowledge of how to manipulate AutoCAD commands on a Windows or Mac platform to create drawings. Covered topics include creating and setting up a drawing, using blocks and wblocks, editing a drawing, saving completed drawings, developing template drawings, printing from paper space, dimensioning, layering, drawing defaults and hatching. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the function of the AutoCAD software and be able to launch it.
  2. Set up a drawing and select appropriate settings.
  3. Create and modify line entities.
  4. Select and use appropriate commands to control the display.
  5. Create layers and manipulate objects on those layers.
  6. Draw entities using the draw commands.
  7. Create objects using precise drawing tools.
  8. Extract information about existing entities.
  9. Create and modify annotation.
  10. Select appropriate command to modify entities.
  11. Select appropriate commands to dimension objects.
  12. Create and edit hatch.
  13. Plot drawings.
  14. Create and insert blocks.
  15. Create a drawing using model space/ paper space concepts.
  16. Discuss “green” CAD software and how it might be used in a drafting/design project.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  AutoCAD Work Environment 
  A. Load AutoCAD software. 
  B. Describe the AutoCAD graphics window and user interface. 
  C. Explain the function and components of dialog boxes. 
  D. Select and use the various keyboard and function keys and identify their command equivalents. 
  E. Use the HELP command and other on-line services for assistance. 
II. Drawing Set Up. 
  A. Set up drawing parameters to begin a new drawing. 
  B. Select appropriate drawing units. 
  C. Explain and use drawing aids: ortho, snap, grid, coordinate display. 
  D. Save drawing file and access existing drawing files. 
  E. End drawing session and exit software. 

III. Line Entities   
  A. Use Direct Distance Entry for drawing lines. 
  B. Enter absolute, relative, and polar coordinates for line construction. 
  C. Erase and restore lines. 
  D. Explain and use selection set options. 
  E. Describe the difference between verb/noun and noun/verb entity selection. 
  F. Undo and redo commands. 

IV. Display Controls 
  A. Zoom selected drawing areas to magnify details. 
  B. Describe the difference between a screen redraw and a screen regeneration. 
  C. Use Pan command to change the viewing area. 
  D. Invoke and navigate the Aerial View window. 
  E. Save, recall, and delete named view. 
  F. Divide the graphic window into multiple viewports. 

V. Layers and Properties 
  A. Select and use colors and linetypes available in AutoCAD. 
  B. Create and manage drawing layers. 
  C. Change the properties of existing entities. 
  D. Purge unused linetypes and layers from drawing file. 

VI. Draw Commands 
  A. Draw curved objects using the CIRCLE, ARC, ELLIPSE, and DONUT commands. 
  B. Construct multi-sided shapes using the PLINE, RECTANG, and POLYGON. commands.  
  C. Explode multi-sided shapes into individual line segments. 
  D. Create angled and rounded corners using CHAMFER and FILLET commands. 
VII. Object Creation Techniques 
  A. Select entities at precise points using object snap modes. 
  B. Use X and Y point filters to locate and project features and views. 
  C. Select and use POINT entities. 
  D. Divide and measure selected entities using the DIVIDE and MEASURE commands. 
  E. Offset an object at a specified distance or through a point to create a new object. 

VIII. Inquiry Commands 
  A. Display the XYZ coordinates of a selected point. 
  B. Find the true distance between two points. 
  C. Obtain the angle between two points. 
  D. Calculate the area and perimeter of an object or shape. 
  E. List the database information for selected entities. 
  F. Display the date and time statistics of a drawing. 
IX. Annotation Commands 
  A. Add annotation, including special character code, to drawings. 
  B. Create text with a specified height, orientation, slant, and width factor. 
  C. Modify and move existing text. 

X. Modify Commands 
  A. Modify existing objects using TRIM and EXTEND commands. 
  B. Break an object at selected points. 
  C. Move, rotate, scale and stretch existing objects. 
  D. Use the change property commands to modify line endpoints and the size of circles. 
  E. Create a mirror image of an object. 
  F. Make one or more copies of selected entities. 
  G. Perform various polyline editing operations. 
  H. Use grips to modify entities. 
  I. Edit a selected entity using a dialog box. 

XI. Dimension Commands 
  A. Add linear, angular, radial, and ordinate dimension to drawings.  
  B. Use dimension variables to control the appearance and format of dimensions. 
  C. Create centerlines through arcs and circles. 
  D. Use leaders to place feature callouts. 
  E. Modify and update existing dimensions. 
  F. Create and use dimension styles. 
XII. Hatch Commands 
  A. Hatch a closed area with a specified hatch pattern, angle, and spacing. 
  B. Edit existing hatched areas. 
  C. Construct polylines form the boundaries of objects. 

XIII. Print Commands 
  A. Prepare drawing to print. 
  B. Print a drawing to a designated scale. 

XIV. Block Commands   
  A. Create, insert, and redefine a block. 
  B. Create, insert, and redefine a wblock. 
  C. Save a block to disk. 

XV. Space Environment Creation 
  A. Describe the difference between models space and paper space. 
  B. Define and use floating viewports. 
  C. Create and manage viewport-specific layers.

XVI. Incorporation of Sustainability
  A. Describe what sustainability is.
  B. Describe some Autodesk software products that incorporate it.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25%   Tests and Final Exam
75-85%   Quizzes/Lab Assignments/Homework
 100%

Grade Criteria:
   90-100%   = A
   80- 89%   = B
   70- 79%   = C
   60- 69%   = D
   Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 135

  • Title: Graphic Analysis*
  • Number: DRAF 135
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 130 or department approval.

Description:

This course expands on introductory knowledge in drafting and CAD. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will solve descriptive geometry problems, locate intersections of geometric shapes, and produce developments of geometric shapes. Most assignments in this course will be completed using AutoCAD software. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify planes and lines used in descriptive geometry.
  2. Construct planes and lines using primary auxiliary theory.
  3. Explain and solve industrial application problems using descriptive geometry successive auxiliary theory.
  4. Locate and draw the intersection of geometric shapes.
  5. Build a model of a geometric shape using flat pattern development theory.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Descriptive Geometry

A. List and identify the different types of lines.

B. List and identify the different types of planes.

C. Identify when a line is true length.

D. Identify when a plane is true size.

II. Primary Auxiliary View

A. Draw the true length of a line using a primary auxiliary view.

B. Draw the point view of a line using a primary auxiliary view.

C. Draw the edge-view of a surface using a primary auxiliary view.

D. Draw the true-size shape of a surface using primary auxiliary views.

E. Draw the slope and bearing of a strata of underground mineral.

F. Draw and measure the strike of an ore deposit.

G. Draw the plan and profile of a dam or roadway which shows soil, cut and fill requirements.

H. Draw the plan and profile which shows stations of storm sewer manholes, grade and/or slope of pipelines, and elevations.

III. Descriptive Geometry and Successive Auxiliary Views

A. Measure the angle between two dihedral planes, using successive auxiliary views, when the intersecting line of the two planes is oblique.

B. Measure the true-length distance between a line and a point, using successive auxiliary views, when the line is oblique.

C. Measure the shortest distance between two (2) skewed lines, and state the angular relationship of the lines, using successive auxiliary views, when both line segments are oblique (by the line and plane methods).

D. Measure the true angle between a line and a plane, using successive auxiliary views, when both are oblique (by the line and plane methods).

IV. Intersections and Developments

A. Draw the intersection of a right cone and another geometric shape.

B. Draw the transition shape of a cylinder and a rectangle.

C. Draw orthographic, first angle views of a sheet metal part that includes two geometric shapes.

D. Draw the flat pattern layout of intersecting sheet metal geometric shapes.

V. Flat Pattern Development

A. Design a geometric model using flat pattern theory.

B. Build a geometric model of multiple geometric shape intersecting.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60-70%    Lab Assignments, Quizzes and Homework
10-20%    Major Exams (Mid-term)
10-20%    Final Exam or Final Project

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 140

  • Title: Topics in CAD I:
  • Number: DRAF 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

This course provides training for a specific design application software. Students will learn software commands and terminology. Students will be provided with in-depth coverage of the selected software and be given hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on the application of software to industry projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the typical applications for the software.
  2. Describe the advantages of using the software for typical applications as compared to traditional methods.
  3. Define typical graphics terms as they would apply to the software.
  4. List conventions and use methods provided in the software to access reference material.
  5. Launch the software and identify the parts of the computer graphics screen and describe their function.
  6. Access software commands through menus, toolbars, and the keyboard.
  7. Identify the syntax of a typical graphics command, including command prompts and defaults.
  8. Select appropriate commands to create and edit objects.
  9. Set up, save, and manage drawing files.
  10. Plot drawings. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction To Software Package
   A. List typical applications.
   B. List advantages of typical applications.
   C. Define software terms.
   D. List conventions.
   E. List reference materials and how to reference them.

