English (ENGL)

Courses

ENGL 102   Writing Strategies* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

English 102 is designed to give students a solid foundation in grammar and punctuation, helping students overcome obstacles in mechanics that have in the past interfered with their ability to communicate clearly. This sentence-level work soon leads to short paragraphs that offer students the opportunity to practice and refine their writing process. Students in English 102 will learn to view their writing within a rhetorical context of author, message, and audience. Clear, well-organized, well-developed, and mechanically sound foundational writing is the ultimate objective of Writing Strategies. This course is a prerequisite in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 103   Practical Writing Skills (1 Hour)

At the completion of this course, the student should be able to recognize and write complete sentences. The student will write a variety of sentences using strategies for building sentences with phrases and clauses as well as editing sentences through coordination and subordination. The student will then practice developing paragraphs in various organizational modes. Along with writing the student will read selected prose and write responses to these readings. The course is designed specifically to aid non-native speaking students in acquiring writing skills through individualized instruction. The aim of this course is to enhance/supplement the English as a Second Language program already offered at JCCC. Also, because hearing-impaired students have similar difficulties with the English language as ESL students, this course addresses the challenges often faced by this student population. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr lecture/wk.

ENGL 106   Introduction to Writing* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or appropriate score on assessment test.

Beginning with a review of basic sentence skills, this course focuses on paragraph development, including subject selection, topic sentences, methods of development, transitional devices and effective introductions and conclusions. The last part of the course will focus on developing multi-paragraph essays. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test. For more information, see a JCCC counselor. This course is in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121.

ENGL 107   Sentence Pattern Skills (1 Hour)

At the completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the parts of speech, elements of a sentence and basic sentence patterns. Emphasis is on sentence combining and sentence composing. Students are told that grammar in isolation will not improve writing skills, and they are encouraged to practice writing. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 108   Composing Skills (1 Hour)

After completing Composing Skills, students will be able to choose a topic, narrow the topic, and organize and develop with supporting evidence a variety of paragraph modes. The student will be able to achieve paragraph unity, coherence and emphasis. Also, the student will learn revision and editing strategies. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 109   Proofreading Skills (1 Hour)

This 1-credit module is designed to provide students with strategies and rules that will help them recognize and repair common grammar, usage and mechanical errors in their writing. This course focuses on the major and minor errors as set forth in the English program objectives (available in the Writing Center). Students will learn to recognize and correct these errors, not only on exercise sheets, but also in their own writing. This class meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 110   English Grammar Review (1 Hour)

English Grammar Review helps students to review the parts of speech, elements of a sentence, basic sentence patterns, major sentence level errors, agreement errors and punctuation. Students are encouraged to practice writing. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 112   Research Skills (1 Hour)

Research Skills is a review of the various aspects of the research process, beginning with limiting the subject and moving to revising the finished product. Emphasis is on the gathering of resource materials, synthesizing the information and developing an essay in which the resource information is used to support a thesis and is documented in an approved academic form. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 115   Revision Skills (1 Hour)

Revision Skills is designed to instruct the practicing writer in skills needed to revise all writing, including business, college and personal writing. Students will use computer programs and self-paced materials. Revision Skills is intended to complement courses in which writing is assigned. Students will be encouraged to bring in business communication or college assignments to apply the learned skills. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 120   Writing in the Disciplines (1 Hour)

This course is designed to complement and/or support classes in which writing is intrinsic to the curriculum and provide students with a process that can be applied to the variety of written assignments typically assigned in classes other than composition. Students will practice writing a variety of short papers using a prescribed process for each assignment. The course is individualized. Students enrolled in this class must come to the Writing Center, LIB 308, to make arrangements for their class schedule, to pick up a syllabus and other materials, and to be assigned an instructor. The course is a combination of written material and software. All completed work will be kept in a folder in the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk. Students should anticipate approximately 20 hours of work to complete the course.

ENGL 121   Composition I* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or appropriate placement test score or both EAP 113 and EAP 117.

Composition I focuses on writing nonfiction prose suitable in its expression and content to both its occasion and its audience. Students will have an opportunity to improve in all phases of the writing process: discovering ideas, gathering information, planning and organizing, drafting, revising and editing. Each text written in the course should clearly communicate a central idea or thesis, contain sufficient detail to be lively and convincing, reflect the voice of the writer and use carefully edited standard written English. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 20 pages (approximately 5,000 words) of revised and edited prose. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test or submit an ACT score of 19 or higher before enrolling. For more information, see a JCCC counselor. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 121H   HON: Composition I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 122   Composition II* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Composition II focuses on skills essential to gathering, comprehending, analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of academic and non-academic sources. Because writing is integral to college coursework and the workplace, this course emphasizes the rhetorical skills needed to understand and produce complex compositions in a variety of forms, which may include essays, presentations, reports, social media posts and other digital forms of communication. Composition II emphasizes the deep revision needed to compose expository, evaluative and persuasive prose. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 25 pages (approximately 6,250 words) of revised and edited prose. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 122H   HON: Composition II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 123   Technical Writing I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course provides a basic knowledge of technical writing. Students will learn the writing process (prewriting, writing and rewriting) to follow when constructing correspondence, including memos, letters, e-mail, reports, instructional manuals and Web pages. Students also will learn seven key traits of effective technical writing: clarity, conciseness, document design, organization, audience recognition, audience involvement and accuracy. Accuracy specifically entails the need for students to adhere to rules of grammar and mechanics. Students will learn how to create computer- generated graphics and learn word processing skills. Finally, the students will learn how to work in teams, modeling Total Quality Management skills. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 130   Introduction to Literature* (3 Hours)  

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Students will read, discuss and analyze works from three literary genres: the short story, the poem and the play. Students will learn and apply the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of these literary forms. Students will be introduced to representative works from various literary traditions and cultures, including numerous works from contemporary writers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 130H   HON: Introduction to Literature* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 140   Writing for Interactive Media* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course teaches students to apply the writing process as well as fundamental rhetorical and composition skills to various interactive media including web pages, CD-ROMs/DVD, e-mail, kiosks, support materials, simulations, social networking and other electronic media. The instruction will focus on skills essential to selecting, evaluating and synthesizing information from primary and secondary sources; in addition, it will emphasize the different approaches to organization that these media require as well as the variety of discourse styles used in informative, instructional, persuasive and entertainment media texts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 150   Digital Narratives* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Games, particularly Role-Playing Games (RPGs) and other participatory narratives, share many properties with traditional narratives, yet differ significantly from their linear counterparts. This course focuses on the elements of narrative as well as the principles that drive virtual or alternative possible worlds (both fictive and reality-based), and it will provide students with practice writing and designing artifacts that demonstrate an understanding of plot, character, setting and the impact of structure and purpose in game development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 205   Bible as Literature* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course introduces students to the literary aspects of Bible. Students will read extracts from both the Hebrew and Greek portions of the Bible in translation. They will learn to analyze these readings as representatives of the Bible's many literary forms. Students will also sample from later literary works that draw on biblical sources for their inspiration. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 215   U.S. Latino and Latina Literature* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course introduces students to texts by U.S. writers of Hispanic descent or origin. Written primarily in English, the texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and/or film. The readings, discussions and related writing projects will emphasize the relationship between mainstream America and borderland writers; explore the cultural and artistic context of the writers and their works; recognize and assess the use of major narrative and rhetorical strategies; and stimulate consideration of issues surrounding assimilation, identity formation, code-switching and cultural hybridity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 217   Literature by Women* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

This survey course introduces students to a representative sample of texts created by women from the mid-seventeenth century to present. Using the lens of gender, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Further, students will identify significant literary devices and genres as employed by these authors. The course will emphasize the dynamic relationship between the literature and its contexts. 3 hr. lecture/wk.

ENGL 217H   HON: Literature by Women* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 222   Advanced Composition* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

This course offers challenging insights into the act of writing. We will move beyond Composition I and Composition II, focusing on writing persuasively to a select audience; working together to anticipate and defuse objections; supply convincing evidence; synthesize the ideas of others to support our ends; look critically at all sources; and perfect a mature, polished style that is suitable to audience and occasion. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 223   Creative Writing* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Students will study and practice writing in two or three of the major literary modes of writing: poetry, fiction, and possibly drama. The reading assignments are based on the premise that, to be a good writer, students must have knowledge of literary techniques and be perceptive readers and critics. Students will examine techniques of two or possibly three of the literary genres and then apply their knowledge to write in each genre. In addition, they will read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 223H   HON: Creative Writing* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 224   Creative Writing Workshop* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 223.

In this class, students will build upon the knowledge and skills learned in ENGL 223. In addition to studying writing techniques, they will produce a body of written work in one or more literary genres of their choice: poetry, fiction, and/or drama. They will also read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 224H   HON: Creative Writing Workshop* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 227   Introduction to Poetry* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course emphasizes close reading and analysis of poetry by writers from different time periods, countries and ethnic backgrounds. Students will study terms, patterns and forms that are useful for an understanding and appreciation of poetic verse. The course will cover major literary, historical and cultural movements as they relate to poetry. Students will be introduced to major classical and contemporary American and English poets, along with contemporary foreign-language poetry in translation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 230   Introduction to Fiction* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

This course features significant opportunities to write about the literature and the reader's response to it. Students will learn the historical fictional precedents of the short story; the similarities and differences between the short story and other narrative forms, such as the novel; the differences between the short story and its historical precedents, between short stories and film adaptations of them, and between commercial and literary short stories. Students will discover the place of short stories in major literary movements, the key elements of short stories and interpretive approaches to short stories. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 230H   HON: Introduction to Fiction* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 232   Children's Literature* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Children's Literature is meant for all students interested in bringing children and books together but is especially suited for those who are students with English or education majors; teachers already in the elementary school classroom; parents; those working with children in preschools, day-care centers and libraries; and grandparents and prospective parents. The course would also benefit those exploring the field of writing and illustrating for children. Students will identify children's needs and interests, list the criteria for choosing books for children, and demonstrate the means by which we can bring children and books together. Students will read, examine and critique a variety of children's literature selected by author, genre and historical time period. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 232H   HON: Children's Literature* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 235   Drama as Literature* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

This course introduces students to the analysis of plays as literature. Beginning with the Greek dramatists and ending with the contemporary scene, students will read full-length plays and the comments of playwrights, directors, actors and critics. They will analyze drama from psychological, historical, philosophical, structural and dramatic perspectives. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 236   British Literature I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

In this survey course, the student will study British literature written up to 1800, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon to the Augustan eras, including works by major authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. Such non-British literary works may be from Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 236H   HON: British Literature I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 237   British Literature II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

In this survey course, the student will study British literature written from 1800 to the present. Major authors from the Romantic, Victorian and Modern eras, such as Austen, Blake, Wordsworth, the Shelleys, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, Eliot and Woolf, will be included. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. Such non-British literary works may be chosen from the traditions of Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. British Literature I is NOT a prerequisite for this course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 237H   HON: British Literature II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 243   Literature of Science Fiction* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course examines the literature of science fiction, especially from 1960 through the present. Students explore the unifying concepts of science and technology, depicted through imaginative narratives of the past, present and future. Students read short stories and/or novels, view science fiction films and discuss key science fiction concepts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 244   Literature of American Popular Music* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Students read, analyze, evaluate and discuss the literature surrounding American popular music. No less than any other form of literature, all genres of American popular music are intertwined, engaged in dialogue and revealing of the American experience. By engaging with, comparing and evaluating the conversations between popular music and fiction, poetry and criticism, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Through this process, students will discover, analyze, synthesize and evaluate the ongoing negotiations between a great diversity of cultural aesthetics, political interests and public opinions in the shaping of American identity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 246   American Literature I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This survey course is a stand-alone course that presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the pre-Colonial Period through the post-Civil War era. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced America's national literary identity. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 247   American Literature II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This survey course is a stand-alone course which need not be taken after American Literature I, covering the pre-Colonial period through the post-Civil War era. American Literature II presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the post-Civil War era to the present. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced and are still influencing America's national literary identity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 250   World Masterpieces* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

World Masterpieces introduces students to literary study using major literary works composed from the times of Homer to Shakespeare that have been influential in shaping and expressing values of Western culture. Students will read selections representative of the epic, tragic, comic and lyric traditions primarily to gain knowledge of the works assigned. In addition, students will analyze the assigned texts as literary works and as cultural artifacts and influences. Finally, students will compare and contrast contemporary understandings of the individual and society with those expressed in the works studied. In completing the course objectives, students will learn the conventions of writing about literature and become familiar with general reference materials useful in studying literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 250H   HON: World Masterpieces* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 254   Masterpieces of the Cinema* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

This course examines the development of cinema from the early experiments in the late 1800s up to the present day, presenting the history and art of both American and international cinema. Students read the textbook, view short and full-length films, and discuss important cinematic techniques and concepts. Students verify their judgments by summarizing and analyzing these important concepts, using discussions, and writing effective, well-organized essays in response to specific films. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 254H   HON: Masterpieces of Cinema* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGL 291   Independent Study* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ENGL 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

English 292 is a 200-level thematic literature and writing course. In this class, students will have the opportunity to refine their critical reading and writing skills by investigating in-depth a single important theme, topic or genre (e.g., environmental literature, the literature of illness, detective fiction, travel literature, the documentary film tradition, creative non-fiction). Students will engage with a wide range of texts, including those from print, film, and other media. The course may also include selections drawn from various national literatures in translation and a range of historical periods. Special Topics in Literature and Composition may be repeated for credit but only on different topics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGL 102

  • Title: Writing Strategies*
  • Number: ENGL 102
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score.

Description:

English 102 is designed to give students a solid foundation in grammar and punctuation, helping students overcome obstacles in mechanics that have in the past interfered with their ability to communicate clearly. This sentence-level work soon leads to short paragraphs that offer students the opportunity to practice and refine their writing process. Students in English 102 will learn to view their writing within a rhetorical context of author, message, and audience. Clear, well-organized, well-developed, and mechanically sound foundational writing is the ultimate objective of Writing Strategies. This course is a prerequisite in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and use the eight parts of speech to write sentences with a variety of phrase and clause structures.
  2. Learn and use foundational paragraph skills to write and refine paragraphs.
  3. Use all stages of the writing process to develop and revise single-paragraph assignments for a target audience.
  4. Demonstrate a proficiency with skills needed to enter Introduction to Writing, including skills with standard edited English.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Eight Parts of Speech, Phrases, Clauses and Sentence Types
   A. Identify the eight parts of speech and recognize them by function.
      1. Identify action, linking, helping, and compound verbs.
      2. Use the three basic verb tenses (present, past, future), the
progressive tenses, and the perfect tenses effectively.
      3. Recognize common, proper, and collective nouns.
      4. Recognize and write nouns and noun substitutes in the following
sentence positions: subjects, objects, complements.
      5. Identify personal, relative, and indefinite pronouns.
      6. Recognize single, coordinate, cumulative, irregular, comparative,
superlative, and noun adjectives.
      7. Identify-ly and non -ly, irregular, comparative and superlative
adverbs.
      8. Recognize prepositions, including those indicating place and
time.
      9. Identify coordinating and subordinating conjunctions as well as
conjunctive adverbs.
     10. Recognize interjections.
   B. Identify and write complete, simple, compound, and gerund and
infinitive subjects.
   C. Identify and write predicates and complete verbs within them,
including action, linking, helping, and compound verbs.
   D. Identify and write a variety of phrase and clause types, including
the following: noun, verb, prepositional, appositive, infinitive, gerund,
participial, and absolute phrases as well as main and subordinate clauses
(noun, adjective, adverb.)
   E. Identify and write all sentence types: simple compound, complex, and
compound/complex.

II. Foundational Paragraph Skills
   A. Begin paragraphs with topic sentences that accurately describe the
main idea of the paragraph.
   B. Use subtopic sentences within paragraphs where appropriate to
introduce main points.
   C. End paragraphs with concluding sentences that reiterate the
paragraph's main idea and make some final point.
   D. Include coherence devices within and between sentences.
   E. Construct paragraphs using the following organizational strategies:
spatial, chronological, and order of importance.
   F. Write paragraphs using several patterns of development refined
through detailed examples and clear explanations.

