Web Development and Digital Media (WEB)

Courses

WEB 110   HTML and CSS (3 Hours)

This course will cover the essential skills needed to create responsive websites, using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Students will be introduced to the concepts, foundations, syntax and structure of HTML and CSS. Additional topics include the use of File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to publish websites and validation to web standards established by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and other organizations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 112   Professional Skills for the Digital Developer (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate effective communications and professional skills important to a career in digital development. Topics covered include the use of technology to achieve effective written and verbal communication skills, team management, project management and problem solving skills. Current and relevant legal, ethical and governmental issues important to a career in digital development are also covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 114   Web Scripting: JavaScript I* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 110.

Students will study the purpose for and principles of client-side scripting using JavaScript. Topics include JavaScript variables, operators, expressions, functions, control structures, arrays and event listeners. Students will use professional techniques to write and debug code. JavaScript security issues will be explored. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 116   Digital Media Concepts* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ENGL 121.

This course examines the digital media creation process and the impact of emerging technology on that process. Emphasis is placed on the need to understand target audiences, as well as the impact of content on those audiences. Creative culture is examined so students may begin to understand the relationship between ideas and the structure and management of the organizations and intellectual property systems used to express those ideas. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 120   Web Analytics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to implement and apply Web analytics techniques. Topics to be covered include Web traffic analysis, data collection methodologies, report analysis, best-practices configuration and search engine optimization. 3 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 121   Digital Media Assets* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 116.

This course focuses on technologies and workflows in managing digital image, digital video and audio assets throughout an asset's life cycle. Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies. Students will design and create multimedia projects that address customer needs and solve real world problems. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

WEB 122   CSS Techniques & Projects* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Students will apply Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) techniques through the use of professional, advanced website development projects. Industry-standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) semantic markup practices and presentation separation through CSS is emphasized. CSS topics include professional syntax practices, formatting and layout skills. Advanced CSS skills for float, positioning, alignment and image formatting are covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 123   Content Management Systems Strategies* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

This course will cover the basics of installing and configuring a Web Content Management System (CMS) to build blogs and websites. Students will use the CMS to perform many functions including installing plug-ins and assigning user permissions. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 124   Web Scripting: JavaScript II* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 114.

Students will apply JavaScript to interact with the Document Object Model (DOM) and the Browser Object Model (BOM), and to manage state information, cookies and security. Students will also use JavaScript to enhance and validate form data and to manipulate data in strings and arrays, and will use existing JavaScript classes and objects to build upon their object-oriented programming skills. Students will study and apply coding techniques to address JavaScript security issues. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 125   Digital Video Tools (1 Hour)

This introductory video production technology course will cover basic desktop computer operating systems and the technologies used to bring photographic (film, video, still) images and audio into the digital domain. Students will learn to prepare audio and video media from pre-production to post-production techniques for digital delivery systems and the Internet. 1hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 126   Technical Interface Skills* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

This course will cover the skills needed to successfully develop Information Architecture (IA) blueprints from concept to completion. Students will use fundamental visual principles, perception, color, composition and typography to analyze and modify existing IA plans while keeping consistent structure. They will create complementary visuals that maintain a client's brand while working through the modification process. Students will review the critical universal usability rules and basic visual design principles quintessential of a design team and to implement an aesthetic vision through every step of development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 128   Server Scripting: PHP with MySQL* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

This course covers the commands and techniques available to add functionality to Web pages using Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP). Students will build client-side PHP scripts with variables, functions, expressions, methods and events to validate forms and enhance Web page functionality. The basics of server-side scripting are introduced. Students also define and build a relational database using MySQL, then use PHP scripts as well as SQL in a Web page to connect to the database to edit, delete and enter records. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 134   Web Scripting: JavaScript III* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

Students will write JavaScript to interact with touch and gesture events. They will also explore technologies that extend JavaScript’s functionality, including popular Application Program Interfaces (APIs), libraries and frameworks. Ajax, JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), jQuery and other technologies will be introduced. Students will code secure web applications, often called web apps. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 150   Essential Web Concepts and Techniques I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: CPCA 105 or CPCA 106 or CPCA 128 or appropriate score on an assesment test.

This current-events course introduces students to essential Web concepts and techniques. Students will explore a range of topics, from fundamental existing technologies to new trends. Real-world applications of the Web will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 152   Web Pages: Expression Web I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise Web pages using Expression Web. Topics to be covered will include researching, planning and creating a website, identifying the purpose of HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), inserting background color, inserting and editing images, creating lists, creating and applying style sheets, inserting files, creating internal and external links and publishing a website. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 154   Web Pages: Dreamweaver I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise web pages using Dreamweaver. Topics to be covered will include basic text layout, viewing and identifying basic HyperText Markup Language (HTML) tags, creating a site map, formatting a Web page, applying background color, inserting images and sounds, creating ordered and unordered lists, inserting files and creating links on Web pages. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 156   JavaScript I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 110.

This course provides a foundation to client-side scripting using the JavaScript language. Students will write, validate and debug JavaScript code to enhance the functionality of Web pages. Topics to be covered include common applications such as responding to user actions, creating pop-up dialog boxes and controlling the Web browser. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 158   Adobe Flash I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

This course will cover the commands and techniques available to add Flash content to Web pages. Topics covered will include using drawing tools, manipulating text with text tools, adding and modifying sound, creating animation and publishing work. This class will be taught in a classroom with both Macintosh and Windows computers. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 160   Essential Web Concepts and Techniques II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

This course is a continuation of Essential Web Concepts and Techniques I, and will cover intermediate commands and techniques required to use various Web based tools and programs. Students will explore a wide range of topics, from existing technologies to new trends. Real-world applications of the Web will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 162   Web Pages: Expression Web II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 152.

This course is a continuation of Web Pages: Expression Web I, and will cover intermediate-level commands and techniques required to create and enhance websites using Expression Web. Topics to be covered will include creating and modifying dynamic links, working with tables, creating forms, and using templates to design Web pages. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 164   Web Pages: Dreamweaver II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 154.

This course builds upon the concepts and design techniques presented in Dreamweaver I. The course includes a range of intermediate Dreamweaver techniques required to work efficiently and create manageable web site designs using Dreamweaver forms, templates and libraries, as well as covering managing your web site and checking files. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 166   JavaScript II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 156.

This course builds on the skills learned in JavaScript I. Students will apply JavaScript to manipulate and validate Web form elements and data. Students will learn to use JavaScript in their Web pages to build menus and navigational structures. Students will expand their debugging skills. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 168   Adobe Flash II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 158.

This course will build on the fundamental skills learned in Adobe Flash I. Topics will include complex animation techniques, interactivity with simple frame actions, and interactivity using objects such as buttons, hotspots and movie clips. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 170   Podcasting (3 Hours)

This course will cover how to create sound, use the appropriate software, develop a show, distribute a podcast and build an audience. Students will begin by learning the basics of blogging and then develop their blogs into audio and/or video podcasts. More advanced topics include audio editing, podcasting on the go and videocasting. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 172   WordPress I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: CPCA 105 or CPCA 106 or CPCA 128 or an appropriate score on an assessment test.

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise blogs and websites using WordPress. Topics to be covered will include basic blogging techniques, working with digital images, hosting, spam and security issues, plugins and themes. Real-world applications of WordPress will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 178   Adobe Flash III* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 168.

This course will build on the skills learned in Adobe Flash II. Students will do projects to control movie clips, sound, external data, multiple timelines and text fields. Some ActionScripting will be introduced. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 188   ActionScript for Flash* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: WEB 178.

This course will teach the basic skills needed to use ActionScripts in Flash movies. Students will build interactivity into their movies using ActionScript. They will also manipulate data and control Flash objects such as movie clips. ActionScript logic and functions will be explained. Students will gain a strong foundation in the latest version of ActionScript and many more general object-oriented programming principles. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 190   E-Commerce I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

This course will introduce students to e-commerce in a software-driven, hands-on way. It will use software tools to discuss and explore a variety of e-commerce activities. Students will examine an extensive list of e-commerce sites, such as those that support purchasing, delivery, support, auction, business-to-business, virtual community and Web-portal business goals. They will examine e-commerce stores that incorporate advertising, marketing, branding and business efficiency goals. They will explore how to populate a store catalog, create sitewide navigation links and publish a store. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 192   E-Commerce II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 190.

Students will examine e-commerce security issues including privacy, copyright and transaction integrity. Students will study electronic payment systems and international, legal and taxation issues. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 230   Asynchronous JavaScript and XML* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: WEB 114.

This course will introduce and explain the use of AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and eXtensible Markup Language). AJAX is not a technology itself but is a combination of HTML (HyperText Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and JavaScript's use of the DOM (Document Object Model). Students will use AJAX to dynamically load data into a Web page. Topics include auto complete functionality and other interactive features to a Web page. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 231   Experience Design* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 126.

This course will serve as a broad survey of the user experience design process for interactive products and services. Students will learn the building blocks of the user experience including interaction design, design research, information architecture and design principles. In addition to understanding how to discover needs and fulfill them with design, it will also provide knowledge of how to evaluate the concepts using common methods such as heuristic evaluation, prototyping or usability studies. Through readings, critiques, exercises and discussions, students will explore what makes the experience of an interactive media application successful. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

WEB 232   Introduction to eXtensible Markup Language* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 124.

This course will introduce and explain the use of XML(eXtensible Markup Language) documents to encapsulate and transfer data across the Internet. Students will learn to use document type definitions, attributes and entities, and XML schemas to build valid and useful XML documents. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) will be introduced to format the XML documents. JavaScript will be used to incorporate programming instructions into the XML document. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 233   Visual Storytelling* (3 Hours)

Storytelling is how people share ideas and meaning. It's how we communicate, reach each other and connect. This course provides an introduction to the methods and tools of visual storytelling. Students will explore the impact of visual storytelling and how to communicate visually. Students will use storytelling techniques enabling them to create, design and produce stories using digital media. This course will explore the key elements to tell realistic and compelling visual stories. Students will write scripts, design storyboards, create still and moving images using music and narration to tell their stories. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

WEB 234   Web Apps I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

Mobile devices outnumber desktop and laptop computers three to one worldwide. This course will cover practical guidelines, standards, techniques and best practices for building Web applications using Client-Side programming including Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) and JavaScript, including basic design and development principles for all mobile devices and platforms. Students will have strong knowledge about the methods and tools used in developing Web applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 235   Digital Communications Technologies* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 116.

This course is intended as an introduction to emerging digital communications technologies. While the primary focus will be on digital and mobile technologies and practices (contemporary new media), the course will also consider a range of older media when they were new including print culture, cinema, television, recorded sound, photography and the telephone. Students will focus on social technologies, such as blogs, wikis and spaces like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter to explore how people find information and how organizations communicate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 236   Content Management Systems Development* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 128.

Content Management Systems (CMS) have gained in popularity as the number of robust and complex websites continues to grow. Students will cover the life cycle of websites, including their creation, management, distribution and publishing of content. This hands-on course will cover open source CMS applications such as Joomla, Drupal, WordPress and other technologies and the resources available to designers and developers. Students will explore the fundamentals of planning dynamic websites, CMS database management, developing Cascading Style Sheet (CSS)-controlled site templates, and creating database-driven websites through the planning and creation of their own topic-based sites. Student exercises include how to interact, engage and contribute to online communities and projects. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 238   Interactive Scripting: JQuery* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 122 and WEB 124.

Designers and developers can use jQuery to have complete access to all Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) styles of any element on a Web page, effortless Web page content manipulation via filters and patterns, detection or creation of events (mouse movement or click), moving, hiding and fading elements and other features. Students will be exposed to how to write efficient jQuery selectors to round up sets of Document Object Model (DOM) elements, how to use the framework's many methods to manipulate DOM elements, how to use the jQuery event application programming interface (API) to set up event listeners and event delegation, how to manage Ajax requests with jQuery and how to extend jQuery with custom filters and methods. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

WEB 240   HTML and CSS II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

This course focuses on the latest generation of browser-based technologies for front-end design and development. Topics in the course include Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), HyperText Markup Language (HTML) elements, HTML Application Programming Interface (API), forms, audio and video, offline applications, Canvas drawing and animation, communication APIs, Web Sockets and Web Workers, Geolocation, local and session storage, Web Structured Query language (SQL) Database, and advanced topics such as mobile Web applications, performance analysis, browser issues and developer tools. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 241   Digital Management Methods* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

The course covers systems development methodologies and the phases of development process from an idea to a product. Students will learn methods and tools that are used in the process of developing web-based and digital media applications. The course will introduce the students to systems development life cycle and the basic skills needed in systems analysis, design and development. Students will deliver an integrated, strategic campaign that demonstrates innovative digital media mastery. Out-of-class collaboration is required to complete the final project. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

WEB 243   Search Engine Optimization* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

This course will cover how to optimize a website to maximize search engine ranking. Upon completion of the course students will be able to identify and implement effective website designs and strategies for search engine optimization. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 244   Web Apps II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: WEB 234.

This course examines the theory, concepts and techniques for designing, producing and evaluating Web applications to meet specific information needs. Students will engage with concepts, techniques and system issues in advanced Web application design and development using advanced programming tools and techniques. Students will look beyond the current status of development and design techniques and conjecture what is possible in the future. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 245   Motion Graphics Tools* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 125.