II. Software Structure
   A. Launch the software.
   B. Describe keyboard functions.
   C. List and describe menus.
   D. List and describe toolbars.
   E. Access the on-line help.

III. Commands
   A. Define software commands.
   B. Describe each software function.
   C. Identify the syntax of a typical command including prompts and
defaults.
   D. Use each command to create or edit objects.

IV. Projects
   A. Set-up drawings using appropriate commands.
   B. Manage files using built-in file manager or a separate file manager
program.
   C. Save drawings for future use.
   D. Plot drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams                      20-40% of grade
Lab Assignments/Homework   60-80% of grade
                             100%

Grading criteria:
      90-100%   = A
      80- 89%   = B
      70- 79%   = C
      60- 69%   = D
      Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 143

  • Title: Introduction to BIM Building Information Modeling*
  • Number: DRAF 143
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 129.

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and usage of BIM: Building Information Modeling in the building construction field. Students will use Building Information Modeling software to interact with a virtual building model. Upon successful completion of this course, students will manipulate the software interface to model, interpret, access data, and view the building model. The student will use the software to model and access plan views, elevations, sections, 3-D views, structural elements, schedules and support files found in a 3-D building model. The REVIT software package is currently used. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe Building Information Modeling - BIM.
  2. Identify the software interface.
  3. Apply the tools used to interpret data from the model.
  4. Apply tools required to model basic elements.
  5. Apply the tools required to edit basic elements.
  6. Explain and demonstrate basic selection methods.
  7. Apply the tools to create printed documents.
  8. Explain JCCC CAD lab procedures. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Building Information Modeling - BIM
A. Explain traditional architectural documentation.
B. Compare BIM to Computer Aided Drafting - CAD.
C. Define 3-D parametric design.
D. List BIM advantages.
E. List BIM disadvantages.
F. Explain systems, components and in-place families/elements.
G. Define model categories.
H. Define annotation categories.
I. Explain the different file extensions.

II. Software Interface
A. Explain the Ribbon interface.
B. Define and list the basic tabs.
C. Define and list the basic panels.
D. Define and list the basic tools.
E. Explain the Project Browser.
F. Explain Type Selector.
G. Describe the application menu.
H. Describe the quick access toolbar.
I. Explain the Status Bar.
J. Explain the View Control Bar.
K. Explain the Help tool.

III. Model Interpretation
A. Use the navigating tools to view the model.
B. Use the Project Browser to view and obtain data from the model.
C. Access element properties to extract data from the model.
D. Explain the data available in the instance properties.
E. Explain the data available in the type properties.
F. Use the View Control Bar to view the model.
G. Access schedules to obtain data from the model.
H. Use the section tool to view the model and extract data.

IV. Basic Model Tools
A. Explain and use the level and grid tools.
B. Explain and use basic walls modeling tools.
C. Explain and apply basic floor modeling tools.
D. Explain and apply basic roof modeling tools.
E. Explain and insert doors and windows elements.
F. Explain and insert components.
G. Explain and apply basic stairs and rails modeling tools for straight
stairs.

V. Selection Methods
A. Use the pick method.
B. Apply the multiple selection method.
C. Explain and apply adding and removing elements.
D. Explain and use the tab selection Chain.

VI. Basic Edit Tools
A. Use the grip editing tools.
B. Edit using temporary dimensions.
C. Use the pick and drag method to edit elements.
D. Use the flip control editing tool.
E. Use the proper tool to align elements.
F. Use the proper tool to trim elements.
G. Use the proper tool to divide an element.

VII. Documentation
A. Create views to print.
B. Prepare sheets from a template to print.
C. Use the dimension tools to place dimensions on a view.
D. Use the annotation tools to place notes and text on a view.
E. Use the print tools to print a sheet.

VIII. JCCC CAD Lab Procedures
A. Explain and use the proper JCCC log-in procedures.
B. Explain and use the proper JCCC network procedures.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70% Class Assignments and Homework
10-15% Quizzes/Midterm Exam
15-20% Final Project/Final Exam
100% Total

Grading Criteria:
A = 100-90%
B = 89-80%
C = 79-70%
D = 69-60%
F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy: Students will need basic computer file management, emailing, and Internet searching skills for the completion of some assignments.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 145

  • Title: Introduction to Parametric Design: Inventor*
  • Number: DRAF 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 123 or Department approval.

Description:

This course is an introduction to parametric design. The course will cover parametric modeling fundamentals, solid geometry concepts, parametric constraints fundamentals and geometric construction tools. Basic software commands will also be covered to give the student ability to demonstrate parametric modeling knowledge. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe and utilize parametric modeling fundamentals.
  2. Identify solid geometry concepts.
  3. Apply basic parametric constraints to a model.
  4. Create models with geometric construction tools. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Parametric Modeling Fundamentals 
  A. Define parametric modeling. 
  B. Identify inventor project file content 
  C. Create a rough sketch 
  D. Create a base solid feature 
  E. View objects in standard orthographic views 
  F. View objects in standard perspective views 

II. Solid Geometry Concepts 
  A. Identify correct modeling strategy. 
  B. Identify and use binary tree 
  C. Create a solid geometric shape 
  D. Create a cut feature 

III. Parametric Constraint Fundamentals 
  A. Define drawing constraints 
  B. Define drawings relations 
  C. Display existing drawing constraints 
  D. Delete existing drawing constraints 
  E. Identify over-constraining 
  F. Identify driven dimensions 
  G. Apply geometric and dimensional constraint to a drawing 

IV. Geometric Construction Tools 
  A. Create a 2D sketch 
  B. Edit a 2D sketch by dragging sketched entities 
  C. Apply dimensions to features 
  D. Redefine a sketch and profile

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab Assignments/Homework 60% - 80%
Exams 20% - 40%
Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 152

  • Title: 3D Modeling with SketchUp
  • Number: DRAF 152
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

The course will teach how to model (draft in 3D) with SketchUp, a popular software program. Students will learn how to sketch their ideas for prototypes, floor plans and buildings, embellish a drawing for presentation purposes, make animations of their model, export the model into different file formats and 3D print the model. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Install SketchUp and maneuver around its interface.
  2. Create floor plans and generate models.
  3. Use downloaded extensions from the Extension Warehouse (EW).
  4. Modify premade content.
  5. Apply realistic colors and textures.
  6. Manage the model with groups and the Outliner feature.
  7. Incorporate real-life terrain information to a model.
  8. Export and present the model.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. SketchUp Interface

A. Find, download and launch the software.

B. Demonstrate how to use the drawing field, dialogue boxes and context menus.

C. Customize the interface.

D. Utilize the inference engine.

E. Find the toolbars and demonstrate how to use the navigation tools.

F. Utilize the Help Center and free online resources.

II. Floor Plans and Models

A. Model new floor plans.

B. Model floor plans from imported images.

C. Model floor plans from AutoCAD files.

D. Apply styles to the model.

E. Apply shades and shadows to the model.

III. Extension Warehouse (EW)

A. Access the EW directly and through the software interface.

B. Locate specific extensions.

C. Download and install extensions through the software.

D. Download and install extensions manually.

E. Find the extension toolbars.

IV. Customize Premade Content

A. Find premade content from various sources.

B. Evaluate premade content for suitability into and outside the model.

C. Download premade content from the Trimble Warehouse.

D. Use editing tools on premade content.

E. Use components to maximize modeling efficiency.

F. Use dynamic components to maximize editing efficiency.

V. Apply realistic colors and textures

A. Find paint RGB (Red Green Blue) values and create paint swatches with the RGB feature.

B. Import textures.

C. Scale imported textures.

D. Import photographs to photo-match the model.

VI. Model with Groups and the Outliner

A. Manage "stickiness" (fusion) with groups.

B. Edit groups.

C. Access the Outliner.

D. Access model groups and components with the Outliner.

E. Create, name and delete layers.

F. Move content to different layers via the Entity Info box.

VII. Real-Life Terrain Information

A. Access Google Earth from the interface.

B. Find a specific property on Google Earth.

C. Import a property swatch into the model.

D. Scale the property swatch to the model.

E. Use SketchUp Sandbox tools.

VIII. Model Presentation

A. Make scenes of different views and properties.

B. Export an animation of the model.

C. Export a .jpg of the model.

D. Export an .stl file for 3D printing.

E. Use printing software to send a model to a 3D printer.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60%    Assignments
15-25%    Quizzes
5-10%      Final Project
5-10%      Presentation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 162

