English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

Courses

EAP 101   Writing and Grammar I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the beginning college level. Students will learn effective writing techniques and grammatical structures for using American English at the sentence and basic paragraph level. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

EAP 103   Writing and Grammar II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 101 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience. Students will focus on using American English in writing at the paragraph level along with grammatical structures to help ensure student success. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 105   Speaking and Listening I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English speaking students the opportunity to develop their speaking, listening and pronunciation skills. Students will learn effective techniques for using American English in academic, career and personal settings. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 107   Speaking and Listening II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 105 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to expand fluency in speaking, listening and pronunciation. Students will learn effective techniques for listening with accuracy and speaking with the stress, rhythm and intonation of American English. Personal communications and group interactions in academic, career and community settings are included. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

EAP 111   Writing and Grammar III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 103 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the high-intermediate level. Students will focus on developing fluency in writing using American English at the paragraph and multiparagraph level along with grammatical structures to support writing. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This course is the third writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 113   Writing and Grammar IV* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 111 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to improve fluency in American English in writing at the high intermediate to advanced level. Students will engage in writing tasks that relate to the academic disciplines. The course also focuses on grammar activities including editing strategies for effective writing. This is the fourth writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 115   Speaking and Listening III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 107 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to enhance fluency in speaking, pronunciation and listening at the upper intermediate level. Students will apply standard American English communication patterns to understand lectures, speak in academic settings and communicate in group interactions. Students will learn effective techniques for presenting formal and informal speeches in specific fields of study and academic debates. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the third speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 117   Speaking and Listening IV* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 115 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course offers non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to master speaking, pronunciation and listening at an advanced level. Students will apply advanced communication patterns to understand lectures, speak fluently in academic settings and communicate broadly in group interactions. Students will learn effective techniques for applying advanced strategies to process knowledge from specific fields of study and communicate precise meanings of standard American English. This course will allow students the opportunity to give presentations with idiomatic vocabulary from literature, media and research sources. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 120   Reading and Vocabulary I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communication experience at the high beginning college level. Students will learn effective techniques for reading, studying and using American English in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 121   Reading and Vocabulary II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 120 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to develop reading fluency, comprehension and vocabulary at the intermediate college level. Reading, writing, speaking and listening will be integrated, and students will learn effective techniques for studying and using American English in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 122   Reading and Vocabulary III* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: EAP 121 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the high-intermediate college level. Students will develop reading fluency, comprehension and vocabulary. Reading, writing, speaking and listening will be integrated, and students will learn effective techniques for using American English to read and study in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the third reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

EAP 101

  • Title: Writing and Grammar I*
  • Number: EAP 101
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the beginning college level. Students will learn effective writing techniques and grammatical structures for using American English at the sentence and basic paragraph level. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the stages of the writing process.
  2. Compose correct sentences using a variety of sentence structures.
  3. Identify the elements of a paragraph.
  4. Explain and discuss American cultural conventions of academic writing and plagiarism.
  5. Identify and correctly use parts of speech.
  6. Identify and correct grammar and mechanics errors.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to the Writing Process

