Dietary Managers (DIET)

Courses

DIET 100   Foodservice Management for Dietary Managers (3 Hours)

This course provides a comparison of the different types of meal service, along with ways of satisfying client preferences. Students will understand and apply the various components of foodservice including forecasting, purchasing, receiving and storing food, and equipment recommendations. Budgeting, marketing, safety and food quality of the industry will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

DIET 151   Nutrition and Meal Planning (3 Hours)  

This course covers the food groups and their function and nutritional values as applied to meal planning. Assessment of personal dietary intake will also be explored. In addition to the current trends in nutrition this course covers energy balance, sustainability and nutrition in the life span. This is a required course for the food and beverage management, chef apprenticeship and dietary manager programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

DIET 151H   HON: Nutrition and Meal Planning* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

DIET 200   Medical Nutrition Therapy* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: DIET 151 or HMEC 151.

This course provides an understanding of how medical nutrition therapy impacts disease and the role of the dietary manager in utilizing this therapy in a clinical setting. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

DIET 251   Nutrition Applications* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: DIET 200.

This course explores the application of nutrition in four areas of emphasis: clinical, community, research and food science. This course requires a minimum of 25 hours of coordinated field experience. Some field experience facilities may have other requirements.

DIET 275   Dietary Managers Practicum* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course enables the student to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The practicum will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student. It will include a minimum of 100 hours per semester in a foodservice organization that would hire a dietary manager. This is a capstone class. Students will be required to have a background check and documentation of current TB skin test - negative results.

DIET 100

  • Title: Foodservice Management for Dietary Managers
  • Number: DIET 100
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course provides a comparison of the different types of meal service, along with ways of satisfying client preferences. Students will understand and apply the various components of foodservice including forecasting, purchasing, receiving and storing food, and equipment recommendations. Budgeting, marketing, safety and food quality of the industry will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Examine the health care foodservice industry.
  2. Interpret an organizational chart.
  3. Evaluate meal service systems and selective menus.
  4. Forecast, order, receive and store food for a foodservice organization.
  5. Evaluate equipment and equipment needs.
  6. Verify quality of food served.
  7. Prepare a financial report, utilizing budgeting criteria.
  8. Develop a marketing plan for a dietary department.
  9. Prepare a survey to assess client’s preferences.
  10. Compile a list of department duties and relationships to other departments and the community.
  11. Identify federal regulations.
  12. List characteristics of continuous quality improvement.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Foodservice Industry
   A. Name the types of institutions that provide foodservice operations.
   B. List current trends and issues.
   C. Define institutional foodservice.
   D. Explain how the objectives of an institutional foodservice operation are developed.
   E. Compare contract management with self-operation of an institutional foodservice operation.

II. Organizational Chart
   A. Identify the lines of authority, power, responsibility and accountability on an organizational chart, as well as the role of the dietary manager.
   B. Compare organizational charts from different institutions.
   C. Discuss the interrelationships among departments in an institution.

III. Client Preferences
   A. Define who the customers are.
   B. Discuss ways to determine client preferences.
   C. Recognize reasons for understanding customer needs and preferences.
   D. List information, prepare questions and administer a survey. 
   E. Identify patient food preferences and food problems.
   F. Determine ways to incorporate information into both employee training and menus in an institution.

IV. Meal Service Systems
   A. Discuss the value of evaluating meal service.
   B. Determine types of distribution systems.
   C. Differentiate between centralized and decentralized service.
   D. Analyze differences between tray service and group dining.
   E. Calculate trays per minute.
   F. Use an evaluation questionnaire.
   G. Discuss solutions for obstacles or constraints in food distribution.
   H. Evaluate compliance of meals served as posted in an institution.
   I. Make recommendations for choosing or revising a service and delivery system.
   J. Recognize that payment systems are integrated with service and delivery.

V. Selective Menus
   A. Define selective menu.
   B. Review dietary requirements of clients.
   C. Determine regulations regarding food substitutions and meeting client food preferences.
   D. Plan appropriate selective menus.
   E. Match food items identified with client preferences and diet restrictions.

VI. Forecasting
   A. Explain the need for forecasting.
   B. Identify methods for forecasting.
   C. List events that can affect forecasting.
   D. Gather data needed for forecasting.
   E. Consider menus, recipes, diet census, tally sheets and cafeteria needs to develop requisitions.
   F. Use data to forecast.
   G. Develop procedures and forms to monitor food production.
   H. Develop procedures for monitoring food waste control.