  • Title: 3D Printing and CNC Fabrication
  • Number: DRAF 162
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

The course will teach how to model and fabricate prototype ideas using Autodesk 123D, a free suite of apps. Students will learn how to make solid, mesh and reality capture models, 3D print them and generate a file for a Computer Numeric Control (CNC) cutting machine. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Create solid models with 123D Design.
  2. Create solid models with 123D Tinkercad.
  3. Create reality capture models with 123D Catch.
  4. Create cutting patterns with 123D Make.
  5. Generate construction drawings from a 123D Design file.
  6. Analyze and combine models with Autodesk 123D Meshmixer.
  7. Construct a 3D print of the model.
  8. Create a Computer Numeric Control (CNC) file.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Solid Models with 123D Design

A. Download and launch the desktop software.

B. Maneuver around the interface.

C. Utilize construction and editing tools on new and premade models.

D. Sketch and extrude sketches to make solids.

II. Solid Models with 123D Tinkercad

A. Launch Tinkercad.

B. Manipulate primitive shapes.

C. Utilize work planes to build on and combine shapes.

D. Generate new forms with the Shape Generator.

E. Send an .stl file to a service bureau.

III. Reality Capture Models with 123D Catch

A. Download the software to a compatible mobile device.

B. Photograph a subject.

C. Upload the photos to the cloud and retrieve the model.

D. Edit the model in 123D Catch Desktop.

E. Edit the model in 123D Catch Web app.

IV. Cutting patterns with 123D Make

A. Download and launch the 123D Make Desktop.

B. Import an .stl file.

C. Create different cutting patterns of one .stl file using different techniques.

V. Construction Drawings from a 123D Design File

A. Utilize 123D Design’s LayOut feature to make construction documents.

B. Retrieve a .dwg file from the cloud.

C. Import the .dwg file into AutoCAD.

D. Import the .dwg file into Autodesk 360 and maneuver around the interface.

E. Generate construction drawings with Autodesk 360.

VI. Model Manipulation with 123D Meshmixer.

A. Import .stl files made with Design and Catch into Meshmixer.

B. Analyze the .stl files for printability.

C. Combine .stl files.

D. Send a printable file to MakerBot Desktop.

VII. 3D Model Printing

A. Download and launch MakerBot Desktop software.

B. Explore the interface.

C. Choose the settings for the physical model.

D. Set up a MakerBot 3D printer.

E. Send the file to a MakerBot 3D printer.

VIII. Create a CNC file.

A. Launch the web-based 123D CNC Utility.

B. Maneuver around the interface.

C. Generate a file for a CNC router.

D. Export the file and send it to a service bureau.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

60-70%    Assignments
10-20%    Quizzes
5-10%      Final Project
5-10%      Presentation

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

1.  Students need access to a smartphone or tablet.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 164

  • Title: Architectural Drafting/Residential Interior Design
  • Number: DRAF 164
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to interpret and draft residential architectural drawings and utilize industry references and resources. Drawings studied include floor plans, elevations, sections, reflected ceiling plans and schedules. Students will draft on a variety of relevant materials. This course is required in the Interior Design, Interior Entrepreneurship and Interior Merchandising AAS programs. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read and interpret residential architectural drawings.
  2. Know NKBA drafting and dimensioning standards.
  3. Draft scale floor plans, interior elevations, sections, reflected ceiling plans and schedules, using manual drafting tools.
  4. Identify and name the major components of a building.
  5. Utilize industry references.
  6. Solve graphics problems using orthographic projection.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interpreting Residential Drawings 
  A. Explain how the theory of orthographic projection relates to architectural drawings.   
  B. Explain line hierarchy. 
  C. Interpret dimensions. 
  D. Interpret information on supporting schedules. 
  E. Explain common symbols and abbreviations. 

II. Interpreting Plans Using NKBA Guidelines. 
  A. Interpret HVAC/mechanical plans.  
  B. Interpret plumbing plans. 
  C. Interpret electrical plans. 
  D. Read and interpret kitchen and bath drawings and schedules. 

III. Drafting Architectural Drawings 
  A. Draw with manual drawing tools and scales) and demonstrate proper usage of the drafting equipment. 
  B. Draw orthographic views of floor plans, interior elevations, sections and details.
  C. Draw on vellum with graphite and ink. 
  D. Draw typical architectural schedules. 
  E. Explain dimensioning standards used on different types of drawings. 
  F. Dimension architectural drawings using proper dimension standards. 
  G. Dimension millwork drawings using NKBA standards. 
  H. Explain the difference between orthographic drawings and perspective, isometric, and oblique drawings. 

IV. Building Construction 
  A. Explain the terminology for the major parts of a house. 
  B. Identify steel, wood and concrete construction. 
  C. Interpret the symbols used to describe building materials.
  D. Identify good and poor building materials from a Best Management Practices (BMP) point of view. 

V. Industry References 
  A. List reference manuals that are commonly accepted as industry standards. 
  B. Specify information using industry standard reference manuals.
  C. Specify references for sustainability BMPs. 

VI. Orthographic Projection 
  A. Explain the theory of orthographic projection. 
  B. Solve and draw 2-D views of 3-D objects using orthographic projection. 
  C. Explain the use of specific linetypes and draw objects using the proper linetype.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab/Daily Work/Homework 35% of grade 
Tests                   35% of grade
Projects                30% of grade
Total:                100%

Grade Criteria:
A = 90% - Above 
B = 80% - 89%
C = 70% - 79%
D = 60% - 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. 70% Competency required for promotion to courses required in the ITMD program.
  2. Word processing and Internet skills may be required to complete course assignments. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 164H

No information found.

DRAF 211

  • Title: Engineering Design Problems*
  • Number: DRAF 211
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 171 or MATH 173 or MATH 241 or department approval.

Description:

This course introduces the student to a variety of engineering design concepts. Topics include structural loading conditions, steel member selection, pressurized fluid flow, open channel flow and stormwater/hydrology. Students apply these concepts to solve practical problems found in industry. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use proper engineering units in standard problem-solving format.
  2. Solve force system problems to determine unknown forces.
  3. Determine stress and strain.
  4. Determine internal shear force and bending moments in beams.
  5. Use industry standard methods to determine deflection, shear stress and bending stress.
  6. Evaluate simple structural systems and select appropriate steel member.
  7. Describe fluid mechanics and its engineering applications.
  8. Analyze pressurized water systems.
  9. Analyze open channel flow systems.
  10. Use industry standard hydrology methods to determine flow rates.
  11. Describe stormwater plans and their applications.
  12. Use industry standard methods to design common stormwater systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Engineering Units

A. Manipulate English and SI (System International) units.

B. Properly use units within standard engineering problem-solving format.

II. Force Systems

A. Describe equilibrium and free-body diagrams.

B. Draw free-body diagrams.

C. Define the principle of transmissibility.

D. Determine unknown forces in a force system.

E. Determine a moment of a force about a point.

F. Determine an equivalent system.

III. Stress and Strain

A. Describe normal and shear stress.

B. Describe normal strain.

C. Describe allowable stress.

IV. Internal Forces

A. Describe axial and longitudinal loads.

B. Determine internal shear and bending moment.

C. Draw shear and bending moment diagrams.

V. Beams

A. Explain the effect of deflection in design.

B. Determine deflection.

C. Describe a shear stress distribution.

D. Determine shear stress.

E. Describe moment distribution.

F. Determine bending stress.

G. Use resource material to determine moment of inertia and section modulus.

VI. Structural Steel Design

A. Select appropriate beams.

B. Analyze simple structural systems.

C. Determine allowable stress for a beam.

VII. Fluid Mechanics

A. Define a fluid.

B. Define hydraulics/fluid mechanics as it pertains to civil engineering applications.

C. Describe fluid properties such as specific weight and pressure.

D. Perform conversions of units typically used in fluid mechanics.

VIII. Pressurized Pipe Flow

A. Define flow rate and pressure.

B. Describe turbulent and laminar flow.

C. Calculate flow capacity, velocity and flow area.

D. Calculate energy and power in a fluid system.

E. Apply the Bernoulli equation to fluid streams.

F. Analyze major energy losses in fluid flow.

G. Apply the Bernoulli and energy equations to pipe flow.

IX. Open Channel Fluid Flow

A. Define flow rate, slope and channel roughness.

B. Apply the Manning formula to uniform open-channel flow problems.

C. Apply flow formulas to natural channel flow.

X. Hydrology

A. Select the design discharge capacity for a hydraulic structure.

B. Describe how rainfall data is used to predict hydraulic load in a channel or structure.

C.  Apply industry-standard methods to estimate flood magnitude.  

XI. Stormwater Plans

A.Define storm water treatment best management practices (BMP).

