Sustainable Agriculture (SAG)

Courses

SAG 245   Principles of Sustainable Market Farming (3 Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize Market Farmers with sustainable methods of production of crops grown in the Market Farming industry. The course will prepare students in the basic principles of soils; pest and weed management; varieties of plants to grow; establishment, growth, harvesting and post-harvesting of crops; marketing methods; and business management. Students will become familiar with principles of sustainability and the importance of good record keeping. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

SAG 272   Sustainable Agriculture Fall Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the fall and early winter seasons. This includes production and marketing of summer crops, planning, and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field, and marketing these fall crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

SAG 274   Sustainable Agriculture Spring Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the winter and early spring seasons. This includes production and marketing of winter crops and planning and production of spring and summer crops in high tunnels and open field and marketing these spring crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs practicum/wk.

SAG 276   Sustainable Agriculture Summer Practicum (2 Hours)

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the summer season. This includes planning, production and marketing of spring and summer crops and planning and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

SAG 245

  • Title: Principles of Sustainable Market Farming
  • Number: SAG 245
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize Market Farmers with sustainable methods of production of crops grown in the Market Farming industry. The course will prepare students in the basic principles of soils; pest and weed management; varieties of plants to grow; establishment, growth, harvesting and post-harvesting of crops; marketing methods; and business management. Students will become familiar with principles of sustainability and the importance of good record keeping. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the concepts of sustainable agriculture.
  2. Differentiate between commercial agriculture and organic production.
  3. Explain the concept of sustainability with respect to fresh market fruit, vegetable and herb production and how it relates to conventional agriculture and organic production.
  4. Differentiate between soil management and fertilization.
  5. Describe methods of weed management in vegetables, small fruits and herbs.
  6. Identify the various methods of water management, including irrigation, raised beds, drainage and mulching.
  7. Compare and contrast methods of insect and disease control in commercial crops.
  8. Compare various methods used to extend the growing season.
  9. Explain the proper stage(s) to harvest, various harvesting techniques, handling methods, market preparation activities, packaging methods and storage options used in sustainable fresh market production.
  10. Recommend methods and requirements used in crop establishment and plant growth of commonly grown vegetables, herbs and small fruits.
  11. Conduct a market analysis and develop a marketing plan for your operation.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concepts of Sustainability

A. Explain the concepts of environmental stewardship and sustainability.

B. Describe the relationship between profitability and sustainability of farms and local farm communities.

C. Discuss crop and livestock diversification.

D. Differentiate between conventional agriculture and organic production.

E. Discuss the connections between sustainable agriculture and human health.

F. Contrast the concepts of biotechnology and genetic engineering with the concept of sustainability.

G. Explain the importance of conservation of resources.

II. Development of Fresh Market, Commercial Agriculture and Organic Crop Production

A. List important considerations in developing a market plan for an organic or sustainable fresh market farm.

B. Identify the goals, assets and skills you bring in planning your farm.

C. Describe the factors you should consider in finding the place on which to develop your operation.

D. List the equipment you will need starting up.

E. Illustrate the importance of planning and record keeping.

III. Soil Management and Fertilization

A. Define topography and drainage.

B. Describe methods of soil preparation.

C. Explain organic matter and how to maintain organic matter.

D. Describe "on-farm" composting.

E. Identify techniques of vermiculture.

F. Illustrate crop rotation.

G. Explain the use of cover crops and green manure and animal manures.

H. Identify methods of conservation tillage.

I. Explain soil testing, soil pH and the effects of liming.

J. Differentiate between primary, secondary and micronutrients.

K. Analyze fertilizer formulas and ratios.

L. Identify application methods for fertilization.

M. Define soil productivity.

IV. Weed Management

A. Identify the types of weeds common to growing zones 5 and 6.

B. Classify different types of weeds.

C. Explain competition between weeds and cultivated crops.

D. Describe weed control methods.

V. Methods of Water Management

A. Explain water requirements for different crops.

B. Recognize critical periods of water use.

C. Explain soil moisture.

D. Determine the frequency of irrigation and amount of water needed.

E. Describe different methods of irrigation.

F. Discuss sources of water and water quality.

G. Identify mulching principles and materials.

VI. Controlling Insects and Diseases

A. Discuss the importance of insect and disease control.

B. Identify various insect and plant disease control methods, including organic methods and Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

C. Recognize the benefit of bees and other pollinators of plants.

D. Describe methods for the control of plant diseases and plant disease agents.

E. Explain the importance of proper timing in the control and prevention of plant diseases.

F. Interpret pesticide labels.

G. Determine the effects of combining insecticides and fungicides.

H. Discuss safe handling and application of insecticides and fungicides.

VII. Extension of the Crop Growing Season

A. Define seed priming.

B. Diagram types of raised beds.

C. Describe different methods of greenhouse production.

D. Differentiate between row covers, high tunnels and cold frames.

E. Explain micro-climate plant selection.

F. Identify emergency frost protection measures.

G. Develop a crop planting plan using hardier plant varieties.

VIII. Harvesting, Handling, Market Preparation, Packaging and Storage Techniques Used in Sustainable Fresh Market Production