III. The Writing Process
   A. Analyze student models and other readings in order to apply basic
composition and rhetorical strategies to the students' own written
paragraphs.
      1. Identify organizational elements such as topic and subtopic
sentences and coherence devices.
      2. Identify patterns of development.
      3. Identify elements of effective development such as appropriate
details and complete explanations.
      4. Identify a writer's primary purpose.
   B. Demonstrate skill with several prewriting methods.
   C. Work in groups to develop and refine the students' writing.
      1. Follow oral and written instructions.
      2. Participate in group discussions.
      3. Critique group members' writing.
      4. Apply to their own writing, critical feedback from group
members.
      5. Revise writing for content, organization, style, and mechanics.

IV. Proficiency with Skills Needed to Enter Introduction to Writing
   A. Write at least one major paragraph assignment that achieves a "C" or
better.
   B. Demonstrate a good command of the mechanics of writing (adhering to
the departmental standard established in the Major and Minor Errors
Checklist).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-50% of grade   Short Paragraphs
20-50% of grade   Objective Tests and/or Quizzes
0-20% of grade    Participation
0-30% of grade    Homework
0-10% of grade    The Writing Process
100%              Total

Grade Criteria:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 -  89%
C = 70 -  79%
D = 60 -  69%
F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 103

  • Title: Practical Writing Skills
  • Number: ENGL 103
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

At the completion of this course, the student should be able to recognize and write complete sentences. The student will write a variety of sentences using strategies for building sentences with phrases and clauses as well as editing sentences through coordination and subordination. The student will then practice developing paragraphs in various organizational modes. Along with writing the student will read selected prose and write responses to these readings. The course is designed specifically to aid non-native speaking students in acquiring writing skills through individualized instruction. The aim of this course is to enhance/supplement the English as a Second Language program already offered at JCCC. Also, because hearing-impaired students have similar difficulties with the English language as ESL students, this course addresses the challenges often faced by this student population. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and write the basic sentence types.

  2. Expand sentences through subordination, coordination, and modification.

  3. Reduce or simplify sentences.

  4. Organize and develop short pieces of writing: narration, description, process analysis, and evaluation.

  5. Read, speak, and write a response to the reading to demonstrate an improved pronunciation and comprehension of the English language.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate the Basic Components of an English Sentence
   A. Recognize and mark subjects and verbs in a piece of writing.
   B. Write sentences to show the different basic sentence patterns.

II. Identify the Types of Phrases Used in Sentences
   A. Recognize, identify, and write prepositions, prepositional phrases, and their various idiomatic used in sentences.
   B. Recognize, identify, and write verbals and verbal phrases in sentences.

III. Recognize Some of the Unique Problems in the English Language Challenging English as a Second Language Students
   A. Identify count/non-count nouns in sentences.
      1. Recognize, identify and write count/noncount nouns and their appropriate articles.
      2. Recognize, identify and write appropriate singular and plural forms of nouns.
   B. Apply appropriate verb form to a variety of sentences.
      1. Recognize, identify and write appropriate verb forms to signify tense.
      2. Recognize, identify and write appropriate verb forms to signify number.

IV. Expand Basic Sentences
   A. Write a variety of sentences to show coordination, subordination, and modification.
   B. Practice sentence combining strategies.

V. Reduce or Simplify Sentences
   A. Rewrite convoluted or rambling sentence into concise, direct structure.
   B. Take sentences from readings and edit for simplification and model for personal writing.

VI. Write in a Variety of Practical Modes
   A. Write a narrative paragraph.
   B. Write a descriptive paragraph.
   C. Write a process analysis paragraph.
   D. Write an evaluative paragraph.

VII. Read two short stories and one essay (choice of student; approved by instructor)
   A. Choose selections of prose to read and demonstrate comprehension by summarizing main ideas.
   B. Choose selections of prose to identify sentence structure and word choice.
   C. Practice enunciation by reading aloud short passages from readings above.
   D. Explain or paraphrase short passages from readings above.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading Rationale: The student's grade will be determined by the student's measurable, observable competency in achieving the objectives of the course.

1. 70% or better on tests given:

   Basic sentence patterns

   Sentence expansion

   Sentence simplification

   Rules for verbs and plurals

"C" or better on writing assignments (At least two out of these four assignments must be completed and graded)

   Description

   Narration

   Process analysis

   Evaluation

2. Approximately 20 hours in the Writing Center to show intent and motivation.

3. At least 3/4 of material completed.

Attendance:

Obviously, attendance is important since all work is done in the Writing Center.  The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one of the many benefits of the Writing Center. The student is responsible for making sure the secretary clocks his/her time spent in the

Writing Center.

Instruction:

Instructors and tutors are available to answer questions and give explanations.  You will be assigned to one specific instructor who will document your progress and evaluate your work. However, you will also be expected to work independently. Remember that many students use the various services of the Writing Center so your instructor will be working with them, also.

Folders:

Students are to keep all papers (written assignments/paragraphs and essays) along with the time sheet and graded tests and paragraphs in the provided folder. Students may collect their written assignments, not tests, the following semester. Folders are kept in the Writing Center at all times and distributed to students at the time of their arrival to the Center and returned at the end of their stay in the Center. Folders may be accessed by any Writing Center staff member, but otherwise are kept private.

Pass/Fail:

Students will be notified by mail at the midterm if they have fallen behind in their hours or work completed in the Writing Center. If these students do not respond, they are responsible for either dropping the course or applying for an incomplete so they may finish the course the following semester. A failure to take no course of action will constitute a fail grade (F) for these students.

Students should follow the course assignment sheet and ask for assistance when necessary.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 106

  • Title: Introduction to Writing*
  • Number: ENGL 106
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or appropriate score on assessment test.

Description:

Beginning with a review of basic sentence skills, this course focuses on paragraph development, including subject selection, topic sentences, methods of development, transitional devices and effective introductions and conclusions. The last part of the course will focus on developing multi-paragraph essays. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test. For more information, see a JCCC counselor. This course is in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Work effectively in groups to develop and refine their writing.

  2. Use all stages of the writing process to develop and refine their writing.

  3. Construct and manipulate effective sentences.

  4. Organize, develop, and revise paragraphs.

  5. Organize, develop, and revise short essays.

  6. Demonstrate proficiency with skills necessary to enter Composition I.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Work Effectively in Groups to Develop and Refine Writing
   A. Follow oral and written instructions.
   B. Participate in group discussions.
   C. Critique group members' writing.
   D. Apply to their own writing, critical feedback from group members.

II. Use All Stages of the Writing Process to Develop and Refine Writing
   A. Demonstrate skill with several prewriting methods.
      1. Create clusters.
      2. Freewrite.
      3. List.
      4. Answer journalist's questions.
   B. Learn how to focus and organize effectively.
      1. Create topic sentences.
      2. Create thesis sentences.
      3. Devise forecasting statement.
      4. Apply transitions and other devices for linking sentences and paragraphs.
      5. Use global arrangement strategies: chronological, order of importance, spatial, classification, comparison/contrast.
   C. Develop paragraphs and essays with effective examples.
      1. Recognize the difference between general and specific examples and apply them appropriately.
      2. Recognize the difference between abstract and concrete examples and apply them appropriately.
      3. Develop some facility with the patterns of development: description, narration,  illustration, comparison/contrast, process analysis, definition, classification, cause/effect.
   D. Revise writing for content, organization, and expression.
      1. Recognize weaknesses in material and demonstrate ability to add, delete, or rearrange material as required to correct the weaknesses.
      2. Recognize and correct flaws in organization in the essay and paragraph (ranging from an overall essay pattern such as comparison/contrast through cohesive devices such as thesis and topic sentences to sentence-level connectors such as transitional words and synonyms).
      3. Recognize and correct flaws in expression on the word and sentence level (ranging from precise word choice to variety in sentence structure).
   E. Revise writing for standard matters of mechanical correctness.
      1. Recognize and correct writing for errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
      2. Perform to the departmental standard as set forth in the English Program Guide on the majority of evaluated paragraph and essay assignments (no more than seven major errors per essay; no more than three major errors per paragraph).

III. Construct and Manipulate Effective Sentences
   A. Develop ability to recognize and construct the four grammatical sentence types.
   B. Identify and use the four functional sentence types.
   C. Recognize and manipulate the fundamental units of the sentence: phrase and clause.

IV. Organize, Develop and Revise Paragraphs
   A. Determine purpose of paragraph and write for a specific audience.
   B. Construct effective topic sentences.
   C. Create unified and coherent paragraphs.
   D. Expand paragraphs using several of the patterns of development.
   E. Develop ability to recognize and achieve a degree of sentence variety.

V. Organize, Develop, and Revise Short Essays
   A. Determine purpose of essay and write for a specific audience.
   B. Recognize and write effective introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs.
   C. Select and use an appropriate overall organizational pattern for the essay.
   D. Select and use effective organizational patterns for paragraphs.
   E. Link paragraphs successfully.

VI. Demonstrate Proficiency with Skills Necessary to Enter Composition I
   A. Write at least one essay that achieves a grade of  C" or better.
   B. Demonstrate a good command of the mechanics of writing (adhering to the departmental standard established in the Major and Minor Errors Checklist).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40%   2-4 essays       
30-40%   4-7 paragraphs   
20-40%   Pre-writing, quizzes, homework, in-class group work.
100%

Grade Criteria:

A 90-100%
B 80-89.9%
C 70-79.9%
D 60-69.9%
F under 60%

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 107

  • Title: Sentence Pattern Skills
  • Number: ENGL 107
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

At the completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the parts of speech, elements of a sentence and basic sentence patterns. Emphasis is on sentence combining and sentence composing. Students are told that grammar in isolation will not improve writing skills, and they are encouraged to practice writing. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and define the terminology of the parts of speech.

  2. Write the basic sentence patterns and expand or simplify the pattern appropriate to the context of the writing.

  3. Punctuate sentences according to context.

  4. Write sentences using a variety of strategies. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review Parts of Speech (words, phrases, and clauses) and their Functions in Sentences
   A. Understand and recognize the parts of speech by identifying and labeling words in sentences.
   B. Recognize the functions and position of each part of speech in the sentence by identifying and labeling words in sentences.
   C. Understand and recognize phrases as parts of speech by labeling phrases in sentences.
   D. Recognize, mark and define the functions and positions of each phrase in assigned sentences.
   E. Recognize, identify, and write independent and dependent clauses.
   F. Identify and label the function and position of dependent clauses in a variety of sentences.
II. Review the Basic Sentence Patterns
   A. Identify and label sentences according to the six patterns.
   B. Write sentences which model the basic patterns.
III. Demonstrate a variety of strategies to enhance the basic sentence pattern
   A. Write sentences using the traditional strategies of coordination, subordination and modification
   B. Write sentences using Christensen rhetorical strategies of quality, detail, and comparison
   C. Write sentences using sentence combining strategies
IV. Classify Sentences According to Their Context
   A. Identify and label sentences declarative, interrogative, imperative.
   B. Write a variety of sentences to demonstrate classification.
V. Write Sentences With No Major Sentence Level Errors and Recognize and Correct Poorly Constructed Sentences
   A. Recognize and label the major sentence level errors (fragments, run-ons, and comma splices).
   B. Correct the major sentence level errors.
   C. Write a variety of sentences demonstrating various structures and context.
   D. Write a short essay which includes a variety of sentence structures and is sentence level error-free.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   1. 70% or better on tests given: Basic Sentence Patterns Sentence Expansion Sentence Simplification Rules for verbs and plurals C or better on writing assignments (At least 2 out of these 4 assignments must be completed and graded) Description Narration Process Analysis Evaluation

   2. Approximately 20 hours in the Writing Center to show intent and motivation.

   3. At least 75% of the material completed Students will be notified by mail at the midterm if they have fallen behind in their hours or work completed in the Writing Center. If these students do not respond, they are responsible for either dropping the course or applying for an incomplete so they may finish the course the following semester. A failure to take no course of action will constitute a fail grade (F) for these students. Students should follow the course assignment sheet and ask for assistance when necessary.

FINAL:

Tutor/instructor will give you a topic to develop for a short writing assignment.  You are to concentrate on sentence correctness, sentence variety, sentence length, and sentence sense.

ATTENDANCE:

Obviously, attendance is important since all work is done in the Writing Center. The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one of the many benefits of the Writing Center. The student is responsible for making sure the secretary clocks his/her time spent in the Writing Center. At least 10 hours must be completed before an incomplete can be granted (approved). Failure to do so will constitute an F in the course. During the time that the student is in the Writing Center, he/she must make good use of that time by completing at least 3/4 of the booklet or suggested software and showing an understanding of the skills taught. Tests will be taken by the student to prove his/her comprehension of the material. A 70% or better indicates that the student may proceed to the next lesson. When the student has completed 20 hours in the Writing Center and passed with 70% comprehension 3/4 of the booklet, he/she must take a final exam which will be a comprehensive review of the lessons/skills learned. Throughout the course short writing assignments will help students to connect knowledge of sentence analysis and sentence correctness.

INSTRUCTION:

Instructors and tutors are available to answer questions and give explanations.  You will be assigned to one specific instructor who will document your progress and evaluate your work. However, you will also be expected to work independently. Remember that many students use the various services of the Writing Center so your instructor will be working with them, also.

FOLDERS:

Students are to keep all papers (written assignments/paragraphs and essays) along with the time sheet and graded tests and paragraphs in the provided folder. Students may collect their written assignments, not tests, the following semester. Folders are kept in the Writing Center at all times and distributed to students at the time of their arrival to the Center and returned at the end of their stay in the Center. Folders may be accessed by any Writing Center staff member, but otherwise are kept private.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 108

  • Title: Composing Skills
  • Number: ENGL 108
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

After completing Composing Skills, students will be able to choose a topic, narrow the topic, and organize and develop with supporting evidence a variety of paragraph modes. The student will be able to achieve paragraph unity, coherence and emphasis. Also, the student will learn revision and editing strategies. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Practice several invention or prewriting techniques appropriate to the writing task. Choose the aim or purpose for a writing assignment.

  2. Write topic sentences which limit and focus a topic.

  3. Develop an outline to support the topic sentence.

  4. Apply strategies for limiting the subject. Writing Assignment - Develop the topic sentence into a short paragraph.

  5. Demonstrate competency by writing a variety of modes for organizing a paragraph; description, narration, evaluation, classification.

  6. Identify paragraph unity, coherence, and emphasis in assigned exercises and in own writing by using a variety of transitional devices.

  7. Choose the mode for organization and write the following assignments: a) Description - Write a descriptive paragraph applying the steps of the writing process; b) Narration - Write a narrative paragraph applying the steps of the writing process; c) Evaluation - Write an evaluative paragraph applying the steps of the writing process; d) Classification - Write a classification paragraph applying the steps of the writing process.

  8. Develop paragraphs using several of the following methods of paragraph development: a) Character sketch; b) Example/illustration; c) Process analysis; d) cause/effect; e) Comparison/contrast; f) Analogy; g) Definition

  9. Practice revising the paragraph by revising and expanding one of the previously written paragraphs.

  10. Practice proofreading strategies by applying skills to numerous paragraphs written. All papers must be corrected and resubmitted to the instructor.

  11. Keep track of common errors made in the writing assignments on the major error grid provided, and if any error is committed more than two times, complete lessons and show competency on 75% or higher on appropriate test. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Use Writing Process to Compose a Variety of Paragraphs
   A. Demonstrate an ability to use various prewriting strategies to decide on a topic by clustering, freewriting, listing, brainstorming.
   B. Demonstrate an ability to focus an idea and write a controlling idea sentence.  Write a topic sentence and a thesis statement.
   C. Define and write a topic sentence paragraph.
   D. Create and write an outline to support the topic sentence.
   E. Organize and develop paragraphs that are unified and coherent.

II. Recognize and Use Various Expository Modes
   A. Write using a variety of modes for organizing a paragraph: description, narration, evaluation, classification.
   B. Write using a variety of methods to develop a paragraph: example/illustration, process analysis, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, analogy, definition.