B. Describe the land-water connection in relation to engineering design and societal impact.

C. List and describe sources of storm water pollution.

D. Define rain garden and bioretention systems.

E. List and describe common stormwater plan components.

XII. Drainage Facilities

A. Use industry standard methods to design simple stormwater conveyance components.

B. Size ditches for design flow rate.

C. Size storm sewer pipes for design flow rate.

D. Size culverts for design flow rate.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Examinations (Final)
30-60%    Examinations (Unit Tests)
20-50%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 222

  • Title: Mechanical Design and Drafting*
  • Number: DRAF 222
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 123 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 245.
Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 172.

Description:

Students successfully completing this course should be able to draw details and assembly views of mechanical parts. The types of parts discussed in this class include castings, sheet metal pieces, jigs and fixtures, and gauges. Important concepts include dimensioning, form and position tolerancing, coordinate tolerancing, and calculations related to material allowances and manufacturing. Students will use the Machinery's Handbook and other technical publications to research and design projects. Project assignments will be completed using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. This course is typically taught in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Select and specify temporary fasteners.
  2. Identify components and materials used in manufacturing.
  3. Draw a casting drawing.
  4. Identify and draw linkages and cams.
  5. Explain and draw a jig or a fixture.
  6. Specify and draw a gauging device.
  7. Identify sustainability in manufacturing standards.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Temporary Fasteners

A. Specify minimum thread engagement for threaded fasteners.

B. Write a bottom tap and plug tap specification (metric and U.S. customary).

C. Specify machining processes for different fastener heads.

D. Identify grades of fasteners.

E. State a thread specification to join multiple work-pieces with one fastener.

F. Draw and specify the machining requirements to key a shaft to a hub rotationally.

G. Draw and specify the machining requirements to join a tapered key to a shaft.

II. Manufacturing Materials

A. Define carbon steel.

B. Define alloy steel.

C. Write the specifications for heat treatment processes.

D. Select tool steel for a specific application.

E. Describe the properties of alloy and carbon steel.

F. Define the characteristics of tool steel.

G. Specify commercially available manufacturing components.

III. Castings

A. List five casting process and their advantages and disadvantages.

B. Define drawing and manufacturing terms related to castings.

C. Describe the forming process known as powder metallurgy.

D. List considerations of casting and powder metallurgy design.

E. Draw a casting and machine-casting drawing.

F. Specify surface finish requirements based on specific capital equipment.

IV. Cams and Linkage

A. Draw, dimension and tolerance a face cam.

B. Draw and dimension a displacement diagrams.

C. Define linkage terms and calculate.

D. Plot the paths of two linkages.

E. Identify common linkage schematic drawing symbols

F. Calculate vector quantities of force, displacement, velocity and acceleration for a machine element.

G. Resolve linkage vectors.

H. Calculate linkage instant centers.

V. Jigs and Fixtures

A. Describe how jigs and fixtures are used in industry.

B. List the factors that influence jig and fixture design.

C. List manufacturers of commercially available jig and fixture components.

D. Select a commercially available jig or fixture component.

E. Describe a workpiece.

F. Select locating datums.

G. Select clamping devices.

H. Calculate fits for mating parts of a jig or fixture.

I. Design, draw, dimension and tolerance a fixture for a specific workpiece.

J. Assign geometric and true position tolerances to a jig or workpiece.

VI. Gauges

A. Identify types of gauges.

B. Calculate gauging surface limits based on the rule of 1 and 10.

C. Identify manufacturers of gauge products.

D. Select a commercially available gauge product.

E. Draw and specify correct tolerance dimensions for a gauge.

VII. Sustainability in Manufacturing

A. Define sustainability in manufacturing.

B. Identify non-sustainable vs. sustainable methods.

C. Describe the benefits of sustainable manufacturing.

D. Apply sustainable methods of manufacturing.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60%    Homework, reports, review questions, quizzes, drafting assignments
15-25%    Quizzes and Exams
15-25%    Final Examination and/or project

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 225

  • Title: Civil Drafting*
  • Number: DRAF 225
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.
Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 244 and (MATH 131 or MATH 172).

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply drafting techniques used in civil engineering offices. Topics covered include the surveying process, property legal descriptions, topographic maps, plan and profile drawings, roadway cross sections and earthwork calculations. The student will use CAD software in drawing projects. This course is typically taught in the fall semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the civil engineering field as it relates to drafting, office organization, and project execution.
  2. Describe the surveying process and interpret and adjust field notes.
  3. Describe components of project drawings and create location, key and property maps using appropriate symbols, abbreviations and scales.
  4. Interpret legal descriptions of land parcels using proper terms and systems.
  5. Describe and draft topographic maps.
  6. Interpret USGS topographic quadrangle maps.
  7. Use appropriate data to produce plan and profile drawings of a civil engineering project containing both horizontal and vertical curves.
  8. Describe and draw typical cross-sectional views of a roadway using standard civil engineering terms.
  9. Describe how grading is used in roadbed construction.
  10. Explain soil characteristics, cut and fill balancing, and perform earthwork calculations.
  11. Describe basic principles of drainage design and typical drainage structures.
  12. Produce drawings that include appropriate drainage structures.
  13. Describe how computers are used to aid civil drafters.
  14. Use CAD and applications software to produce civil engineering drawings.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Civil Drafting

A. List responsibilities related to civil drafting.

B. Describe employment opportunities for civil drafters.

C. Explain how a civil engineering office is organized.

D. Describe how a typical civil engineering project is executed.

E. Discuss trends in civil drafting and their future impacts.

II. Basic Surveying Procedures

A. Describe the duties of members of a survey crew.

B. Define the different types of land surveys.

C. Identify and explain the purpose of various surveying instruments, such as transit, theodolite, dumpy level, autolevel, EDM, total station, data collector, tape, leveling rod, prism and plumb bob.

D. Describe how horizontal and vertical distances are established.

E. List factors that influence measured distances and how to make corrections.

F. Interpret field notes for taking horizontal distance measurements.

G. Define station angle, deflection angle, interior angle, exterior angle, azimuth, bearing, true north, magnetic north, vertical angle and zenith angle.