A. Determine appropriate post-harvest handling techniques.

B. Identify the different types of fruit and vegetable classifications.

C. Describe the factors that cause deterioration of crop products.

D. Differentiate between hand harvesting and mechanical harvesting techniques.

E. Describe preparations for fresh fruit harvesting.

F. Determine the appropriate time of season for harvesting.

G. Describe the use of temperature control as a method of protecting harvested crops.

H. Explain processes used in cooling vegetables.

I. Describe the various modes for safe transit and management of fresh produce.

J. Analyze the quality of vegetables by shelf-life, proper packaging and grade standards.

IX. Establishment and Requirements of Commonly Grown Vegetables, Herbs and Small Fruits

A. Discuss the origin, history, classification, industry and production of commonly grown vegetables, herbs and small fruits.

B. Describe the development and growth cycle of the plants.

C. Describe the criteria to be considered in planting and crop establishment.

D. Identify climatic and different cultural practices in growing vegetables, herbs and small fruits.

E. Identify plant cultivars.

X. Market Analysis and Marketing Plans for a Successful Operation

A. Determine and analyze your niche as a Market Farmer.

B. Identify the various marketing options available to a Market Farmer.

C. Based on a market analysis, develop a marketing plan for your operation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50-70%    Examinations
30-50%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  2. SAFETY - Consumption of tobacco products is prohibited during class. Consumption of food will only take place in approved areas separate from harvest handling location. Proper hand-washing techniques must be followed.

  3. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SAG 272

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Fall Practicum
  • Number: SAG 272
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the fall and early winter seasons. This includes production and marketing of summer crops, planning, and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field, and marketing these fall crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.
  2. Develop a production plan for selected vegetables, flower, fruit and herb crops for the fall/winter season, including determining seed and supply needs and sources.
  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques, including fertility, water, pest, disease and weed management, and plasticulture techniques.
  4. Employ safe measures to harvest, handle and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers.
  5. List a range of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management, including rotations, cover crops, fertilizers and amendments.
  6. Demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment and tools required for tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.
  7. Demonstrate the use of irrigation systems, including drip and sprinkler systems.
  8. Demonstrate safe spraying applications of fertilizers and pesticides.
  9. Maintain detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification, and safety.
  10. Practice farm safety techniques, including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.
  11. Compile additional information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities and plan future market farming activities.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Market Farming

A. Describe models of market farms in and around the metro area (and beyond).

B. Describe types of market outlets and their requirements.

C. Describe the concepts of sustainability, organic and conventional production.

II. Safety

A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper lifting, etc.

B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements and tools according to OSHA safety standards.

C. Outline and demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on EPA worker protection standard training.

D. Outline and illustrate good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production Planning

A. Identify markets and crops or crop mixes for fall/winter season

B. Determine area requirements and production methods (organic, conventional).

C. Recognize seed sources and supplies for crop production.

IV. Crop Production (Integrated Crop Management)

A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.

B. Grow crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules using appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.

C. Manage existing crops from the summer season, including a range of vegetable, small fruit and flowers.

D. Water and fertilize as needed.

E. Observe and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control using appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures.

F. Control weeds using appropriate cultural practices.

V. Harvest and Postharvest Handling

A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.

B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards required by markets.

C. Use and describe practices for maximum maintenance of postharvest quality.

D. Employ and discuss best management practices for food safety during harvest and postharvest handling.

VI. Marketing through Various Outlets

A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and wholesalers.

B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to commercial operations.

C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via the Internet.

VII. Soil and Crop Fertility Management

A. Plant fall cover crops.

B. Interpret soil fertility tests and make recommendations.

C List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their appropriate use.

D. Analyze and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage Equipment and Field Preparation

A. Describe various tillage options and demonstrate some appropriate to high tunnel and field production.

B. Discuss weed control and cultivation options.

C. Demonstrate appropriate weed control options for high tunnel and field production.

IX. Irrigation and Spraying Systems

A. Demonstrate irrigation principles and practices related to the use of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.

B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation.

X. Season Extension and Protected Crop Production

A. Use and describe season extension options.

B. Outline and use crop protection measures.

XI. Record Keeping (organic certification, farm planning, safety)

A. Describe procedures and maintain records for organic certification.

B. Employ procedures to maintain records to allow tracking of farm profits.

C. Discuss procedures and maintain records for EPA compliance on pesticide application.

D. Describe and keep records for good handling practices on crops for sale.

XII. Information and Resources for Market Farmers

A. Use disease and pest diagnostic, and soil analytical services from extension or qualified alternatives.

B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and other sources.