A. Practice methods for generating ideas.

1. Use brainstorming.

2. Use free writing.

3. Use clustering.

B. Practice techniques for organizing information.

1. Use grouping.

2. Use outlining.

C. Practice strategies for revising.

1. Use peer feedback to edit writing.

2. Read aloud.

3. Use dictionaries for editing.

II. Practice of Correct Sentence Composition

A. Practice writing a variety of sentence structures.

1. Create simple sentences.

2. Create compound sentences.

3. Create complex sentences.

4. Use proper word order.

5. Create questions.

6. Create imperative sentences.

B. Identify conjunctions.

1. Study coordinating conjunctions.

2. Study subordinating conjunctions.

3. Study correlating conjunctions.

C. Use comparatives.

1. Form comparatives correctly.

2. Use comparatives in sentences.

D. Use superlatives.

1. Form superlatives correctly.

2. Use superlatives in sentences.

E. Identify negative forms of verbs.

1. Form negatives correctly.

2. Use negatives in sentences.

III. Introduction of Paragraph Writing

A. Practice writing various sentence structures in paragraph format.

1. Practice writing topic sentences.

2. Practice writing supporting sentences.

3. Practice writing concluding sentences.

B. Recognize unity within a paragraph.

C. Recognize coherent paragraph structure.

D. Practice using simple transitional words.

E. Practice correct academic format for paragraphs.

IV. Introduction of Cultural Conventions of U.S. College-Level Academic Writing

A. Identify writing expectations in the U.S. college classroom.

B. Explain the definition of plagiarism.

C. Discuss the consequences of plagiarism.

D. Discuss various college-level writing tasks.

V. Identification of Parts of Speech

A. Identify nouns in context.

B. Identify pronouns in context.

C. Identify verbs in context.

D. Identify adjectives in context.

E. Identify adverbs in context.

F. Identify functions of each part of speech.

G. Differentiate between count and non-count nouns.

H. Identify use of determiners in context.

1. Recognize various uses of articles.

2. Recognize various uses of other determiners.

I. Identify prepositions.

J. Identify prepositional phrases.

VI. Practice of Beginning Grammar

A. Use simple tenses.

B. Use progressive tenses.

C. Express future time with time phrases.

D. Differentiate between regular and irregular verbs.

E. Use prepositions.

F. Use prepositional phrases.

G. Differentiate between statement and question grammatical structures.

H. Study sentence construction errors.

1. Identify incomplete sentences

2. Identify problems of subject-verb agreement

3. Identify problems with verb tenses

4. Identify improper verb forms

I. Study proofing errors.

1. Identify misspelled words.

2. Use correct capitalization.

3. Use end-of-sentence punctuation.

4. Use commas.

5. Use apostrophes.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group work
40-50%    In-Class Activities, Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 103

  • Title: Writing and Grammar II*
  • Number: EAP 103
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 101 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience. Students will focus on using American English in writing at the paragraph level along with grammatical structures to help ensure student success. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the pre-writing and writing processes to develop effective paragraphs.
  2. Compose a variety of coherent and unified paragraphs.
  3. Use correct academic vocabulary for academic tone and style.
  4. Explain and discuss American cultural conventions of academic writing and plagiarism.
  5. Expand use of sentence constructions and sentence patterns in writing.
  6. Identify and correct grammar and mechanics errors.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Application of the Writing Process

A. Use pre-writing methods.

B. Use planning to construct paragraphs.

C. Use drafting to write paragraphs.

D. Use techniques for revising and editing.

1. Participate in peer feedback.

2. Use available resources for improving writing.

a. Use grammar handbooks.

b. Use Internet sources.

c. Use campus resource centers.