This course is designed to introduce students to motion graphics and special effects. All basic applications of the program will be touched upon including credits, transitions, filters, masks and mattes. Students will experience the complete motion graphics workflow, beginning by capturing their own still images and videos and concluding by rendering and exporting an original composition. 1hr. lecture/wk.

WEB 290   Web Development and Digital Media Capstone* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course is the culmination of the course work that makes up the Web Development and Digital Media AAS degree. It incorporates elements from each of the core program courses to allow students to walk through the entire Web design process, including design/project documentation, wire framing, creating mock-ups, revisions, pages and final deliverables. Upon completion of course, students will have a professional website that can serve as part of their professional portfolio. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 292   Special Topics:* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course periodically presents specialized topics in Web Development and Digital Media that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics. 1 - 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

WEB 294   Web Development and Digital Media Internship* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Web Development and Digital Media Internship provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in the workplace and translate classroom learning into practice. An internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting. The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks. 180 hours minimum requirement of on-the-job training.

WEB 110

  • Title: HTML and CSS
  • Number: WEB 110
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will cover the essential skills needed to create responsive websites, using HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Students will be introduced to the concepts, foundations, syntax and structure of HTML and CSS. Additional topics include the use of File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to publish websites and validation to web standards established by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and other organizations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain how to create sites that are compliant with current W3C standards in web development.
  2. Create valid and semantically correct HTML pages.
  3. Organize website files and FTP them to a web server.
  4. Create valid HTML tables.
  5. Create absolute, relative and anchor links.
  6. Apply cascading styles to an HTML document through inline, internal or external style sheets.
  7. Test and troubleshoot HTML and CSS.
  8. Create web forms using HTML and style them with CSS.
  9. Apply responsive web design principles.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Page Building Blocks

A. Develop web page files.

B. Describe W3C standards.

C. Discuss how Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act affects web page design.

D. Write the source code of a web page.

E. Describe web page elements, attributes and values.

II. Structure and Formatting

A. Declare the encoding and create the foundation.

B. Write semantically correct HTML.

C. Identify the body of the web page.

D. Apply styles.

E. Create structures for the web page.

F. Create hypertext and hypermedia links.

III. Web Page Files

A. Define web file naming conventions and file management.

B. Use FTP to deploy pages to a web server.

IV. Tables

A. Discuss the appropriate use for tables.

B. Create and modify table rows and columns.

C. Apply styles to tables.

V. Absolute, Relative and Anchor Links

A. Create links.

1. Relative links to other pages

2. Absolute links to other websites

B. Create anchor links.

C. Create targeting links.

D. Use images as links.

E. Discuss image maps.

VI. Cascading Style Sheets

A. Apply style rules.

B. Select elements by name, type or id.

C. Select part of an element.

D. Specify groups of elements.

E. Create an external style sheet.

F. Create an internal style sheet.

G. Apply styles locally.

H. Apply font family, italics, bold, size and font values.

I. Set text color, text background, text spacing and indents.

J. Apply background and foreground color.

K. Apply borders, padding and margins of elements.

L. Apply alignments.

M. Apply float.

N. Create flexible layouts.

VII. Testing and Validation

A. Test and validate HTML of the published website.

B. Test and validate CSS of the published website.

C. Employ popular browsers to test web pages.

VIII. Web Forms

A. Create a web form.

B. Create form styles using CSS.

C. Define form input elements and other controls.

D. Create form labels.

IX. Responsive Web Design

A. Define the goals and techniques of responsive web design.

B. Describe and apply flexible units of measurement for fonts and layout.

C. Create flexible images using CSS.

D. Create media queries in CSS.

E. Insert appropriate HTML meta tags for responsive design.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40%    Homework and projects
30-40%    Quizzes and tests
30-40%    Final website

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 112

  • Title: Professional Skills for the Digital Developer
  • Number: WEB 112
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate effective communications and professional skills important to a career in digital development. Topics covered include the use of technology to achieve effective written and verbal communication skills, team management, project management and problem solving skills. Current and relevant legal, ethical and governmental issues important to a career in digital development are also covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Select the best technology for effective and professional communication in a variety of situations.
  2. Use a variety of digital tools for effective and professional written communication.
  3. Use a variety of digital tools for effective and professional verbal communication.
  4. Create both a functional and a chronological resume for a digital technologies-related career.
  5. Use technology to successfully identify problems, define arguments, assess credibility and estimate business opportunities.
  6. Use technology to build skills to improve group decision-making, project management, meeting effectiveness and committee-driven decisions.
  7. Analyze common information systems decisions from a cost-benefit perspective.
  8. Apply technology to common decision support models such as what-if and weighted criteria analysis.
  9. Identify current legal, ethical and governmental issues that impact technology-related careers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Technology for Professional Communication

A. Identify current digital technologies and differentiate when and why they are appropriate in various business situations in the area of written communication.

B. Identify current digital technologies and differentiate when and why they are appropriate for various business situations in the area of verbal communication.

II. Digital Tools for Effective Written Communication

A. Compose well-designed examples of written communication using a variety of current digital tools for common business purposes.

B. Correct poor examples of written communication within a variety of current digital technologies in common business situations.

C. Work with functional requirements documents.

D. Work with software requirements specifications.

III. Digital Tools for Effective Verbal Communication

A. Create and present effective presentations using a variety of current digital tools for common business purposes.

B. Critique poor examples of verbal communication skills and technology choices in common business situations.

IV. Resume for a Digital Professional

A. Create a functional resume.

B. Create a chronological resume.

C. Create a cover letter.

D. Request letters of reference.

E. Analyze Web-related methods of searching for a new job.

V. Problem Solving Skills

A. Use digital tools to build strategies to successfully identify problems, define arguments and assess credibility.

B. Use digital tools to build strategies to effectively estimate and use the “reasonableness test.”

VI. Team Skills

A. Use digital tools to improve group decision-making for common projects related to digital technologies.

B. Use digital tools to improve meeting and committee effectiveness.

C. Use digital tools to develop listening, speaking and negotiating skills.

D. Hold various roles to work within a team to address common digital technology challenges.

E. Plan, lead and manage a digital technology project using professional project management skills.

VII. Information Systems Decisions from a Cost-Benefit Perspective

A. Analyze and define a technology-related business problem.

B. Gather and analyze cost-benefit data.

C. Identify and define multiple solutions to the problem.

D. Prepare a cost-benefit analysis for each solution.

VIII. Decision Support Models

A. Use digital tools to develop a what-if analysis to support decision-making for a future projection.

B. Use digital tools to develop a weighted criteria analysis to support decision-making on a subjective evaluation.

C. Analyze other common decision support models commonly used for technology-related projects.

IX. Issues that Impact a Career in Web Technology

A. Identify current legal issues that impact digital technology careers.

B. Identify current ethical issues that impact digital technology careers.

C. Identify current government issues that impact digital technology careers.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

25-45%    Exams
45-75%    Assignments, activities and quizzes

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 114

  • Title: Web Scripting: JavaScript I*
  • Number: WEB 114
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

Students will study the purpose for and principles of client-side scripting using JavaScript. Topics include JavaScript variables, operators, expressions, functions, control structures, arrays and event listeners. Students will use professional techniques to write and debug code. JavaScript security issues will be explored. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the purpose of and relationship between HyperText Markup Language (HTML), client-side and server-side scripting languages.
  2. Integrate JavaScript using HTML event attributes, the HTML script element and external JavaScript files.
  3. Create JavaScript variables, expressions and operators.
  4. Create JavaScript functions and event listeners.
  5. Write JavaScript to store and use data in arrays.
  6. Write JavaScript to control program flow.
  7. Debug JavaScript.
  8. Identify JavaScript security issues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to JavaScript Programming

A. Define purpose for and relationship between HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

B. Explain purpose for and relationship between client-side and server-side scripting languages.

II. JavaScript and HTML

A. Insert script tags on a web page.

B. Explain JavaScript syntax.

C. Create external JavaScript files.

D. Write scripts using JavaScript objects, properties and methods.

E. Add comments.

F. Run code based on events.

III. Expressions and Operators

A. Declare and initialize local and global variables.

B. Build expressions with assignment and comparison operators.

C. Build expressions with arithmetic operators.

D. Build expressions with logical operators.

E. Describe operator precedence.

IV. Functions and Event Listeners

A. Use built-in JavaScript functions.

B.Create custom functions

C.Work with numeric, Boolean and string variables.

D. Run code from event listeners.

V. Arrays

A. Declare and initialize arrays.

B. Use and modify arrays in scripts.

C. Use HTML element arrays.

VI. Program Flow

A. Use the while statement.

B. Use the do while statement.

C. Write scripts using for statements.

D. Write scripts using if and else if statements.

E. Build scripts using the switch statement.

VII. Debugging

A. Explain the difference between syntax, run-time and logic errors.

B. List professional practices that help reduce errors.

C. Use debugging techniques to trace errors.

D. Use browser debugging tools to find errors.

E. Apply linting to find JavaScript errors.

VIII. Security

A. Identify current JavaScript security concerns.

B. Describe current strategies to address security concerns.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 116

  • Title: Digital Media Concepts*
  • Number: WEB 116
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course examines the digital media creation process and the impact of emerging technology on that process. Emphasis is placed on the need to understand target audiences, as well as the impact of content on those audiences. Creative culture is examined so students may begin to understand the relationship between ideas and the structure and management of the organizations and intellectual property systems used to express those ideas. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Examine concepts of communication through digital media.
  2. Analyze the usability of digital media.
  3. Discuss copyright and fair use guidelines.
  4. Explain the importance of information privacy and security.
  5. Utilize a design model or process to plan and implement an interactive project.
  6. Explore careers in interactive media and web design and development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concepts of Communication

A. Explore core concepts of digital media.

B. Identify the values and problems with social networking.

C. Explore the impact of current and future digital media technology.

D. Discuss the relationship between digital media and society.

II. Digital Media Usability

A. Explain how digital technology expands the features of media devices.

B. Discuss uses of Web-enabled devices.

C. Identify, describe and use various output devices.

III. Copyright and Fair Use

A. Explain the difference between legal and ethical issues surrounding the access and use of media.

B. Examine copyright and fair use guidelines.

C. Discuss intellectual property.

D. Identify the various acts of copyright violation and measures to prevent those acts.

E. Identify the legal concerns that are associated with information exchange.

IV. Information Privacy and Security

A. Explore the impact of cloud computing.

B. Explain the importance of securing a computer.

C. Explain how some online behaviors can be harmful personally and to a business.

V. Design Processes

A. Discuss rapid development processes.

B. Describe a project and the problems addressed.

C. Explore the needs of the audience or customer.

D. Organize a project.

E. Write a project proposal.

VI. Digital Media, Web Design and Development Careers

A. Identify the skills needed for employment in digital media and Web design.

B. Identify different specialties in digital media and Web design and development.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

10-20%    Class participation
10-45%    Research papers
30-45%    Prototypes

Total    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 120

  • Title: Web Analytics*
  • Number: WEB 120
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to implement and apply Web analytics techniques. Topics to be covered include Web traffic analysis, data collection methodologies, report analysis, best-practices configuration and search engine optimization. 3 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the purpose of Web analytics and associated terminology.
  2. Discuss available Web analytics methodologies and their accuracy.
  3. Use Web analytics tools to collect and analyze data.
  4. Use Web analytics tools to configure and build reports.
  5. Identify key performance indicators.
  6. Describe and implement search engine optimization strategies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Analytics

A. Describe the purpose of Web analytics.

B. Discuss the technical terminology used in Web analytics.

C. Describe the benefits of website measurement.

D. Explain the types of information obtained from Web analytics tools.

E. Identify the kinds of decisions that can be made from Web analytics tools.

F. Discuss the ROI (Return on Investment) of Web analytics.

G. Discuss how Web analytics fits into a business or organization.

II. Available Methodologies

A. Discuss available Web analytics methodologies and their accuracy.

B. Describe visitor data and how it is collected.

C. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of price tags and logfiles.

D. Discuss the role of cookies in Web analytics.

E. Identify the accuracy limitations of Web traffic information.

F. Describe end-user privacy concerns in relation to Web analytics.

III. Popular Web Analytics Tools

A. Identify the most popular Web analytics tools.

B. Discuss key features, benefits and limitations of various Web analytics tools.

C. Use Web analytics tools to collect and analyze data.

IV. Reports

A. Discuss the top reports used by Web analytics tools.

B. Configure and build reports.

C. Describe page value and data sampling.

D. Explain best-practices configuration.

V. Website Performance

A. Discuss objectives and key results for a website.

B. Identify key performance indicators.

C. Use visitor data to drive website improvement.

D. Discuss increasing website visibility.

VI. Search Engine Optimization

A. Discuss search engine optimization.

B. Identify and optimize poorly performing pages.

C. Discuss ways to track e-commerce transactions.

D. Describe the importance of optimizing landing-pages.

E. Identify methods for tracking offline marketing.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 121

  • Title: Digital Media Assets*
  • Number: WEB 121
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 116.