III. Rewrite Drafts Using Specific Revising, Editing, and Proofing Strategies
   A. Improve the content of a discovery draft by identifying opportunities to add, cut, change, or move ideas and support and by implementing those revision strategies.
   B. Demonstrate the ability to edit word choices and sentence structure to improve logic and flow, rhythm and punch, transition and coherence - in general, to improve the writing style.
   C. Apply active proofreading strategies to identify and eliminate convention errors, as listed in the English Program Objectives.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

I. Use Writing Process to Compose a Variety of Paragraphs

   A. Demonstrate an ability to use various prewriting strategies to decide on a topic by clustering, freewriting, listing, brainstorming.

   B. Demonstrate an ability to focus an idea and write a controlling idea sentence.  Write a topic sentence and a thesis statement.

   C. Define and write a topic sentence paragraph.

   D. Create and write an outline to support the topic sentence.

   E. Organize and develop paragraphs that are unified and coherent.

II. Recognize and Use Various Expository Modes

   A. Write using a variety of modes for organizing a paragraph: description, narration, evaluation, classification.

   B. Write using a variety of methods to develop a paragraph: example/illustration, process analysis, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, analogy, definition.

III. Rewrite Drafts Using Specific Revising, Editing, and Proofing Strategies

   A. Improve the content of a discovery draft by identifying opportunities to add, cut, change, or move ideas and support and by implementing those revision strategies.

   B. Demonstrate the ability to edit word choices and sentence structure to improve logic and flow, rhythm and punch, transition and coherence – in general, to improve the writing style.

   C. Apply active proofreading strategies to identify and eliminate convention errors, as listed in the English Program Objectives.

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

In this course students are required to follow the outline of the course booklet and complete the assignments therein.  At least 6 paragraphs and 1 essay must be written using the suggested process and revised.  The instructor will review the assignment draft and make suggestions.  The student will then make the prescribed changes and write a final draft which will be marked by the instructor, corrected by the student and kept in the W.C. folder.  At the completion of the text and approximately 20 hours, the student will be required to write a final essay which will include all prewriting, an outline, a rough draft (reviewed by the instructor) and a final draft.  The instructor will assign a topic.  Failure to complete the assigned work will constitute a fail grade for the student.  Grades are based on average of graded writing assignments and final.

GRADING RATIONALE:

The student's grade will be determined by the student's measurable, observable competency in achieving the objectives of the course.

50% = 70% or better on tests and activities given: "C" or better on writing assignments and others as assigned.

  • Description
  • Narration
  • Classification
  • Evaluation

and three of the following:

  • Character Sketch 
  • Example/Illustration
  • Process Analysis
  • Cause/Effect
  • Comparison/Contrast
  • Analogy
  • Definition or Summary

  Paragraphs - 5 points each

  Essay - (final)- 15 points

  Total = 50 points

25% = Approximately 20 hours in the Writing Center to show intent and motivation. (The online course does not require W.C. attendance)

25%= At least 75% of the material completed which includes the assigned exercises.

ATTENDANCE:

Obviously, attendance is important since all work is done in the Writing Center.  The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one of the many benefits of the Writing Center.  The student is responsible for making sure the secretary clocks his/her time spent in the Writing Center. At least 10 hours must be completed before an incomplete can be granted (approved).  Failure to do so will constitute an F in the course.  During the time that students are in the Writing Center, they must make good use of that time by completing at least 3/4 of the booklet or suggested software and showing an understanding of the skills taught.  Writing assignments will be evaluated by the assigned instructor, but any Writing Center staff member may provide feedback, suggestions or advice.  Revision of drafts will be continued until the instructor and the student are satisfied with the paper. Then the student may proceed to the next lesson.

INSTRUCTION:

Instructors and tutors are available to answer questions and give explanations.  Students will be assigned to one specific instructor who will document their progress and evaluate their work.  However, students will also be expected to work independently.

FOLDERS:

Students are to keep all papers (written assignments/paragraphs and essays) along with the time sheet in the provided folder. Students may collect their written assignments the following semester.  Folders are kept in the Writing Center at all times and distributed to students at the time of their arrival to the Center and returned at the end of their stay in the Center. Folders may be accessed by any Writing Center staff member, but otherwise are kept private.

PASS/FAIL:

Students will be notified by mail at the midterm if they have fallen behind in their hours or work completed in the Writing Center. If these students do not respond, they are responsible for either dropping the course or applying for an incomplete so they may finish the course the following semester.  A failure to take no course of action will constitute a fail grade (F) for these students. Students should follow the course assignment sheet and ask for assistance when necessary.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 109

  • Title: Proofreading Skills
  • Number: ENGL 109
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This 1-credit module is designed to provide students with strategies and rules that will help them recognize and repair common grammar, usage and mechanical errors in their writing. This course focuses on the major and minor errors as set forth in the English program objectives (available in the Writing Center). Students will learn to recognize and correct these errors, not only on exercise sheets, but also in their own writing. This class meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize major and minor sentence errors

  2. Correct those errors both on exercises and in actual writing

  3. Improve overall writing correctness 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Recognize sentence level errors, such as fragments, run-on
sentences, and comma splices
   A. Demonstrate a mastery (70% or better) of the conventions of edited
standard English prose.
   B. Write a short essay which demonstrates an improved ability to edit
and proofread own prose.
   C. Demonstrate an ability to edit and proofread models of poorly edited
and proofread prose through written exercises in course booklet or on the
program Blue Pencil.

II. Recognize and correct grammar errors, such as subject-verb agreement,
pronoun-antecedent agreement, verb form (shifts in person, number, voice,
tense, mood), misplaced and dangling modifiers, parallel structures, and
pronoun case.
   A. Demonstrate a mastery (70% or better) of the conventions of edited
standard English prose.
   B. Write a short essay which demonstrates an improved ability to edit
and proofread own prose.
   C. Demonstrate an ability to edit and proofread models of poorly edited
and proofread prose through written exercises in course booklet or on the
program Blue Pencil.

III. Recognize and correct usage problems, such as faulty pronoun usage,
wrong or inappropriate word choice, tangled constructions, and use of
numbers and abbreviations.
   A. Demonstrate a mastery (70% or better) of the conventions of edited
standard English prose.
   B. Write a short essay which demonstrates an improved ability to edit
and proofread own prose.
   C. Demonstrate an ability to edit and proofread models of poorly edited
and proofread prose through written exercises in course booklet or on the
program Blue Pencil.

IV. Recognize and correct mechanics problems usually found in spelling and
misplaced punctuation, missing punctuation, and overused punctuation, as in
commas, semi-colons, colons, apostrophes, end marks, quotations, italics,
capitalization, and parentheses (brackets, dashes, hyphens, and ellipsis
are also covered.).
   A. Demonstrate a mastery (70% or better) of the conventions of edited
standard English prose.
   B. Write a short essay which demonstrates an improved ability to edit
and proofread own prose.
   C. Demonstrate an ability to edit and proofread models of poorly edited
and proofread prose through written exercises in course booklet or on the
program Blue Pencil.

V. Use a style checker and be able to distinguish between its benefits and
weaknesses.
   A. Practice style checking original writing using Editor or Writers
Workbench.
   B. Explain verbally to instructor what checker suggests to edit and
then writer's decision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Because this course is individualized and not structured as a classroom
course, students must be self-disciplined. In other words, they must
organize their schedules so as to include the hours required to complete
this course (approximately 20 hours spent in the W.C.). During the time
that the student is in the W.C., he/she must make good use of that time by
completing at least 3/4 of the booklet and showing an understanding of the
skills taught. Tests will be taken by the student to prove his/her
comprehension of the material. A 70% or better indicates that the student
may proceed to the next lesson. When the student has completed 20 hours in
the W.C. and passed with 70% comprehension 3/4 of the booklet, he/she must
take a final exam which will be a comprehensive review of the
lessons/skills learned. The student has the option to cover some of the
material on computer programs. MicroLab provides mastery tests for some of
the curriculum covered in this class. The mastery test may be used as a
replacement for the written test. If the student chooses to take the
computer tests, the instructor or tutor will document the score in the
folder with a date and his/her initials. Again, a 70% comprehension must
be reached.

PASS/FAIL:

The student's final grade is an average of the recorded tests. A pass/fail
option may be chosen by a student. (See the secretary.)

INSTRUCTION:  

Instructors and tutors are available to answer questions and give
explanations.  You will be assigned to one specific instructor who will
document your progress and evaluate your work. However, you will also be
expected to work independently. Remember that many students use the
various services of the Writing Center so your instructor will be working
with them, also.

ATTENDANCE:

Obviously attendance is all-important since all work is done in the W.C.
The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one of the
many benefits of the W.C. The student is responsible for making sure the
secretary clocks his/her time spent in the W.C. If a student falls behind
in his/her hours, a midterm letter will remind the student to attend
regularly. However, the student is responsible for dropping the course or
taking an incomplete should the student find completion impossible. At
least 10 hours must be completed before an incomplete can be permitted.

FOLDERS:

Students are to keep all papers (written assignments/paragraphs and
essays) along with the time sheet and graded tests and paragraphs in the
provided folder. Students may collect their written assignments, not
tests, the following semester. Folders are kept in the Writing Center at
all times and distributed to students at the time of their arrival to the
Center and returned at the end of their stay in the Center. Folders may be
accessed by any Writing Center staff member, but otherwise are kept
private.

Students will be notified by mail at the midterm if they have fallen
behind in their hours or work completed in the Writing Center. If these
students do not respond, they are responsible for either dropping the
course or applying for an incomplete so they may finish the course the
following semester. A failure to take no course of action will constitute
a fail grade (F) for these students.

Students should follow the course assignment sheet and ask for assistance
when necessary.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 110

  • Title: English Grammar Review
  • Number: ENGL 110
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

English Grammar Review helps students to review the parts of speech, elements of a sentence, basic sentence patterns, major sentence level errors, agreement errors and punctuation. Students are encouraged to practice writing. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand and recognize the parts of speech.
  2. Recognize the functions and position of each part of speech in the sentence.
  3. Understand and recognize the basic sentence patterns.
  4. Write better sentences and recognize poorly constructed sentences.
  5. Recognize the major level sentence errors (fragments, run-ons, and comma splices).
  6. Correct the major sentence level errors.
  7. Correct agreement (subject/verb and pronoun/antecedent) errors.
  8. Apply rules of punctuation to any writing. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review Parts of Speech
   A. Demonstrate an ability to identify the eight parts of speech.
   B. Label their various functions in sentences

II. Review Basic Sentence Patterns
   A. Demonstrate an ability to label the parts of a sentence.
   B. Demonstrate an ability to write a variety of sentences demonstrating
various structures and context

III. Review Sentence Level Errors
   A. Demonstrate an ability to recognize and correct sentence level
errors
   B. Demonstrate an ability to write a variety of sentences which are
free of errors
   C. Write a short essay which includes a variety of sentence structures
and is sentence level error-free

IV. Review Agreement Errors in Sentences
   A. Demonstrate an ability to recognize and correct subject/verb and
pronoun/antecedent errors in sentences.
   B. Demonstrate an ability to write a variety of sentences which are
free of agreement errors
   C. Write a short essay which includes a variety of sentence structures
and is agreement error-free

V. Review Rules For Using Commas, Apostrophes, and Semicolons
   A. Demonstrate an ability to apply punctuation rules to a variety of
sentences.
   B. Demonstrate an ability to write a variety of sentences and punctuate
them correctly.
   C. Write a short essay which includes a variety sentence structures and
is punctuated correctly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1. 70% or better on tests given:
    Parts of Speech
    Basic Sentence Patterns
    Major Sentence Level Errors
    Agreement Errors
    Punctuation
2. Approximately 20 hours in the Writing Center to show intent and
motivation.
3. At least 3\4 of the material completed

PASS/FAIL:

Students will be notified by mail at the midterm if they have fallen
behind in their hours or work completed in the Writing Center.  If these
students do not respond, they are responsible for either dropping the
course or applying for an incomplete so they may finish the course the
following semester.  A failure to take no course of action will constitute
a fail grade (F) for these students.

Students should follow the course assignment sheet and ask for assistance
when necessary.

ATTENDANCE:

Obviously, attendance is important since all work is done in the Writing
Center. The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one
of the many benefits of the Writing Center. The student is responsible for
making sure the secretary clocks his/her time spent in the Writing Center.
At least 10 hours must be completed before an incomplete can be granted
(approved). Failure to do so will constitute an F in the course.

During the time that the student is in the Writing Center, he/she must
make good use of that time by completing at least 3/4 of the booklet or
suggested software and showing an understanding of the skills taught.
Tests will be taken by the student to prove his/her comprehension of the
material. A 70% or better indicates that the student may proceed to the
next lesson. When the student has completed 20 hours in the Writing Center
and passed with 70% comprehension 3/4 of the booklet, he/she must take a
final exam which will be a comprehensive review of the lessons/skills
learned. Throughout the course short writing assignments will help
students to connect knowledge of sentence analysis and sentence
correctness.

INSTRUCTION:  

Instructors and tutors are available to answer questions and give
explanations. You will be assigned to one specific instructor who will
document your progress and evaluate your work. However, you will also be
expected to work independently. Remember that many students use the
various services of the Writing Center so your instructor will be working
with them, also.

FOLDERS:  

Students are to keep all papers (written assignments/paragraphs and
essays) along with the time sheet and graded tests and paragraphs in the
provided folder.  Students may collect their written assignments, not
tests, the following semester.  Folders are kept in the Writing Center at
all times and distributed to students at the time of their arrival to the
Center and returned at the end of their stay in the Center. Folders may be
accessed by any Writing Center staff member, but otherwise are kept
private.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 112

  • Title: Research Skills
  • Number: ENGL 112
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

Research Skills is a review of the various aspects of the research process, beginning with limiting the subject and moving to revising the finished product. Emphasis is on the gathering of resource materials, synthesizing the information and developing an essay in which the resource information is used to support a thesis and is documented in an approved academic form. This course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explore various invention techniques to choose and focus a topic for research.

  2. Identify audience and purpose for a research essay.

  3. Demonstrate a process for gathering and organizing research from a variety of credible sources.

  4. Evaluate credible resources.

  5. Apply the methods of taking notes, such as paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting.

  6. Compile a working bibliography.

  7. Write an annotated bibliography.

  8. Synthesize several resources into a research essay.

  9. Document resources using MLA, Chicago, or APA style.

  10. Apply editing and revising strategies to the research essay. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Select and Limit the Topic
   A. Demonstrate an ability to choose a topic
   B. Focus a research topic by applying one of the studied invention
strategies
   C. Write a thesis

II. Understand the Two Aims of Research and the Importance of Knowing
Audience
   A. Demonstrate an ability to choose either persuasive or informative
aim for research project
   B. Demonstrate an ability to write an audience analysis for the
research project

III. Organize Research by Prewriting Strategies, Especially Brainstorming
   A. Demonstrate an ability to compile a list of questions to guide
research, categorize questions
   B. Demonstrate an ability to develop an outline for researching a
topic

IV. Learn a Process For Conducting Research
   A. Demonstrate an ability to find credible resources to use in the
research essay through a variety of sources: on-line data bases, the
Internet, the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature, the interview, and
the survey. Make bibliography cards of each resource used
   B. Show an improved understanding of the resources by taking notes on
literature read on note cards
   C. Show an ability to compile a working bibliography
   D. Demonstrate the ability to write an annotated bibliography
   E. Keep a log of the research process
   F. Synthesize resources by summarizing, paraphrasing and/or quoting
   G. Organize synthesized resources into an essay which is informative or
persuasive

V. Write a Research Essay Which Demonstrates an Ability to Complete the
Following Steps
   A. Document resources cited in essay using MLA or APA style
   B. Revise and edit the research essay with feedback from instructor or
writing center peer tutors
      1. Show the ability to apply revision strategies, such as add, cut,
change, or move
      2. Demonstrate the ability to eliminate convention errors, as listed
in the English Program Objectives

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

COURSE RATIONALE:  In this course students are expected to follow the
guideline of the course booklet. There are no tests; however, the
student's work will be evaluated by the instructor at each step of the
process. (See instructor's evaluation sheet.) T'he final will be
determined by the completion of the module booklet (approximately 20 hours
spent in the W.C.). Students will use a W.C. word processor program to type
their final papers.