E. Use proofreading strategies.

1. Change typographical errors.

2. Use a spell-check program.

II. Practice of Paragraph Writing

A. Review characteristics of a paragraph.

B. Develop unity and coherence of the paragraph.

1. Write topic sentences with clear controlling ideas.

2. Write supporting sentences that relate to and further explain the topic sentence.

3. Write concluding sentences to logically end a paragraph.

C. Compose different types of paragraphs.

D. Practice timed writing.

E. Use correct academic format for paragraphs.

III. Introduction to Essay Writing

A. Explain the structure of U.S. academic essays.

B. Explain the purposes of U.S. academic essays.

C. Write an essay with an introduction, body and conclusion.

D. Recognize correct academic format for essays.

IV. Practice of Using Correct Academic Vocabulary for Academic Tone and Style

A. Use transition expressions to connect ideas.

B. Determine audiences for academic writing.

C. Determine purposes for academic writing.

D. Differentiate between denotation and connotation.

E. Use college-level academic vocabulary.

V. Discussion of Cultural Conventions of U.S. College-Level Academic Writing

A. Review the definition of plagiarism.

B. Review the consequences of plagiarism.

C. Explain methods of avoiding plagiarism.

1. Identify a source when quoting.

2. Identify paraphrasing.

3. Identify summarizing.

VI. Expansion of Sentence Constructions and Sentence Patterns in Writing

A. Review sentence structure.

B. Review sentence types.

C. Study adjective clauses.

D. Study noun clauses.

E. Apply sentence variety to enhance fluency.

1. Apply coordination correctly.

2. Apply subordination correctly.

3. Apply relative pronouns in subordination correctly.

4. Apply prepositional phrases correctly.

F. Edit sentence-level errors.

1. Edit for correct subject-verb agreement.

2. Edit for run-on sentences.

3. Edit for comma splices.

4. Edit for fragments.

5. Edit for incorrect shifts in verb tense.

VII. Practice of Intermediate Grammar

A. Use beginning grammatical constructions.

B. Recognize intermediate level grammatical constructions.

1. Identify gerunds.

2. Identify infinitives.

3. Identify perfect tenses.

4. Identify passive voice.

5. Identify phrasal verbs.

6. Identify transitive verbs.

7. Identify intransitive verbs.

8. Identify active verbs.

9. Identify stative verbs.

10. Identify modals.

C. Practice correct use of pronoun-antecedent agreement.

D. Use correct forms for all parts of speech.

E. Edit for proofing errors.

1. Use correct spelling.

2. Use correct capitalization.

3. Use correct end-of-sentence punctuation.

4. Use commas correctly.

5. Use apostrophes correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group work
40-50%    In-Class Activities, Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 105

  • Title: Speaking and Listening I*
  • Number: EAP 105
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English speaking students the opportunity to develop their speaking, listening and pronunciation skills. Students will learn effective techniques for using American English in academic, career and personal settings. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate listening comprehension of a variety of sources.
  2. Identify and apply listening strategies.
  3. Apply a variety of note-taking strategies.
  4. Produce and differentiate American English vowel and consonant sounds.
  5. Identify American English rhythm of stressed and unstressed syllables and words in sentences.
  6. Present and evaluate a variety of short speeches, both formal and informal.
  7. Apply appropriate language to accomplish a variety of tasks inside and outside the classroom.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Beginning Listening Comprehension Skills

A. Identify basic listening topics.

B. Identify main ideas.

C. Identify supporting details.

D. React to a listening text with questions and opinions.

E. Respond to comprehension questions.

F. Collaborate with others to share ideas and views about listening text.

II. Application of Beginning Listening Strategies

A. Use context to predict content.

B. Use context to guess meaning of words and phrases.

C. Identify common signal words and phrases.

D. Identify key words in spoken discourse.

E. Use graphic organizers.

F. Practice listening for signal words and phrases.

G. Practice note-taking skills.

H. Recall information based on notes.

III. Introduction to Beginning Oral Production Skills

A. Identify the number of syllables in words.

B. Distinguish between stressed and unstressed syllables.

C. Distinguish between stressed and unstressed words.

D. Identify tone and inflection.

E. Identify the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) system.

1. Recognize consonant and vowel IPA symbols.

2. Interpret consonant and vowel IPA symbols.

3. Use an American English dictionary to identify pronunciation of unfamiliar words.

4. Pronounce words based on IPA spelling.

IV. Introduction to Beginning Presentation Skills

A. Recognize culturally acceptable non-verbal communication.

B. Articulate basic meaning through speaking.

C. Prepare outlines.

D. Demonstrate standard American English pronunciation.

E. Evaluate presentations of self and others.

V. Practice of Beginning Academic Communication Skills

A. Produce grammatically comprehensible American English.

B. Give and follow oral instructions.

C. Ask and answer questions.

D. Interact regularly with native speakers of English.

E. Recognize differing levels of formal and polite language.

F. Practice using appropriate expressions during a dialogue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%:    Collaborative Group work
40-50%:    Presentations and Homework
20-30%:    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 107