Description:

This course focuses on technologies and workflows in managing digital image, digital video and audio assets throughout an asset's life cycle. Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies. Students will design and create multimedia projects that address customer needs and solve real world problems. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Create and edit digital media assets.
  2. Discuss digital media asset management.
  3. Explore intellectual property laws and practices.
  4. Create a system for tracking and managing digital assets.
  5. Explore open source and proprietary software packages for digital image editing.
  6. Demonstrate project-specific awareness of how to compose with multiple media.
  7. Implement and evaluate projects using digital media techniques.
  8. Apply the principles of information design.
  9. Write a proposal, with timelines and creative concepts.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Digital  Media Assets

A. Apply knowledge of software, equipment and skills related to digital media production.

B. Apply knowledge of digital media production tools and applications.

C. Convert the formats for digital assets.

D. Discuss components of effective digital business communication.

II. Digital Media Asset Management (DMAM)

A. Identify the key components and functions of a DMAM system.

B. List and explain asset management techniques.

C. Explain storage considerations.

D. Describe cross-platform considerations.

E. Develop competencies in online project management and collaboration.

III. Intellectual Property Laws and Practices

A. List credible sources for copyright, accessibility and usability issues.

B. Discuss why intellectual property law is important.

C. Define fair use for different types of interactive media assets.

D. Discuss the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

E. Explore Creative Commons, open source and other standards for legally sharing digital media.

F. Evaluate ethical and legal considerations in working with digital media.

IV. Digital Assets Management

A. Discuss digital asset and rights management.

B. Explore workflow of digital media creation.

C. Discuss effectively managing digital media creation.

V. Open Source and Proprietary Software

A. Discuss what open source means.

B. Compare open source and proprietary image editing software.

VI. Multiple Media Composition

A. Demonstrate how to engage various audiences.

B. Determine the appropriate distribution channel.

C. Explain why the media should be a digital project.

D. Explore online digital media tips, tutorials, newsletters and user groups.

VII. Digital Media Techniques

A. Use written, oral and visual communication skills to communicate information and ideas about new media.

B. Examine assistive technologies.

C. Identify rich media content.

D. Describe various output options for digital media.

E. Plan and create a digital media project.

F. Conduct usability testing of digital media.

VIII. Information Design

A. Examine current trends and key technologies in the media industry.

B. Create active and interactive content with graphics, animation, sound and video using media authoring software.

C. Describe and implement the phases of media production, from the initial planning to the final delivery of a professional product.

IX. Proposal

A. Plan and manage the life cycle of a multimedia production.

B. Formulate the implementation of a production pipeline.

C. Write and produce concept guidelines.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

25-55%    Quizzes
25-55%    Project
10-35%    Final Exam

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 122

  • Title: CSS Techniques & Projects*
  • Number: WEB 122
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

Students will apply Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) techniques through the use of professional, advanced website development projects. Industry-standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) semantic markup practices and presentation separation through CSS is emphasized. CSS topics include professional syntax practices, formatting and layout skills. Advanced CSS skills for float, positioning, alignment and image formatting are covered. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the benefits of separating website content and presentation using semantic HTML markup and CSS. 
  2. Demonstrate current HTML and CSS standards including div tags, class and id attributes.
  3. Write CSS styling rules. 
  4. Write CSS layout rules.   
  5. Write CSS rules for advanced layout techniques such as positioning, float and alignment of block elements.
  6. Write CSS rules for common Web page areas such a navigation bar and image gallery. 
  7. Apply inline, embedded and linked style sheets to Web pages.
  8. Research current HTML, CSS and browser support issues.
  9. Demonstrate CSS “best practice” techniques.
  10. Validate and correct HTML and CSS to adhere to industry standards.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. CSS

A. Explain the problem created by using HTML to format or position Web page content.

B. Explain the purpose of semantic HTML.

C. Explain how CSS provides uniform and productive website formatting and layout.

II. HTML and CSS Markup Standards

A. Semantically markup a Web page applying div elements, id and class selectors as appropriate.

B. Explain CSS rule syntax and vocabulary.

C. Write CSS comments.

D. Write CSS rules for common HTML elements and also the div (division) element.

E. Write CSS rules for the id and class selectors.

III. CSS Styling Rules

A. Write CSS rules to apply background properties.

B. Write CSS rules to apply text properties.

C. Write CSS rules to apply font properties.

D. Write CSS rules to format links.

E. Write CSS rules to apply list properties.

F. Write CSS rules to format tables.

IV. CSS Layout Rules

A. Apply CSS terminology and rules.

B. Write CSS rules to apply border properties.

C. Write CSS rules to apply outline properties.

D. Write CSS rules to apply margin properties.

E. Write CSS Rules to apply padding properties.

V. Advanced CSS Layout Rules

A. Write CSS rules to apply dimension properties.

B. Write CSS rules for the display and visibility property.

C. Write CSS rules to apply positioning properties using static, fixed, relative and absolute positioning methods.

D. Write CSS rules to apply and clear float.

E. Write CSS to align block elements.

F. Write CSS rules for pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements.

G. Write CSS to build a two-column liquid layout.

H. Write CSS to build a three-column liquid layout CSS template.

I. Write CSS to build an absolutely-positioned layout CSS template.

VI. CSS Advanced Web Page Content Rules

A. Write CSS rules to style a navigation bar.

B. Write CSS rules to create an image gallery.

C. Write CSS rules to create transparent images.

D. Apply CSS rules to image sprites.

E. Apply CSS rules to control media types.

VII. Linked, Embedded and Inline Style Sheets

A. Create an external CSS file.

B. Insert a link tag to reference an external style sheet.

C. Insert a style tag to reference an embedded (internal) style sheet.

D. Insert inline styles in the style attribute of the relevant tag.

E. Define the cascading order of style sheets.

F. Apply multiple style sheets to experience precedence.

VIII. Current Brower CSS Support Issues

A. Research common CSS browser incompatibilities and bugs.

B. Research common CSS browser usability issues.

IX. CSS “Best Practice” Techniques

A. Write consistent, readable CSS rules.

B. Apply a CSS framework.

C. Apply reset CSS.

D. Apply comments.

E. Insert an appropriate DOCTYPE declaration statement.

X. CSS Validation

A. Validate CSS.

B. Validate markup.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 123

  • Title: Content Management Systems Strategies*
  • Number: WEB 123
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course will cover the basics of installing and configuring a Web Content Management System (CMS) to build blogs and websites. Students will use the CMS to perform many functions including installing plug-ins and assigning user permissions. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe a content management system.
  2. Discuss the various options for Web hosting.
  3. Select, install and customize the appearance of a selected theme.
  4. Use widgets to feature content on a website or blog.
  5. Install plug-ins to add additional features.
  6. Assign various user roles and permissions.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. CMS Description

A. Define a content management system.

B. Explain the need for content management systems.

II. Web Hosting

A. Describe the options available with both free and paid hosting for websites.

B. Choose the best option for the project.

III. CMS Installation and Customization

A. Identify the best theme for your audience.

B. Install that theme through the CMS and/or via File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

C. Distinguish elements that are easily customized within a theme from more complex changes.

D. Modify the theme to the needs of your project.

IV. Widgets

A. Define widgets.

B. Implement widgets in the available areas within a theme.

V. Plug-Ins

A. Clarify the differences between plug-ins and widgets.

B. Determine the functionality missing from your CMS that can be added through a plug-in.

C. Explore the plug-in options available for that function.

D. Install the appropriate plug-in for your project.

VI. User Roles and Permissions

A. Describe the various roles available in a CMS.

B. Classify the permissions available to those roles.

C. Decide which users require certain permissions.

D. Assign users to roles appropriate to their needs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-30%    In-class quizzes/activities
40-50%    Projects
40-50%    Exams

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 124

  • Title: Web Scripting: JavaScript II*
  • Number: WEB 124
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 114.

Description:

Students will apply JavaScript to interact with the Document Object Model (DOM) and the Browser Object Model (BOM), and to manage state information, cookies and security. Students will also use JavaScript to enhance and validate form data and to manipulate data in strings and arrays, and will use existing JavaScript classes and objects to build upon their object-oriented programming skills. Students will study and apply coding techniques to address JavaScript security issues. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Manipulate the DOM.
  2. Add and remove HyperText Markup Language (HTML) document nodes.
  3. Control the BOM.
  4. Enhance and validate form data.
  5. Create scripts using built-in JavaScript classes.
  6. Manipulate data in strings and arrays.
  7. Validate JavaScript and apply advanced debugging techniques.
  8. Apply coding techniques to address JavaScript security issues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. DOM

A. Describe the DOM.

B. Modify HTML elements.

C.Open and close windows and tabs.

D. Utilize the History, Location, Navigator and Screen objects.

II. HTML Document Nodes

A. Add document nodes.

B. Remove document nodes.

III. BOM

A. Open and close windows.

B. Access with the History object.

C. Use the Location object.

D. Use the Navigator object.

E. Manipulate the Screen object.

IV. Forms

A. Improve form usability.

B. Program custom form validation.

C. Identify data passed through a query string.

V. JavaScript Object-Oriented Programming

A. Explain the principles of object-oriented programming.

B. Create and use objects using the Date class.

C. Create and use objects using the Number class.

D. Create and use objects using the Math class.

E. Define custom objects.

VI. Strings and Arrays

A. Find, extract, combine and compare strings.

B. Code regular expressions.

C. Find, extract, sort and combine arrays.

VII. Validation and Debugging

A. Use lint to improve and fix code.

B. Write error handling code.

C. Use debugger windows from all major browsers.

VIII. Security

A. Write code to store state information.

1. Query strings

2. Hidden form fields

B. Investigate and apply current security holes and techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 125

  • Title: Digital Video Tools
  • Number: WEB 125
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This introductory video production technology course will cover basic desktop computer operating systems and the technologies used to bring photographic (film, video, still) images and audio into the digital domain. Students will learn to prepare audio and video media from pre-production to post-production techniques for digital delivery systems and the Internet. 1hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate digital workflow in desktop video.
  2. Demonstrate how to import, log and capture media.
  3. Use editing tools for video composition.
  4. Enhance a sequence with transitions, effects, titles and composites.
  5. Demonstrate the use of graphics and animation in a desktop video composition.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Desktop Video

A. Explore workflows.

B. Utilize file management.

II. Import, Log and Capture Media

A. Set device controls and capture preferences.

B. Utilize capture window.

C. Describe video compression techniques.

III. Editing Tools

A. Use the Razor Blade tool.

B. Explore the Source Panel.

C. Explore the Trim Monitor.

IV. Transitions, Effects, Titles and Composites

A. Apply transition effects between clips.

B. Apply filters and transition effects to clips.

C. Integrate After Effects and Photoshop.

D. Create a credit roll.

E. Create an end slate.

V. Graphics and Animation

A. Use color correction.

B. Apply transitions.

C. Discuss basics of keyframing.

D. Animate a slideshow.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

15-35%    In-class quizzes/activities
35-55%    Projects
35-55%    Exams

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 126

  • Title: Technical Interface Skills*
  • Number: WEB 126
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course will cover the skills needed to successfully develop Information Architecture (IA) blueprints from concept to completion. Students will use fundamental visual principles, perception, color, composition and typography to analyze and modify existing IA plans while keeping consistent structure. They will create complementary visuals that maintain a client's brand while working through the modification process. Students will review the critical universal usability rules and basic visual design principles quintessential of a design team and to implement an aesthetic vision through every step of development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Diagram the technical process and structural guidelines of Web design development.
  2. Research and analyze universal usability and implement strategies.
  3. Establish and modify Information Architecture plans.
  4. Incorporate interface design principles and universal usability during website development.
  5. Review and analyze online page design and typography.
  6. Analyze graphics as content, their characteristics, color systems and uses.
  7. Integrate forms and applications which support interaction.
  8. Evaluate appropriate use of multimedia.
  9. Explore existing and emerging technologies and review considerations for these technologies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Technical Process and Structural Guidelines of Web Design Development

A. Establish a site development team and allocate responsibilities.

B. Analyze types of websites and documents.

C. Review the development process.

II. Universal Usability and Implementation Strategies

A. Examine and measure accessibility within designs.

B. Outline universal usability guidelines.

C. Discuss flexibility, adaptation, user control and functionality.

D. Collect user research through surveys, interviews, focus groups and Web analytics.

E. Review goals, scenarios and personas.

F. Implement universal design principles.

III. Information Architecture Plans

A. Establish themes to organize information.

B. Develop a viable site structure.

C. Modify an existing site structure.

D. Review functionality of site structure.

E. Present final information architecture plans and rules for future modifications.

IV. Interface Design Principles and Universal Usability During Website Development

A. Analyze and compare navigation and wayfinding solutions.

B. Review principles of wayfinding.

C. Compare browsing and searching capabilities.

D. Diagram interface design solutions.

E. Review consistency, integrity and stability issues.

F. Measure options, bandwidth and interaction.

G. Consider information design evolution and standardization.

H. Review and apply the enterprise interface and potential corporate identity standards.

V. Online Page Design and Typography

A. Define Web, digital media and design terminology.

B. Analyze page designs and anticipate design for use in multiple mediums.

C. Apply visual design basics.

D. Analyze characteristics of typography on the Web.

E. Compare typefaces and families, type size, leading, kerning and tracking options.

F. Review visual principles that dominate the Web.

G. Employ adaptive design techniques.

H. Demonstrate incorporating page frameworks and design grids for Web pages.

VI. Graphics as Content, Their Characteristics, Color Systems and Use

A. Discuss the origins of information graphics.

B. Document the characteristics of Web graphics.

C. Compare imaging strategies, images on screen and evaluate complex illustrations and photographs.

D. Identify traditional color systems.

E. Define and employ digital color systems.

F. Identify cross platform color issues and resolve them.

G. Review color terminology and compare color choice and use in appropriate online settings.

VII. Forms and Applications Which Support Interaction

A. Identify technologies that support interaction.

B. Incorporate user design analysis when designing Web applications.

C. Create wireframes and prototypes to demonstrate application.

VII. Appropriate Use of Multimedia

A. Review multimedia considerations.

B. Discuss multimedia strategies.

C. Manage multimedia preparations.

IX. Technologies Existing and Emerging

A. Create prototypes for traditional Graphical User Interface (GUI).

B. Evaluate additional display options and document any architecture, graphic and usability considerations.

C. Propose solutions for delivering content on multiple platforms.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 128