VII. Purchasing
   A. Describe how an inventory list is developed.
   B. Identify resources needed to develop requisitions.
   C. Explain the procedure for determining inventory value.
   D. List the objectives of purchasing.
   E. Differentiate among the types of purchasing.
   F. Describe how to develop specifications for food products.
   G. Discuss the process of evaluating products for possible purchase.
   H. Evaluate facility needs, budget restrictions and products available.
   I. Complete purchase order/requisition forms.
   J. Identify practices that are essential for ethical purchasing.

VIII. Receiving, Storage and Distribution
   A. Discuss the impact of receiving practices on quality and cost.
   B. Describe accounting procedures and documentation, from purchasing through receiving, storage and issuing.
   C. Discuss the need to supervise the requisition and distribution of supplies.
   D. Establish security procedures.

IX. Equipment
   A. List factors that influence the design of a foodservice facility.
   B. Examine the regulatory requirements that affect design and construction decisions.
   C. Compare equipment in receiving, storage, production and service areas.
   D. Outline steps for purchasing capital equipment.
   E. List factors affecting equipment selection.
   F. Review an equipment specification.
   G. List the benefits of effective preventive maintenance.
   H. Complete an equipment record card.
   I. Justify a decision to purchase a piece of equipment.
   J. Identify training needs for current and new equipment.

X. Quality
   A. Determine management actions that influence the quality of food served.
   B. Describe the steps involved in managing quality.
   C. List the different methods of evaluating food quality.
   D. Locate where food quality standards are located.
   E. Evaluate food quality/quantity served.
   F. Describe recommendations for improvement.
   G. Recognize the influence of external standards in a dietary quality management program.
   H. Discuss record keeping and monitoring for accountability.
   I. Recognize the influence of external standards in a dietary quality management program.

XI. Safety and Productivity
   A. Identify common safety hazards in foodservice.
   B. Determine federal safety laws/regulations.
   C. List techniques for improving safety in the workplace.
   D. Explain the concept of ergonomics.
   E. Discuss examples of practices that improve ergonomic factors in foodservice.
   F. Differentiate between employee productivity and work simplification.
   G. Apply principles of work simplification.
   H. Write an inspection report on hazard control.

XII. Budget
   A. Distinguish between cash operations and board plans.
   B. Explain how a budget is used.
   C. Define key terminology used in budgets.
   D. Identify the role of the dietary manager in financial management.
   E. State the major factors affecting cost control for food production and service, labor and operating expenses.
   F. Compare monthly costs to monthly budget.
   G. Determine labor costs.
   H. Convert employee lists and working hours to FTE figures.
   I. Prepare a short financial report.

XIII. Cost-Effectiveness
   A. Analyze the need for cost-effective procedures.
   B. Review the bidding process and application to cost control.
   C. Examine terms used in budget reporting.
   D. Read an operating statement.
   E. Recommend cost-saving purchasing practices.
   F. Recommend cost-saving department practices.
   G. Establish criteria to assess labor costs.
   H. Investigate software designed for financial management.

XIV. Revenue-Generating Services
   A. Plan foodservice and menus for a catered event.
   B. Calculate costs and price per unit for a catered event.
   C. Research new revenue-generating opportunities.
   D. Determine target audience.
   E. Name some examples of an image a dietary department might wish to convey as a foundation for marketing efforts.
   F. List examples of promotional techniques.
   G. Establish criteria to assess the marketing effort.
   H. Design a simple marketing plan for a foodservice department.

XV. Department Services
   A. Identify outside groups and departments important to the work of the foodservice department.
   B. Prepare a list of services provided by the foodservice department.
   C. Identify internal groups/departments who might work together to provide services to the community.
   D. Develop a plan to meet community needs.
   E. Honor clients’ rights while providing food and nutrition care.

XVI. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)
   A. Define terms related to CQI.
   B. Relate the need for CQI to meet current regulations.
   C. List steps required in CQI.
   D. Determine the CQI process in a facility.
   E. Identify the role of the dietary manager in the CQI process.
   F. Monitor quality indicators.
   G. Develop auditing tools to determine the effectiveness of quality indicators.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and quizzes 40-60% 
Projects, assignments, and activities 40-60%
Total 100%
 
Grading Criteria:
90%-100% A
80%-89% B
70%-79% C
60%-69% D
Below 60% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DIET 151