  • Title: Speaking and Listening II*
  • Number: EAP 107
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 105 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to expand fluency in speaking, listening and pronunciation. Students will learn effective techniques for listening with accuracy and speaking with the stress, rhythm and intonation of American English. Personal communications and group interactions in academic, career and community settings are included. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate listening comprehension of a variety of sources.
  2. Demonstrate organized note-taking strategies.
  3. Produce and differentiate American English vowels, consonants, consonant clusters, and final consonants.
  4. Describe and produce American English rhythm and intonation.
  5. Deliver and evaluate brief and well-organized oral presentations in a variety of formats.
  6. Apply learned speaking strategies inside and outside the classroom.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Development of Listening Comprehension Skills

A. Use listening strategies to aid comprehension.

B. Identify common organizational cues.

C. Recognize main ideas and supporting details.

D. React to a listening text with questions and opinions.

E. Respond to comprehension questions.

F. Collaborate with others to share ideas and views about listening text.

II. Application of Intermediate Listening Strategies

A. Use graphic organizers.

B. Use abbreviations and symbols.

C. Organize notes based on oral cues.

D. Use note-taking skills.

E. Recall information based on notes.

III. Introduction to Intermediate Oral Production Skills

A. Identify and articulate beginning and final consonant clusters.

B. Identify and articulate final consonants.

C. Identify and describe reductions in spoken English.

D. Identify and explain purposes of rising and falling intonation.

E. Recognize thought groups.

IV. Application of Intermediate Oral Production Skills

A. Use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to explain, differentiate, and produce American English vowels and consonants.

B. Use an American English dictionary to pronounce unfamiliar words.

C. Pronounce words based on IPA spelling.

D. Syllabicate words correctly.

E. Differentiate between content and structure words.

F. Emphasize words appropriately in extended discourse.

V. Practice of Intermediate Presentation Skills

A. Recognize culturally acceptable norms of non-verbal communication.

B. Organize presentations with introduction, body and conclusion.

C. Convey more in-depth meaning through speaking.

D. Demonstrate standard American English pronunciation.

E. Evaluate presentations of self and others.

VI. Practice of Intermediate Academic Communication Skills

A. Produce grammatically comprehensible American English.

B. Engage in brief, impromptu conversations.

C. Discuss in pairs and small groups.

D. Demonstrate differing levels of formal and polite language appropriate to context.

E. Interact regularly with native speakers of English.

F. Apply appropriate expressions during a dialogue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 111

  • Title: Writing and Grammar III*
  • Number: EAP 111
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 103 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the high-intermediate level. Students will focus on developing fluency in writing using American English at the paragraph and multiparagraph level along with grammatical structures to support writing. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This course is the third writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the pre-writing and writing processes to construct effective paragraphs and essays.
  2. Compose a variety of well-organized non-research essays.
  3. Use correct academic vocabulary for academic tone and style.
  4. Explain and discuss American cultural conventions of academic writing and plagiarism.
  5. Use a variety of sentence structures correctly and effectively.
  6. Identify and correct grammar and mechanics errors.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Application of the Writing Process