  • Title: Server Scripting: PHP with MySQL*
  • Number: WEB 128
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course covers the commands and techniques available to add functionality to Web pages using Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP). Students will build client-side PHP scripts with variables, functions, expressions, methods and events to validate forms and enhance Web page functionality. The basics of server-side scripting are introduced. Students also define and build a relational database using MySQL, then use PHP scripts as well as SQL in a Web page to connect to the database to edit, delete and enter records. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the purpose and interaction between data-driven website components, including the purpose for scripting languages and middleware.
  2. Use HTML elements to create a Web form.
  3. Write PHP scripts using various coding constructs.
  4. Differentiate between client-side and server-side PHP scripts.
  5. Post PHP Web pages and debug PHP scripts.
  6. Design a small relational database.
  7. Use MySQL to create the relational database.
  8. Use SQL to edit, enter, delete and query data in a MySQL database.
  9. Connect to a MySQL database using PHP scripts in a Web page.
  10. Write a PHP script to display, enter, edit and delete data from a MySQL database.
  11. Describe the use and application of cookies and session variables.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Data-Driven Web Site Components

A. Explain the role and functions of the browser and Web page.

B. Compare the role and functions of HTML and scripts.

C. Contrast the role and functions of client-side and server-side scripts.

D. Explain the role and functions of the database.

E. Demonstrate the purpose of SQL.

F. Explain the role and functions of various Web page development tools.

G. Contrast the role and functions of the client with the server.

H. Explain the role and functions of the server and server operating system.

II. Web Forms

A. Use the form element in a web page to create a Web form.

B. Set the action attribute to a script file.

C. Differentiate between post and get methods.

D. Use input elements to collect and submit data on a form.

E. Use select and option elements to collect data on a Web form.

F. Add table elements to align information on a Web form.

III. Introduction to PHP Scripts

A. Describe the purpose for PHP.

B. Demonstrate the rules for PHP syntax.

C. Create basic PHP scripts to build HTML files using variables, arrays, functions, expressions, methods, properties and events.

D. Add PHP control structures such as if statements and loops.

IV. Server-Side PHP Scripts

A. Create PHP scripts for form input.

B. Create PHP scripts for various user interface effects such as rollovers.

C. Create server-side PHP scripts.

D. Create PHP scripts to obtain form data and output HTML.

E. Use PHP scripts to open files to read, write and append data.

F. Post and Debug Scripts

G. Post PHP server-side PHP scripts.

H. Debug PHP server-side PHP scripts.

V. Relational Database Design

A. Explain the benefits of a properly designed relational database.

B. State proper field and object naming conventions.

C. Demonstrate the use of proper field data types.

D. Build a diagram to model the data using tables, fields, primary key fields, foreign key fields and one-to-many relationships.

VI. Introduction to MySQL

A. Use MySQL to create and define the tables, fields, field types and joins necessary to create a small relational database.

B. Use MySQL to enter, edit, delete and query data.

VIII. Introduction to SQL

A. Define SQL terminology and demonstrate proper SQL syntax.

B. Create a table with field names using the CREATE statement.

C. Select data to the database using the SELECT statement.

D. Add data to the database using the INSERT statement.

E. Change data in the database using the UPDATE statement.

F. Delete data in the database using the DELETE statement.

G. Write WHERE conditions to select certain records.

H. Use the simple and left JOIN operations.

IX. PHP, Web Page and MySQL Database Connections

A. Define the name of the Database Management System (DBMS) software, driver, database location and server permissions.

B. Write a connection PHP script to link the Web page to the database.

X. PHP and MySQL Data

A. Write a PHP script to insert data into the MySQL database.

B. Write a PHP script to display the contents of the MySQL database.

C. Write a PHP script to delete the contents of the MySQL database.

D. Write a PHP script to update the contents of the MySQL database.

E. Write a PHP script to select data with queries involving more than one table.

F. Debug PHP scripts and SQL.

XI. Files, Cookies and Session Variables

A. Read and write text files with PHP.

B. Upload a file using PHP.

C. Explain the nature of a stateless protocol and the need for cookies and session variables.

D. Write PHP scripts to set cookies.

E. Write PHP scripts to set session variables.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 134

  • Title: Web Scripting: JavaScript III*
  • Number: WEB 134
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

Description:

Students will write JavaScript to interact with touch and gesture events. They will also explore technologies that extend JavaScript’s functionality, including popular Application Program Interfaces (APIs), libraries and frameworks. Ajax, JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), jQuery and other technologies will be introduced. Students will code secure web applications, often called web apps. 2 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Integrate touch and gesture events.
  2. Use APIs.
  3. Create an Ajax application.
  4. Update data using JSON.
  5. Apply basic jQuery functions.
  6. Compare and apply popular JavaScript libraries and frameworks.
  7. Address web app security issues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Touch and Mobile

A. Implement touch events.

B. Implement pointer events.

II. APIs

A. Explore current popular APIs.

B. Apply Geolocation APIs.

C. Apply Visualization APIs.

D. Apply device access APIs.

III. Ajax

A. Explain the history and purpose of Ajax.

B. Send and receive HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) messages.

C. Request server data.

D. Process server data.

IV. JSON

A. Explain the history and purpose of JSON.

B. Use JSON to to send and receive data from the server.

V. jQuery

A. Explain the history and purpose of jQuery.

B. Manipulate the Document Object Model (DOM) with jQuery methods.

C. Use built-in jQuery effects.

VI. Libraries, Frameworks and Tools

A. Investigate and compare current popular libraries and frameworks.

B. Apply new JavaScript libraries and frameworks.

VII. Security

A. Investigate current security threats that apply to all aspects of a web application.

B. Practice professional security strategies to handle security threats.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 150

  • Title: Essential Web Concepts and Techniques I*
  • Number: WEB 150
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: CPCA 105 or CPCA 106 or CPCA 128 or appropriate score on an assesment test.

Description:

This current-events course introduces students to essential Web concepts and techniques. Students will explore a range of topics, from fundamental existing technologies to new trends. Real-world applications of the Web will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web.
  2. Compare, configure and use the features of several browsers.
  3. Use different types of Web technologies and storage services to manage files and folders.
  4. Construct a basic Web page.
  5. Publish a Web page to a Web server.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Development of the Internet and the World Wide Web

A. Differentiate between the Internet and World Wide Web.

B. Discuss the history of the Internet.

C. Discuss the history of the World Wide Web.

D. List hardware and software components of an Internet connection.

E. Compare and evaluate different methods for connecting to the Internet.

II. Browsers

A. Use and compare current browsers.

B. Configure and change default options.

C. Search the World Wide Web effectively using a variety of search tools and techniques.

D. Create and organize bookmarks.

E. Send and receive Web-based email.

III. Web File and Folder Management

A. Use different types of Web-based cloud storage services to manage files and folders.

B. Download files using different browsers.

C. Manage email file attachments.

D. Use professional file and folder naming conventions.

IV. Web Page Construction

A. Create an HTML template with required tags.

B. Use HTML tags to markup content in a Web page.

C. Create headings, paragraphs, hyperlinks and lists.

V. Publishing

A. Configure Web publishing options.

B. Publish Web pages to a Web server.

C. View published Web pages using the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) created by the Web server.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects

100%  Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 152

  • Title: Web Pages: Expression Web I*
  • Number: WEB 152
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

Description:

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise Web pages using Expression Web. Topics to be covered will include researching, planning and creating a website, identifying the purpose of HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), inserting background color, inserting and editing images, creating lists, creating and applying style sheets, inserting files, creating internal and external links and publishing a website. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss the Web page development process.
  2. Create and edit a Web page and a website.
  3. Enhance a website by applying a variety of formatting styles and techniques.
  4. Add images and navigational links to a website.
  5. Publish a website.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Page Development

A. Discuss the Internet, the World Wide Web, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

B. Explore a website.

C. Open a website in different views.

D. View the HTML and CSS codes for a Web page.

II. Website Creation

A. Use Expression Web to create and edit a website and a Web page.

B. Import an existing Web page into a website.

C. Discuss file management rules and restrictions.

D. Enter and spell check text in a Web page.

E. Test a Web page in a Web browser.

III. Web Site Enhancement

A. Apply heading styles and text formatting techniques.

B. Change the background color.

C. Insert and edit images.

D. Create and modify a horizontal line.

E. Create and modify a border.

F. Create bulleted and numbered lists.

G. Create and attach CSS to text and pages.

IV. Images and Links

A. Discuss image file formats.

B. Insert and edit images.

C. Create a folder for images.

D. Create bookmarks and an email link.

E. Add internal and external links.

F. Edit and manage links.

V. Publish Web Pages

A. Configure Web publishing options.

B. Publish Web pages to a Web server.

C. View published Web pages using the URL created by the Web server.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 154

  • Title: Web Pages: Dreamweaver I*
  • Number: WEB 154
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

Description:

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise web pages using Dreamweaver. Topics to be covered will include basic text layout, viewing and identifying basic HyperText Markup Language (HTML) tags, creating a site map, formatting a Web page, applying background color, inserting images and sounds, creating ordered and unordered lists, inserting files and creating links on Web pages. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explore the Dreamweaver workspace.
  2. Create a website.
  3. Create Web pages.
  4. Create Web page layout.
  5. Link Web pages.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dreamweaver Workspace

A. Discuss Web basics.

B. Explore the Dreamweaver interface.

C. Discuss elements of Web design and development.

D. Explore the Property Inspector.

E. Explore viewing Web pages, HTML and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

II. Web Site Creation

A. Plan the website project.

B. Use design tools to plan the website.

C. Set up the website in Dreamweaver.

D. Discuss current Web design techniques and methods.

E. Explore validation and Lint testing of a website.

F. Upload website to a server.

III. Web Page Creation

A. Create Web page documents.

B. Create head and body components of a page.

C. Format Web page content using CSS.

D. Insert images.

E. Discuss high resolution screens.

F. Adjust image location using CSS.

G. Preview a completed Web page.

IV. Web Page Layout

A. Explore various Web page layout models.

B. Discuss media queries for responsive Web page layout.

C. Discuss design patterns.

D. Discuss wireframes.

V. Web Page Linking

A. Create CSS navigation and rollovers.

B. Create hyperlinks to internal and external pages.

C. Create links to locations on a Web page.

D. Create email links.

E. Create navigation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 156

  • Title: JavaScript I*
  • Number: WEB 156
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course provides a foundation to client-side scripting using the JavaScript language. Students will write, validate and debug JavaScript code to enhance the functionality of Web pages. Topics to be covered include common applications such as responding to user actions, creating pop-up dialog boxes and controlling the Web browser. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the purpose and relationship between HyperText Markup Language (HTML), client-side and server-side scripting languages.
  2. Integrate JavaScript and HTML.
  3. Create popup windows and scrolling messages.
  4. Write JavaScript to respond to user events.
  5. Validate and debug JavaScript.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. JavaScript Programming

A. Define HTML and explain the use of HTML tags.

B. Define JavaScript cookies and variables.

C. Define expression and describe the arithmetic operators.

D. Discuss the use of JavaScript functions.

E. Define objects, properties, methods and events.

F. Describe the purpose of event handlers, frames and arrays.

II. JavaScript and HTML

A. Describe how to integrate JavaScript and HTML.

B. Insert script tags on a Web page.

C. Set the background color of Web page using JavaScript.

D. Extract the system date.

E. Use several variables to construct a message.

F. Write a user-defined function that displays a message and links viewers to a new Web page.

G. Use the lastModified property to display the last modified document date.

III. Pop-Up Windows and Scrolling Messages

A. Explain the four basic components of a scrolling message.

B. Write a user-defined function.

C. Use the open() method to display another Web page in a pop-up window.

IV. Image and Form Objects

A. Create an image object.

B. Write a rolling banner function.

C. Create a dynamic greeting.

D. Write a user-defined function that calculates the number of days to a future date.

E. Write a user-defined function that changes an image when the mouse pointer passes over a related link.

V. Validate and Debug

A. Describe JavaScript syntax.

B. Validate JavaScript.

C. Debug JavaScript.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 158

  • Title: Adobe Flash I*
  • Number: WEB 158
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course will cover the commands and techniques available to add Flash content to Web pages. Topics covered will include using drawing tools, manipulating text with text tools, adding and modifying sound, creating animation and publishing work. This class will be taught in a classroom with both Macintosh and Windows computers. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify components of the Flash interface.
  2. Use the drawing tools.
  3. Use the text tool.
  4. Identify and use sound files.
  5. Explain the use of layers in Flash movies.
  6. Use animation and tweening techniques.
  7. Test Flash movies.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Flash Interface