  • Title: Nutrition and Meal Planning
  • Number: DIET 151
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the food groups and their function and nutritional values as applied to meal planning. Assessment of personal dietary intake will also be explored. In addition to the current trends in nutrition this course covers energy balance, sustainability and nutrition in the life span. This is a required course for the food and beverage management, chef apprenticeship and dietary manager programs. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify the six classes of nutrients and their sources.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients.
  3. Employ available resources to make sound nutritional choices.
  4. Explain energy balance and weight control as they relate to nutrition and wellness.
  5. Describe nutritional needs throughout the life span.
  6. Recognize global food safety, security and sustainability issues.
  7. Differentiate between reliable and unreliable nutrition information

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Nutrient Intake and Diet Planning Guides

A. Classify the essential and nonessential nutrients.

B. Define flavor.

C. Assess three days of food intake via a computerized analysis.

D. Describe recommended nutrient intakes.

E. Identify current USDA Dietary Guidelines and food groups.

F. Read and interpret information on a food label.

G. Discuss the relationship between portion sizes and food intake.

H. Identify common food allergens and dietary substitutions.

I. Explain the concept of nutrient density.

II. Nutritional Information

A. Identify sources of reliable nutrition information.

B. Identify website evaluation criteria.

III. Digestion and Metabolism

A. Identify the organs in the digestive tract.

B. Identify the enzymes, hormones and fluids involved in digestion.

C. Describe the absorption and metabolism of nutrients.

IV. Carbohydrates

A. Describe the digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates..

B. Identify the food sources of carbohydrates.

C. Differentiate between simple and complex carbohydrates.

D. Explain the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber.

E. Explain the difference between dietary and functional fiber.

F. Summarize the functions of carbohydrates in the body.

G. Summarize the functions of carbohydrates in food sources.

H. Explain how the body regulates the level of glucose in the blood.

I. Describe the etiology of diseases involving carbohydrates.

V. Lipids

A. Describe the digestion, absorption and metabolism of lipids.

B. Define lipids, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids.

C. Define saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans fats.

D. List the functions of lipids in the body.

E. Define the essential fatty acids.

F. Discuss the relationship between lipids and diseases.

G. List the functions of lipids in food sources.

H. Identify the food sources of lipids.

I. Design a heart healthy menu.

VI. Proteins

A. Describe the digestion, absorption and metabolism of proteins.

B. List the functions of proteins in the body.

C. Compare and contrast the nutrients in animal and plant protein.

D. Explain the difference between essential and non-essential amino acids.

E. Describe the relationship between protein and health.

F. List the advantages and disadvantages of vegetarian diets.

G. Design a vegetarian meal plan.

VII. Vitamins

A. Differentiate between fat and water-soluble vitamins.

B. Identify the functions of vitamins.

C. Identify the food sources of vitamins.

D. Describe deficiencies and toxicities of vitamins.

E. Discuss food storage, preparation and preservation techniques to preserve vitamins.

VIII. Water and Minerals

A. State the functions of minerals.

B. Identify the food sources of minerals.

C. Describe deficiencies and toxicities of minerals.

D. Identify appropriate and in appropriate uses of vitamin and mineral supplementation.

E. List the function of water in the body.

F. Identify the dietary sources of water.

G. Discuss the moderate and excessive use of alcohol.

IX. Energy Balance and Weight Control

A. Define kilocalories.

B. Explain energy balance.

C. Define overweight and obese.

D. Describe the components of a weight loss program.

E. Recognize the health risks of obesity.

F. Identify methods to decrease calories in food preparation.

X. Fitness, Nutrition and Exercise

A. Describe the importance of physical activity.

B. Recognize nutrition’s relationship to exercise and performance.

C. Identify common ergogenic aids.

XI. Food Technology, Safety and Sustainability

A. Identify food additives and pesticides.

B. Describe the relationship of food and sustainability.

C. Identify food insecurity domestically and globally.

D. Identify methods to create more healthful menus and recipes.

XII. Nutrition in the Life Span

A. Identify nutrient needs throughout the life span.

B. Describe nutrition’s impact on pregnancy.

C. Define methods of infant feeding.

D. Describe appropriate food choices for children.

E. Describe the physiological aspects of aging.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-30%    Multi-day Diet Analysis
30-50%    Projects
30-50%    Exams and/or Quizzes

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DIET 151H

No information found.

DIET 200

  • Title: Medical Nutrition Therapy*
  • Number: DIET 200
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: DIET 151 or HMEC 151.