A. Use pre-writing methods to explore topic ideas.

B. Use outlining methods to construct paragraphs.

C. Create multiple drafts of essays.

D. Use techniques for revising and editing.

1. Use peer feedback.

2. Use available resources for improving writing.

3. Use grammar handbooks.

4. Use Internet sources.

5. Use campus resource centers.

II. Practice of Essay Writing

A. Review characteristics of a paragraph.

B. Practice writing the parts of an essay.

1. Write an introductory paragraph.

2. Write a thesis statement.

3. Write body paragraphs that relate to and explain the thesis statement.

4. Write a concluding paragraph that logically ends the essay.

C. Compose a variety of non-research essays.

D. Practice timed essays.

E. Use correct academic format for essays.

III. Practice of Using Correct Academic Vocabulary for Academic Tone and Style

A. Use a variety of transition expressions to write coherently.

B. Determine audiences for academic writing.

C. Determine purposes for academic writing.

D. Apply college-level academic vocabulary.

E. Evaluate between denotation and connotation.

IV. Discussion of Cultural Conventions of U.S. College-Level Academic Writing

A. Review the definition of plagiarism.

B. Review the consequences of plagiarism.

C. Expand strategies to avoid plagiarism.

1. Study acknowledging sources.

2. Study paraphrasing.

3. Study summarizing.

V. Application of Sentence Constructions and Sentence Patterns in Writing

A. Study more complex coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

B. Study dependent clauses.

1. Identify full adjective clauses.

2. Identify reduced adjective clauses.

3. Identify subject relative clauses.

4. Identify object relative clauses.

5. Identify restrictive adjective clauses.

6. Identify non-restrictive adjective clauses.

7. Identify adverb clauses.

8. Identify noun clauses.

C. Edit sentence-level errors.

1. Edit for correct subject-verb agreement.

2. Edit for run-on sentences.

3. Edit for comma splices.

4. Edit for fragments.

5. Edit for unnecessary shifts in verb tense.

VI. Practice of High-Intermediate Grammar

A. Use intermediate grammatical constructions correctly.

B. Study high-intermediate grammatical constructions.

1. Recognize conditional statements.

2. Recognize indirect speech.

3. Recognize quotes.

4. Identify vague pronoun references.

C. Demonstrate knowledge of correct word forms for all parts of speech.

D. Edit for proofing errors.

1. Use correct spelling.

2. Use correct capitalization.

3. Use correct end-of-sentence punctuation.

4. Use commas correctly.

5. Use apostrophes correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    In-Class Activities, Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams and Assessments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 113

  • Title: Writing and Grammar IV*
  • Number: EAP 113
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 111 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to improve fluency in American English in writing at the high intermediate to advanced level. Students will engage in writing tasks that relate to the academic disciplines. The course also focuses on grammar activities including editing strategies for effective writing. This is the fourth writing and grammar course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Employ the writing process to construct effective academic essays.
  2. Compose academic essays using outside sources effectively and responsibly.
  3. Use correct academic vocabulary for academic tone and style.
  4. Explain and discuss American cultural conventions of academic writing and plagiarism.
  5. Employ sentence variety effectively to enhance writing sophistication.
  6. Use correct grammar to produce coherent prose.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Application of the Writing Process

A. Use pre-writing methods to explore topic ideas.

B. Use outlining methods to construct paragraphs.

C. Create multiple drafts of essays.

D. Use techniques for revising and editing.

1. Use peer feedback.

2. Use available resources for improving writing.

3. Use grammar handbooks.

4. Use Internet sources.

5. Use campus resource centers.

II. Practice of Writing a Research Essay

A. Review characteristics of an essay.

B. Write academic research essays using multiple sources.

C. Select, evaluate and use appropriate library, Internet and other sources for writing assignments.

D. Acknowledge and correctly cite sources used in a research essay.

E. Use an academic citation format.

F. Use correct academic format for research essays.

III. Practice of Using Correct Academic Vocabulary for Academic Tone and Style

A. Use a variety of cohesive devices to demonstrate unity and coherence.

B. Determine audience and purpose for academic writing.

C. Employ college-level academic vocabulary.

D. Compose denotation and connotation styles.

IV. Discussion of Cultural Conventions of U.S. College-Level Academic Writing

A. Review American academic research writing conventions.

B. Quote texts effectively.

C. Paraphrase texts effectively.

D. Summarize texts effectively.

E. Contextualize quotes effectively.

F. Use correct punctuation for quotes.

V. Application of Sentence Constructions and Sentence Patterns in Writing

A. Use dependent clauses appropriately.

B. Use parallel construction appropriately.

C. Use modifiers appropriately.

D. Demonstrate knowledge of correct use of semicolons and colons.

VI. Practice of Advanced Grammar

A. Use high-intermediate grammatical constructions correctly.

B. Study advanced grammatical constructions.

1. Use adverb clauses correctly.

2. Use phrasal verbs correctly.

3. Use conditional statements correctly.

C. Use pronouns correctly.

D. Demonstrate knowledge of correct parts of speech.

E. Edit for proofing errors.

1. Use correct spelling.

2. Use correct capitalization.

3. Use correct end of sentence punctuation.

4. Use commas correctly.

5. Use apostrophes correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    In-Class Activities, Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 115