A. Manage timeline.

B. Understand stage.

C. Use rulers and guides.

D. Configure and use grids.

E. Configure toolbox.

F. Use the Flash timeline to choreograph the movie.

II. Drawing Tools

A. Use selection tool.

B. Use line tool.

C. Select with Lasso tool.

D. Draw with pen tool.

III. Text Tool

A. Create static text.

B. Use dynamic text.

C. Use input text.

IV. Sound Files

A. Import sound files into library.

B. Put sound file into frame.

C. Put sound file into button frame.

D. Incorporate sounds into a Flash movie.

V. Layers

A. Explain the use of layers in the timeline.

B. Create a new layer in the timeline.

C. Delete an existing layer in the timeline.

D. Copy layers in the timeline.

E. Use guide layers to position elements on the stage.

F. Use motion guide layers to direct the animation in a motion tween.

VI. Animation and Tweening

A. Create frame by frame animation.

B. Create tween animation(s).

C. Create a motion tween animation.

VII. Test And Publish

A. Use the Publish Preview tool.

B. Use the Profiler tool to determine the bandwidth needs.

C. Publish the movie to a Web format.

D. Publish the movie to a Flash Player format.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 160

  • Title: Essential Web Concepts and Techniques II*
  • Number: WEB 160
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

Description:

This course is a continuation of Essential Web Concepts and Techniques I, and will cover intermediate commands and techniques required to use various Web based tools and programs. Students will explore a wide range of topics, from existing technologies to new trends. Real-world applications of the Web will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast current Web development software.
  2. Describe current social media tools.
  3. Discuss current Web security and privacy issues.
  4. Compare and contrast Web applications.
  5. Discuss emerging technologies and trends.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Development Software

A. Discuss the purpose of Web development software.

B. Identify current Web development tools.

C. Compare and contrast current Web development software.

D. Use web development software to create content for delivery on the Web .

II. Social Media Tools

A. Define social media.

B. Identify current social media tools.

C. Discuss the benefits and risks of social networking sites.

III. Web Security and Privacy Issues

A. Discuss online security issues and concerns.

B. Identify methods for protecting online security.

C. Discuss online privacy issues and concerns.

D. Identify methods for protecting online privacy.

IV. Web Applications

A. Identify current Web apps and native apps.

B. Discuss the differences between native apps and Web apps.

C. Compare and contrast Web apps and native apps for personal and professional use.

V. Emerging Technologies and Trends

A. Identify emerging technologies.

B. Discuss emerging trends.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 162

  • Title: Web Pages: Expression Web II*
  • Number: WEB 162
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 152.

Description:

This course is a continuation of Web Pages: Expression Web I, and will cover intermediate-level commands and techniques required to create and enhance websites using Expression Web. Topics to be covered will include creating and modifying dynamic links, working with tables, creating forms, and using templates to design Web pages. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Enhance Web pages using interactive components.
  2. Create and modify tables.
  3. Build and modify forms.
  4. Create and edit templates.
  5. Publish Web pages.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Page Interactivity

A. Insert and edit an interactive button.

B. Create a Jump Menu.

C. Create a swap image.

D. Create a hover button.

E. Create an image map.

F. Draw and modify a hotspot.

G. Discuss relative and absolute file addressing.

II. Tables

A. Discuss the difference between data tables and layout tables.

B. Create and modify a data table.

C. Insert an Excel worksheet.

D. Merge and split table columns and rows.

E. Create and modify a layout table.

F. Create a navigation bar for a layout table.

III. Forms

A. Discuss the purpose of forms and the associated terminology.

B. Create an XHTML (Extensible Hypertext Markup Language) form.

C. Determine the form structure.

D. Create a text field.

E. Create text boxes.

F. Create option buttons, check boxes and list boxes.

G. Evaluate and create methods for sending data and clearing forms.

H. Create Advanced Command buttons.

I. Insert a file upload control.

J. Organize and describe the form elements.

IV. Templates

A. Identify page templates and site templates.

B. Define the CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) box model.

C. Use and edit a Dynamic Web Template.

D. Create a document using a template layout.

E. Manage the editable regions of a Dynamic Web Page Template.

F. Format a page to adopt a template design.

V. Publish Web Pages

A. Configure Web publishing options.

B. Publish Web pages to a Web server.

C. View published Web pages using the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) created by the Web server.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 164

  • Title: Web Pages: Dreamweaver II*
  • Number: WEB 164
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 154.

Description:

This course builds upon the concepts and design techniques presented in Dreamweaver I. The course includes a range of intermediate Dreamweaver techniques required to work efficiently and create manageable web site designs using Dreamweaver forms, templates and libraries, as well as covering managing your web site and checking files. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Create and use Dreamweaver libraries.
  2. Create and use Dreamweaver templates.
  3. Create and use forms and form tags in a Web page.
  4. Add interactivity to the Web page using Dreamweaver behaviors.
  5. Discuss search engine optimization basics.
  6. Explore site testing and management.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Dreamweaver Libraries

A. Use a site library.

B. Create, modify and update library items.

II. Dreamweaver Templates

A. Create, edit and apply site templates.

B. Define editable regions on the page.

C. Create pages based on a template.

D. Edit and update Dreamweaver template pages.

E. Add content to pages based on a template.

III. Forms

A. Create Web page form.

B. Process the form data.

C. Style Web page forms using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

IV. Behaviors

A. Use Dreamweaver behaviors to add JavaScript functions.

B. Discuss Dreamweaver JavaScript and JQuery behaviors.

V. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Basics

A. Explain title tags and meta tags.

B. Discuss writing good text content.

C. Discuss search engines and search engine spiders.

VI. Testing and Site Management

A. Use Find and Replace to change selected content or Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) code throughout the page.

B. Test and check for broken links in Web pages.

C. Use the site manager in Dreamweaver to manage and update files.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 166

  • Title: JavaScript II*
  • Number: WEB 166
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 156.

Description:

This course builds on the skills learned in JavaScript I. Students will apply JavaScript to manipulate and validate Web form elements and data. Students will learn to use JavaScript in their Web pages to build menus and navigational structures. Students will expand their debugging skills. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Manipulate Web forms and data.
  2. Build a menu for a website with JavaScript.
  3. Use JavaScript operators.
  4. Write JavaScript with control structures.
  5. Apply advanced debugging techniques.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Form Validation

A. Apply the form object to form controls.

B. Manipulate form elements.

C. Validate form data.

II. Menus

A. Design a website menu system.

B. Create drop-down menus using JavaScript.

III. JavaScript with Advanced Operators

A. Write functions using bitwise operators.

B. Write conditional statements with comparison and Boolean operators.

C. Create and initialize variables with assignment operators.

D. Write functions that calculate values using arithmetic operators.

IV. Control Structures

A. Write a looping function that uses the Break command.

B. Write a looping function that uses the Continue command.

C. Write a Do-While loop that lists the names of the images in a Web page.

D. Write a For-In loop that checks the value store in every element of an array.

E. Write a For loop that initializes the contents of an array.

F. Write an If / Else structure that branches program execution.

G. Write a Switch structure that displays one of many different error messages for data validation.

H. Write a While loop that processes the contents of a text string.

V. Exception and Error Handling Techniques

A. Diagnose and correct run-time errors.

B. Analyze logic errors.

C. Interpret error messages.

D. Trace errors.

E. Apply debugging tools.

F. Specify breakpoints.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 168

  • Title: Adobe Flash II*
  • Number: WEB 168
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 158.

Description:

This course will build on the fundamental skills learned in Adobe Flash I. Topics will include complex animation techniques, interactivity with simple frame actions, and interactivity using objects such as buttons, hotspots and movie clips. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Build interactive movies using buttons, keyboard and mouse detection.
  2. Manage movie organization with scenes and layers.
  3. Combine tweening and frame-by-frame animation.
  4. Manage symbols and symbol libraries.
  5. Build interactivity using simple ActionScripts.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Buttons, Keyboard, and Mouse

A. Create buttons.

B. Build menus with buttons.

C. Modify button properties and tracking options.

D. Detect a key press.

E. Detect keystrokes in ActionScript using the Key object methods andlisteners.

F. Detect Mouse Movement on the Stage.

G. Detect button clicks on the Mouse object with listeners.

II. Movie Organization

A. Create layer folders.

B. Delete layer folders.

C. Control layer folders.

D. Cut and paste between layer folders.

E. Create a new scene.

F. Delete an existing scene.

G. Duplicate an existing scene.

H. Reorder scenes.

III. Advanced Animation

A. Combine frame-by-frame animation with tweened animation.

B. Create an animation using ActionScripting.

C. Use movieClips.

IV. Symbol Libraries

A. Create a new symbol.

B. Create a symbol from an existing graphic.

C. Create a symbol instance on the stage.

D. Edit a master symbol.

E. Duplicate a master symbol.

F. Create a shared library.

G. Use font symbols.

V. Interactivity with Simple Frame Actions

A. Choose and use the Normal Scripting mode and the Expert Scripting mode.

B. Add an action to a frame.

C. Edit a frame action.

D. Add frame labels and comments.

E. Create a named anchor.

F. Control movie playbacks.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 170

  • Title: Podcasting
  • Number: WEB 170
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course will cover how to create sound, use the appropriate software, develop a show, distribute a podcast and build an audience. Students will begin by learning the basics of blogging and then develop their blogs into audio and/or video podcasts. More advanced topics include audio editing, podcasting on the go and videocasting. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Define Podcasting.
  2. Explore music and intellectual property rights.
  3. Explain and use terminology associated with syndication and podcasting.
  4. Set up audio software and hardware.
  5. Explore recording and configuring podcasts.
  6. Post podcasts to a blog or other Internet media service.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Podcasting

A. Explain and use terminology associated with podcasting and audio recording.

B. Explore uses of podcasts and syndication related to their own specific educational, business-related or personal uses.

C. Set up audio software and recording microphone to record and edit captured sound.

D. Implement podcasting by uploading podcasts into blogs, websites or other Internet media service.

E. Set up syndication service.

II. Music and Intellectual Property Rights

A. Define copyright.

B. Discuss royalty and royalty-free assets.

C. Explore how to protect podcasts through packaging.

D. Integrate podcasts in a website.

E. Discuss podcasts with pictures.

III .Podcasting Syndication

A. Discuss podcasting vocabulary.

B. Examine podcast authoring software terminology.

C. Explore uses of podcasts and Real Simple Syndication (RSS).

D. Search availability of podcasts of interest.

E. Subscribe to useful podcasts.

IV. Audio Software and Hardware

A. Load and configure software.

B. Connect microphone and other audio hardware.

C. Test configuration.

V. Podcasts Recording

A. Write the script.

B. Explore recording considerations and configurations.

VI. Podcast Upload

A. Upload and link to the podcast.

B. Check playback.

C. Syndicate the podcast.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Assignments and Quizzes
40-60%    Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 172

  • Title: WordPress I*
  • Number: WEB 172
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: CPCA 105 or CPCA 106 or CPCA 128 or an appropriate score on an assessment test.

Description:

This course will cover the commands and techniques required to create and revise blogs and websites using WordPress. Topics to be covered will include basic blogging techniques, working with digital images, hosting, spam and security issues, plugins and themes. Real-world applications of WordPress will be the primary focus of this course. Hands-on, practical projects will be performed to reinforce the concepts. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Set up a WordPress hosting account.
  2. Install WordPress and create a blog.
  3. Manage and install themes.
  4. Work with digital content.
  5. Discuss spam and security issues.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. WordPress Host

A. Differentiate between free and fee-based WordPress options.

B. Discuss host options and criteria.

C. Set up a host account.

D. Install WordPress software.

II. WordPress Blog

A. Start a WordPress blog.

B. Make a blog public or private.

C. Write and publish a post.

III. Customize Blogs

A. Install and apply themes.

B. Manage themes.

C. Identify basic configuration.

IV. Digital Content

A. Upload an image.

B. Adjust images as they are being uploaded.

C. Use a picture from a social media site.

D. Resize pictures.

E. Discuss online image editing tools.

F. Manage photos.

G. Rename pictures.

H. Embed Web-based content.

V. Spam and Security

A. Discuss blog comment spam.

B. Understand blog security.

C. Adjust comment and spam settings.

D. Discuss blog backup options.

E. Update WordPress.

F. Discuss and download plugins.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 178

  • Title: Adobe Flash III*
  • Number: WEB 178
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 168.

Description:

This course will build on the skills learned in Adobe Flash II. Students will do projects to control movie clips, sound, external data, multiple timelines and text fields. Some ActionScripting will be introduced. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Control multiple timelines.
  2. Manage outside communication.
  3. Control movie clips.
  4. Control sound.
  5. Control data sources.
  6. Control text.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Timeline Control

A. Navigate timelines with movie clips.

B. Name movie clip instances.

C. Use absolute and relative target paths.

D. Target movie clips using the WITH action.

E. Control the flow of information in ActionScript with the scope of variables.

F. Use movie clips as containers.

II. Outside Communication

A. Build a movie that sends data.

1. Through the WEB browser

2. To an external movie

3. To an external image

B. Build two movies that talk to each other.

C. Use the fscommand action in a projector.

D. Build a movie that communicates with a printer.

E. Detect a movie's playback environment.

F. Build a preloader to detect download progress.

III. Movie Clip Control

A. Drag a movie clip.

B. Set movie clip properties.

C. Get movie clip properties.

D. Modify movie clip color.

E. Detect dropped movie clips.

F. Detect movie clip collisions.

G. Get the boundaries of movie clips.

H. Generate movie clips dynamically.

I. Remove movie clips dynamically.

J. Customize the mouse pointer.

IV. Sound Control

A. Attach sounds to movies.

B. Build a movie to play sounds.

C. Transform sounds using the sound envelope editor.

D. Load external sounds.

E. Read sound properties.

F. Detect sound events.

V. Data Sources

A. Initialize data in a movie.

B. Control movie flow with variables and expressions.

C. Load external variables.

D. Share information with other movies.

E. Modify variables.

F. Concatenate variables.

G. Test data with conditional statements.

VI. Text Manipulation

A. Create input and dynamic text fields.

B. Set and select text field options.

C. Concatenate text fields.

D. Display HTML formatted text in text fields.

E. Tween a text field.

F. Set text field properties.

G. Generate text fields dynamically.

H. Modify text in text fields.

I. Set the focus of text fields.

J. Detect changes in a text field.

K. Manipulate text field content with the String object.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

40-60%    Quizzes
40-60%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 188

  • Title: ActionScript for Flash*
  • Number: WEB 188
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 178.