H. Describe how angle measurements are taken.

I. Identify sources of error in angle measurements.

J. Interpret field notes of angle measurements.

K. Describe the procedures used in differential leveling.

L. Demonstrate how to balance field notes from a differential level circuit.

M. Describe basic field operations in running a traverse.

N. Interpret traverse data in a field book.

O. Perform traverse adjustments using manual and computer methods.

III. Introduction to Map Drafting

A. Identify standard map symbols and abbreviations.

B. Set up a map legend.

C. Produce a location map for a civil engineering project.

D. Distinguish between new work and existing features.

E. Use appropriate units of measure for project drawings.

F. Describe the components of a set of project drawings.

G. Produce a key map for a civil project.

H. Draw property map from field survey data.

IV. Property Surveys and Legal Descriptions

A. List and explain terms relating to legal land descriptions.

B. Describe the U.S. Public Land Survey System.

C. Define section, township, range, principal meridian and base line as used with the USPLSS.

D. List subdivisions of a USPLSS section of land.

E. Interpret legal descriptions written for USPLSS subdivisions, metes and bounds and lot and blocks.

F. Define right-of-way, including its purpose, how it is obtained, who owns it and how it is shown on a drawing.

V. Topographic Maps

A. Describe common features of a topographic map.

B. Interpret contour lines.

C. Describe characteristics of USGS quadrangle maps.

D. Describe various field methods used to perform topographic surveys.

E. Draw contour map from field data.

VI. Plan and Profile Drawings

A. Read and calculate bearings.

B. Apply stationing to map centerlines.

C. Determine station distances and adjustments.

D. Calculate grades and slopes.

E. Determine appropriate drawing scales.

F. Explain the purpose of benchmarks.

G. Explain horizontal alignment on a plan view.

H. Define terms associated with horizontal curves.

I. Calculate horizontal curve values from appropriate data.

J. Explain vertical alignment on a profile view.

K. Define terms associated with vertical curves.

L. Calculate vertical curve values from appropriate data.

M. Interpret plan and profile views of roadway alignment.

N. Produce plan and profile drawings of a civil engineering project.

VII. Cross-sections

A. Describe typical cross-sectional views of a roadway.

B. Define profile grade point, profile grade line, cut section, fill section, crown, superelevation and transition.

C. Describe the relationship between cross-sections and plan and profile views.

D. Draw cross-sectional views for proposed roadway.

VIII. Earthwork

A. Describe how cut and fill operations are used to construct a roadbed.

B. Explain the use of a borrow pit.

C. Describe basic subsoil characteristics important to cut and fill operations for roadbed construction.

D. Explain shrinkage factors.

E. Evaluate end areas showing earthwork quantities.

F. Describe how to adjust roadway alignment to balance cut and fill.

G. Describe how a mass diagram is used.

IX. Drainage Maps

A. Explain the rationale for stormwater drainage.

B. Explain the basic principles used in drainage design.

C. Identify significant physical features shown on a drainage map.

D. Describe flow lines, channels, channel changes, pipe culverts, box culverts and manholes.

E. Identify types of drainage structures typically found in a set of road plans and describe how they are presented.

F. Describe the format for showing cross-sections of drainage structures.

G. Produce a set of civil drawings that include appropriate drainage structures.

X. Computers in Civil Drafting

A. Describe the impact of computers and electronic survey equipment on surveying/civil drafting.

B. Describe field-to-finish surveying.

C. Describe civil engineering applications that are typically performed using a microcomputer.

D. List various software programs for the PC used in civil drafting along with their appropriate applications.

E. Use CAD and civil applications software to produce civil engineering drawings for class projects.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Assignments
20-40%    Tests/quizzes
15-30%    Final exam

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 230

  • Title: Intermediate CAD: AutoCAD*
  • Number: DRAF 230
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 130 or department approval.

Description:

This course provides an increased knowledge of AutoCAD as it is used in today's industries. Students will build on their CAD experience by learning new commands and techniques that increase system productivity. Special emphasis will be on developing construction techniques and command usage to increase CAD proficiency. Additional study of standard symbols, layers and editing functions will occur. Concepts covered will include dimensioning variables and styles, attributes and external referencing, as well as paper space and model space, as used in multiple-view drawings. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Create and apply a selection set for selecting objects to edit.
  2. Create and apply object filters to object selection sets for editing objects.
  3. Control the AutoCAD Environment by setting and modifying AutoCAD's Preference.
  4. Change program settings and set system variables.
  5. Create, modify and use Blocks, Attributes and Groups.
  6. Combine drawing files using external references.
  7. Create, identify and use drawings with raster and vector formats.
  8. Create and modify AutoCAD drawings in Model Space and Paper Space.
  9. Communicate and share design information as part of AutoCAD Management task.
  10. Layout and draw isometric drawing.
  11. Create and modify dimension styles.
  12. Edit text files used by AutoCAD.
  13. Create graphic objects using advanced locating methods.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Creating and Controlling Selection Sets

A. Use proper Object Selection Settings.

B. Define available options when prompted to Select Objects.

C. Use the SELECT command.

D. Use Grips to create selection sets.

E. Use shift-click to remove objects from a selection set.

II. Filtering Objects and Layers

A. Learn how to access the Object Selection Filters dialog box.

B. Select object types and properties.

C. Save a named selection set.

D. Apply object filters.

E. Query a layer list.

F. Use wild cards when creating filters.

III. Controlling the AutoCAD Environment

A. Make changes to the Preferences dialog box and tab options.

B. Adjust settings in the tabs found in the Preferences dialog box.

C. Save the preferences settings as a Preferences Profile.

D. Export a Preferences Profile to disk.

E. Review, access and change system variables.

IV. Creating and Controlling Blocks and Attributes

A. Use the commands necessary for creating, inserting, exploding and redefining blocks.

B. Use CUTCLIP and PASTCLIP to create and insert blocks.

C. Define standard working practices for using blocks.

D. Create, edit and extract attributes.

E. Insert drawings and blocks into drawing using the AutoCAD Design Center.

F. Use a symbol library of existing blocks.

G. Create a template file for the storage of block attribute date.

H. Extract attribute values to create a bill of materials.

I. Create a drawing file using the WBLOCK command.

V. Managing External References

A. Attach and detach external references.

B. Attach external references using the overlay option.

C. Bind external references.

D. Update an existing external reference.

E. Define the difference between attached and overlaid external references.

F. Display attached xrefs using the List View and Tree View option.

G. Manage external references and their path locations.

H. Use VISRETAIN to maintain layer property consistency.

I. Define the function of external references.

J. Reference an existing drawing into the current drawing using the XREF command.

K. Bind external references and selected dependent objects to a drawing.

L. Use the AutoCAD Design Center to attach external references.

M. Use external references to create a multiview drawing layout.

N. Control the display of layers in viewports using the Layer Properties Manager dialog box.

O. Use the XCLIP command to clip an externally reference drawing.

VI. Raster Images

A. Attach a raster image into an AutoCAD drawing.

B. Change the display order of the objects in the drawing.

C. Define a clip boundary for the image.

D. Edit the image properties, including Fade and Transparency.

VII. AutoCAD Drawing Environments

A. Identify the concepts behind paper space and model space.

B. Define and create tiled and floating viewports.

C. Create multiple viewports in model space.

D. Create multiple viewports in paper space.

E. Use paper space to plot views with different scales.

F. Use linetypes in paper space.

G. Dimension geometry in model space and in paper space.

H. Define the terms model space and paper space.

VIII. Advanced Plotting

A. Print and plot a drawing.

B. Set up layouts using title blocks and viewports.

C. Create new viewports in a layout tab.

D. Manage layout tabs.

E. Select a plotting device and modify a plotting device configuration.

F. Explain plot styles, plot style tables and plot style modes.

G. Create and modify plot styles and plot style tables.

H. Assign plot styles to drawings, layers and objects.

I. Select the proper plot settings to produce scaled drawings.

J. Calculate scale factors based on the drawing scale.

K. Explain keys to efficient plotting.

IX. Data Management

A. Explain the concepts and applications of AutoCAD's Internet publishing capabilities.

B. Learn to share CAD information with import, export and previous release file interoperability.

C. Use search options to locate existing drawing by time and location.

D. Discuss CAD related file types including DWG, DXF and DWT.

X. Isometric Drawing.

A. Use the AutoCAD tools necessary to draw isometric drawings.

B. Create a text style and place it on the proper ISOPLANE.

C. Create dimensions on the proper ISOPLANE.

D. Use the oblique dimension setting to create isometric appearing dimensions.

XI. Dimension Styles

A. Edit the settings in a dimension style.

B. Create and save a new dimension style.

XII. Files Used by AutoCAD

A. Edit the aliases in the PGP file.

B. Define the areas of the CUI file.

XIII. Advanced Locating Methods

A. Use point filters to locate positions in space.

B. Use direct distance to locate positions in space.

C. Use point acquisition snaps to locate points in space.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Quizzes
50-60%    Lab Assignments/Projects/homework
20-25%    Final Exam

Total 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 238

  • Title: Architectural Design and Drafting*
  • Number: DRAF 238
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 129 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 243.