  • Title: Speaking and Listening III*
  • Number: EAP 115
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 107 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to enhance fluency in speaking, pronunciation and listening at the upper intermediate level. Students will apply standard American English communication patterns to understand lectures, speak in academic settings and communicate in group interactions. Students will learn effective techniques for presenting formal and informal speeches in specific fields of study and academic debates. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the third speaking course in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate listening comprehension of a variety of sources.
  2. Analyze American English sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).
  3. Analyze and produce correct American English rhythm and intonation.
  4. Deliver a variety of organized and well-developed oral presentations using visual aids.
  5. Select appropriate language for various purposes and audiences.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Expansion of Listening Comprehension Skills

A. Use listening strategies to aid comprehension.

B. Identify more complex organizational cues.

C. Recognize main ideas and supporting details.

D. Recognize digressions from main topic.

E. React to a listening text with questions and opinions.

F. Respond to comprehension questions.

G. Collaborate with others to share ideas and views about listening text.

II. Application of High Intermediate Listening Strategies

A. Demonstrate effective and organized note-taking strategies.

B. Illustrate graphic organizers.

C. Interpret a speaker's purpose.

III. Application of High Intermediate Oral Production Skills

A. Use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to differentiate between American English vowel and consonant sounds in written and spoken English.

B. Identify and articulate consonant clusters across word boundaries.

C. Produce final consonants correctly.

D. Use American English dictionary to pronounce unfamiliar words.

E. Pronounce words based on IPA spelling.

F. Syllabicate words correctly.

G. Produce common reductions in spoken English.

H. Produce appropriate rising and falling intonation.

I. Produce appropriate thought group pauses.

J. Emphasize content and reduce structure words appropriately.

K. Use appropriate stress to differentiate grammatical structures.

IV. Expansion of High Intermediate Presentation Skills

A. Recognize culturally acceptable norms of non-verbal communication.

B. Organize presentations with introduction, body and conclusion.

C. Communicate and elaborate meaning through speaking.

D. Demonstrate standard American English pronunciation.

E. Evaluate presentations of self and others.

F. Incorporate visual aids effectively.

V. Application of High Intermediate Academic Communication Skills

A. Produce grammatically comprehensible American English.

B. Engage in extended impromptu conversations.

C. Discuss in pairs and small groups.

D. Use differing levels of formal and polite language appropriate to context.

E. Use appropriate turn-taking strategies.

F. Interact regularly with native speakers of English.

G. Demonstrate appropriate expressions during a dialogue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 117

  • Title: Speaking and Listening IV*
  • Number: EAP 117
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 115 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course offers non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to master speaking, pronunciation and listening at an advanced level. Students will apply advanced communication patterns to understand lectures, speak fluently in academic settings and communicate broadly in group interactions. Students will learn effective techniques for applying advanced strategies to process knowledge from specific fields of study and communicate precise meanings of standard American English. This course will allow students the opportunity to give presentations with idiomatic vocabulary from literature, media and research sources. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate listening comprehension of a variety of sources.
  2. Deliver a variety of organized and well-developed individual and group oral presentations and effectively use multimedia aids.
  3. Use appropriate and effective language for various purposes and audiences.
  4. Analyze and produce American English rhythm and intonation.
  5. Infer information not stated in direct speech.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Refinement of Listening Comprehension Skills

A. Use listening strategies to aid comprehension.

B. Recognize main ideas and supporting details.

C. Recognize digressions from main topic.

D. React to a listening text with questions and opinions.

E. Respond to comprehension questions.

F. Collaborate with others to share ideas and views about listening text.

G. Take effective and organized notes.

H. Interpret literal and indirect spoken messages from various discourses.

II. Application of Advanced Listening Strategies

A. Demonstrate highly effective and organized note-taking strategies.

B. Relate expressions of approval and disapproval.

C. Interpret fact from opinion.

D. Apply meaning when misunderstanding occurs.

III. Refinement of Advanced Oral Production Skills

A. Utilize the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to differentiate between American English vowel and consonant sounds in written and spoken English.