Description:

This course provides an understanding of how medical nutrition therapy impacts disease and the role of the dietary manager in utilizing this therapy in a clinical setting. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe basic nutritional principles and how they relate to dietary modifications for disease states.
  2. Assess nutritional status utilizing anthropometrics and chemical, biochemical and dietary data.
  3. Develop a nutrition care plan.
  4. Conduct a nutrition education session.
  5. Develop modified menus for dietary and cultural restrictions.
  6. Assess meal service options in a healthcare setting.
  7. List regulatory agencies and expectations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Food Preferences and Customs

A. Investigate factors that affect food intake.

B. Classify reasons for food selections.

C. Identify food customs of various racial, ethnic or religious groups.

D. Modify a menu for an ethnic, racial or religious preference.

II. Basic Nutrition Principles

A. Discuss the importance of well-balanced nutrition.

B. Identify the six groups of nutrients.

III. Digestion

A. Follow the path of digestion.

B. Describe the organs involved in digestion.

C. Differentiate among digestion of protein, fat and types of carbohydrates.

D. Discuss absorption and its relationship to other body systems.

IV. Life Cycle Nutrition

A. Define at-risk populations.

B. Trace nutrition needs from infancy, childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, lactation and through the elderly.

C. Discuss school lunch regulations.

D. Modify a general menu for at-risk populations.

E. Prepare a one-day menu for a life-cycle family.

V. Medical Nutrition Therapy

A. Review symptoms of nutritional deficiency and excess.

B. Identify basic medical nutrition terminology.

C. Define the basic concepts of medical nutrition therapy.

D. Relate basic concepts to nutritional deficiency and excess.

E. Relate basic concepts of medical nutrition therapy to diseases involving various organ systems.

F. Compare basic concepts of current diet manual or other accepted resources.

G. Explain utilization of medical nutrition therapy in long-term care and acute-care settings.

VI. Nutrition Screening

A. Discuss interview techniques.

B. Identify appropriate data to be gathered.

C. Differentiate between nutrition screening and full assessment.

D. Collect basic diet information.

E. Calculate calorie needs utilizing BMR and activity factor.

F. Calculate BEE, RDA and BMI.

G. Calculate daily fluid requirements.

H. Locate resources to evaluate information gathered.

I. List potential drug/nutrient interactions.

J. Differentiate between routine and at-risk clients.

VII. Nutrient Intake Data Collection

A. List sources of nutrient intake data.

B. Use the ADA exchange system.

C. Use the carbohydrate counting system.

D. Perform routine computations using a computerized nutritional analysis program.

E. Complete a calorie count.

F. Relate a nutrient intake to laboratory values.

VIII. Nutrition Data Interpretation

A. Identify clients needing nutritional intervention.

B. Apply standards of medical nutrition therapy to specific disease state interventions.

C. Use available resources to verify information to ensure its accuracy.

D. Summarize information using accepted formats.

E. Draw conclusions from interpreting nutrition data.

F. Discuss uses for nutrition data interpretations.

G. Describe the role of the dietary manager in interpreting nutrition data.

H. Follow up on problems to ensure impact of documentation.

IX. Nutrition Data Documentation

A. Review medical terminology.

B. Describe the purpose of documentation.

C. List information typically documented in medical records.

D. Discuss where information for documentation is kept.

E. Write notes using correct medical nutrition therapy documentation protocol.

F. Enter nutrition information utilizing the computer if indicated.

G. Locate section in the medical record for nutritional care interventions.

X. Client Information Communication

A. List members of the healthcare team.

B. Review communication techniques.

C. Plan appropriate questions for clients.

D. Practice interviewing clients, family members and health professionals.

E. Identify significant information and problems.

F. Discuss ethical and confidentiality principles.

G. Record information gathered.

XI. Nutrition Care Plan

A. Discuss federal regulations concerning nutritional care in skilled nursing facilities.

B. Differentiate among nutritional care regulations for different types of healthcare facilities.

C. Use Minimum Data Set forms for data recording.

D. List steps in care planning.

E. Review communication techniques.

F. Participate in a care planning session.

G. Summarize information for progress notes in medical charts.

H. Identify client/resident conditions that may be flagged.

I. Initiate client/resident nutrition care protocols.

J. Describe the influence of changes in regulations in nutrition care interventions.

XII. Nutrition Care Plan Effectiveness

A. Interpret anthropometrics, clinical, biochemical and dietary intake.

B. Assess hydration levels, blood glucose levels, edema and skin conditions.

XIII. Client Education

A. Identify the need for nutrient education.

B. Evaluate client readiness and ability to learn.

C. Participate in preparing outlines for nutrition education sessions.

D. Prepare outlines for nutrition education sessions.

E. Determine the most appropriate format for specific sessions.

F. Locate resource materials for nutrition education sessions.

G. Participate in nutrition education sessions.

H. Critique the nutrition education session.

XIV. Regulatory Agencies