Description:

This course is an introduction to the production of architectural drawings for residential and commercial construction. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to design and draw floor plans, sections, elevations, dimensions and schedules. Industry standard code and reference books, such as the International Residential Code and Architectural Graphic Standards books, will be used in the research and design process. Projects will be completed using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify wood construction systems.
  2. Identify construction materials and their graphic symbols.
  3. Dimension architectural drawings.
  4. Draw window and door details and schedules.
  5. Identify stair details.
  6. Use industry references and regulatory agencies' standards.
  7. Produce a set of commercial or residential architectural drawings.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Wood Construction Systems

A. Identify common residential framing systems.

B. Identify and describe post-and-beam construction.

C. Draw a typical residential wall section.

D. Define and calculate roof pitch.

II. Construction Materials and Symbols

A. Identify the symbol for concrete block.

B. Identify the symbol for poured-in-place concrete.

C. Identify the symbol for brick.

D. Identify the symbol for glass.

E. Identify the symbol for gypsum board.

F. Identify the symbol for stone.

G. Identify the symbol for metals.

H. Describe common residential uses of concrete.

I. Describe the purpose of footings and foundations.

J. Describe the items that affect footing depth.

K. Describe typical reinforcement used in concrete.

III. Architectural Drawings

A. Dimension masonry construction with standard dimension style.

B. Dimension wood frame construction with standard dimension style.

IV. Window and Door Details and Schedules

A. Draw window and door details.

B. Produce door and window schedules.

V. Stair Details

A. Calculate the rise and run needed for a flight of stairs.

B. Draw stair details.

VI. Industry References and Regulatory Agencies

A. Use the Architectural Graphic Standards reference book.

B. Use the International Residential Code book.

C. Research city or county building codes.

VII. Commercial or Residential Construction Drawings

A. Draw site plans.

B. Draw floor plans.

C. Draw structural plans.

D. Draw electrical plans.

E. Draw mechanical plans.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-60%    Work Activities (labs, homework)
20-30%    Tests
20-30%    Final exam

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 242

  • Title: Topics in CAD II*
  • Number: DRAF 242
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.

Description:

This course provides training for a specific CAD-related software. Students will learn software commands and terminology. Students will be provided with in-depth coverage of the selected software and be given hands-on experience. Emphasis will be on the application of the selected software to industry projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. For special topics, check the section note on the credit class search site.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the applications and advantages of the software as used in industry.
  2. Identify the differences from standard or previous CAD programs.
  3. Define typical graphics terms as they would apply to the software.
  4. List conventions and use methods provided in the software to access reference material.
  5. Launch the software and identify the parts of the computer graphics screen and describe their function.
  6. Access software commands through menus, toolbars, and the keyboard.
  7. Select appropriate commands to create and edit objects.
  8. Set up, save, and manage drawing files for projects.
  9. Plot drawings. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction To Software Package
A. List industry applications.
B. List advantages for typical applications as compared to traditional
methods.
C. Describe differences from standard or previous CAD programs.
D. Define software terms.
E. List conventions used in the application of the software.
F. List reference materials and how to access them.

II. Software Structure
A. Launch the software.
B. Describe keyboard functions.
C. List and describe menus.
D. List and describe toolbars.
E. Access the on-line help.

III. Commands
A. Define software commands.
B. Describe each command function.
C. Identify the syntax of a typical command including prompts and
defaults.
D. Use each command to create or edit objects.

IV. Projects
A. Set-up project drawings using appropriate commands.
B. Manage files using built-in file management or a separate file
manager program.
C. Save drawings for future use.
D. Plot drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams                      20% - 40% of grade
Lab Assignments/Homework 60% - 80% of grade
100%
Grading Criteria:
90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 243

  • Title: Advanced BIM: Revit*
  • Number: DRAF 243
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 143 or department approval.

Description:

This course introduces the student to advanced Building Information Modeling (BIM) concepts used by many architectural and engineering design firms. Topics include advanced modeling and documentation tools, project setup and the design process. Students will model commercial buildings and produce architectural drawings. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the current software to industrial projects. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the advanced applications of software used in industry.

  2. Explain the current software interface.

  3. Apply tools to develop advanced modeling elements.

  4. Create commercial architectural drawings using the current software.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Advanced BIM Applications

A. List industry applications.

B. List advantages for typical applications as compared to traditional methods.

C. List reference materials and how to access them.

II. Current Software Interface

A. Explain the current software interface.

B. List and describe advanced tools syntax.

C. Access the online help and models resources.

III. Advanced Modeling Elements

A. Apply advanced tools to create and edit advanced modeling elements:

1. Walls

2. Floors

3. Ceilings

4. Roofs

B. Use advanced tools to create and edit sections and details.

C. Apply tools to create schedules used for a commercial building.

D. Explain and create a basic family model with parameters.

IV. Commercial Projects

A. Create commercial architectural project drawings using appropriate commands.

B. Manage files using built-in file management or a separate file manager program.

C. Plot drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Exams
60-80%    Lab Assignments/Homework

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 244

  • Title: Civil 3D*
  • Number: DRAF 244
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 225 or department approval.

Description:

This course introduces the student to the Civil 3D software used by many land planning, civil engineering and surveying firms. Topics include software commands, project setup and the design process. Survey points, surfaces, topography, road layout and soil volumes are covered in this course. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the software to industrial projects. It is recommended that students have previous civil engineering design knowledge or are taking or have taken DRAF 225, Civil Drafting. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the applications of Civil 3D software used in industry.
  2. Launch the software, identify the interface components and describe their function.
  3. Access software commands through menus, toolbars and the keyboard.
  4. Create typical civil engineering drawing components using Civil 3D software.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Civil 3D

A. List industry applications.

B. List advantages for typical applications as compared to traditional methods.

C. Define software terms.

D. List conventions used in the application of the software.

E. List reference materials and how to access them.

II. Software Structure

A. Launch the software.

B. Describe keyboard functions.

C. List and describe menus.

D. List and describe toolbars.

E. Access the online help.

III. Commands

A. Define software commands.

B. Describe each command function.

C. Identify the syntax of a typical command including prompts and defaults.

D. Use each command to create or edit objects.

IV. Projects

A. Set up civil engineering project drawings using appropriate commands.

B. Use the civil design process to create civil engineering drawings.

C. Manage files using built-in file management or a separate file manager program.

D. Create survey points.

E. Create a surface from survey data.

F. Create a topographic map.

G. Lay out a road with both horizontal and vertical curves.

H. Create a road cross section.

I. Calculate soil volumes.

J. Save drawings for future use.

K. Plot drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Exams
60-80%    Lab Assignments/Homework

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 245

  • Title: Advanced Parametric Design: Inventor*
  • Number: DRAF 245
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DRAF 145 or department approval.

Description:

This course uses the Inventor Parametric design software used by many industrial and mechanical design firms. Topics include software commands, project setup and the design process. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on application of the software to industrial projects. It is recommended that students have previous mechanical design knowledge or have taken DRAF 145. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the applications for parametric design software as used in industry.
  2. Explore the software interface.
  3. Access software commands through menus, toolbars and the keyboard.
  4. Use commands to develop advanced parametric models.
  5. Use commands to develop assembly models.
  6. Create a set of machine drawings using drawing sheets and associated functions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Parametric Design Software Applications

A. List industry applications.

B. List advantages for parametric applications as compared to traditional methods.

C. Define software terms.

D. List design strategies used in the application of the software.

E. List reference materials and how to access them.

II. Software Interface

A. Launch the software.

B. Explain the current software interface.

C. List and describe menus.

D. List and describe toolbars and panels.

E. Access the online help.

III. Commands

A. Define software commands.

B. Describe each command function.

C. Identify the syntax of a typical command including prompts and defaults.

D. Use commands to create or edit parametric objects.

IV. Advanced Parametric Models

A. Describe model construction using the parent/child design relationship.

B. Apply and modify dimensions using the parent/child relationship.

C. Create and edit material properties.

D. Create parts with revolved features.

E. Create parts with circular patterns and mirrored features.

F. Create parts that contain lofted or shelled features.

G. Create parts that contain extruded or swept features.

V. Assembly Models

A. Describe assembly modeling methodologies.

B. Define assembly constraints.

C. Apply assembly constraints to a model.

D. Create a bill of materials from the assembly model.

E. Apply basic motion analysis.

VI. Projects

A. Set up mechanical engineering project drawings using appropriate commands.

B. Use pre-defined sheets and views to create drawings.

C. Manage files using built-in file management or a separate file manager program.

D. Use feature-based modeling to produce datum features and auxiliary views.

E. Produce complete drawings with dimensions, linetypes, notations and title blocks.

F. Set up a drawing sheet for an assembly model.

G. Save drawings for future use.

H. Plot drawings.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Exams
60-80%    Lab Assignments/Homework

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 246

  • Title: MicroStation for AutoCAD users*
  • Number: DRAF 246
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 230 or department approval.

