Global & International Studies (GIST)

Courses

GIST 101   Study Abroad Reflections* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: Department approval; student must be enrolled in the study abroad program.

This course will assist students in maximizing their study abroad experience. In this course, students will reflect on the three phases of study abroad: pre-departure, being abroad and return. The topics covered in this course include general administrative and logistical issues, intercultural interactions, global competencies, culture shock, integration of study abroad experiences with current life and future plans, and the impact of international/intercultural experiences on one's self and one's worldview. Students through reflection on their study abroad experience will identify new skills and growth, and articulate how these will enhance their professional, personal and academic goals.

GIST 250   Introduction to Globalization (3 Hours)

This course will provide students with the origins and current implications of globalization. In this course, students will examine the question "what is globalization?" The topics covered include economic and political globalization as well as global security, culture and environmental issues. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the variation in global issues that influence national policy and our daily lives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

GIST 250H   HON: Introduction to Globalization* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

GIST 101

  • Title: Study Abroad Reflections*
  • Number: GIST 101
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 15 - 45
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 15 - 45

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: Department approval; student must be enrolled in the study abroad program.

Description:

This course will assist students in maximizing their study abroad experience. In this course, students will reflect on the three phases of study abroad: pre-departure, being abroad and return. The topics covered in this course include general administrative and logistical issues, intercultural interactions, global competencies, culture shock, integration of study abroad experiences with current life and future plans, and the impact of international/intercultural experiences on one's self and one's worldview. Students through reflection on their study abroad experience will identify new skills and growth, and articulate how these will enhance their professional, personal and academic goals.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use other-cultural material so as to engage with, analyze and understand various elements of communities outside the United States.
  2. Discuss, debate and analyze non-U.S. cultures in relation to one’s own value assumptions so as to identify one’s own cultural values and biases and how these impact one’s ability to work with others.
  3. Negotiate cross-cultural situations by employing knowledge of various cultural beliefs, behaviors and practices on cultural competency so as to recognize how to interact more effectively and appropriately with people who have been socialized in a different linguistic and cultural environment.
  4. Document and measure one’s grasp of global cultures and value systems, evaluating one’s awareness of global interdependence (e.g., environmental, economic, cultural, health, etc.) through reflective written or oral analysis.
  5. Analyze theories of culture shock and reverse culture shock, and relate them to one’s study abroad experience and return.
  6. Explain how one’s international/intercultural experiences have affected one’s sense of self and worldview.
  7. Synthesize one’s international/intercultural experiences into one’s academic/daily life and future plans.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Other-Cultural Understanding of Communities Outside the U.S.

A. Use other-cultural material.

B. Engage with and synthesize various elements of other-cultural understanding of communities outside of the U.S.

II. Relation of Non-U.S. Cultures to One’s Own Value Assumptions.

A. Identify one’s own cultural values and biases and how these impact one’s ability to work with others.

B. Discuss, debate and analyze non-U.S. cultures in relation to one’s own value assumptions.

III. Negotiating Cross-Cultural Situation.

A. Research cultural competency to recognize how to interact more effectively and appropriately with people who have been socialized in a different culture.

B. Negotiate cross-cultural situations by employing knowledge of various other cultural beliefs, behaviors and practices.

IV. Global Interdependence

A. Document and measure one’s grasp of global cultures and value systems.

B. Evaluate one’s awareness of global interdependence (e.g., environmental, economic, cultural, health, etc.).

V. Culture Shock

A. Describe theories of culture shock and reverse culture shock.

B. Relate the above theories to one’s own study abroad experience and return.

VI. Self and the World

A. Explain how one’s international/intercultural experience affects one’s self.

B. Discover how one’s international/intercultural experience affects one’s worldview.

VII. Integration of Study Abroad Experience

A. Synthesize one’s international/intercultural experiences into one’s academic and daily life.

B. Synthesize one’s international/intercultural experiences into one’s future plans.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Completing quizzes on assigned readings
20-30%    Participating in meetings and discussions prior to departure and after returning
40-60%    Completing all written assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

This is a variable credit hour course (1-3 credits).  The option of the 2 or 3 credit hour course requires additional course work under objective 1:  "Use other-cultural material so to engage with, analyze and understand various elements of communities outside the United States."  The "other-cultural material" will, in this case, correspond to the specific contextual location of the study abroad experience outside the United States.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GIST 250

  • Title: Introduction to Globalization
  • Number: GIST 250
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will provide students with the origins and current implications of globalization. In this course, students will examine the question "what is globalization?" The topics covered include economic and political globalization as well as global security, culture and environmental issues. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the variation in global issues that influence national policy and our daily lives. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify ideologies and definitions of globalization.
  2. Discuss the history of globalization.
  3. Describe the different forms of globalization.
  4. Assess some of the effects of technology on globalization.
  5. Trace some of the processes of economic globalization.
  6. Analyze some tensions that underlie political globalization.
  7. Explain how multilateralism can increase the security of globalization.
  8. Evaluate cultural globalization including beneficial and harmful example.
  9. Explain the impact of globalization and migration.
  10. Enumerate the major issues linked to environmental globalization.
  11. Define and explain the future of the nation-state.
  12. Discuss human rights and democracy in a globalizing world.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Globalization and its Origins

A. Compare and contrast conflicting ideologies of globalization.

B. Identify the competing definitions of globalization.

II. History of Globalization

A. Compare different historical paths to globalization.

B. Discuss various forms of globalization.

III. Alternative Globalizations

A. Differentiate top-down from bottom-up globalization.

B. Review components of social justice.

C. Describe the different forms of Islamic globalization.

IV. Technology and Globalization

A. Classify some effects of technology on the scale and permeability of political, economic, social and cultural identifies.

B. Assess the impact of the Internet on political protests.

C. Evaluate controversial uses of technology.

V. Economic Globalization

A. Trace the processes, according to neoliberalism, through which class power is restored to power elites following creative destruction.

B. Outline some of the benefits that can accrue from open trade.

VI. Political Globalization

A. Relate definitions of civil society to political positions on globalization.

B. Analyze the global tension that exists between the underrepresented and the great powers.

VII. Security Globalization

A. Explain how multilateralism can increase global security.

B. Review the use of cyber tactics in past conflicts.

VIII. Cultural Globalization

A. Discuss the controversial aspects of Samuel Huntington’s paper on the clash of civilizations.

B. Evaluate the McDonaldization paradigm with a view at how well it accommodates the local.

IX. Globalization and Migration

A. Explain the impact of migration in both positive and negative terms.

B. Examine the resentment and opposition to immigration as exemplified in either the United States or Europe.

X. Environmental Globalization

A. Enumerate the major environmental issues linked to globalization.

B. Evaluate how countries have tried to manage environmental concerns.

XI. The Future of the Nation-State

A. Enumerate the most commonly used definitions of the state.

B. Identify and explain some possible future state adaptations to national identity.

XII. Human Rights and Democracy in a Globalizing World

A. Enumerate the different rights (positive and negative) that encompass the human rights laid out by international organizations.

B. Discuss whether international norms are essential to most human rights.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-40%     A mid-term and final exam which will constitute 20 to 40% of the final grade.
20-40%     Five short writing assignments. Each paper will be 2-3 pages.
10-20%     Three map quizzes for three general regions of the world.
10-20%     Class participation will constitute 10-20% of the final grade.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

GIST 250H

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