A. Identify regulatory standards for dietary departments.

B. Review deficiencies and F-tags.

C. Develop an appropriate plan of correction for deficiencies.

D. Demonstrate professional interaction with surveyors.

XV. Menu Planning

A. List menu planning techniques.

B. Use a checklist for nutritional adequacy and appearance.

C. Recommend additions or changes to menus.

D. Plan a general menu for one week.

E. List the steps for writing modified menus.

F. Explain the rationale for common diet modifications.

G. Describe the use of spreadsheets for modifications.

H. Describe the relationship of residents’ rights to the liberalization of modified diets in long-term care.

I. Explain the use of thickeners in foods.

XVI. Meal Service

A. Define methods of providing client/resident meal service.

B. Contrast advantages and disadvantages of each method.

C. Establish criteria for selecting the most appropriate meal service for clients/residents.

D. Identify methods for providing enteral and parenteral nutrition support.

E. List criteria for providing oral supplements.

F. Explain the role of the dietary manager in providing enteral and parenteral nutrition support.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Exams and quizzes
40-60%    Projects, assignments and activities

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DIET 251

  • Title: Nutrition Applications*
  • Number: DIET 251
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3.5
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3.5

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: DIET 200.

Description:

This course explores the application of nutrition in four areas of emphasis: clinical, community, research and food science. This course requires a minimum of 25 hours of coordinated field experience. Some field experience facilities may have other requirements.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Assess nutritional status utilizing anthropometrics, chemical, biochemical and dietary data.
  2. Discuss the current concepts of behavioral change.
  3. Assess nutritional data and environment.
  4. Examine and participate in community nutrition programs.
  5.  Describe and utilize the methods used to carry out nutrition research.
  6. Explain and utilize the appropriate ingredient functionality to a given food application or process.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Nutrition Screening

A. Use appropriate interviewing techniques.

B. Collect appropriate data.

C. Calculate nutrient needs.

D. Interpret anthropometric, chemical, biochemical and dietary data.

E. Develop a plan of action.

II. Behavioral Change

A. Discuss the current concepts of behavioral change.

B. Apply the principles of behavioral change to a specific person or situation.

II. Nutritional Data and Environmental Assessment

A. Collect data in multiple forms utilizing surveys, menus and recipes

B. Analyze data collected.

C. Summarize recommended changes.

III. Community Nutrition

A. Identify sources of nutrition programs in the community.

B. Explain objectives of community nutrition programs.

C. Develop an appreciation for the difficulty of meeting nutritional needs on a limited budget.

D. Show involvement in a community nutrition program.

IV. Nutrition Research

A. List types of nutrition research.

B. Develop a nutrition research question.

C. Review the literature.

D. Produce a research project.

E. Evaluate results of a research project.

V. Food Science

A. Explain ingredient functionality in foods.

B. Develop an original food item.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Clinical Nutrition Project
20-30%    Community Nutrition Project
15-25%    Nutrition Research Project
15-25%    Food Science Project

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

DIET 275

  • Title: Dietary Managers Practicum*
  • Number: DIET 275
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 100
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 100

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course enables the student to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. The practicum will be developed cooperatively with area employers, college staff and each student. It will include a minimum of 100 hours per semester in a foodservice organization that would hire a dietary manager. This is a capstone class. Students will be required to have a background check and documentation of current TB skin test - negative results.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Apply knowledge and skills acquired in Dietary Manager Certificate courses in a noncommercial foodservice setting.
  2. Document the details of the practicum, including tasks performed, knowledge gained, and problems encountered and how they were solved.
  3. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Application of Knowledge and Skills

A. List objectives to be met in the practicum.

B. Implement classroom knowledge to meet objectives.

C. Demonstrate completion of objectives.

II. Documentation of Practicum

A. Maintain a log of hours worked and major responsibilities completed.

B. Discuss problems and solutions with preceptor.

III. Professional Conduct and Effective Workplace Skills

A. Develop human relations skills needed for the position.

B. Display sensitivity to the needs of the diversity of individuals encountered in the practicum setting.

C. Adhere to policies and procedures of the practicum site.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Practicum Hours completed: 60%

Practicum Objectives Met: 30%

Professional Conduct: 10%

Completion of all 100 hours is a requirement to complete the Dietary Manager Certificate Program.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).