W.C. FOLDER:

Because of the importance of instructor feedback, close supervision of the
completed work will be on-going. The student is expected to keep his/her
papers in the W.C. folder and check with the instructor before and after
each session spent in the W.C. or library. Also, the student is
responsible for making sure the W.C. secretary has logged the time spent.
Folders are kept in the W.C. and distributed when the student signs in.

ATTENDANCE:

Obviously attendance is all-important since all work is done in the W.C.
The availability of tutors to assist students needing help is one of the
many

PASS/FAIL:

Benefits of the W.C. The student is responsible for making sure the
secretary clocks his/her time spent in the W.C.  Students will be notified
by mail at the midterm if they have fallen behind in their hours or work
completed in the W.C. If these students do not respond, they are
responsible for either dropping the course or applying for an incomplete'
so they may finish the course during the next semester. A failure to take
no course of action will constitute a failing grade for these students
(which is an "F" on the student's transcript). The steps of the process
(outline, notes, rough drafts, and final paper) and the research log make
up the final grade.

Students should follow the assignment sheet and ask for assistance when
necessary.

Library orientation/exercises    10 pts.
Question outline                  5 pts.
Notes/research/bib cards         10 pts.
Working bibliography              5 pts.
Outline (revised)                10 pts.
Annotated bibliography            5 pts.
Rough draft                       5 pts.
Revised draft with works cited   10 pts.
Research log                     10 pts.
Final                            30 pts.
Total                           100 pts.

Research Log: 

Students must keep a notebook which logs the number of hours which are
spent working on their projects, activities which are accomplished, and
problems which are encountered.

'The contract  I" grade is reserved for the student who is unable to
complete the course requirements because of a crisis situation (lengthy
illness, death in the family, etc.) and who has completed more than 50% of
the minimum hourly requirements.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 115

  • Title: Revision Skills
  • Number: ENGL 115
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

Revision Skills is designed to instruct the practicing writer in skills needed to revise all writing, including business, college and personal writing. Students will use computer programs and self-paced materials. Revision Skills is intended to complement courses in which writing is assigned. Students will be encouraged to bring in business communication or college assignments to apply the learned skills. Course meets by arrangement in the Writing Center. After registering for this course, the student should contact the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize a variety of organizational structures and choose one which fits the specific writing situation.

  2. Demonstrate the ability to edit word choices and sentence structures to improve logic and flow, rhythm and punch, transition and coherence-in general, to improve the writing style.

  3. Understand the reader and write in a style appropriate to that audience.

  4. Discover the writer's own voice and use it effectively.

  5. Improve the content of a discovery draft by identifying opportunities to add, cut, change, and move ideas and support and by implementing those strategies.

  6. Apply active proofreading strategies to identify and eliminate convention errors, as listed in the Program Objectives.

  7. Select the appropriate computer software tool and apply to the revision activity (listed in the right hand column). 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Improve paragraph structure by completing assigned activities pertaining to the order of paragraphs considering the following modes:
   A. Chronological-narration
   B. Process-description
   C. Classification
   D. Problem/solution
   E. Comparison/contrast
   F. Assertion and support
   G. Cause/effect

II. Improve the sentence style in a draft by applying sentence strategies for variety and emphasis by working through assigned activities with practice in the following formats:
   A. Periodic
   B. Loose
   C. Subordination and coordination
   D. Read and apply strategies to improve Introductions and Conclusions to assigned activities and own writing.
   E. Add or change transitional devices and correct errors in parallelism as a revision strategy for own writing and assigned activities.
   F. Apply revision strategies to improve meaning and coherence.
      1. Add or move ideas and evidence which support the thesis,
      2. Cut ideas and evidence that do not improve meaning.
      3. Determine appropriate documentation of sources
   G. Apply strategies for changing word choice to own writing and assigned activities. 1.Edit for specific detail and clarity 2.Edit for active verbs 3.Edit for wordiness and verbosity 4.Edit for denotation and connotation
   H. Demonstrate strategies for revising for an audience by completing assigned activities and by using own writing applying strategies for...

1.Writing for oneself,

2.Imagining a reader,

3.Objectively reading one's
own writing, and

4.Understanding the peer critique

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Students will be graded on mastery of the skills covered. They will
also be required to apply their newly learned revising strategies to short
writings assigned by the Writing Center instructor or to previously written
assignments. Points will also be awarded for the completion of exercises.

1. Software                                   15 pts.
2. Written Exercises from Style activities   35 pts.
3. Writing Assignment                         25 pts.
4. Test - Revising the Rough Draft            25 pts.
   Total                                     100 pts.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 120

  • Title: Writing in the Disciplines
  • Number: ENGL 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Description:

This course is designed to complement and/or support classes in which writing is intrinsic to the curriculum and provide students with a process that can be applied to the variety of written assignments typically assigned in classes other than composition. Students will practice writing a variety of short papers using a prescribed process for each assignment. The course is individualized. Students enrolled in this class must come to the Writing Center, LIB 308, to make arrangements for their class schedule, to pick up a syllabus and other materials, and to be assigned an instructor. The course is a combination of written material and software. All completed work will be kept in a folder in the Writing Center. 1 hr. lecture/wk. Students should anticipate approximately 20 hours of work to complete the course.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Connect writing skills learned in composition courses to other academic writing assignments.

  2. Apply the writing process to any writing assignment.

  3. Break any writing assignment down into a manageable process.

  4. Know and define terms connected to rhetorical problems.

  5. Use library indexes, Infotrac and other online data bases, and bibliographic files with competence.

  6. Know criteria on which to base the credibility of media sources.

  7. Write in several documentation styles including the Modern Language Association (MLA), American Psychological Association (APA), and Chicago styles and understand their applications.

  8. Critique and revise their own writing.

  9. Use software programs which assist in editing and formatting a document, i.e., Citation (a documentation program); Editor, Writers Workbench, or other style checker.

  10. Write in a variety of writing formats indicative of assignments given in college. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Review the Writing Process of prewriting and invention, drafting,
revising, and editing.
   A. Choose an audience appropriate to the writing assignment and analyze
that audience.
   B. Demonstrate an ability to use various prewriting strategies to
decide on a topic, discover ideas, and develop support. Practice a variety
of devices such as the following:
      1. Freewriting
      2. Clustering
      3. Listing
      4. Observing
      5. Reading/Researching
      6. Interviewing
      7. Notetaking
   C. Demonstrate the ability to choose a topic, focus ideas, and write a
thesis statement
      1. Write a thesis statement appropriate to the assignment
      2. Organize and write a plan (outline) appropriate to the
assignment
   D. Choose a format appropriate to the assignment and the discipline
      1. Recognize and use various expository modes, i.e., description,
narration,  classification, etc.  Practice a variety of methods for
developing and supporting ideas, i.e., examples, statistics, anecdotes,
facts, etc.
   E. Support content with appropriate documentation within the text of
the paper and in the compiled list of sources at the end of the paper.
   F. Revise and edit drafts using specific revising, editing, and
proofing strategies
      1. Demonstrate an improved sense of style
      2. Demonstrate an improved use of language
      3. Demonstrate an ability to apply appropriately a specific
documentation style
II. Apply critical thinking skills to specific writing assignments which
demonstrate an understanding of the writing process.
   Each of the assignments will include readings and models appropriate to
the discipline. Style sheets are available for each of the following
disciplines:  Biology, Humanities, Psychology and History.  Others as the
need arises.  Each assignment begins with an appropriate description and
then sets up the writing process.  Readings specific to each task and
discipline will be assigned. Samples of the completed assignments, written
by JCCC students for actual classes, will be available for review. Each
step of the process will be critiqued by a member of the Writing Center
staff, and correct grammar and usage will be discussed. Reviews of
mechanics will be included as individual needs arise.  Stylistic points
will be emphasized.
   Each assignment will include the following steps: a) Prewriting (a
variety of prewriting strategies will be provided); b) Focusing, reading,
researching, observing, notetaking; c) Writing- analyzing, interpreting,
synthesizing; d) Rewriting- appropriate style, appropriate language,
appropriate documentation; e) Proofreading/Editing - grammar, punctuation,
mechanic, spelling.
   A. Analysis: Students will select a professional journal article to
read, identify key points, and summarize in three formats.
      1. Point out the distinguishing characteristics of a precis,
abstract, and a summary by writing one of each format.
      2. Discover disciplinary applications and appropriate terminology
for potential collegiate writing assignments such as the executive summary
or the science hypothesis.
   B. Synthesis: Students will select, read, analyze, interpret, and
synthesize several (at least three) articles which provide varying
perspectives on a focused topic.
      1. Demonstrate research skills by accessing electronic data bases
and the Internet.
      2. Assess the selected articles by qualifying them against a
prepared set of criteria.
      3. Create an essay (300 to 500 words) which combines the ideas of
the sources with  their own explanations and point of view. The research
report or synthesis paper may include all or some of the following parts:
a proposal or executive summary or abstract, a journal or log, search
questions, an interview as a source, field research.
      4. Write the report in the appropriate form and style of a specific
discipline.
      5. Demonstrate ability to work assignment through the writing
process.
      6. Rephrase or paraphrase, summarize, or quote the articles
appropriately and    document the information as it is integrated into the
text in the previously decided upon format (APA, MLA, Chicago).
      7. Prepare and compile a bibliography, works cited, or references
cited page which documents the sources used in the essay in the
appropriate discipline format.
   C. Interpretation and Critique: Students will write a literature review
which demonstrates a critical review of a professional journal article.
      1. Select an article from a professional journal and critique its
appropriateness to its topic and discipline.
      2. Read the article carefully, select several disciplinary
characteristics of its content, form, or writer's style and measure these
traits against established criteria.
      3. Provide adequate support in the form of examples.
   D. Evaluation and Critique: Students will write a book, art, or film
review.
      1. Select and study by taking notes the selected art form to be
evaluated against a set of criteria determined by its genre or
classification.
      2. Develop essay or review with specific examples, facts, or
illustrations.
   E. Comprehension and Application: Students will define instructional
key words frequently used in designing essay examinations, write their own
essay questions using these terms and write their own answers to the
questions.
      1. Select terms to be defined as those representative of a specific
discipline.
      2. Create essay questions using cognitive behavioral terms.
      3. Demonstrate an understanding of the question.
      4. Write sample answers to the questions.
      5. Show knowledge of relevant material in answers.
      6. Reflect an ability to present the material in an organized form
appropriate to academic discipline.
      7. Demonstrate an ability to state ideas clearly.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Each writing assignment will be graded by the assigned Writing Center
instructor. Although the final product is important, points will also be
awarded for the steps of the process. Each assignment will be worth 20
points-100 points total. Five papers = Summary, precis, abstract; research
project; literature review or analysis; art review; essay examination.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 121

  • Title: Composition I*
  • Number: ENGL 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or appropriate placement test score or both EAP 113 and EAP 117.

Description:

Composition I focuses on writing nonfiction prose suitable in its expression and content to both its occasion and its audience. Students will have an opportunity to improve in all phases of the writing process: discovering ideas, gathering information, planning and organizing, drafting, revising and editing. Each text written in the course should clearly communicate a central idea or thesis, contain sufficient detail to be lively and convincing, reflect the voice of the writer and use carefully edited standard written English. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 20 pages (approximately 5,000 words) of revised and edited prose. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test or submit an ACT score of 19 or higher before enrolling. For more information, see a JCCC counselor. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Produce writing for specific purposes and audiences as required by various writing situations.
  2. Integrate their own ideas with those of others.
  3. Practice ethical means of creating their work.
  4. Employ conventions of format, structure, voice, tone and level of formality appropriate to the writing situation.
  5. Demonstrate flexible strategies for prewriting, developing, drafting, revising, editing and proofreading.
  6. Critique own and others’ work.
  7. Control syntax, grammar, punctuation and spelling.
  8. Identify and profile an appropriate audience for published texts.
  9. Identify controlling ideas and organizational patterns in published texts.
  10. Evaluate the biases and reliability of sources.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Composition of Audience-directed Texts

A. Describe the ideal audience for an essay and other forms of discourse.

B. Create patterns of organization appropriate to the audience and rhetorical aims of an essay and other forms of written discourse.

C. Write essays and other forms of written discourse of varying length and complexity with expressive, informative and persuasive purposes.

II. Employment of Sources

A. Include outside materials, such as text, tables, graphs, video or images, in original texts while employing academic conventions and standard punctuation for doing same.

B. Summarize sources with thoroughness and accuracy.

C. Paraphrase sources while avoiding distortion of meaning.

D. Quote sources accurately and fairly.

III. Acknowledgement of Source Use

A. Define plagiarism.

B. Attribute integrated material from sources using a standard documentation style, such as MLA, APA or Chicago.

C. Include and fairly represent sources whose viewpoints may differ substantially from the writer’s own, especially those who may hold differing political, religious or cultural views.

IV. Application of Conventions

A. Decide on a suitable controlling idea.

B. State points of analysis in a sequence that supports the main goal of an essay and other written discourse.

C. Compose effective introductions which provide background, context and specificity to the essay and other written discourse.

D. Compose conclusions which reinforce the writer’s point and bring closure to the essay and other written discourse.

E. Employ transitions that lend coherence to the text.

F. Develop a written voice with appropriate and varied sentence structure and vocabulary suitable to the audience.

V. Development of Compositional Strategies

A. Begin a writing task by using appropriate methods for discovering and narrowing ideas.

B. Demonstrate proficiency with brainstorming techniques.

C. Locate supporting materials and evidence from personal experience as well as field/library research.

D. Write essays and other written discourse that present ideas and support them with sufficient detail to be convincing and interesting.

E. Revise paragraphs so that ideas progress logically through coherent sentences.

VI. Peer Review

A. Critique own and others’ texts to improve the focus, organization, support, clarity, correctness and effectiveness.

B. Collaborate with peers to make significant revisions in the organization, development, style and mechanics of texts using comments from the instructor and/or other students.

VII. Revision of Compositions on the Sentence Level

A. Employ strategies for matching diction, tone and style to audience expectations.

B. Use sentence variety techniques.

C. Apply rules of standard punctuation.

D. Demonstrate proficient proofreading skills.

VIII. Audience Analysis of Published Texts

A. Identify techniques used by authors to address specific audiences in texts, such as prose, images, videos, tables and graphs.

B. Analyze the authors’ intended effect upon an audience.

IX. Rhetorical Analysis of Published Texts

A. Locate the controlling idea of a text.

B. Describe the organizational pattern of a text.

C. Identify and categorize specific types of arguments made within a text.

D. Discuss the use of supporting details and information in a text.

X. Evaluation of the Reliability of Sources

A. Analyze students’ own biases when encountering texts.

B. Identify language in published texts that reveal authorial bias.

C. Examine published texts for sufficient and appropriate support.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

70-80%    5-7 major writing projects
5-10%      Peer review
15-25%    Prewriting and in-class writing assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 121H

No information found.

ENGL 122

  • Title: Composition II*
  • Number: ENGL 122
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

Composition II focuses on skills essential to gathering, comprehending, analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of academic and non-academic sources. Because writing is integral to college coursework and the workplace, this course emphasizes the rhetorical skills needed to understand and produce complex compositions in a variety of forms, which may include essays, presentations, reports, social media posts and other digital forms of communication. Composition II emphasizes the deep revision needed to compose expository, evaluative and persuasive prose. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 25 pages (approximately 6,250 words) of revised and edited prose. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Maintain and continue to improve learning outcomes from Composition I, including focus, organization, supporting detail and proofreading skills applied to the writing of essays.
  2. Apply an ethical research writing process, which calls for a series of tasks including finding, evaluating, analyzing, synthesizing and citing appropriate primary and secondary sources.
  3. Demonstrate that different rhetorical situations require different structural, stylistic and mechanical conventions.
  4. Decide on a suitable controlling idea and arrangement of supporting ideas for compositions with explanatory, evaluative and argumentative purposes.
  5. Make and assist others to make significant revisions in the organization and development of ideas using comments from the instructor and/or other students.
  6. Develop a written style within the conventions of standard edited prose.
  7. Demonstrate ability to read and think critically about texts.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Skill Reinforcement

A. Demonstrate the ability to read and formulate objectives of an assignment.

B. Formulate controlling ideas for texts suitable to the range of assignments and audiences for academic writing.

C. Employ appropriate methods for discovering ideas and gathering materials for a range of purposes and subjects, including library, online and field research.