Description:

This course introduces the student to the MicroStation software interface and command structure. The course is intended for students who are familiar with the use of the AutoCAD software and need a transition to the use of MicroStation. Topics include basic operating fundamentals, AccuDraw, working with elements, references and printing. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Open MicroStation and create accurate elements using AccuDraw.
  2. Describe the basics of working with a DGN file.
  3. Create Model, Design and Sheet files.
  4. Add text, notes and annotations to Design files.
  5. Set up References and use them to create drawings.
  6. Create printed output including 3D PDF files.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Element creation

A. Adjust the element attribute settings.

B. Select appropriate drawing tools.

C. Adjust tool settings.

D. Interact with the status bar prompts.

E. Specify the location of new elements.

F. Use AccuDraw to create and manipulate elements.

G. Use the XY mode and Distance Angle Mode to local elements.

H. Use shortcuts tools.

II. DGN File

A. Create a DGN file.

B. Use tools to modify the DGN file.

C. Use tools to manipulate the element attributes.

III. Model, Design and Sheet Files

A. Create and modify model files.

B. Create and modify design files.

C. Create and manage sheet files.

IV. Annotation

A. Use the single and multi-line tools.

B. Create dimensioned drawings.

C. Create revision clouds.

V. References

A. Reference vector files into the drawing.

B. Reference raster files into the drawing.

C. Reference data files using the Project Explorer.

VI. Output

A. Produce printed output.

B. Produce PDFs.

C. Produce 3D PDFs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-40%    Exams
60-80%    Lab Assignments/Homework

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 252

  • Title: Structural Design and Drafting*
  • Number: DRAF 252
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 129 and DRAF 135 and DRAF 230 and DRAF 243 or department approval.
Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 172.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to produce structural drawings and details of steel, concrete and wood structures for manufacturing, construction, engineering and architectural firms. The student will use industry standard references and perform design calculations. Project work will be done using CAD. This course is typically taught in the spring semester. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe steel as a structural material.
  2. Explain and draw commercial steel structural systems.
  3. Define industrial steel structural systems.
  4. Describe wood as a structural material.
  5. Explain and draw commercial wood structural systems.
  6. Define industrial wood structural systems.
  7. Describe concrete as a structural material.
  8. Explain and draw commercial concrete structural systems
  9. Define industrial concrete structural systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Structural Material: Steel

A. Explain how structural steel is manufactured.

B. Name structural steel shapes and identify their symbols.

C. Identify the different types of open-web steel joists.

D. Identify the different types of trusses and their components.

E. Describe the types of loads and stresses acting on members.

F. Name the fastening methods employed in steel construction.

G. Describe basic steel framing systems.

H. Describe beam connections and column connections.

I. Describe steel wall studs and their applications.

J. Describe lintels and their function.

II. Commercial Steel Structural Systems

A. Identify commercial framing systems generally used.

B. Describe framing systems used with prefabricated metal buildings.

C. Detail welded and bolted connections.

D. Prepare column schedules.

E. Prepare structural steel design drawings and details.

F. Prepare fabrication (shop) drawings.

G. Prepare bill of materials from structural steel drawings.

III. Industrial Steel Structural Systems

A. Explain long-span framing usage for industrial buildings.

B. List the characteristics of steel that make it a frequent choice for industrial structures.

C. Describe the two functions which steel columns may perform.

D. Describe a bent.

E. List the common truss types used in industrial construction.

F. Cite the factors to consider when choosing a particular truss.

G. Define purlins, girts and struts and describe their uses.

H. Describe the function of diagonal bracing.

I. Describe a crane girder and its support system.

IV. Structural Material: Wood

A. Define lumber grades.

B. Define the categories of softwoods and hardwoods.

C. Identify types of structural infirmities in wood.

D. Explain the effect of wood grain on structural properties.

E. Describe the effects of shrinkage on lumber properties.

F. Identify actual sizes from nominal lumber sizes.

G. Define engineered lumber and compare it to regular lumber.

H. Describe the stresses given in design tables for various grades and species of lumber.

I. List the advantages and disadvantages of wood trusses to conventional framing.

J. Describe various fastening devices used with wood connections.

K. Describe structural glulam and microlam lumber and their uses.

V. Commercial Wood Structural Systems

A. Name the various wood framing systems for commercial use.

B. Define the term camber.

C. List factors to consider when detailing beam connections.

D. Name the two wood species commonly used in laminated wood.

E. Describe the layout of individual laminations in glulam members.

F. Name the various arch and rigid-frame types available.

G. Describe a hinge connection for arches.

H. Describe the type of foundation required for arches.

I. Prepare connection details for laminated wood members.

J. Describe post-and-beam construction and its applications.

K. Draw a floor-framing plan.

VI. Industrial Wood Structural Systems

A. List types of installations where wood systems would be advantageous.

B. List metal fastening devices used for typical wood connections.

C. Describe lateral ties and their purpose.

D. Describe diagonal and longitudinal bracing and their purpose.

E. Explain the purpose of bracing between trusses.

F. Create drawings and details for a roof truss system.

VII. Structural Material: Concrete

A. Define what concrete is and list its components.

B. List the factors which affect the quality of concrete.

C. Define course and fine aggregates.

D. Explain the process of consolidating concrete in forms.

E. List the variables which affect the strength of concrete.

F. Describe the slump test and explain its purpose.

G. Describe the compression test and explain its purpose.

H. Explain the purpose of steel reinforcement in concrete.

I. Describe the various steel reinforcement types used with concrete.

J. Define cast-in-place, precast and prestressed concrete.

K. Describe the two types of drawings used for structural concrete systems.

L. List the commonly used admixtures for concrete and describe their application.

VIII. Commercial Concrete Structural Systems

A. Describe the purpose of footings and foundations.

B. Explain how soil bearing capacity affects the design of footings.

C. Explain how soil pressures affect the design of foundation walls.

D. Describe the considerations affecting footing depth.

E. List the different types of footings.

F. Describe typical reinforcing used in residential foundations.

G. List the factors to consider in the design of reinforced concrete block walls.

H. List the factors to consider in concrete floor slab construction.

I. Name various types of concrete framing systems used for commercial construction.

J. Explain the fire-resistive and maintenance qualities of concrete.

K. Describe the typical drawings required for concrete systems.

L. Identify different foundation systems for varying site conditions.

M. Define grade beams.

N. Describe marking systems used for concrete structural members.

O. Create design drawings for a commercial foundation system.

P. Create a bar placing drawing for a foundation system.

Q. Prepare a typical beam and column schedule for placing steel reinforcement.

IX. Industrial Concrete Structural Systems

A. Name the common structural framing systems used in industrial construction.

B. Discuss the impact of moving loads on structural systems.

C. Describe different types of floor slabs used in industrial construction.

D. Describe the various joints and connections used in concrete construction.

E. Describe a typical beam and column schedule for placing steel reinforcement in industrial concrete construction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Assignments/Homework
20-30%    Test/Quizzes
20-30%    Final Examination

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 264

  • Title: CAD:Interior Design*
  • Number: DRAF 264
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 164 and ITMD 121(both courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or higher), or department approval.