Description:

This course will teach the basic skills needed to use ActionScripts in Flash movies. Students will build interactivity into their movies using ActionScript. They will also manipulate data and control Flash objects such as movie clips. ActionScript logic and functions will be explained. Students will gain a strong foundation in the latest version of ActionScript and many more general object-oriented programming principles. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe ActionScript basics.
  2. Handle events.
  3. Target paths.
  4. Employ objects.
  5. Write functions.
  6. Manipulate data.
  7. Use conditional logic.
  8. Control movie clips dynamically.
  9. Load external content.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basics

A. Describe ActionScript.

B. List ActionScript elements.

C. Write ActionScript.

D. Test ActionScript.

II. Event Handlers

A. Explain event handlers.

B. Use event handlers.

C. Activate movie events.

D. Attach mouse events to movie clips.

E. Incorporate frame events.

F. Use clip events.

G. Manage multiple events.

H. Use event handler methods.

I. Use listeners.

III. Target Paths

A. Use absolute and relative paths.

B. Specify target paths.

C. Create and reference global elements.

IV. Objects and Functions

A. Use different object types.

B. Create functions.

C. Add parameters to a function.

D. Return results from a function to local variables.

V. Dynamic Data

A. Create variables, arrays and dynamic text fields.

B. Retrieve information from dynamic text fields.

VI. Manipulate Data

A. Build an expression using variables of different data types.

B. Use operators to build a condition.

C. Calculate mathematical expressions.

D. Manipulate strings of data.

VII. Conditional Logic

A. Control a script's flow.

B. Determine conditions using variables.

C. React to multiple conditions and user interaction.

D. Detect symbol collisions.

VIII. Movie Clip Control

A. Create movie clips dynamically.

B. Build continuous feedback buttons.

C. Dynamically draw lines with the Draw methods.

D. Create filled shapes dynamically.

E. Drag and drop movie clip instances.

F. Remove dynamically created content.

IX. External Assets

A. Load a movie into a target.

B. Load JPG images dynamically.

C. Create an interactive placeholder.

D. Load movies into a level.

E. Control a movie on a level.

F. Load MP3 files dynamically.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 190

  • Title: E-Commerce I*
  • Number: WEB 190
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 150.

Description:

This course will introduce students to e-commerce in a software-driven, hands-on way. It will use software tools to discuss and explore a variety of e-commerce activities. Students will examine an extensive list of e-commerce sites, such as those that support purchasing, delivery, support, auction, business-to-business, virtual community and Web-portal business goals. They will examine e-commerce stores that incorporate advertising, marketing, branding and business efficiency goals. They will explore how to populate a store catalog, create sitewide navigation links and publish a store. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast traditional commerce vs. e-commerce.
  2. Explore new business websites including Web auctions, group purchasing sites, virtual communities and Web  portal sites.
  3. Plan a successful Web presence including the use of a flexible website interface and effective advertising.
  4. Build an online store.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electronic Commerce

A. Explore selling on the Web.

B. Explore advertising on the Web.

C. Explore business-to-business e-commerce .

II. New Web-Based Businesses

A. Participate in auctions.

B. Participate in group purchasing sites.

C. Participate in virtual communities.

III. Web Presence

A. Identify Web presence goals.

B. Plan a website interface.

C. Plan website advertising and costs.

D. Explore Web branding strategies and costs.

IV. Online Store

A. Identify needed ecommerce features and functions.

B. Identify needed transactions.

C. Set up a merchant account.

D. Use a Web hosting service to build a storefront.

E. Explore how to populate an e-commerce catalog and publish an e-commerce store.

F. Explore how to promote the online store using advertising and search engine strategies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 192

  • Title: E-Commerce II*
  • Number: WEB 192
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 190.

Description:

Students will examine e-commerce security issues including privacy, copyright and transaction integrity. Students will study electronic payment systems and international, legal and taxation issues. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explore website and set security issues.
  2. Explore e-commerce threats including those to privacy, property, communications and technology.
  3. Work with electronic payment systems such as scrip, electronic checks, credit cards, electronic cash, smart cards and electronic wallets for online purchases.
  4. Explore cultural, language and customs issues as they relate to e-commerce.
  5. Find information on legal and regulatory information for state, national, and international issues on items such as contract and warranty issues.
  6. Learn about e-commerce taxes including sales and use taxes.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Security

A. Create and delete cookies.

B. Create and remove encryption.

II. Threats

A. Define privacy threats.

B. Define intellectual property threats.

C. Remove client computer threats.

D. Identify and minimize technology and communication threats.

E. Install antivirus software.

F. Create encrypted transactions.

G. Create a digital signature.

III. Electronic Payment Systems

A. Define scrip.

B. Define electronic checks.

C. Define credit cards.

D. Define electronic wallets.

IV. Cultural Issues

A. Explain major language barriers as they relate to e-commerce.

B. Explain how customs relate to e-commerce.

V. International and Legal E-Commerce Issues

A. Explain relevant statewide legal and regulatory e-commerce issues.

B. Explain relevant national legal and regulatory e-commerce issues.

C. Explain relevant international legal and regulatory e-commerce issues.

VI.Taxation

A. Communicate how sales taxes affect an e-commerce website.

B. Communicate how use taxes affect an e-commerce website.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 230

  • Title: Asynchronous JavaScript and XML*
  • Number: WEB 230
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 114.

Description:

This course will introduce and explain the use of AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and eXtensible Markup Language). AJAX is not a technology itself but is a combination of HTML (HyperText Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and JavaScript's use of the DOM (Document Object Model). Students will use AJAX to dynamically load data into a Web page. Topics include auto complete functionality and other interactive features to a Web page. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain AJAX applications.
  2. Create HTTP Request Object.
  3. Implement HTTP Request Object methods.
  4. Use HTTP Request properties.
  5. Read data from files on a server.
  6. Write data to a Web page.
  7. Use the GET and POST methods.
  8. Use the HEAD Request to gather data.
  9. Use AJAX debugging tools.
  10. Use an AJAX library and toolkits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. AJAX Applications

A. Discuss and reverse engineer mapping software.

B. Discuss and reverse engineer calendar software.

II. XMLHTTPRequest Object

A. Create and use the XMLHTTPRequest Object in a Mozilla-based browser.

B. Create and use the XMLHTTPRequest Object in a Microsoft-based browser.

C. Identify and verify the existence of the XMLHTTPRequest Object.

III. XMLHTTPRequest Methods

A. Use the abort() command.

B. Use the getAllResponseHeaders() command.

C. Use the getResponseHeader() command.

D. Use the open() command.

E. Use the send() command.

F. Use the setRequestHeader() command.

IV. XMLHTTPRequest Properties

A. Define and use the onreadystatechange property.

B. Define and use the readyState property.

C. Define and use the responseText property.

D. Define and use the responseXML property.

E. Define and use the status property.

F. Define and use the statusText property.

V. Data Retrieval

A. Open and read a text file.

B. Open and read an XML file.

VI. Data on the Web Page

A. Display time.

B. Display date.

VII. Data Transferred to the Server

A. Use GET method.

B. Use POST method.

VIII. HEAD Requests

A. Configure HEAD request to return header data.

B. Find the last-modified date.

IX. AJAX Debugging

A. Discuss AJAX debugging.

B. Identify browser support issues.

C. Identify and fix AJAX errors.

X. AJAX Libraries and Toolkits

A. Use a JavaScript Library to build an update.

B. Identify and use an AJAX toolboxes and libraries.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Assignments and Quizzes
35-65%    Exams

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 231

  • Title: Experience Design*
  • Number: WEB 231
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 126.

Description:

This course will serve as a broad survey of the user experience design process for interactive products and services. Students will learn the building blocks of the user experience including interaction design, design research, information architecture and design principles. In addition to understanding how to discover needs and fulfill them with design, it will also provide knowledge of how to evaluate the concepts using common methods such as heuristic evaluation, prototyping or usability studies. Through readings, critiques, exercises and discussions, students will explore what makes the experience of an interactive media application successful. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Map the design process from concept to completion, including research, testing and production.
  2. Research target audience, document expectations, attitudes and productivity levels of users.
  3. Consider and implement interaction beyond the display, including environment, devices and social media.
  4. Apply a number of methods to identify opportunities for improvement on the usability of products and services.
  5. Examine, understand, and execute the principles and guidelines of user experience design through conceptual sketches and wireframes.
  6. Apply design elements including color, typography and supporting graphics, adhering to usability requirements and attention to the target audience.
  7. Create a functioning prototype.
  8. Employ user testing.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Principles and Guidelines of User Experience Design

A. Identify and understand the project objectives and underlying problem.

B. Create an intuitive, simple product.

C. Provide visibility of system status.

D. Allow user control and freedom.

E. Apply consistency and standards.

F. Prevent errors.

G. Employ recognition over recall.

H. Allow flexibility and efficiency of use.

I. Research and understand the user.

J. Assist users to recognize, diagnose and recover from errors.

K. Develop supporting documentation.

II. Universal Usability, Usability Motivations and Professional Goals

A. Establish usability goals.

B. Determine measurements of usability.

C. Analyze human-computer interaction.

D. Consider time to learn.

E. Consider speed of performance.

F. Consider rate of errors by users.

G. Consider retention over time.

H. Consider subjective satisfaction.

III. Design Process, Research and Deliverable Schedule

A. Research the user.

B. Create user stories/personas.

C. Identify tasks.

D. Develop information architecture.

E. Create a prototype.

F. Implement user testing.

G. Amend the design.

H. Establish a design aesthetic, implement on an interface.

I. Develop the product and deploy.

IV. Environment, Devices and Social Media

A. Research user environment.

B. Consider portable devices and peripherals.

C. Review social media considerations.

D. Develop strategies to incorporate current and emerging technologies.

V. Form and Function Issues

A. Identify system errors vs. user errors.

B. Establish a pattern for handling errors.

C. Apply structure to content before aesthetics.

D. Determine and apply navigation strategies.

E. Consider maximum number of steps.

F. Consider orientation.

G. Consider reversing any action.

H. Consider different navigational structures.

VI. Design Elements

A. Establish or employ branding standards.

B. Develop the digital story.

C. Define layout: formats, proportions and grids.

D. Establish typography aesthetic: display and text fonts, line spacing, hierarchy.

E. Identify color and texture.

F. Identify or develop supporting graphics, icons or symbols.

G. Consider motion graphics for interactivity.

H. Incorporate audio.

I. Organize the content.

J. Create a simple, intuitive, minimalist aesthetic.

K. Match the interface to the capability of the user.

VII. Functioning Prototype

A. Research and select appropriate authoring tools.

B. Consider ease of use and development tools.

C. Consider maintenance.

D. Consider search engines.

E. Consider media support and devices, portable and fixed.

F. Consider cross-platform issues.

G. Consider playback.

H. Consider efficiency.

I. Consider authoring languages.

VIII. User Testing

A. Examine accessibility and universal usability solutions.

B. Review brand identity placement and recognition among users.

C. Review paths users follow to find information.

D. Document time spent reviewing individual pages.

E. Document time spent searching for information.

F. Document effort required to understand navigation.

G. Examine recognition ability by user.

H. Review content placement and hierarchy.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

10-25%    Class participation, collaboration, critiques
10-25%    Research and writing
20-40%    Exams
25-50%    Functioning and mock prototypes

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 232

  • Title: Introduction to eXtensible Markup Language*
  • Number: WEB 232
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 124.

Description:

This course will introduce and explain the use of XML(eXtensible Markup Language) documents to encapsulate and transfer data across the Internet. Students will learn to use document type definitions, attributes and entities, and XML schemas to build valid and useful XML documents. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) will be introduced to format the XML documents. JavaScript will be used to incorporate programming instructions into the XML document. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify uses of XML.
  2. Create an XML document.
  3. Identify the components of a “Well Formed” XML document.
  4. Create valid Document Type Definitions.
  5. Create and use attributes and entities.
  6. Create an XML schema.
  7. Create and use elements in a schema.
  8. Use CSS in the XML document to apply formatting.
  9. Use JavaScript with XML.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. XML Basics

A. Display XML file in a browser.

B. Identify and describe real-world uses of XML.

II. Creation of XML Documents

A. Evaluate and compare XML editors.

B. Use an XML validator to verify XML structure.

C. Identify and describe American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII), Unicode and Unified Computing System (UCS) character encoding.