D. Take notes which accurately reflect source materials.

E. Express suitable controlling ideas for research essays.

F. Organize research and other materials into patterns of organization appropriate to support a complex thesis.

II. Source Materials Synthesis

A. Locate and evaluate supporting material from library, online and field research, including professional journals and digital media.

B. Locate in sources useful evidence, examples and details which aid in advancing a student’s own argument.

C. Select and utilize evidence free of logical fallacies.

D. Analyze, organize, introduce and interpret evidence that supports a text’s main idea.

E. Integrate appropriate source materials into original texts, using quotations, paraphrases and summaries.

F. Quote from source materials accurately and without misrepresentation, making clear the context of the original material.

G. Paraphrase complex source materials accurately and effectively.

H. Summarize complex texts without distorting the source materials.

I. Incorporate other viewpoints—including opinions of people who hold different political, religious or cultural views—into written texts.

J. Document outside sources with an appropriate citation system.

III. The Rhetorical Situation of the Writer

A. Define the elements of a rhetorical situation.

B. Define how subject, audience and purpose interact to create effective discourse.

C. Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate stylistic conventions.

D. Demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate formatting conventions.

IV. Organization and Development of Texts

A. Write logically structured and developed texts for audience comprehension.

B. Comprehend argumentative appeals.

C. Write persuasive texts using logos, ethos and pathos.

D. Write texts free of logical fallacies.

E. Differentiate between explanatory, evaluative and argumentative purposes.

F. Write texts that include fair explanations, evaluations and arguments.

V. Whole-Essay Revision Strategies

A. Global Revision Techniques

1. Revise organizational patterns to allow ideas to progress more smoothly and logically through coherent sentences, paragraphs and major points of development.

2. Insert additional materials where needed for support and eliminate repetitive, irrelevant or ineffective and unreliable information.

B. Peer Review

1. Critique the work of peers to assist them in improving the focus, organization, support, clarity, correctness and effectiveness of their written discourse.

2. Collaborate on the revision of the writer’s own and peers’ compositions.

VI. Sentence-level Revision Strategies

A. Editing

1. Select and correctly use vocabulary appropriate to the topic and audience.

2. Write sentences that grammatically convey clear and complex relationships.

3. Use figurative language appropriately to add clarity and interest.

B. Proofreading

1. Apply the rules of standard academic prose.

2. Scrutinize the use of a research style, making certain documentation is thorough and the style accurately employed.

VII. Analytical Reading Strategies

A. Establish the reliability of sources.

1. Critique source materials.

2. Explain the author’s probable intent within a text.

3. Discuss the argumentative strategies employed by an author, including appeals to pathos, logos and ethos.

4. Locate logical fallacies within texts.

5. Analyze the merits of evidence used within a text, including the reliability of facts and examples employed by the writer.

B. Identify bias in outside sources.

1. Define bias.

2. Describe the personal and cultural biases in texts that influence readers.

3. Describe the approximate demographics for ideal audience of individual articles, journals, books and student essays.

4. Determine biases appealed to through an analysis of the vocabulary, support and organization of a text.

C. Evaluate the reliability and bias of sources.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

70-85%    5-7 major writing projects
5-10%      Peer review
10-20%    Additional assignments which may include homework, prewriting, quizzes, reading responses and graded discussions

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 122H

No information found.

ENGL 123

  • Title: Technical Writing I*
  • Number: ENGL 123
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course provides a basic knowledge of technical writing. Students will learn the writing process (prewriting, writing and rewriting) to follow when constructing correspondence, including memos, letters, e-mail, reports, instructional manuals and Web pages. Students also will learn seven key traits of effective technical writing: clarity, conciseness, document design, organization, audience recognition, audience involvement and accuracy. Accuracy specifically entails the need for students to adhere to rules of grammar and mechanics. Students will learn how to create computer- generated graphics and learn word processing skills. Finally, the students will learn how to work in teams, modeling Total Quality Management skills. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use various prewriting techniques to overcome writer's block.
  2. Write rough drafts.
  3. Rewrite rough drafts by employing revision techniques and working with Peer Evaluation groups.
  4. Compose different types of technical correspondence.
  5. Write correspondence which abides by the seven essential traits of Technical Writing: Clarity, Conciseness, Document Design, Organization, Audience Recognition, Audience Involvement, and Accuracy (correspondence which is grammatically and mechanically correct).
  6. Create computer-generated graphics.
  7. Download and modify computer-generated graphics.
  8. Use computer word processing skills.
  9. Acquire problem-solving skills inherent in the challenges of writing and teamwork.
  10. Work in teams, modeling Total Quality Management skills. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Prewrite to Overcome Writer's Block
   A. Gather information for correspondence.
   B. Organize this information according to the type and purpose of the
correspondence being written:
      1. spatial
      2. chronological
      3. importance
      4. analytical
      5. cause/effect
      6. problem/solution
      7. memo
      8. letter
      9  report
      10. instruction
      11. e-mail
      12. web page
      13. sales
      14. inquiry
      15. directive
      16. informative
   C. Identify and determine audience needs.

II. Write Rough Drafts
   A. Draft text for the specific assignment.
   B. Organize the text according to the type and purpose of the
correspondence being written:
      1. spatial
      2. chronological
      3. importance
      4. analytical
      5. cause/effect
      6. problem/solution
      7. memo
      8. letter
      9  report
      10. instruction
      11. e-mail
      12. web page
      13. sales
      14. inquiry
      15. directive
      16. informative

III. Rewrite the Rough Drafts Using Revision Techniques and Peer Group
Evaluations
   A. Add new details for clarity.
   B. Delete unnecessary information for conciseness.
   C. Reformat the text to improve document design.
   D. Enhance the tone of the text for audience involvement.
   E. Clarify word usage.
   F. Correct grammatical and mechanical errors.
   G. Work with peers to help each other and learn from each other.

IV. Compose Different Types of Technical Correspondence
   A. Write a sales letter to market a product or service.
   B. Write a letter of inquiry to request additional information about
the product or service.
   C. Write a directive memo telling subordinates to create a web site.
   D. Create a web site with a home page and multiple screens.
   E. Write a user manual informing clients how to perform a series of
tasks.
   F. Write a progress report to a boss, informing him or her of status on
a project.
   G. Write e-mail to the teacher updating him or her about the student's
achievements and challenges in the course.

V. Write Correspondence Which Abides by the Seven Essential Traits of
Technical Writing
   A. Clarify ideas by answering reporter's questions and by providing
specific, quantifiable information.
   B. Write concisely, by limiting the length of words, the length of
sentences, and the length of paragraphs.
   C. Design the page layout of text through highlighting techniques
      1. boldface
      2. underlining
      3. white space
      4. italics
      5. changes in font size and typeface
   D. Organize the text according to the type and purpose of the
assignment.
      1. spatial
      2. chronological
      3. importance
      4. analytical
      5. cause/effect
      6. problem/solution
      7. memo
      8. letter
      9  report
      10. instruction
      11. e-mail
      12. web page
      13. sales
      14. inquiry
      15. directive
      16. informative
   E. Recognize audience.
      1. Determine whether the reader is a high-tech peer, a low-tech
peer, a lay reader, or combinations of the above.
      2. Define terms according to the reader's level of understanding
avoiding sexist language.
   F. Involve audience through pronouns, contractions, positive word
usage, and personalized tone.
   G. Create accurate text, avoiding the nine major grammatical errors and
minor errors in punctuation.
      1. fused sentences
      2. fragments
      3. agreement errors
      4. verb tense shifts
      5. reference problems
      6. problems with modification
      7. spelling errors
      8. comma splices
      9. shifts in person

VI. Create Computer-Generated Graphics
   A. Use Paint, PhotoShop, Lview, FrontPage, Adobe Workshop, etc., to
create bitmap images.
   B. Use Microsoft Word to create bar charts, pie charts, line graphs,
etc., for use in documentation.

VII. Download and Modify Computer-Generated Graphics
   A. Download GIFs (Graphical Interfaces) and JPGs (Joint Photographic
Group) graphics from the Internet.
   B. Use a conversion software to modify the text to avoid copyright
infringement.

VIII. Use Computer Word Processing Skills with Microsoft Word.

IX. Acquire Problem-Solving Skills Inherent in the Challenges of Writing
and Teamwork
   A. Solve problems inherent in writing.
      1. gathering information
      2. organizing text
      3. recognizing audience
      4. abiding by the seven key criteria for Technical Writing
      5. avoiding grammatical/mechanical errors
   B. Work in groups for team projects, overcoming challenges inherent
with writing skills.

X. Work in Teams, Model Total Quality Management Skills
   A. Choose team leaders for projects.
   B. Choose team record keepers for role checking.
   C. Work to get along with others from diverse backgrounds.
   D. Achieve equal levels of labor.
   E. Support others in team projects.
   F. Help each other and learn from each other.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Sales letter         10%
Letter of inquiry    10%
Directive memo       10%
Web site             20%
User manual          20%
Progress report      10%
3 e-mail             10%
Class participation  10%
(includes prewriting, rough drafts, and group writing activities)
                    100%

Final grades will be assigned according to the following scale:
      90 -100  = A
      80 - 89  = B
      70 - 79  = C
      60 - 69  = D
      Below 60 = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 130

  • Title: Introduction to Literature*
  • Number: ENGL 130
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

Students will read, discuss and analyze works from three literary genres: the short story, the poem and the play. Students will learn and apply the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of these literary forms. Students will be introduced to representative works from various literary traditions and cultures, including numerous works from contemporary writers. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the major components specific to a short story, poem or play, such as their settings, narrative patterns, metaphors and themes.
  2. Identify the components shared by these genres that make them "literary."
  3. Apply the technical vocabulary specific to works in each genre.
  4. Recognize how imaginative writing is itself a mode of inquiry.
  5. Explore the ways in which each student interacts uniquely with a literary text.
  6. Construct meaning based on the language of literary works, the student's own experience, the student's encounters with other works, and knowledge gleaned from discussions with other students.
  7. Write essays that explore and analyze issues identified by the student as significant.
  8. Explain the contributions of some of the major authors of the Western literary tradition.
  9. Identify common or universal literary themes expressed in ethnic literature.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Analysis of Reader's Personal Tastes in Imaginative Literature

A. Review literary tastes.

B. Speculate on the sources and background of those tastes.

C. Identify what is most valued or devalued (privileged or marginalized) in the reading experience.

D. Document changes in reading style and taste over the course of the semester.

E. Reflect on what personal experiences are most brought to bear on the reading experience.

F. Recognize the literary elements presently being studied (motifs, themes, symbols, characters, moods, etc.) in works the student has previously encountered in film, television or print media.

II. Readers in a Community

A. Describe the reading experience of imaginative texts to other students in discussion groups.

B. Review the reading experiences of other students in group discussion or with the full class.

C. Locate major areas of personal and community interests and values, describing similarities and differences between them.

D. Identify those aspects of an imaginative text that may generate multiple meanings.

E. Identify those aspects of an imaginative text which may not allow for meaningful paraphrase, summary, simplification or reduction.

F. In groups, construct a negotiated statement about the value, significance and possible meaning of a given text.

III. Textual Analysis of Short Fiction

A. Recall and summarize the "facts" of a specific text.

B. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of short fiction.

C. The plot

1. Differentiate between those details in a narrative that are significant to the plot and those that are not.

2. Construct alternative plot lines at potentially significant textual moments.

3. Identify each character's major goals.

4. After outlining the sequence of events in a story, reconstruct the "fabula" of the story.

5. Identify disruptive elements in a character's drive toward his or her goal.

D. The characters

1. Identify patterns based on a character's speech, appearance, actions, interaction with other characters, values, material possessions and physical space.

2. Differentiate between "flat"and "round" characters.

3. Revise a "flat" character's profile to create a more fully dimensional personality.

4. Speculate about the value systems that govern the behavior, thoughts and feelings of a given character.

E. The story world

1. Identify and characterize two competing value systems dominating each short story read.

2. Describe the dynamics of each value system and identify points of tension between them.

3. Discuss those characters who seem to have an unstable relationship with either or both realms of value.

F. Story and meaning

1. Differentiate between traditional and constructed symbols employed in a text.

2. Identify and articulate a short story's themes.

G. Story and value

1. Assess the value of a short story as an artistic achievement.

2. Articulate the thematic bearing a story may have on marginalized populations.

IV. Textual Analysis of Poetry

A. Construct a preliminary definition of poetry.

B. List a number of major poems and specific works in the Western literary tradition.

C. A poem's content

1. Distinguish between the author and speaker of a poem.

2. Describe the dramatic situation of a poem, including the speaker's predicament and vulnerability.

3. Read poems out loud, responding meaningfully to the cues given in the text that indicate sense, rhythm, emphasis and closure.

4. Paraphrase poems.

D. A poem's form

1. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of poetry, including stanza forms, metrics, tropes and traditional themes.

2. Employ technical vocabulary in discussions of "counted verse."

3. Draw distinctions between "counted" and "free" verse.

E. The poem's artistry

1. Locate and characterize the predominant images in a poem.

2. Identify and explain the use of metaphors in a poem.

3. Identify and describe various "voices" found in poems, specifically characterizing those belonging to the "innocent" and "experienced" perspectives.

F. Exploration of a poem's meaning

1. Identify specific moments of "ambiguity" in a poem.

2. Construct multiple meaning statements for a given poem.

V. Textual Analysis of Drama

A. Summarize the major actions in a play.

B. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of written (not performed) dramatic texts.

C. Dramatic structure

1. Review the elements of traditional plot structures in Greek, Shakespearean and Modern drama.

2. Identify the major characters' fundamental goals.

3. Characterize the conflicts created by the differing goals of characters in the same play.

4. Identify significant choices made by characters in the play for which the consequences cannot be foreseen or controlled.

D. The stage

1. Describe the various kinds of stages on which plays have been and are performed.

2. Discuss the impact of the construction of the stage on the structure of the play itself.

E. Theatrical language

1. Distinguish between theatrical dialogue and everyday conversation.

2. Examine the contradiction between what characters say and what they actually think and feel.

3. Identify moments in the dialogue where the "subtext" breaks through into the dramatic discourse.

F. Performance

1. Contrast "stage" acting with "method" acting.

2. List criteria used to evaluate a play's performance and apply those to a specific production.

G. Identify the major themes in a dramatic work.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10%:    Students will respond to literature in daily journal entries that will require them to write about literary works in detail and connect them to their daily lives.
10%:    Students will be asked to write plot summaries of the dramas.
10%:    Students will respond to literature through reports submitted by in-class discussion groups.
30%:    Students will be given three examinations on the three literary genres in which they will be asked to discuss and analyze literary works in detail, define literary terms and apply those terms to specific works. Students will also be asked to write in-class essays that create thematic unity among various texts.
30%:    Students will be asked to write three essays that will analyze and comment on individual literary works.
10%:    Students will be given credit for attending class and participating in group discussion.
All work is graded on a point system and computed into percentages. The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned at semester's end.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 130H

No information found.

ENGL 140

  • Title: Writing for Interactive Media*
  • Number: ENGL 140
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course teaches students to apply the writing process as well as fundamental rhetorical and composition skills to various interactive media including web pages, CD-ROMs/DVD, e-mail, kiosks, support materials, simulations, social networking and other electronic media. The instruction will focus on skills essential to selecting, evaluating and synthesizing information from primary and secondary sources; in addition, it will emphasize the different approaches to organization that these media require as well as the variety of discourse styles used in informative, instructional, persuasive and entertainment media texts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Compose written profiles of interactive media products identifying appropriate audiences, rhetorical purposes and appeals.
  2. Summarize various experiences which separate audiences may encounter when using a single interactive media product with accuracy.
  3. Evaluate professional and student interactive media products critically, including web sites, support documents, scripts for multi-modal and nonlinear products, and other assigned writing tasks.
  4. Generate controlling concepts using brainstorming and research techniques.
  5. Arrange materials according to the rhetorical aim of projects and the needs of various media.
  6. Write text that fulfills the writing projects' rhetorical purpose by effectively utilizing appropriate style, rhetorical appeals and primary and secondary sources.
  7. Make and assist others to make global, functional and editorial revisions in writing projects according to the conventions of the media and standard written English.
  8. Compose spontaneous, accurate, effective replies for electronic correspondence. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Develop a writing process appropriate for creating interactive
texts.
   A. Compose written profiles of published interactive media to establish
criteria for effective writing with the genre.
   B. Generate controlling concepts using brainstorming and researching
techniques.
   C. Arrange materials according to the project's rhetorical aim and the
media's needs.  
   D. Write projects for appropriate rhetorical aims and audiences.
   E. Make and assist others to make global, functional and editorial
revisions in projects according to the conventions of the media and
standard written English.