C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Assignments
20-30%    Log
20-30%    Attendance

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.

  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.

  3. Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  4. SAFETY - Consumption of tobacco products is prohibited during class. Consumption of food will only take place in approved areas separate from harvest handling or pesticide preparation or application. Proper hand-washing techniques must be followed.

  5. Students must deal with any potentially dangerous chemicals according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  6. Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SAG 274

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Spring Practicum
  • Number: SAG 274
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the winter and early spring seasons. This includes production and marketing of winter crops and planning and production of spring and summer crops in high tunnels and open field and marketing these spring crops. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs practicum/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.

  2. Design a crop plan for selected vegetable, flower, fruit and herb crops for the spring/summer season including determining seed and supply needs and sources.

  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques, including fertility, water, pest, disease and weed management, and plasticulture techniques.

  4. Employ safe methods to harvest, handle and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers.

  5. List a range of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management, including rotations, cover crops, fertilizers and amendments.

  6. Demonstrate the appropriate use of equipment and tools required to conduct tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.

  7. Demonstrate the appropriate methods of irrigation, including drip and sprinkler systems.

  8. Demonstrate proper methods to safely apply fertilizers and pesticides.

  9. Keep detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification and safety.

  10. Practice farm safety including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.

  11. Compile additional information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities, and plan future market farming activities.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Market Farming

A. Illustrate models of market farms in and around the metro area (and beyond).

B. Identify and discuss types of market outlets and their requirements.

C. Employ the concepts of sustainability, organic and conventional production.

II. Safety

A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper lifting, etc.

B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements and tools according to OSHA safety standards.

C. Demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on EPA worker protection standard training.

D. Demonstrate good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production Planning

A. Identify market and crop or crop mix for spring/summer season.

B. Determine area requirements, and production methods (organic, conventional).

C. Source seeds and supplies for crop production.

IV. Crop Production (Integrated Crop Management)

A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.

B. Establish crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules using appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.

C. Manage existing crops from the winter season including a range of vegetable, small fruit and flowers.

D. Water and fertilize as needed.

E. Recognize and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control using appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures.

F. Control weeds using appropriate cultural practices.

V. Harvest and Postharvest handling

A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.

B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards required by markets.

C. Employ good practices for maximum maintenance of postharvest quality.

D. Identify and use best management practices for food safety during harvest and postharvest handling.

VI. Marketing

A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and wholesalers.

B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to commercial operations.

C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via the Internet.

VII. Soil and crop fertility management

A. Plant spring cover crops.

B. Interpret soil fertility tests and recommendations.

C. List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their appropriate use.

D. Analyze and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage equipment and field preparation

A. Discuss various tillage options and use appropriate options in high tunnel and field production.

B. Outline weed control and cultivation options.

C. Demonstrate appropriate option in high tunnel and field production.

IX. Irrigation and Spraying Systems

A. Demonstrate irrigation principles and practices related to the use of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.

B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation as required.

X. Season extension and protected crop production

A. Identify and use season extension options including mulches, row covers, low tunnels, cold frames, high tunnels and greenhouses.

B. Discuss and use crop protection measures including row covers, high tunnels, shade cloth and windbreaks.

XI. Record Keeping (Organic Certification, Farm Planning, Safety)

A. Discuss procedures and keep records for organic certification.

B. Describe production procedures and maintain records to allow tracking of farm profits.

C. Discuss procedures and keep records for EPA compliance on pesticide application.

D. Discuss and keep records for good handling practices on crops for sale.

XII. Additional Information and Resources for Market Farmers

A. Use disease and pest diagnostic and soil analytical services from extension or qualified alternatives.

B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and other sources.

C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%:    Projects/Assignments
30%:         Log
30%:         Participation (attendance below 70% will result in failure)

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.

  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.

  3. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  4. SAFETY - Consumption of tobacco products is prohibited during class. Consumption of food will only take place in approved areas separate from harvest handling or pesticide preparation or application. Proper hand-washing techniques must be followed.

  5. Students may deal with potentially dangerous chemicals and must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  6. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

SAG 276

  • Title: Sustainable Agriculture Summer Practicum
  • Number: SAG 276
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 1
  • Lab Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

Through practical experience complemented by lectures and discussions, students will gain exposure to a broad range of tasks facing the market farmer during the summer season. This includes planning, production and marketing of spring and summer crops and planning and production of fall crops in high tunnels and open field. Topics include production planning, planting, integrated crop management, harvest and postharvest practices, marketing through various channels, tools and equipment, soil fertility management, and record keeping. Practicum activities will integrate with other courses in this market farming certificate program. Students will learn both conventional and organic production techniques. Entrepreneurship will be emphasized throughout. 7 hrs. practicum/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe practical options for successful market farming in and around Kansas City, including applied experience in marketing to various direct-market and wholesale outlets.