D. Separate XML Markup and XML Data from each other.

E. Identify whitespace characters.

F. Create a prolog for an XML file.

G. Create a declaration for an XML file.

H. Add comments to an XML file for documentation.

I. Define processing instructions.

J. Define tags and elements.

1. Define and create tag names

2. Define and create empty elements

3. Define and create a root element

4. Define and create attributes

K. Define and create CDATA sections.

L. Use entities to complete XML document.

III. Creation of “Well Formed” XML Documents

A. Begin the document with an XML declaration.

B. Use only legal character references.

C. Use correct element structure.

D. Nest elements correctly.

E. Use unique attribute names.

F. Use XML namespaces.

1. Create namespaces

2. Define namespaces with Uniform Resource Locators (URLs)

3. Create local namespaces

4. Create default namespaces

IV. Valid XML Documents

A. Use Document Type Definitions (DTD).

B. Create element content models.

1. Identify child elements

2. Identify multiple child elements

C. Support external DTDs

1. Identify and define private and public DTDs

2. Use internal and external DTDs at the same time

3. Manage namespaces in DTDs

V. Attributes and Entities in DTDs

A. Identify and define attributes in DTDs.

B. Specify default values for the DTD.

C. Specify attribute types.

D. Use Entities.

1. Create Internal General Entity Reference

2. Create External General Entity Reference

VI. Valid XML Documents Using XML Schemas

A. Create XML schemas.

B. Create elements and types.

C. Specify a specific number of elements.

VII. Types of XML Schemas

A. Restrict simple types.

B. Identify and use anonymous type definitions.

C. Declare empty elements.

D. Declare mixed content elements.

E. Group elements together.

F. Group attributes together.

G. Handling namespaces in schemas.

1. Declare locals without qualifying them

2. Identify, declare and qualify locals

H. Document an XML schema.

VIII. XML With CSS

A. Connect CSS style sheets and XML documents.

B. Create style sheet selectors.

1. Create and use style classes

2. Select an option by ID

C. Use inline styles.

D. Create style rule specifications in style sheets.

1. Create block elements

2. Specify text styles

3. Create styling colors and background

4. Apply styling borders

5. Customize styling alignments

6. Modify image styles

7. Customize lists styles

8. Create tables styles

IX. JavaScript and XML

A. Identify and define the Document Object Model (DOM) objects.

1. Define and use the XMLDOMNode object

2. Define and use the XMLDOMElement object

3. Define and use the XMLDOMText object

B. Reference elements by name.

C. Read attribute values.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Assignments and Quizzes
35-65%    Exams

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 233

  • Title: Visual Storytelling*
  • Number: WEB 233
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Description:

Storytelling is how people share ideas and meaning. It's how we communicate, reach each other and connect. This course provides an introduction to the methods and tools of visual storytelling. Students will explore the impact of visual storytelling and how to communicate visually. Students will use storytelling techniques enabling them to create, design and produce stories using digital media. This course will explore the key elements to tell realistic and compelling visual stories. Students will write scripts, design storyboards, create still and moving images using music and narration to tell their stories. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss visual storytelling.
  2. Distinguish among different kinds of stories.
  3. Identify the elements of story structure and describe their function.
  4. Plan and design visual stories.
  5. Identify and compose visual elements to support story ideas.
  6. Utilize visual language in shots and sequences.
  7. Communicate visual story ideas verbally.
  8. Use social media tools to publish stories.
  9. Develop a collaborative Web native film project.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Visual Storytelling

A. Explore visual archetype characters.

B. Discuss how to visually engage people online.

C. Explore visual literacy.

D. Discuss visual grammar.

II. Different Kinds of Stories

A. Evaluate visual stories critically.

B. Explore the explicit and implicit messages in visual stories.

C. Explore the relationship of words, imagery and motion.

D. Translate character behavior principles into narrative ideas.

III. Elements of Visual Story Structure

A. Identify and use the underlying universal themes in stories.

B. Identify the characteristics, themes, structures and components of a good story.

C. Analyze stories and their structures in a variety of media.

IV. Visual Stories Preproduction

A. Plan and design stories.

B. Write the concept statement.

C. Write the outline.

D. Write the script of the story.

E. Create the storyboard(s).

V. Visual Element Composition

A. Capture images and sounds that will tell the story.

B. Edit images and sounds to create a cohesive, compelling story.

C. Explore lighting techniques.

D. Employ nonlinear video editing techniques.

E. Employ fundamentals of camera operation and techniques to capture imagery.

F. Explore production crew roles and production management process.

G. Edit and caption images.

H. Incorporate best practices for lighting, composition and storytelling.

VI. Visual Language

A. Explore the semantics and syntax of video.

B. Discuss forms and uses of images and audio in visual storytelling across media.

C. Communicate original information using audio-visual storytelling.

VII. Visual Storytelling

A. Express story ideas verbally for a presentation of information, ideas and values to a specific audience.

B. Compose, critically analyze, present and deliver information through verbal interactions.

VIII. Publish Stories

A. Use social media tools.

B. Explore Web storytelling.

IX. Collaborative Web Native Film Project

A. Create a collaborative project.

B. Explore digital storytelling communities, resources and challenges.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-40%    Examinations
30-40%    Projects/Assignments
30-40%    Final Project

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 234

  • Title: Web Apps I*
  • Number: WEB 234
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

Description:

Mobile devices outnumber desktop and laptop computers three to one worldwide. This course will cover practical guidelines, standards, techniques and best practices for building Web applications using Client-Side programming including Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) and JavaScript, including basic design and development principles for all mobile devices and platforms. Students will have strong knowledge about the methods and tools used in developing Web applications. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss Web application development.
  2. Describe Web application development environment.
  3. Use responsive design techniques.
  4. Build responsive Web pages for various devices.
  5. Explain mobile Web applications versus native Web applications.
  6. Discuss the future of Web applications and responsive design.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Application Development

A. Discuss markup, style and scripting languages.

B. Explore Web application industry groups and standards bodies.

C. Discuss Web applications versus native applications.

II. Web Application Development Environment

A. Explore client-side development tools.

B. Evaluate mobile Web browsers on the desktop.

III. Responsive Design Techniques

A. Write HTML for responsive design.

B. Write CSS for mobile devices.

C. Explain device awareness.

D. Write JavaScript for mobile devices.

E. Test client-side markup.

F. Validate client-side markup.

IV. Responsive Web Pages

A. Use responsive Web techniques.

B. Build Web applications.

C. Deploy a Web application.

V. Web Applications versus Native Web Applications

A. Discuss differences in developing Web versus native applications.

B. Explore Web application security.

VI. Future of Web Applications and Responsive Design

A. Explore single-page applications.

B. Discuss performance issues.

C. Discuss maintainability.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-40%    Assignments and Quizzes
20-40%    Projects
20-40%    Exams

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 235

  • Title: Digital Communications Technologies*
  • Number: WEB 235
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 116.

Description:

This course is intended as an introduction to emerging digital communications technologies. While the primary focus will be on digital and mobile technologies and practices (contemporary new media), the course will also consider a range of older media when they were new including print culture, cinema, television, recorded sound, photography and the telephone. Students will focus on social technologies, such as blogs, wikis and spaces like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter to explore how people find information and how organizations communicate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explore the roots of human communication, the transition from the oral tradition to broadcast and recorded media and from there to today’s age of mobile communication.
  2. Discuss the concept of media literacy and its importance.
  3. Recognize the demographic and psychographic qualities of audiences of digital media.
  4. Explain ways to evaluate digital media.
  5. Describe our current understanding of the connections between participatory culture and civic engagement, including the relationship between the digital divide and the participation gap.
  6. Describe ways digital media impacts and influences popular culture.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Computer-Based Communication

A. Describe the transition from traditional media to digital media.

B. Discuss the relationship between technology and culture.

C. Explain how emergence of digital, networked and mobile communications technology has impacted pre-existing media forms.

II. Media Literacy

A. Use media and technology tools skillfully and share appropriate and relevant information with others.

B. Comprehend messages and use critical thinking to analyze message quality, veracity, credibility and point of view, while considering potential effects or consequences of messages.

C. Create content using creativity and confidence in self-expression, with awareness of purpose, audience and composition techniques.

D. Apply social responsibility and ethical principles to one’s own identity and lived experience, communication behavior and conduct.

III. Digital Media Audiences

A. Design strategies to reach target audience.

B. Discuss the value of content.

C. Explore the strengths and weaknesses of different media.

D. Discuss engagement with target audiences, promoting content and building personal brands.

IV. Digital Media Evaluation

A. Demonstrate the use of appropriate social media tools.

B. Discuss cross-platform dynamics and why certain messages go “viral.”

C. Coordinate channel activities.

D. Develop creative competence.

1. Authenticity

2. Storytelling

3. Artistic vision

V. Participatory Culture and Civic Engagement

A. Discuss methods to enable participation.

B. Explore the participation gap.

C. Discuss challenges of a participatory culture.

D. Discuss barriers for engagement.

E. Describe forms of engagement in a participatory culture.

VI. Digital Media Impacts and Influences

A. Define and discuss slacktivism.

B. Discuss advocacy and digital activism.

C. Explore the effects of the Internet and Web on advocacy and activism.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

25-35%    Examinations
65-75%    Projects/Assignments

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 236

  • Title: Content Management Systems Development*
  • Number: WEB 236
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 128.

Description:

Content Management Systems (CMS) have gained in popularity as the number of robust and complex websites continues to grow. Students will cover the life cycle of websites, including their creation, management, distribution and publishing of content. This hands-on course will cover open source CMS applications such as Joomla, Drupal, WordPress and other technologies and the resources available to designers and developers. Students will explore the fundamentals of planning dynamic websites, CMS database management, developing Cascading Style Sheet (CSS)-controlled site templates, and creating database-driven websites through the planning and creation of their own topic-based sites. Student exercises include how to interact, engage and contribute to online communities and projects. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe a CMS.
  2. Demonstrate CMS Workflow.
  3. Define content types.
  4. Use CMS themes and templates.
  5. Create custom CMS themes.
  6. Explore methods, tools and applications for content management.
  7. Discuss acquisition, storing, application and maintenance of a CMS.
  8. Discuss semantic Web and knowledge management.
  9. Explore usability and information architecture.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. CMS

A. Discuss various CMSs.

B. Explore the different categories of CMSs.

C. Explore the differences between markup and markdown syntax.

D. Explore the difference between a CMS website, a static website and websites using other server-side technologies.

E. Explore the benefits of working with a server-side database and the power it brings to creating and managing websites.

F. Discuss roles of CMSs.

II. CMS Workflow

A. Explain content strategy.

B. Define CMS workflow roles.

C. Perform CMS workflow task audit(s).

D. Integrate content planning into CMS workflow.

E. Create and deploy websites using a CMS.

F. Evaluate existing libraries and scripts for applicability to a task.

G. Use prototyping as a method to explore, design, communicate and test design concepts.

III. Content Types

A. Define website and blog taxonomies.

B. Define and customize sections of the CMS website.

C. Create a CMS taxonomy vocabulary.

D. Use taxonomic Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) to display content.

E. Create and edit content.

IV. CMS Templates

A. Explore CMS templates.

B. Use CMS template engine to create templates.

C. Create custom templates.

V. CMS Themes

A. Explore the structure of CMS themes.

B. Modify the appearance of themes.

C. Customize an existing theme.

D. Create custom themes.

VI. CMS Methods, Tools and Applications

A. Discuss and use server-side scripting technologies to generate dynamic websites.

B. Discuss and use client-side scripting technologies.

C. Explore and use Web application frameworks.

D. Discuss benefits and advantages of Web application frameworks.

E. Create code guidelines and standards.

F. Discuss and use Web application life cycle model.

G. Discuss and use Web application development process.

H. Install plugins to enhance functionality.

VII. CMS Maintenance

A. Create a CMS update and management schedule.

B. Explore text and image update to data backup.

C. Assign user permissions.

D. Discuss and perform optimization for website performance.

E. Explain search engine optimization for CMS.

F. Explore and discuss secure and maintainable coding practices.

VIII. Semantic Web

A. Explore semantic use of elements and the benefits of using standards-based, valid code.

B. Explore microformats to create semantically meaningful, portable content.

C. Discuss and use Web Accessibility Initiative-Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA).

D. Create knowledge management tools and methods.

IX. Usability and Information Architecture

A. Explore principles and methodologies of Information Architecture.

B. Conduct user research, content assessment and content organization.

C. Document technical processes within systems, defining organizational structures and developing interactive prototypes.

D. Develop a usability test plan.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

15-30%    In-class quizzes/activities
35-50%    Projects
35-50%    Exams

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 238

  • Title: Interactive Scripting: JQuery*
  • Number: WEB 238
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 122 and WEB 124.