II. Write and design materials suited to a hierarchical/clustered design.
   A. Develop a project with an expressed aim.
   B. Compose a written profile of the conventions for web sites or other
media with internal links.
   C. Outline organization of multi-page site.
   D. Select on-line materials to integrate and link to site.
   E. Write prose that complements but does not rely on graphics.
   F. Edit prose to fit into organization of site and dimensions of a
standard screen.
   G. Compose transitional words, phrases or icons to lead logically to
other pages within the site.

III. Create a multi-modal text.
   A. Develop a project with an expository or instructional aim.
   B. Describe conventions in virtual tour packages, slide shows, viral
videos and other linear, multi-modal texts.
   C. Select appropriate secondary (library/electronic) sources to
integrate into project.
   D. Write "voice over script" using conventions of spoken English.
   E. Coordinate visuals and "voice over" using a storyboard.
   F. Select appropriate materials to support the text's purpose.
   G. Compose proposal describing the project purpose and process.
   H. Write script using appropriate format.

IV. Write and design materials for an interactive simulation experience.
   A. Develop a project with an instructional/educational aim.
   B. Describe various "paths" individuals might take through the
simulation.
   C.  Propose an original training or learning simulation.
   D. Devise and organize non-linear, inner-connected nodules or scenes
using flowcharting strategies.
   E. Write scripts using appropriate format to indicate character
dialogue, action sequences and user interactivity.
      1. Compose scenes incorporating multiple user choices.
      2. Compose scenes with dialogue "triggers" that determine the
direction of the text.
   F. Write additional non-linear scenes.

V. Incorporate user-centered, highly-interactive media components.
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of searchable databases (kiosks).
      1. Analyze interactive databases and kiosks to identify current
conventions.
      2. Define concepts of Boolean logic.
      3. Compose a project proposal describing function and audience for a
searchable database.
      4. Evaluate methods to collect data through primary research.
      5. Identify and categorize desirable attributes to use as search
tags for data.
   B. Demonstrate an understanding of social networking tools.
      1. Identify and analyze popular online tools.
      2. Compose text for use on a variety of social networking cites.

VI. Write clear and effective supporting documents.
   A. Respond to e-mails using appropriate tone.
      1. Supply information in an accurate and timely fashion.
      2. Develop an impromptu written style within the conventions of
standard edited prose.
   B. Write effective letters, memos and proposals.
   C. Evaluate "Help" and supporting materials in currently published
computer applications.
      1. Identify concepts and functions in published program to be
included in a manual.
      2. Write primary (simple) and secondary (in-depth) definitions,
explanations and troubleshooting screens.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-20% Analyses and reviews of previously published materials
60-70% 4-6 projects
10-20% Tests and in-class activities
100%   Total

FINAL GRADES
 A  90% - 100%    
 B  80% -  89.9%   
 C  70% -  79.9%        
 D  60% -  69.9% 
 F  under  60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 150

  • Title: Digital Narratives*
  • Number: ENGL 150
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

Games, particularly Role-Playing Games (RPGs) and other participatory narratives, share many properties with traditional narratives, yet differ significantly from their linear counterparts. This course focuses on the elements of narrative as well as the principles that drive virtual or alternative possible worlds (both fictive and reality-based), and it will provide students with practice writing and designing artifacts that demonstrate an understanding of plot, character, setting and the impact of structure and purpose in game development. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and describe the relationships between the roles of character, setting and plot, and user interactivity in digital narratives.
  2. List, describe and outline different linear and nonlinear story structures and plots.
  3. Write and format proposals, screenplay material, treatments, and character sketches.
  4. Describe dialogue engines and their role in moving a participatory narrative.
  5. Analyze characters presented in various media for complexity, motivations, and consistency in personality and expression.
  6. Write dialogue with “stage directions” that demonstrate a consistent character in a nonlinear narrative.
  7. Describe the elements that create an explorable virtual world.
  8. Generate ideas for game concepts, characters, plot complications, gameplay challenges, and structures for participatory narratives using brainstorming techniques.
  9. Design gameplay challenges that complement the rhetorical aim of educational, training and entertainment games.
  10. Make and assist others to make global, functional and editorial revisions in writing projects according to the conventions of the media and industry.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Purposes of Games and Participatory Narratives
   A. Identify and describe games that entertain.
   B. Identify and describe games that inform or teach facts and skills.
   C. Identify and describe games that persuade users to adopt certain
attitudes or teach desirable behaviors.
   D. Write a proposal for a game with an emphasis on its purpose and
objective.

II. The Role of Setting and Virtual Worlds in Games
   A. Analyze setting-driven games.
      1. Critique the virtual explorable world in games.
      2. Describe the role of setting in digital narratives.
         a. Identify the relationship between setting and game
challenges.
         b. Identify the relationship between setting and archetypal
characters and character growth.
   B. Describe the role of design elements in games and digital stories.
      1. Describe the role of color and shapes in suggesting mood, tone,
and physical sensations like heat, cold, hardness, sharpness, etc.
      2. Identify and discuss dominant art styles in establishing user
expectations.
   C. Identify the role of setting in establishing narrative limits.
      1. Infer spatial limits within the game from the setting.
      2. Anticipate temporal limits within the game from the setting.
      3. Predict the physical laws within the game from the setting.
   D. Create detailed and appropriate settings for games.
      1. Analyze the role of setting in several forms of media (print,
film, digital).
      2. Propose back stories and game objectives suitable to specific
game worlds.
      3. Design (visually or textually) settings for an original scene in
a game.

III. The Role of Character in Games
   A. Identify archetypal characters (hero, mentor, sidekick, higher self,
allies, shape shifters, tricksters, threshold guardians, shadows, and
heralds).
   B. Describe the role of viewpoint in games.
      1. Identify and analyze third-person viewpoint in games.
         a. List and describe the elements of characterization.
            1) Defining characters through their appearance.
            2) Defining characters through their dialogue.
            3) Defining characters through their actions.
         b. List and describe the challenges in characterization.
            1) Maintaining consistency in personality traits.
            2) Using flat and rounded characters to move the story and
promote identification.
      2. Identify and analyze first-person viewpoint in games.
         a. Identify and describe the challenges of creating a
first-person character to be played by all kinds of people.
         b. Identify and describe the challenges of inserting the
first-person character into the story smoothly.
            1) Providing player with the context.
            2) Providing player with the viewpoint character’s
exposition.
   C. Describe the role of motive in games.
      1. List and describe classic character motives.
      2. Identify and describe the challenges of creating a motive for the
player/user in first-person games.
      3. Describe methods of revealing motives for characters within the
game.
   D. Create developed characters for games
      1. Compile a character bible describing principle physical
characteristics, personality traits and driving motives for several key
characters in an original or published game.
      2. Write several pieces of dialogue with instructions for vocal and
visual expressions for a single character in keeping with that
character’s profile.
      3. Write appropriate material for a dialogue engine.

IV. The Role of User-Interactivity in Games
   A. Describe the role of and expectations for the tools used to
experience digital narratives and games (interfaces, keyboards,
controllers, specialized equipment). 
   B. Identify types of user-challenges:
      1. Logical and inference challenges.
      2. Lateral-thinking challenges.
      3. Memory challenges.
      4. Intelligence and knowledge-based challenges.
      5. Pattern-recognition challenges.
      6. Spatial-relationship challenges.
      7. Coordination and reflex challenges.
      8. Moral and ethical challenges.
   C. Employ techniques for establishing and modifying pace.
      1. Balance explicit and implicit problem-solving.
      2. Discuss impact of challenge sequencing.
      3. Incorporate short- and long-term game objectives and goals.
   D. Analyze the role of gameplay in the interactive experience.
      1. Maintain a player’s log reflecting on game-playing
experiences.
      2. Create a representation (textual, visual, video-diary,
multi-media, etc.) describing the student’s individual definition of
“gameplay.”

V. The Role of Plot in Games
   A. Describe the role of structure in stories.
      1. Outline the traditional story structure.
      2. Identify interactive variations including hierarchical, open, and
common closed (string of pearls, multi-path, parallel tracts) structures.
   B. Describe the role of plot in games.
      1. Describe the purposes of narrative plots in games and explorable
worlds.
         a. Constructing “back stories” that act as catalysts for
action.
         b. Creating narratives that establish objectives throughout a
game.
      2. List and understand archetypal plots for stories.
      3. Describe plot types most appropriate for different kinds of
games/digital stories.
   C. Describe the role of challenges in games and stories.
      1. List complications that arise from characters and their natures.
      2. Describe complications that arise from setting.
      3. Discuss complications that arise from plot devices.
      4. Define complications that arise from the supernatural.
   D. Design plot structures for games.
      1. Map an overarching structure for a proposed game.
      2. List and describe several challenges players will encounter in a
proposed game.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Analyses and reviews of previously published materials: 20-30%
4-9 Projects: 50-60%
Final and in-class activities: 20% 
  Total: 100% 

FINAL GRADES
 A = 90% - 100%  
 B = 80% -  89% 
 C = 70% -  79%      
 D = 60% -  69% 
 F = under  60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 205

  • Title: Bible as Literature*
  • Number: ENGL 205
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course introduces students to the literary aspects of Bible. Students will read extracts from both the Hebrew and Greek portions of the Bible in translation. They will learn to analyze these readings as representatives of the Bible's many literary forms. Students will also sample from later literary works that draw on biblical sources for their inspiration. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the important literary forms used by both the Hebrew and Greek writers of the biblical texts.
  2. Describe the major events in the formation and translation of the contemporary English-language Bible.
  3. Discuss some of the important thematic and formal influences of the Bible on later literature.
  4. Analyze biblical writings as literary productions independent of a religious context.
  5. Write essays discussing texts in terms of historical context, structure, characterization or theme. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction

A. Identify and define the major divisions and genres comprising the contemporary Bible.

B. Identify the literary forms used within the biblical genres.

C. Explain the challenges of translation from Hebrew and Greek to English.

D. Describe the translation choices for an assigned passage using both a strictly literal translation and several different idiomatic translations.

E. Describe the major events in the formation of the contemporary biblical canon.

F. Describe the major events in the translation process from the original texts to the present English Bible.

II. The Hebrew Bible

A. Describe the chronology of the history described in the text.

B. Explain and discuss the importance of Torah in Jewish tradition from the earliest times to the present.

C. Discuss the scholarly editorial theories of the Hebrew Bible texts, including the Documentary Hypothesis.

D. Identify and discuss the major events of the Genesis accounts of creation.

E. Identify and discuss the stories of the Hebrew patriarchs.

F. Identify and discuss the major events in the Exodus narrative.

G. Define and discuss the nature of the prophetic tradition in Hebrew culture.

H. Discuss the role of David as a literary figure in the Hebrew tradition.

I. Define and give examples of typical Hebrew tropes such as parallelism and chiasmus.

III. The Greek New Testament

A. Identify the important differences between the four gospels, speculating on possible explanations for those differences.

B. Explain and discuss the scholarly editorial theories of the first five books of the New Testament.

C. Describe the traditional elements of first century letters.

D. Discuss the various cultures represented in the recipients of the New Testament epistles.

E. Practice rhetorical analysis.

F. Perform a rhetorical analysis on one of the shorter New Testament epistles.

G. Define apocalyptic literature and discuss the Revelation and Daniel in the light of that definition.

H. Discuss the use of Hebrew Bible texts in the New Testament.

IV. The Literary Legacy of the Bible

A. Define and describe the genres of mystery and morality plays.

B. Demonstrate an understanding of the hermeneutical tradition drawing from the rabbinical tradition and patristic writings.

C. Identify and evaluate the biblical analogies in selected writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Bunyan, Hawthorne, Melville, Morrison or Baraka.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-40%    2 examinations
30-40%    2 short papers
15-25%    1 longer paper
15-20%    In-class projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Required Textbooks: Various translations, including Hebrew Scriptures translated by Jewish scholars, the Kings James Version of the Christian Bible, and other modern translations of both the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 215

  • Title: U.S. Latino and Latina Literature*
  • Number: ENGL 215
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course introduces students to texts by U.S. writers of Hispanic descent or origin. Written primarily in English, the texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and/or film. The readings, discussions and related writing projects will emphasize the relationship between mainstream America and borderland writers; explore the cultural and artistic context of the writers and their works; recognize and assess the use of major narrative and rhetorical strategies; and stimulate consideration of issues surrounding assimilation, identity formation, code-switching and cultural hybridity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between major literary genres and appraise the rhetorical strategies of selected U.S. Latino/a writers.
  2. Identify linguistic code-switching and posit rationales for and implications of such practice.
  3. Compose an academic paper evaluating the manner in which at least one Latino/a writer confronts identity issues, including transnational identities, cultural hybridity, and cultural assimilation and resistance.
  4. Explain the literary catalysts for and products of major U.S. Latino/a groupings, including Nuyoricans, Tejanos and Chicanos.
  5. Identify the cultural, historical and artistic contexts of selected Latino/a writers.
  6. Discuss the Hispanic strand of U.S. literary history, beginning with Cabeza de Vaca, and the Hispanic literary heritage U.S. Latino/a writers share and from which they draw. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Hispanic History and Heritage of U.S. Latino/a Literature

A. Identify Spanish contact, conquest and colonization of the “New World,” and discuss residual effects.

1. Texts from 16th- to 18th-century writers such as Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega.

2. Texts from 19th-century writers such as María Amparo Ruiz de Burton and José Martí.

B. Identify related literary and art movements in Spain and Latin America (e.g., modernism, surrealism and magic realism).

C. Identify related political movements in Spain and Latin America (e.g., fascism, communism and socialism).

II. Major Literary Genres

A. Distinguish between major literary genres and recognize the conventions of each.

1. Non-fiction (e.g., historical/political/social texts, memoir, personal narrative).

2. Fiction (e.g., novels and short stories).

3. Poetry (e.g., free verse and fixed forms).

4. Drama (e.g., El Teatro Campesino, Luis Valdez, Miguel Piñero, contemporary Latino/a drama and film).

B. Describe criticism.

C. Identify generic hybrids and discuss unconventional writing.

III. Linguistic Code-Switching

A. Identify when Latino/a writers switch linguistic codes (e.g., English, Spanish and Spanglish).

B. Interpret instances of code-switching and speculate reasons for and implications of the practice.

IV. U.S. Latino/a Movements

A. Discuss the Nuyorican Movement.

B. Discuss Miguel Algarín and Nuyorican Poets Café, Spanish Harlem and the Lower East Side (NYC), and writers such as Miguel Piñero, Pedro Pietri, Tato Laviera.

C. Discuss the Chicano Movement.

D. Discuss César Chávez and Delores Huerta (grape boycotts), “La Raza” in California, Tejanos, Tex-Mex and the homeland myth of Aztlán.

V. Issues of Identity

A. Examine transnational identities.

1. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

2. Mexican-American “borderland” identity (Gloria Anzaldúa).

B. Explain the concept of cultural hybridity (breaking profiles)—e.g., hyphenated America, both but neither, Latinos with African roots, Latinos with Native American roots.

C. Analyze the practice of assimilation and resistance.

VI. Cultural, Historical and Artistic Contexts

A. Recognize significant historical contexts such as the Monroe Doctrine and Roosevelt Corollary, the revolt by and U.S. annexation of Texas, the U.S.-Mexican War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Spanish-American War (Puerto Rico, Cuba and Platt Amendment), immigration issues (legal and illegal), and the Civil Rights movements of the 1960s and '70s.