Description:

This course is an introduction to the use of computer-aided drafting (CAD) as used in the interior design field. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to draw floor plans and elevations of interiors using a computer-aided drafting system. AutoCAD LT software will be used. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed. Note: Prerequisites DRAF 164 and ITMD 121 require a grade of "C" or higher.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the parts of a computer graphics system and describe their function.
  2. Explain JCCC CAD lab procedures.
  3. Define and use the commands needed to construct floor plans and interior elevations.
  4. Define and use the commands needed to edit objects.
  5. Define and use the commands needed to create symbols.
  6. Define and use the dimensioning and text commands.
  7. Define and use the layer and linetype commands.
  8. Define and use the commands to improve productivity.
  9. Define and use the inquiry commands.
  10. Use a plotter and a printer to create hard copies.
  11. Manage files using the appropriate software.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Computer Graphic System

A. Identify and explain the different disk drives related to the JCCC system.

B. Identify and explain input and output devices related to the JCCC system.

C. Explain the screen layout.

D. Define a CPU.

E. Identify the functions of the various keyboard symbols and control characters on a computer keyboard.

II. JCCC CAD Lab Procedures

A. Explain and use the proper JCCC log-in procedures.

B. Explain and use the proper JCCC network procedures.

III. Basic Drawing Commands

A. Identify the construction syntax of a typical graphics command.

B. Define the Cartesian coordinate system.

C. Use the Absolute, Relative, Polar coordinate systems and other data entry methods for entering point locations.

D. Create and save a new drawing using the proper commands.

E. Use the LINE, CIRCLE and ARC commands to create objects.

F. Use the GRID and SNAP commands to draw objects.

G. Use the HATCH command to draw objects.

H. Use the PLINE command to draw objects.

I. Use the ELLIPSE, POLYGON, RECTANG and POINT to draw objects.

J. Use the OSNAP commands to draw objects.

K. Use the ZOOM, PAN and VIEW commands to position and scale the displayed image on your screen to a convenient work size.

IV. Basic Editing Commands

A. Use the ERASE command to edit different objects.

B. Use the MIRROR, ROTATE, ARRAY and OFFSET commands to construct and modify objects and patterns of objects.

C. Use the COPY and MOVE commands to modify objects.

D. Use the FILLET and CHAMFER commands to modify objects.

E. Use the DIVIDE and MEASURE command to divide various objects into specific portions.

F. Use the SCALE and STRETCH commands to modify objects.

G. Use the PROPERTIES command to edit objects.

H. Use the TRIM, LENGTHEN, JOIN, BREAK, and EXTEND commands to modify objects.

I. Use the 'Grips' tools to edit objects.

J. Use the PEDIT command to edit plines.

V. Create Symbols

A. Use the BLOCK commands to create symbols.

B. Use the INSERT commands and the DESIGN CENTER to position symbols in a drawing.

C. Use the WBLOCK command to save objects to a drawing.

VI. Dimensioning and Text Commands

A. Use the DIMENSION commands to place various dimensions on a drawing.

B. Use the TEXT commands to create and to place text and notes on a drawing.

C. Use the appropriate commands needed to change the height, width, slant and location of existing text and dimensions.

D. Use the DIMENSION STYLE and TEXT STYLE commands to create styles based on given standards or specifications.

VII. Layer and Linetype Commands

A. Use the LAYER command to make specified layers visible on the graphics display.

B. Use the LAYER command to get information about the current layer status of a drawing.

C. Use the proper command to change objects from one layer to another layer.

D. Construct an object while keeping the drawing, dimensions and the text on separate layers.

E. Use the LINETYPE command to specify different linetypes.

F. Use the proper command that would change the linetype of existing objects.

VIII. Improve Productivity

A. Use the ‘right click’ to access drawing commands and palettes.

B. Use the ‘right click’ to access editing commands and palettes.

IX. Inquiry Commands

A. Use the INQUIRY commands to verify different objects of a drawing.

B. Use the INQUIRY commands to answer specific questions about the size, area, location, or angle of objects.

C. Use the ONLINE HELP feature as a reference resource.

X. Create Hard Copies

A. Use the PLOT command to set up and use a plotter for plotting a drawing.

B. Use the PLOT command to print a copy of the drawing.

C. Use the proper commands to place the drawing on the screen at a desired scale and position for plotting.

XI. File Management

A. Use the current software to copy, list, delete and rename files.

B. Use the proper commands to enter the graphics system.

C. Use the proper commands for assigning a filename.

D. Use the proper commands for exiting from the graphics system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Projects
10-30%    Labs, Quizzes, Homework
20-40%    Exams

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

70% Competency required for promotion to courses required in the ITMD program.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 264H

No information found.

DRAF 271

  • Title: Drafting Internship I*
  • Number: DRAF 271
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job- and career-related skills while in a work setting. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals. 15 hrs. min./wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe work activities accomplished on-the-job to the internship facilitator.
  2. Provide an accurate description of the company, it's products and services.
  3. Perform technical drafting tasks to accomplish work assignments.
  4. Document the application of classroom knowledge used and new skills developed at the work place.
  5. Document a greater preparedness, personally and professionally, for a career position. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Work Activities Accomplished On-The-Job
   A. Describe the work related activities accomplished on the job to the
internship Facilitator.
   B.  Discuss in a meeting with the Facilitator and the job Supervisor
the success of the internship.
   C. Prepare a final written report summarizing the learning experience
provided by the internship.

II. The Company
   A. Provide an accurate description of the company's products. 
   B. Provide an accurate description of the services the company
provides.
   C. Provide an accurate description of the task related polices and
procedures at the company.

III. Work Assignments
   A. Meet with the job Supervisor to discuss work related tasks.
   B. Meet with the Facilitator to develop learning objectives for the
work related tasks.
   C. Write the individualized learning objectives for the job-related
tasks.
   D. Perform the job related tasks at the work site.
   E. Maintain an activity log (journal) detailing the job-related tasks.
   F. Maintain a journal of time spent on the job.
   G. Document new learning that is a result of company provided
training.

IV. Application Of Classroom Experience To The Work Place Environment
   A. Use classroom knowledge to complete job-related tasks.
   B. Document the use of classroom knowledge to complete job-related
tasks.
   C. Document new learning that occurs as a result of completing
job-related tasks.

V. Personal And Professional Preparedness For A Career Position
   A. Document the increased personal preparedness for a career resulting
from the internship.
   B. Document the increased professional preparedness for a career
resulting from the internship.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Writing of student objectives           5% of grade
Final Report and Journal Evaluation    60%of grade
Final Employer Evaluation              35% of grade
                                      100%
Grading criteria:
 90 - 100% = A
 80 -  89% = B
 70 -  79% = C
 60 -  69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Transportation to the work site is the responsibility of the student.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 272

  • Title: Drafting Internship II*
  • Number: DRAF 272
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 15
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DRAF 271 and department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The internship will provide advanced students the opportunity to develop job- and career-related skills while in a work setting. The work will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student to provide a variety of actual job experiences directly related to the student's career goals.15 hrs. min./wk. Drafting classes that have additional lab have either the time and room listed or TBA (to be announced) with the room number listed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe work activities accomplished on-the-job to the internship facilitator.
  2. Provide an accurate description of the company, its products and services.
  3. Perform technical drafting tasks to accomplish work assignments.
  4. Document the application of classroom knowledge used and new skills developed at the workplace.
  5. Document a greater preparedness, personally and professionally, for a career position. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Work Activities Accomplished On-the-Job
A. Describe the work related activities accomplished on the job to the
internship facilitator.
B. Discuss in a meeting with the facilitator and the job supervisor the
success of the internship.
C. Prepare a final written report summarizing the learning experience
provided by the internship.

II. The Company
A. Provide an accurate description of the company's products.
B. Provide an accurate description of the services the company
provides.
C. Provide an accurate description of the task-related polices and
procedures at the company.

III. Work Assignments
A. Meet with the job supervisor to discuss work-related tasks.
B. Meet with the facilitator to develop learning objectives for the
work-related tasks.
C. Write the individualized learning objectives for the job-related
tasks.
D. Perform the job-related tasks at the work site.
E. Maintain an activity log (journal) detailing the job-related tasks.
F. Maintain a journal of time spent on the job.
G. Document new learning that is a result of company-provided
training.

IV. Application of Classroom Experience to the Workplace Environment
A. Use classroom knowledge to complete job-related tasks.
B. Document the use of classroom knowledge to complete job-related
tasks.
C. Document new learning that occurs as a result of completing
job-related tasks.

V. Personal and Professional Preparedness for a Career Position
A. Document the increased personal preparedness for a career resulting
from the internship.
B. Document the increased professional preparedness for a career
resulting from the internship.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Writing of Student Objectives          5% of grade
Final Report and Journal Evaluation 60% of grade
Final Employer Evaluation 35% of grade
Total 100%

Grade criteria:
90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Transportation to the work site is the responsibility of the student. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DRAF 291

No information found.