B. Produce linking of end consonant sounds to beginning vowel sounds.

C. Syllabicate words correctly.

D. Produce phrase-level reductions in spoken English.

E. Use emphatic speaking style intonation.

F. Use fillers appropriately.

G. Use appropriate stress to differentiate grammatical structures.

IV. Refinement of Advanced Oral Presentation Skills

A. Use culturally acceptable norms of non-verbal communication.

B. Organize presentations with introduction, body, and conclusion.

C. Communicate and elaborate meaning through speaking.

D. Incorporate relevant and useful research into presentations.

E. Demonstrate standard American English pronunciation.

F. Evaluate presentations of self and others.

G. Use a variety of multimedia aids.

H. Acknowledge outside sources of information.

V. Application of Advanced Academic Communication Skills

A. Produce grammatically comprehensible American English.

B. Engage in extended impromptu conversations.

C. Discuss in pairs and small groups.

D. Use differing levels of formal and polite language appropriate to context.

E. Use appropriate turn-taking strategies.

F. Interact regularly with native speakers of English.

G. Articulate appropriate expressions during a dialogue.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 120

  • Title: Reading and Vocabulary I*
  • Number: EAP 120
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communication experience at the high beginning college level. Students will learn effective techniques for reading, studying and using American English in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the first reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read and respond to a variety of short and extended texts.
  2. Identify a text's main ideas, supporting details and organization.
  3. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  4. Use active reading strategies.
  5. Recognize context clues and word parts.
  6. Expand and use a range of academic and thematic words and idiomatic expressions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Beginning Reading Skills

A. Identify the stages of the reading process.

B. Read aloud to practice pronunciation, syllabication and stress patterns.

C. Read for comprehension.

D. React to passages of text with questions and opinions.

E. Respond to comprehension questions.

F. Discuss ideas and views about written text.

G. Evaluate ideas in text for their personal worth or enrichment.

II. Practice of Beginning Reading Comprehension

A. Identify the parts of a text.

B. Identify organizational structure of a text.

C. Identify a topic sentence when it is stated in a paragraph.

D. Identify main ideas.

E. Identify supporting details.

III. Application of Critical Thinking

A. Use active reading strategies.

1. Make notes on a text.

2. Develop graphic organizers.

3. Practice scanning techniques.

4. Practice skimming techniques.

5. Recognize parts of a sentence.

B. Predict content of a reading.

C. Differentiate between fact and opinion.

D. Recognize inferences.

E. Relate content of a reading to prior knowledge.

IV. Expansion of Vocabulary

A. Read widely to build vocabulary.

B. Record definitions of new vocabulary found in reading material.

C. Use English-English dictionaries to define unfamiliar words.

D. Identify idiomatic expressions which cannot be literally translated.

V. Application of Reading and Vocabulary Skills

A. Recognize stated definitions of words in a text.

B. Recognize context clues to establish definitions.

1. Locate key punctuation symbols.

2. Discuss collocations.

C. Identify common word roots.

D. Identify common affixes.

E. Identify parts of speech.

F. Recognize word families.

G. Recall learned vocabulary.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 121

  • Title: Reading and Vocabulary II*
  • Number: EAP 121
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 120 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students the opportunity to develop reading fluency, comprehension and vocabulary at the intermediate college level. Reading, writing, speaking and listening will be integrated, and students will learn effective techniques for studying and using American English in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the second reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read and respond to a wider variety of short and extended texts, including tables and graphs.
  2. Explain a text's main ideas, supporting details and organization.
  3. Identify an author's purpose and tone.
  4. Use active reading strategies.
  5. Find the meaning of vocabulary using context clues and word parts.
  6. Expand and use a broader range of academic and thematic words and idiomatic expressions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Intermediate Reading Skills