Description:

Designers and developers can use jQuery to have complete access to all Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) styles of any element on a Web page, effortless Web page content manipulation via filters and patterns, detection or creation of events (mouse movement or click), moving, hiding and fading elements and other features. Students will be exposed to how to write efficient jQuery selectors to round up sets of Document Object Model (DOM) elements, how to use the framework's many methods to manipulate DOM elements, how to use the jQuery event application programming interface (API) to set up event listeners and event delegation, how to manage Ajax requests with jQuery and how to extend jQuery with custom filters and methods. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. and 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Incorporate the most recent version of jQuery into Web pages.
  2. Use jQuery harmoniously with other JavaScript libraries.
  3. Retrieve DOM elements using jQuery selector expressions and make changes to the elements’ structure, content and styling.
  4. Create interactive and responsive Web pages using jQuery’s event API.
  5. Initiate Ajax requests with jQuery and handle responses in HTML, eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formats.
  6. Author plugin methods that extend jQuery's native functionality.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. jQuery

A. Discuss framework structural overview.

B. Use jQuery with other libraries.

C. Explore jQuery utility methods.

II. DOM Elements with jQuery

A. Use CSS Selectors.

1. Basic CSS selectors

2. Hierarchical selectors

3. Attribute selectors

B. Apply jQuery Filters.

1. Basic filters

2. Content filters

3. Visibility filters

4. Child-specific filters

5. Form element filters

C. Discuss jQuery Object Methods.

III. Event-Driven Programming with jQuery

A. Use event helper methods.

B. Use Interaction Helpers: toggle() and hover().

C. Implement jQuery event object.

D. Implement jQuery live events and event delegation.

E. Explore ways to pass data to event callbacks.

F. Create jQuery custom events.

G. Create jQuery special events.

IV. jQuery and Ajax

A. Discuss the load() method.

B. Explore basic Ajax requests with $.get() and $.post().

C. Exercise complete control with $.ajax().

D. Explain global Ajax events.

E. Utilize Ajax helper methods.

V. Extend jQuery

A. Add custom filters to selectors.

B. Discuss utility method plugins.

C. Discuss jQuery object method plugins.

D. Provide default argument values.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Examinations
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 240

  • Title: HTML and CSS II*
  • Number: WEB 240
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 124.

Description:

This course focuses on the latest generation of browser-based technologies for front-end design and development. Topics in the course include Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), HyperText Markup Language (HTML) elements, HTML Application Programming Interface (API), forms, audio and video, offline applications, Canvas drawing and animation, communication APIs, Web Sockets and Web Workers, Geolocation, local and session storage, Web Structured Query language (SQL) Database, and advanced topics such as mobile Web applications, performance analysis, browser issues and developer tools. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Manipulate HTML structural elements.
  2. Explore CSS features and functions.
  3. Design HTML forms.
  4. Use HTML media elements.
  5. Optimize for accessibility, device agnosticism, responsive design and user content.
  6. Apply HTML JavaScript Application Program Interfaces (APIs) and custom controls.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. HTML Structural Elements

A. Write semantic HTML and CSS.

B. Write correct syntax for HTML.

C. Discuss Web standards.

D. Generate semantic metadata to structured HTML content.

II. CSS Feature and Functions

A. Construct CSS transforms and transitions.

B. Use CSS declarations for presentation.

C. Apply CSS properties and techniques.

D. Create gradients and multiple backgrounds.

E. Examine future CSS properties, features and functions.

III. HTML Forms

A. Explain form input types and attributes.

B. Create Web form(s).

C. Validate form data.

IV. HTML Media Elements

A. Use HTML Canvas.

B. Utilize HTML Audio.

1. Audio codes and fallbacks supported by HTML

2. Audio file types supported by HTML

3. Audio file types supported by Web–enabled devices

C. Utilize HTML Video

1. Video codecs and fallbacks supported by HTML

2. Video file types supported by HTML

3. Video file types supported by Web–enabled devices

D. Create Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG).

E. Apply embedded fonts and multicolumn layouts.

V. Accessibility, Device Agnosticism, Responsive Design and User Content

A. Discuss Web Accessibility Initiative-Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI- ARIA).

B. Explore the accessibility of media controls.

C. Add meta-content and multimedia.

D. Design to support user needs and the tasks.

VI. HTML JavaScript API and Custom Controls

A. Create persistent data storage of key-value pair data in Web clients.

B. Create persistent communication connection between the client and the server.

C. Define Web workers allowing JavaScript to be run in the background.

D. Create offline Web applications.

E. Demonstrate accessing a device's media capture mechanism.

F. Explore HTML JavaScript API attributes, methods and events.

G. Create custom multimedia controls.

H. Use the Drag and Drop API.

I. Apply the Geolocation API.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-30%    In-class quizzes/activities
30-50%    Projects
30-50%    Exams

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 241

  • Title: Digital Management Methods*
  • Number: WEB 241
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

The course covers systems development methodologies and the phases of development process from an idea to a product. Students will learn methods and tools that are used in the process of developing web-based and digital media applications. The course will introduce the students to systems development life cycle and the basic skills needed in systems analysis, design and development. Students will deliver an integrated, strategic campaign that demonstrates innovative digital media mastery. Out-of-class collaboration is required to complete the final project. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Develop a digital media design strategy.
  2. Explain the needs for information systems development process.
  3. Create strategic decisions in content management and brand development through digital media.
  4. Use analytics to assess positive outcomes and performance gaps of a digital media design strategy.
  5. Collaborate with faculty, community leaders and clients to find solutions.
  6. Apply media content-based knowledge gained through approaches and techniques previously studied.
  7. Discuss web site governance.
  8. Define and discuss tools to support digital operations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

  1. Digital Media Design Strategy

    1. Define mobile marketing channels.

    2. Explain mobile applications.

    3. Discuss social websites and social bookmarking.

    4. Explain inbound marketing.

    5. Discuss visualizing complex data.

    6. Describe loyalty marketing.

  2. Information Systems Development Process

    1. Apply appropriate business model(s).

    2. Demonstrate an understanding of digital media production.

  3. Outcomes and Performance Gaps

    1. Demonstrate accumulated knowledge of digital media applications within one’s own discipline.

    2. Examine primary objectives and metrics for performance.

  4. Project Development

    1. Collaborate to solve the technical and creative challenges of a client.

    2. Complete projects relevant to program disciplines.

  5. Project Development

    1. Collaborate to solve the technical and creative challenges of a client.

    2. Complete projects relevant to program disciplines.

  6. Media Content-Based Knowledge

    1. Devise solutions to the task in a structured and organized manner.

    2. Identify project challenges and issues.

    3. Demonstrate how a message translates between different types of media.

  7. Web Governance

    1. Research web governance activities.

    2. Explore web  governance resources.

    3. Explore how to configure activities and resources into a workable system of governance.

  8. Tools to Support Digital Operations

    1. Explore social media tools.

    2. Discuss and define frameworks.

    3. Discuss analytic tools.

    4. Research emerging technologies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35% – 65%   Assignments and Collaboration

35% – 65%  Final Project

     100%  Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 243

  • Title: Search Engine Optimization*
  • Number: WEB 243
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 110.

Description:

This course will cover how to optimize a website to maximize search engine ranking. Upon completion of the course students will be able to identify and implement effective website designs and strategies for search engine optimization. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of search engine visibility.
  2. Create Web design rules for search engine optimization.
  3. Discuss what can harm search engine visibility.
  4. Explore best practices for search engine optimization.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Search Engine Visibility

A. Explain the importance of search engine visibility.

B. Identify search engine services.

II. Web Design Rules for Search Engine Optimization

A. Create, list and use text components.

B. Create and set up keyword placement.

C. Include the link component.

D. Discuss the compromise between marketing and design.

E. Describe JavaScript and search engine visibility.

III. Visibility

A. Manage flash sites for search engine visibility.

B. Discuss dynamic Web pages using server-side includes (SSI).

C. Optimize PDF documents for search engine visibility.

IV. Best Practices Search Engine Marketing

A. Describe types of spam.

B. Discuss common misconceptions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Quizzes
35-65%    Projects/Assignments

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 244

  • Title: Web Apps II*
  • Number: WEB 244
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: WEB 234.

Description:

This course examines the theory, concepts and techniques for designing, producing and evaluating Web applications to meet specific information needs. Students will engage with concepts, techniques and system issues in advanced Web application design and development using advanced programming tools and techniques. Students will look beyond the current status of development and design techniques and conjecture what is possible in the future. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Define and discuss major concepts, tools, techniques and methods of Web applications and Web services, from both the business and technology perspectives.
  2. Analyze emerging Web technologies, applications and business models.
  3. Identify and utilize best practices for Web application development and management.
  4. Plan, design and develop a Web application solution in a specific context.
  5. Compare and contrast proprietary and open source Web technologies and applications.
  6. Manage and create search engine optimization.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Web Applications and Services

A. Discuss business models for Web applications and services.

B. Explore major concepts of Web applications development.

C. Examine the impact of the Web on society.

II. Web Technologies

A. Distinguish between open and closed Web applications.

B. Define and discuss Web usability.

C. Discuss Web application security.

D. Explore Web and Web-related technologies.

III. Best Practices

A. Explain Information Architecture.

B. Apply menu decisions to a responsive website and Web application.

C. Demonstrate icons versus text on a responsive website and Web application.

D. Explain responsive website hierarchy.

IV. Web Application and Responsive Design Solutions

A. Create responsive Web pages and Web applications.

B. Apply responsive Web page properties.

C. Create internal and external links.

D. Build responsive Web page templates.

V. Proprietary and Open Source Web Technologies

A. Define Open Source technologies.

B. Define proprietary technologies.

C. Use Application Programming Interface(s) (API).

VI. Search Engine Optimization

A. Explain content formats for mobile Web.

B. Apply mobile and tablet image optimization techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

30-40%    Assignments/Quizzes
30-40%    Projects
30-40%    Exams

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 245

  • Title: Motion Graphics Tools*
  • Number: WEB 245
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: WEB 125.

Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to motion graphics and special effects. All basic applications of the program will be touched upon including credits, transitions, filters, masks and mattes. Students will experience the complete motion graphics workflow, beginning by capturing their own still images and videos and concluding by rendering and exporting an original composition. 1hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create a motion graphics composition on a timeline utilizing keyframes and anchor points.
  2. Utilize linear, Bezier and hold to define the relationships between keyframes.
  3. Create and import masks, layer masks and backgrounds from Photoshop.
  4. Use blending modes to correct color, lighting and sharpness in video footage and still images.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Motion Graphics Composition

A. Explore the timeline.

B. Utilize keyframes and anchor points.

II. Three Kinds of Interpolation Techniques

A. Create a linear interpolation.

B. Create a Bezier interpolation.

C. Create a hold interpolation.

III. Masks and Backgrounds

A. Create and utilize masks.

B. Use layer masks.

C. Incorporate backgrounds in motion graphics compositions.

IV. Blending Modes

A. Discuss libel and defamation.

B. Explore fair comment and criticism.

C. Explore copyright and fair use.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

25-35%    In-class quizzes/activities
45-65%    Projects
45-65%    Exams

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 290

  • Title: Web Development and Digital Media Capstone*
  • Number: WEB 290
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course is the culmination of the course work that makes up the Web Development and Digital Media AAS degree. It incorporates elements from each of the core program courses to allow students to walk through the entire Web design process, including design/project documentation, wire framing, creating mock-ups, revisions, pages and final deliverables. Upon completion of course, students will have a professional website that can serve as part of their professional portfolio. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Develop a concept and plan for a Web-based media project.
  2. Design and build a prototype.
  3. Develop a project production schedule.
  4. Test the media project.
  5. Determine and produce a distribution and maintenance plan.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Concept and Plan

A. Identify and define the audience and client goals.

B. Utilize existing content and/or develop new content.

C. Identify copyright issues and other legal issues.

II. Design and Prototype

A. Create project style guide.

B. Develop prototypes.

III. Production

A. Develop a production schedule.

B. Identify production resources.

C. Produce the necessary media.

D. Write production documentation.

IV. Project Testing

A. Employ user testing.

B. Perform functional testing.

C. Perform testing across devices.

V. Distribution and Maintenance

A. Determine appropriate distribution methods.

B. Identify future maintenance issues or concerns.

C. Produce project documentation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

35-65%    Assignments and Collaboration
35-65%    Final Project

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: WEB 292
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course periodically presents specialized topics in Web Development and Digital Media that are not available in the regularly offered curriculum. Special Topics may be repeated for credit, but only on different topics. 1 - 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Appropriately use terminology related to the special topic.
  2. Solve problems by using content related to the special topic.
  3. Demonstrate conceptual understanding of the special topic.
  4. Use software related to the special topic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Varies based on content and nature of special topic.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

WEB 294

  • Title: Web Development and Digital Media Internship*
  • Number: WEB 294
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 12
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 12

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

Web Development and Digital Media Internship provides students with the opportunity to gain experience in the workplace and translate classroom learning into practice. An internship experience provides the student with an opportunity to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting. The experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks. 180 hours minimum requirement of on-the-job training.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Acquire practical experience within the business environment.
  2. Develop a greater understanding about career options while more clearly defining personal career goals.
  3. Experience the activities and functions of business professionals.
  4. Develop and refine oral and written communication skills.
  5. Identify areas for future knowledge and skill development.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Practical Experience

A. Develop competencies on specific types of assignments.

B. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.

C. Examine data to grasp issues, draw conclusions and solve problems.

D. Resolve difficult or complicated challenges.

II. Career Options

A. Identify potential career paths within and across job families.

B. Assess skills considered essential for professionals engaging in that career.

III. Activities and Functions

A. Demonstrate an ability to work effectively as a member of a development team.

B. Demonstrate professional conduct and effective workplace skills.

IV. Oral and Written Communication

A. Write clearly and succinctly.

B. Present technical information in a way that makes sense.

C. Demonstrate ability to communicate and actively engage with management and leadership.

V. Skill Development

A. Develop and implement a shared vision and mission.

B. Create and implement plans to achieve goals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

20-30%    Sponsor's mid-term evaluation
20-30%    Instructor's mid-term evaluation
20-30%    Sponsor's final evaluation
20-30%    Instructor's final evaluation

Total:   100% 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).