B. Identify significant cultural contexts such as Mexican and Mexican-American cultures, Puerto Rican culture, other Caribbean cultures (Cuban, Dominican), Central American cultures and South American cultures.

C. Identify significant artistic contexts such as 19th-century expectations, Modernism, Surrealism, Post-modernism and Latina Feminism.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    2 Formal Papers
10-30%    Portfolio or Final Exam
10-30%    Participation
5-20%      Journals
5-20%      Quizzes

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 217

  • Title: Literature by Women*
  • Number: ENGL 217
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

This survey course introduces students to a representative sample of texts created by women from the mid-seventeenth century to present. Using the lens of gender, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Further, students will identify significant literary devices and genres as employed by these authors. The course will emphasize the dynamic relationship between the literature and its contexts. 3 hr. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate among major literary genres.
  2. Identify and evaluate the rhetorical strategies and devices of women writers surveyed.
  3. Identify and analyze the lenses through which women authors confront identity issues.
  4. Describe the social construction of gender identity.
  5. Explain the evolution of feminist literary theory, including first-, second- and third-wave feminisms.
  6. Compare and contrast the social, historical, political and cultural contexts of women writers.
  7. Analyze the character of women’s identities, including those defined by race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and class.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Major Literary Genres

A. Distinguish among major literary genres and recognize the conventions of each.

1. Non-fiction (e.g., historical/political/social texts, memoir, criticism, personal narrative)

2. Fiction (e.g., novels and short stories)

3. Poetry (e.g., free verse and structured forms)

4. Drama (e.g., theater and television)

B. Recognize and analyze significant instances of figurative language such as metaphor, simile, imagery, symbolism, irony and analogy.

C. Explain the influence of the major literary genres in consideration of social, historical, political and cultural contexts.

II. Rhetorical Strategies and Devices

A. Identify and define rhetorical strategies and devices such as themes, imagery, characterization, plot development, narration, symbolism and Aristotelian appeals (i.e., ethos, logos, pathos).

B. Explain the importance of rhetorical strategies and devices as they apply to the literature.

C. Explain the impact of the social, historical, political and cultural contexts on the use of rhetorical strategies and devices.

III. Identity Issues

A. Identify and analyze multiple perspectives relating to the identity of women who are authors.

B. Identify and analyze multiple perspectives of characters in literature authored by women.

IV. Gender Identity and Literature

A. Examine the social construction of female identity found in literature, including Virgin/Whore dichotomy, Maid/Wife/Widow, Motherhood, Public/Private person and Concept of the Other.

B. Examine the social construction of gender as it is reflected in literature.

V. Feminist Literary Theory

A. Explain and apply the arguments of the first wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., 19th and early 20th century) to assigned literature.

B. Explain and apply the arguments of the second wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., mid- to late 20th century) to assigned literature.

C. Explain and apply the arguments of the third wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., late 20th century to present) to assigned literature.

VI. Social, Historical, Political and Cultural Contexts

A. Explain the importance and significance of contextualizing literature.

B. Analyze the significance of influential social, historical, political and cultural contexts/events which impacted the author and/or the reading and/or the reception of the literature. Contexts/Events may include Puritanism, Salem Witch Trials, Science and Rationalism, Urbanization, Education Reform, Slavery, Abolition, Women’s Rights, Industrialization, Civil Rights Movement, Modernism, Postmodernism and particular War Eras.

VII. Character of Women’s Identities

A. Analyze the social locations of women authors, particularly in consideration of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and class.

B. Analyze the social locations of literary characters of texts authored by women, particularly in consideration of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-60%    Formal Papers
20-60%    Portfolio or Exams
0-30%      Participation
0-20%      Daily Assignments (e.g., journals, quizzes, etc.)

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 217H

No information found.

ENGL 222

  • Title: Advanced Composition*
  • Number: ENGL 222
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

This course offers challenging insights into the act of writing. We will move beyond Composition I and Composition II, focusing on writing persuasively to a select audience; working together to anticipate and defuse objections; supply convincing evidence; synthesize the ideas of others to support our ends; look critically at all sources; and perfect a mature, polished style that is suitable to audience and occasion. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze and persuade a select audience.
  2. Locate and control source material with precision.
  3. Use and adapt a personal voice.
  4. Think critically, using logic to promote a desired end.
  5. Work collaboratively with fluency.
  6. Write with an effective, flexible style. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Analyze and Persuade a Select Audience
   A. Explore methods for profiling audiences.
   B. Practice appealing to primary, secondary, and peripheral audiences.
   C. Examine and manipulate evidence for a specific audience.
   D. Construct a persuasive persona based on the needs of a specific
audience.
   E. Manipulate emotional appeals for a target audience.

II. Locate and Control Source Material with Precision
   A. Explore all the resources of a traditional library.
   B. Work with the Internet, refining searches, selecting sources with
discretion and learning how to refute arguments based on questionable
sources.
   C. Use interviews as a regular part of source-supported arguments.

III. Use and Adapt a Personal Voice
   A. Recognize voice in writing.
   B. Practice controlling voice within the demands of a rhetorical
context.
   C. Use flaws in voice of opposing arguments as grounds for refutation.

IV. Think Critically, Using Logic to Promote a Desired End
   A. Identify major logical fallacies.
   B. Refute an argument that uses logical fallacies.
   C. Manipulate logical fallacies to support an argument.
   D. Detect assumptions and biases in opposing arguments and use for
refutation.
   E. Detect assumptions and biases in students' own arguments and use to
advance their arguments.

V. Work Collaboratively with Fluency
   A. Analyze peer drafts and professional models for elements of
effective composition.
   B. Analyze peer drafts and professional models for elements of
effective rhetoric.
   C. Give substantive and specific suggestions for revising drafts.
   D. Discriminate among peer feedback suggestions: weak, lateral, and
strong.

VI. Write with an Effective, Flexible Style
   A. Master a basic "writer's grammar."
   B. Select diction appropriate in connotation, denotation, and tone for
the rhetorical circumstances.
   C. Manipulate sentences at the phrase and clause level to achieve
variety, clarity, and emphasis.
   D. Identify, evaluate, and manipulate the three classical categories of
style.
   E. Practice deliberate style shifts within a larger communication to
achieve a rhetorical effect.
   F. Recognize and manipulate stylistic elements of several discourse
communities, both in and out of the academy.
   G. Work with the classical tropes and schemes.
   H. Write with concision (unless rhetorical situation requires
otherwise).

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Assignments:

1. Diagnostic - In class (300-400 words)     Ungraded
2. Position (750-1000 words)                 100 points
3. Proposal (750-1000 words)                 100 points
4. Evaluation (750-1000 words)               100 points
5. Major Documented Argument (1200-1500)     150 points
6. Minor Documented Argument (750-1000)      100 points
7. Final (500-750 words)                     100 points  
                                    subtotal             650 points

Additional Work:

1. 12 rough drafts                      @ 5 = 60 points
2. 20 (approx.) homework assignment     @ 3 = 60 points
3. 4 journal grades                     @15 = 60 points
4. 10 in-class writing projects         @ 3 = 30 points
5. 47 class-participation opportunities @ 3 =141 points
                                    subtotal             351 points
                                    Total possible      1001 points

Grading Scale:
   1001-900 points = A     
    899-800 points = B
    799-700 points = C
    699-600 points = D
      < 599 points = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Please note that much of the grade in this course is based on work peripheral (but integral) to the major writing assignments.
  2. You must attend class conscientiously and do your classwork diligently to earn a superior grade. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 223

  • Title: Creative Writing*
  • Number: ENGL 223
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

Students will study and practice writing in two or three of the major literary modes of writing: poetry, fiction, and possibly drama. The reading assignments are based on the premise that, to be a good writer, students must have knowledge of literary techniques and be perceptive readers and critics. Students will examine techniques of two or possibly three of the literary genres and then apply their knowledge to write in each genre. In addition, they will read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the major elements of poetry, fiction, and drama.
  2. Identify the major elements in published works of literature.
  3. Apply these elements in their own writing.
  4. Critique other students' writing with respect to the major elements used.
  5. Practice confidently and independently the process of writing creatively from the inception of an idea through the final polishing stage. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Generating Ideas for Poetry
   A. Compose Writer's Journal Entries on a Regular Basis
      1. Respond to sight and sound (the world at large).
      2. React to friends and family.
      3. Probe inner feelings.
      4. Explore moments of growth and discovery.
      5. Think figuratively.
   B. Read published poems.
      1. Read published poems for inspiration to write about similar
issues and topics.
      2. Use published poems as models to imitate.

II. Major Elements of Poetry
   A. Sound
      1. Identify and define the four major sound devices, including
alliteration, consonance, assonance, and onomatopoeia.
      2. Analyze published poems for their use of sound devices.
      3. Compose an original poem that employs at least one sound device.
   B. Rhyme
      1. Identify and define the major types of rhyme, including rhyme
scheme, true rhyme, slant rhyme, and enjambment.
      2. Analyze published poems for their use of rhyme.
      3. Compose an original poem that employs a rhyme scheme.
   C. Meter
      1. Identify and define the major metrical feet, including the iamb,
trochee, anapest, dactyl, spondee, and pyrrhic.
      2. Identify and define the number of metrical feet per line,
including diameter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentamenter, hexamenter,
heptameter, and octometer.
      3. Analyze published poems for their use of meter.
      4. Compose an original poem that employs a meter.
   D. Imagery
      1. Identify and define image and image cluster.
      2. Identify and define the simile, metaphor, and personification as
used to create imagery.
      3. Distinguish between the public symbol and the private symbol, and
explain their use in creating imagery.
      4. Analyze published poems for their use of imagery.
      5. Compose original poems that employ imagery.
   E. Persona
      1. Identify and define persona, tone, and irony.
      2. Analyze published poems for their use of persona, tone, and
irony.
      3. Compose original poems that adopt a specific persona and tone.
   F. Theme
      1. Identify and define theme as it relates to poetry.
      2. Analyze published poems for their use of theme. 
      3. Compose original poems that reflect a theme.
   G. Elements to avoid in poetry
      1. Identify and define cliche, mixed metaphor, archaic diction, and
hackneyed language and imagery.
      2. Compose original poems that avoid these elements.
   H. Fixed form poetry
      1. List and describe the five most popular fixed forms of poetry,
including the Elizabethan sonnet, Italian sonnet, haiku, villanelle, and
ballad. 
      2. Analyze a published poem for each of the fixed forms, identifying
its rhyme scheme, meter, and stanza structure.
      3. Identify the topics, themes, and treatments common to each type
of fixed form.
      4. Compose an original poem that follows the form of any of the most
common fixed types, and uses appropriate poetic techniques as described in
the Major Elements of Poetry.
   I. Free verse poetry
      1. List and describe the five most popular techniques of free verse
poetry, including typography, anaphora, syntactical rhythms, line length,
and syntax.
      2. Analyze a published poem for each of the free verse techniques,
identifying its function.
      3. Compose original poems that employ at least one free verse
technique, and use other appropriate poetic techniques as described in the
Major Elements of Poetry.

III. Peer Evaluation
   A. Students will exchange copies of a poem with all members of the
class and then evaluate them, both in writing and orally in class, with
the instructor serving as the facilitator. Students will then have the
opportunity to revise this poem.

IV. Generating Ideas for Fiction
   A. Compose writer's journal entries on a regular basis
      1. Rely on personal experience.
      2. Explore relationships.
      3. Explore moments of growth and discovery.
      4. Transform real events into fiction.
   B. Read published stories
      1. Read published stories for inspiration to write about similar
issues and topics.
      2. Use published stories as models to imitate.

V. Major Elements of Fiction
   A. Narrative structure
      1. Identify and define the elements that structure a narrative,
including plot, conflict, complication, climax, resolution, rising and
falling action, scene, flashback, pace, and epiphany.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of elements that
structure a narrative.
   B. Character
      1. Identify and define the six major types of characters, including
protagonist, antagonist, flat, round, static, and dynamic.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of the different types of
characters.
   C. Setting
      1. Identify and define setting as it is used to create the time and
the place of a story.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of setting.
   D. Theme
      1.  Identify and define theme as it is incorporated into a story.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of theme.
   E. Narrative modes
      1. Identify and define the five narrative modes, including dialogue,
thought, action, description, and exposition.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of narrative modes.
   F. Narrative personae
      1. Identify and define the six major types of narrators, including
first person, third person, objective, limited omniscient, reliable, and
unreliable.
      2. Identify and define the four major types of narrative distance,
including temporal, emotional, intellectual, and moral.
      3. Identify and define point of view.
      4. Analyze published stories for their use of narrators and point of
view.
   G. Style
      1. Identify and define the five major elements of style, including
diction, syntax, density, the balance of narrative modes, and tense.
      2. Analyze published stories for their use of the elements of
style.

VI. Application: Writing an Original Story
   A. Write a premise and character sketch identifying and describing the
nature of the conflict, the protagonist, the antagonist, the setting, the
time frame, and the type of narrator.
   B. Based upon the premise and character sketch, compose an original
story that incorporates all appropriate Major Elements of Fiction.

VII. Peer Evaluation
   A. Students will exchange copies of their story with all members of the
class and then evaluate them, both in writing and orally in class, with the
instructor serving as the facilitator. Students will then have the
opportunity to revise their story.

VIII. Sources for Drama
   A. Compose writer's journal entries on a regular basis
      1. Rely on personal experience.
      2. Explore media stories and accounts of individuals.
      3. Brainstorm a list of dramatic concepts.
      4. Write sample dialogue, developing a conversation between two
characters.
   B. Read and attend plays
      1. Use plays for inspiration to write about similar topics and
issues.
      2. Use plays as models to imitate.

IX. Major Elements of Drama
   A. Unique aspects of drama
      1. Identify and define the unique aspects of drama, including
dramatic impact, visual appeal, auditory appeal, physical production,
continuous action, and spectator art.
      2. Analyze published plays for their use of the unique aspects of
drama.
   B. Dramatic plot
      1. Identify and define the five elements of a dramatic plot,
including concept, scene, dramatic questions, pace and subplot.
      2. Analyze published plays for their use of dramatic plot.
   C. Types of conflict
      1. Identify and define the four major types of conflict, including
person against person, triangular conflicts, the individual against
society and inner conflict.
   D. Character
      1. Identify and define the three major methods of presenting
characters, including vividness, depth, and a strong first impression.
      2. Analyze published plays for their use of character presentation.
   E. Theme
      1. Identify and define theme as it functions in drama.
      2. Analyze published plays for their development of theme.
   F. Visual impact
      1. Identify and describe the function of sets, lighting, a bare
stage, and costumes.
      2. Identify the major elements of drama as used in the six major
types of drama.

X. Types of Drama
   A. Identify and define six major types of drama, including comedy,
tragedy, farce, thesis play, expressionism, theater of the absurd.
   B. Identify the major elements of drama as used in the six major types
of drama.
   C. Read published plays of at least three types.

XI. Application
   A. Compose an original one-act play that is one of the six major types
and incorporates all appropriate elements of drama.

XII. Marketing Manuscripts
   A. Markets
      1. Identify appropriate magazines and journals to submit work to.
   B. Submission
      1. Identify the guidelines for submitting a manuscript.

NOTE: SOME INSTRUCTORS EXPAND THE WORKSHOP ELEMENTS OF WRITING POEMS AND
STORIES AND ELIMINATE THE DRAMA UNIT.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A. Major Writing Assignments
   1. Original poetry collection
   2. Premise and character sketch
   3. Original story
   4. Original one-act play

B. Minor Writing Assignments
   1. Short essays, writing exercises and quizzes.

C. Peer Evaluation
   1. Students evaluate one poem and a story.

D. Percentage of Assignments
   1. Original poetry collection    20%
   2. Premise and character sketch   5%
   3. Original story                15%
   4. Original one-act play         20%
   5. Minor writing assignments     20%
   6. Peer evaluation               20%

E. Grading Scale
   A + = 100
   A - =  95
   A   =  90
   B+  =  88
   B   =  85
   B-  =  80
   C+  =  78
   C   =  75
   C-  =  70
   D+  =  68
   D   =  65
   D-  =  60
   F   =  50

F. Grading Rationale
   The determination of the final grade in this course is necessarily less
objective than in most courses, given the nature of the subject. Generally
speaking, if students attend class consistently, satisfactorily complete
the requirements of the course, turn in their work on time, and show an
understanding of literary techniques in their work, discussion, and peer
evaluation, they will do well. Poor editing and mechanics will seriously
affect students' grade, as will turning assignments in late, being absent
during peer evaluation workshops, or not following the instructions for an
assignment.