A. Apply the stages of the reading process.

B. Practice reading aloud to improve spoken fluency.

C. Read for comprehension.

D. Discuss content of reading material.

E. Evaluate ideas presented in a text.

II. Practice of Intermediate Reading Comprehension

A. Identify a text's organization through signal words.

B. Identify stated or implied main ideas.

C. Identify supporting details.

D. Identify elements of various types of literary genres.

E. Read fluently.

III. Application of Critical Thinking

A. Use active reading strategies.

1. Make notes on a text.

2. Use graphic organizers.

3. Use scanning techniques.

4. Use skimming techniques.

5. Interpret parts of a sentence.

B. Predict content of a reading.

C. Differentiate between fact and opinion.

D. Make inferences.

E. Recognize relevant information for a summary.

F. Describe relevance of text to reader's experience.

IV. Expansion of Vocabulary

A. Read widely to build vocabulary.

B. Discuss and compile new words and phrases found in reading material.

C. Use English-English dictionaries to define unfamiliar words.

D. Interpret idiomatic expressions.

E. Implement newly acquired vocabulary in original contexts.

V. Application of Reading and Vocabulary Skills

A. Determine stated definitions of words in a text.

B. Use context clues to establish definitions.

1. Find key punctuation symbols.

2. Explain collocations.

C. Use common word roots.

D. Use common affixes.

E. Locate parts of speech.

F. Find word families.

G. Distinguish between literal and figurative language in reading material.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

EAP 122

  • Title: Reading and Vocabulary III*
  • Number: EAP 122
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: EAP 121 or appropriate ESL assessment test score.

Description:

This English for Academic Purposes course provides non-native English-speaking students an integrated communicative experience at the high-intermediate college level. Students will develop reading fluency, comprehension and vocabulary. Reading, writing, speaking and listening will be integrated, and students will learn effective techniques for using American English to read and study in an academic setting. This course does not fulfill degree requirements. This is the third reading course in the sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Read and respond to an extensive variety of short and extended texts.
  2. Analyze texts for meaning and organization.
  3. Examine and discuss an author's purpose and tone.
  4. Demonstrate effective note-taking, summarizing and paraphrasing skills.
  5. Find the meaning of vocabulary using context clues and word parts.
  6. Expand and use an advanced range of academic and thematic words and idiomatic expressions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to High-Intermediate to Advanced Reading Skills

A. Implement the stages of the reading process.

B. Read aloud fluently.

C. Read for comprehension.

D. Analyze content of reading material.

II. Practice of High-Intermediate to Advanced Reading Comprehension

A. Interpret textual organization using signal words and phrases.

B. Paraphrase the main idea of a text.

C. Evaluate supporting details.

D. Recognize elements of various types of literary genres.

E. Build necessary background knowledge.

III. Application of Critical Thinking

A. Use active reading strategies.

1. Make notes on a text.

2. Produce graphic organizers.

3. Use scanning techniques.

4. Use skimming techniques.

5. Analyze parts of a sentence.

B. Predict content of a reading.

C. Distinguish between fact and opinion.

D. Identify an author's bias in reading material.

E. Evaluate support for a claim.

IV. Expansion of Vocabulary

A. Read widely to build vocabulary.

B. Document new words and phrases found in reading material.

C. Use English-English dictionaries to define unfamiliar words.

D. Utilize newly acquired vocabulary in novel contexts.

E. Determine idiomatic expressions.

V. Application of Reading and Vocabulary Skills

A. Utilize newly acquired vocabulary in novel contexts.

1. Apply common word roots.

2. Determine common affixes.

3. Apply a word's part of speech.

4. Use context clues.

5. Apply collocations.

B. Summarize reading material.

1. Recognize relevant information.

2. Acknowledge a source appropriately to avoid plagiarism.

3. Synthesize ideas from several texts.

C. Provide logical inferences.

D. Interpret graphic information.

E. Relate content to reader's experience.

F. Illustrate literal and figurative language in reading material.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-30%    Collaborative Group Work
40-50%    Presentations and Homework
20-30%    Quizzes, Exams, and Assessments

Total: 100 %

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about current course caveats.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).