  2. Provide a detailed production plan for a broad range of vegetable, flower, fruit and herb crops for year-round production.

  3. Grow selected crops using appropriate integrated crop management techniques.

  4. Employ appropriate methods to harvest, handle, and appropriately package selected crops for delivery to customers.

  5. Compile a comprehensive list of techniques for soil and crop fertility and health management.

  6. Expertly use equipment and tools required to conduct tillage and crop production activities at a range of scales.

  7. Demonstrate the use of good irrigation practices.

  8. Demonstrate the safe use sprayers for application of pesticides and fertilizers.

  9. Maintain detailed records related to tracking farm finances/profitability, organic certification, and safety.

  10. Practice farm safety techniques, including good working habits to avoid injury and illness, safe use of tools and equipment, and safe pesticide handling.

  11. Compile information necessary to solve production problems, evaluate market opportunities, and plan future market farming activities. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Market Farming

A. Describe models of market farms in and around the metro area (and beyond).

B. Identify and describe types of market outlets and their requirements.

C. Describe the concepts of sustainability, and organic and conventional production.

II. Safety

A. Demonstrate appropriate practices with respect to common occupational farm safety hazards related to weather, wildlife, improper lifting, etc.

B. Demonstrate appropriate safety procedures for equipment, implements and tools according to OSHA safety standards.

C. Demonstrate safe pesticide handling practices based on EPA worker protection standard training.

D. Demonstrate and employ good agriculture practices for food safety.

III. Production Planning

A. Identify market and crop or crop mix for late summer and fall seasons.

B. Determine area requirements, and production methods (organic, conventional).

C. Determine seed sources and supplies for crop production.

IV. Crop Production (Integrated Crop Management)

A. Prepare for crop production in open field or high tunnel using appropriate techniques including tillage, plasticulture, etc.

B. Grow crops from seed and/or transplants, or other propagules using appropriate hand tools or mechanized implements.

C. Manage existing crops from the spring season including a range of vegetable, small fruit and flowers

D. Water and fertilize as needed.

E. Recognize and monitor for disease and pest problems, and control using appropriate biological, cultural practice or chemical measures.

V. Harvest and Postharvest Handling

A. Use appropriate harvest techniques.

B. Clean, grade and pack produce according to quality standards required by markets.

C. Discuss and use conditions for maximum maintenance of postharvest quality.

D. Describe the use best management practices for food safety during harvest and postharvest handling.

VI. Marketing

A. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to farmer’s markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and wholesalers.

B. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing to commercial operations.

C. Discuss the standard procedures and expectations for marketing via the Internet.

VII. Soil and Crop Fertility Management

A. Plant summercover crops.

B. Interpret soil fertility tests and recommendations.

C. List organic and conventional fertilizers and amendments, and their appropriate use.

D. Measure and adjust soil pH.

VIII. Tillage Equipment and Filed Preparation

A. Discuss various tillage options and use some appropriate to high tunnel and field production.

B. Discuss weed control and cultivation options.

C. Identify appropriate weed and cultivation options in high tunnel and field production.

IX. Irrigation and Spraying Systems

A. Discuss and use irrigation principles and practices related to the use of drip and sprinkler irrigation systems.

B. Install, maintain and use drip and sprinkler irrigation as required.

X. Season Extension and Protected Crop Production

A. Discussion and use season extension options including mulches, row covers, low tunnels, cold frames, high tunnels and greenhouses.

B. Discuss and use crop protection measures including row covers, high tunnels, shade cloth and wind breaks.

XI. Record Keeping (organic certification, farm planning, safety)

A. Discuss procedures and record keeping for organic certification.

B. Discuss procedures and keep records for EPA compliance on pesticide application.

C. Discuss keep records for good handling practices on crops for sale.

XII. Information and Resources for Market Farmers

A. Use disease and pest diagnostic services and soil analyses from extension services or qualified alternatives.

B. Compile information on crop production from diverse extension and other sources.

C. Develop a network of peers and mentors within the region.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%:    Projects/Assignments               
20-30%:    Participation  (attendance below 70% will result in failure)
20-30%:    Log                             
100%        Total                          

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students will consult with instructor during the first class session to decide on their practicum site. The practicum site will be selected from a) the JCCC student farm; b) a list of cooperating farms provided by the instructor; c) a site proposed by the student and approved by the instructor.

  2. Students must provide transportation to and from the practicum site.

  3. SAFETY STANDARDS - Students must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  4. SAFETY - Consumption of tobacco products is prohibited during class. Consumption of food will only take place in approved areas separate from harvest handling or pesticide preparation or application. Proper hand washing techniques must be followed.

  5. Students will deal with potentially dangerous chemicals and must dress and behave according to safety standards required by state and federal law.

  6. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS - Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).