   Plagiarized work will receive a zero.

NOTE: METHODS OF EVALUATION MAY VARY, DEPENDING ON THE INSTRUCTOR.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 223H

No information found.

ENGL 224

  • Title: Creative Writing Workshop*
  • Number: ENGL 224
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 223.

Description:

In this class, students will build upon the knowledge and skills learned in ENGL 223. In addition to studying writing techniques, they will produce a body of written work in one or more literary genres of their choice: poetry, fiction, and/or drama. They will also read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use workshopping methods to provide other writers with feedback on their writing.
  2. Produce readable poetry on a regular basis.
  3. Produce readable fiction on a regular basis.
  4. Produce readable drama on a regular basis. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Course Overview
   A. Explore motivations for writing.
   B. Explore the traits of published authors.
   C. Practice the workshop method.

II. Explore the Methods of Writing Fiction
   A. Structure narratives using plot.
   B. Select and maintain suitable points of view in short stories and
novels.
   C. Open short stories and novels effectively.
   D. Develop fictional characters through assorted methods.
   E. Create believable and effective dialogue.
   F. Use good style.
   G. Create convincing settings for fiction.
   H. Construct stories and novels using scene, summary, and transitions.
   I. Move smoothly back and forth in time in fiction.
   J. Present theme in fiction in various ways.
   K. Choose effective titles for stories and novels.

III. Explore the Methods of Writing Poetry
   A. Identify and incorporate into poems the major elements of poetry,
including line length, sound, rhythm, image, diction, and density.
   B. Write free-verse poems.
   C. Write fixed-form poems.

IV. Explore the Methods of Writing Drama
   A. Identify and incorporate into short plays the major elements of
drama, including conflict, character, scene, pace, dialogue, and visual
impact.
   B. Write short plays.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Written work         75% of the grade
Class participation  25% of the grade

Over the course of the semester, students will develop approximately three
major writing projects for a total of 15,000-20,000 words (or an
equal-value number of lines of poetry), including rough drafts and
revisions. In addition, students are expected to participate in class
discussions, classroom activities designed to practice the methods under
study, and workshops.

Grading criteria:
   A = 90 - 100% of the total possible points
   B = 80 -  89%
   C = 70 -  79%
   D = 60 -  69%
   F =  0 -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 224H

No information found.

ENGL 227

  • Title: Introduction to Poetry*
  • Number: ENGL 227
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course emphasizes close reading and analysis of poetry by writers from different time periods, countries and ethnic backgrounds. Students will study terms, patterns and forms that are useful for an understanding and appreciation of poetic verse. The course will cover major literary, historical and cultural movements as they relate to poetry. Students will be introduced to major classical and contemporary American and English poets, along with contemporary foreign-language poetry in translation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss poetry as a major literary genre.
  2. Identify and describe major patterns and forms related to poetry.
  3. Define appropriate literary and poetic terminology.
  4. Examine major literary and historical movements as they relate to British and American poetry.
  5. Interpret, analyze and evaluate poems to demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of poetry as a literary genre.
  6. Identify, discuss and assess major contemporary world poets to broaden an understanding of the relationship between literature and the culture, politics and geography of specific countries. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Poetry as a Major Literary Genre

A. Distinguish poetry from other major literary genres.

B. Compare and contrast literary verse with musical lyrics.

II. Major Patterns and Forms Related to Poetry

A. Identify and explain the importance of a poem’s sound as it pertains to the meaning and value of poetry by defining and applying the following terms: rhyme, rhythm, meter, assonance, alliteration, consonance, euphony, cacophony and onomatopoeia.

B. Identify and explain the importance of various major poetic verse forms such as open form, closed form, blank verse, stanza, couplet, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, ballad, elegy, ode, pastoral, epic, haiku, limerick and concrete poetry.

III. Literary Terminology

A. Define and apply terms related to meter such as sprung rhythm, caesura, end-stopped, enjambment, prosody and scansion.

B. Define and apply terms related to rhyme such as exact rhyme, slant rhyme, near rhyme, off rhyme, imperfect rhyme, eye rhyme, end rhyme, internal rhyme, masculine rhyme and feminine rhyme.

C. Define and apply terms related to words such as denotation, connotation, concrete, abstract, allusion, colloquial, general English, formal English and dialect.

D. Define and apply terms related to voice such as tone, persona, dramatic monologue, sarcasm, satire and irony.

E. Define and apply terms related to figures of speech such as symbol, metaphor, simile, pun, personification, apostrophe, hyperbole, metonymy, synecdoche and paradox.

IV. Major Literary and Historical Movements of British and American Poetry

A. Describe the following major literary movements as they pertain to poetry. Examples:

1. Metaphysical movement

2. Romanticism

3. Harlem Renaissance

4. Modernism

5. Contemporary poetry

B. Describe major poetic theories and the uses of poetic theory:

1. Mimetic theories

2. Pragmatic theories

3. Expressive theories

4. Objective theories

C. Analyze the significance of major historical and cultural events as they pertain to specific poems.

V. Understanding and Appreciating Poetry as a Literary Genre

A. Explain the importance of sound and form as they relate to the poem’s message and poem’s affect on readers.

B. Explain the meaning of poems through close reading and the application of relevant literary terminology.

C. Critically evaluate poems by applying information regarding sound, form and word choice as appropriate criteria.

VI. The Role of Contemporary World Poetry

A. Explain the relevance of a region’s culture, politics and geography upon specific poems.

B. Explain the relationship between a country’s poetry and history.

C. Assess the role of specific poets and poems in culture and society.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

20-60%    A minimum of 2 formal essays or formal essay exams
0-40%      Exams and quizzes
5-40%      Journals or electronic discussions
5-20%      One group project or individual class presentation
0-30%      Participation or in-class activities

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 230

  • Title: Introduction to Fiction*
  • Number: ENGL 230
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

This course features significant opportunities to write about the literature and the reader's response to it. Students will learn the historical fictional precedents of the short story; the similarities and differences between the short story and other narrative forms, such as the novel; the differences between the short story and its historical precedents, between short stories and film adaptations of them, and between commercial and literary short stories. Students will discover the place of short stories in major literary movements, the key elements of short stories and interpretive approaches to short stories. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Both orally and in writing, define and interpret short fiction.
  2. Differentiate the short story from other narrative forms.
  3. Define at least four major historical precedents of the short story and compare each to the short story.
  4. Define, differentiate, and apply major literary movements to short stories.
  5. Compare and contrast key differences between commercial and literary short fiction.
  6. Contrast the significant differences among the major genres of short fiction, using appropriate short stories to illustrate their attributes.
  7. List and describe the key elements of short stories, including character, conflict, language and style, plot, point of view, setting, voice and tone, and theme.
  8. Use appropriate short stories to illustrate the above key elements.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Interpretation of Short Fiction, Orally and in Writing
   A. Major interpretive approaches
      1. Describe and differentiate the major approaches to
interpretation:
         a. Historical-cultural
         b. Reader response
         c. Textual-linguistic
      2. Write one or more interpretive papers using the reader response
approach. 
      3. Write an interpretive paper using either the historical-cultural
or textual-linguistic approach. 
      4. Deliver an oral presentation using either the reader response
interpretive approach to a story, the historical-cultural approach, or the
textual-linguistic approach.
      5. Describe and differentiate at least four minor approaches to
interpretation, including:
         a. Biographical
         b. Feminist 
         c. Moral-philosophical
         d. Mythical-archetypal
         e. Psychological, such as family systems and Freudian 
         f. Socio-economic/political, such as Marxist
      6. Write an interpretive paper, using any one of the minor
approaches to interpretation.

II. Narrative Forms Related to Short Fiction
   A. List and describe at least three narrative forms related to short
fiction, including:
      1. Autobiography
      2. Memoir 
      3. Novel
      4. Novella
      5. Vignette
   B. Compare and contrast the preceding narrative forms to short
stories.

III. Historical Story-Telling Precedents of  Short Fiction
   A. List and describe the 14 story-telling precedents of short fiction:
      1. Allegory 
      2. Anecdote
      3. The Canterbury Tales and Decameron
      4. Epic
      5. Fable
      6. Fairy tale
      7. Folk tale
      8. Joke
      9. Legend
      10. Medieval romance
      11. Myth  
      12. Parable
      13. Religious tale
      14. Tall tale
   B. Identify evidence of such precedents in short stories.

IV. Major Literary Movements
   A. List and describe the following major literary movements:
      1. Impressionism
      2. Minimalism
      3. Naturalism
      4. Realism 
      5. Romanticism
      6. Surrealism
   B. Trace the development of those movements.
   C. Identify patterns of such literary movements in short stories.

V. Compare and Contrast the Key Differences Between Commercial Short
Fiction and Literary Short Fiction

VI. Major Genres of Short Fiction
   A. Describe, compare, and contrast at least five of the major genres of
fiction.
      1. Bildungsroman
      2. Crime/ detective story
      3. Episodic
      4. Ghost story/ occult story 
      5. Historical story
      6. Love story
      7. Picaresque story  
      8. Science fiction story 
      9. Self-discovery/coming-of-age story 
      10. Stream of consciousness story
      11. Utopian story
      12. Western story
   B. Identify the aspects of above fictional genres in short stories.

VII. List and Describe the Key Elements of Short Fiction, Including:
   A. Character
      1. Antagonist and protagonist
      2. Flat and round
      3. Developing and static
      4. Confidante
      5. Foil
      6. Parody
      7. Stereotype, stock character, and caricature
   B. Conflict
      1. Interpersonal
      2. Intrapersonal
   C. Language and style
      1. Allusion: internal and external
      2. Concreteness and abstraction
      3. Dialogue
      4. Denotation and connotation
      5. Dialect and idiom
      6. Figurative language, including analogy, metaphor, and simile
      7. Literal and contextual
      8. Repetition
      9. Rhythm
      10. Sensory detail
      11. Showing and telling
      12. Symbolism and allegory
   D. Plot
      1. Ambiguity
      2. Chronology, flashback, and in media res
      3. Coincidence
      4. Communication and failure of communication
      5. Comparison and contrast
      6. Complication
      7. Conclusion
      8. Crisis/dilemma
      9. Cultural adjustment
      10. Endings: plausible/ surprise/ walk away and implausible/ trick
      11. Epiphany
      12. Exposition and dramatization
      13. Fantasy
      14. Foreshadowing
      15. Irony: verbal, dramatic, and situational
      16. Leads: false leads, true leads, suspense
      17. Nature and its relationship to humans
      18. Peripety
      19. Plotlessness: mood piece
      20. Resolution
      21. Revelation: illumination of earlier detail
      22. Rising action and falling action
      23. Rite of passage
   E.  Point of view
      1. Authorial editorializing vs. objectivity
      2. Narrative angles such as third person-omniscient, third
person-main character, third person-minor character, first person-main
character, first person-minor character
   F. Setting
      1. As catalyst
      2. As character
      3. As stage
      4. As symbol/microcosm
   G. Voice and tone
      1. Admiration
      2. Belief
      3. Disbelief
      4. Prophecy
      5. Satire
      6. Skepticism
      7. Sympathy
   H. Theme
      1. Aging and mortality
      2. Acceptance and denial
      3. Alienation and connection
      4. Authority
      5. Change and stasis: individual and generational
      6. Closeness and distance
      7. Connection and distance
      8. Community and isolation
      9. Economic class
      10. Expectation and reality
      11. Family relationships, including parent-child relationships
      12. Friendship
      13. Generational continuity and difference
      14. Growth and stagnation
      15. Implicit and explicit
      16. Innocence and experience
      17. Love and hate
      18. Men and women; men and men; women and women relationships
      19. Mortality
      20. Political
      21. Race and ethnicity
      22. Reality and appearance
      23. Self-discovery, including coming of age, initiation, and
self-deception
      24. Society and the individual, including political issues
      25. Supernatural
      26. Universal and transient/localized
      27. Violence and peace

VIII. Identify, Illustrate, and Explain, Both Orally and in Writing, the
Above Elements in Short Fiction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A. Activities:
   1. Frequent tests on individual readings-at least five times during the
semester (between 10%-20% of grade).
   2. Cumulative midterm and end-of-term examinations, a major part of
which will be writing of the types described in Section I above (between
30%-40% of grade).
   3. Two major homework writings of the types described in Section I
above (between 30%-40% of grade).
   4. Oral presentation (between 10-15% of grade).
   5. In-class participation: statements and responses to questions that
illustrate mastery of the competencies I-VIII described above (between
10-20% of grade).

B. Grading: All grading is on a point basis. The final grade in the course
is based on the percentage of final actual points divided by final possible
points.

Grading Scale:
   A =  90%-100%
   B =  80%- 89%
   C =  70%- 79%
   D =  60%- 69%
   F = Below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 230H

No information found.

ENGL 232

  • Title: Children's Literature*
  • Number: ENGL 232
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

Children's Literature is meant for all students interested in bringing children and books together but is especially suited for those who are students with English or education majors; teachers already in the elementary school classroom; parents; those working with children in preschools, day-care centers and libraries; and grandparents and prospective parents. The course would also benefit those exploring the field of writing and illustrating for children. Students will identify children's needs and interests, list the criteria for choosing books for children, and demonstrate the means by which we can bring children and books together. Students will read, examine and critique a variety of children's literature selected by author, genre and historical time period. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify children's needs and interests in respect to literature.
  2. Relate the history of children's literature to its present form.
  3. Identify the different types of children's literature, including Mother Goose books, picture books, alphabet, counting and concept books, folktales, fables, myths, epics, modern fantasy, animal stories, realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography, and informational books.
  4. List and use criteria for judging the various types of children's books.
  5. Recognize significant authors/illustrators and their works and identify factors which make them significant.
  6. Identify and demonstrate the techniques for bringing children and books together.
  7. Design and construct a simple children's book.
  8. Identify issues of realism, social trends, and censorship in children's literature and evaluate sample books for use by children based on impact of these issues. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Children and Books Today
   A. Social influences
      1. Recognize social impact on children's literature.
      2. Identify current trends and barriers in children's literature.
      3. Identify goals for adults in encouraging reading.
   B. Child development
      1. Outline hierarchy of children's needs.
      2. Paraphrase theories of child development.

II. Guiding Children's Book Selection
   A. Literary qualities
      1. Define setting, point/s of view, characterization, plot, theme,
and style as they apply to children's literature.
      2. Identify these qualities within selected works.
   B. Authors and illustrators
      1. Apply library research skills to selected children's
authors/illustrators.
      2. Identify resources in our library which include children's
authors/illustrators.
      3. Report to the class on a famous children's author or
illustrator.
   C. Libraries
      1. Examine the layout and selection of a local children's library.
      2. Critique the library in terms of accessibility and acquisitions.

III. History of Children's Books
   A. History of books and printing
      1. Relate history of printing and books to modern children's
literature.
      2. Recognize earliest forms of children's books
      3. Design, write, illustrate and construct a children's book.
   B. Early children's literature
      1. Explain the theories of didacticism which guided early children's
literature.
      2. Identify milestones in the development of children's literature.
      3. Read, summarize and evaluate selected works.

IV. Artists and Children's Books
   A. Criteria for judging illustrations
      1. Examine and analyze use of color, line, shape, texture,
arrangement, typesetting.
      2. Identify artistic mediums such as oil/acrylics, pen and ink,
watercolor, and collage.
   B. Application
      1. Select, examine and evaluate works by various illustrators.
      2. Identify significant illustrators of children's literature.
   C. Caldecott Award
      1. List requirements for this award.
      2. Recreate the selection process.

V. Types of Children's Literature
   A. Types of genre
      1. Define the types of children's literature
         a. Books for the very young (Mother Goose, picture story,
alphabet, counting, concept, wordless, beginning readers, toy books)
         b. Folktales, fables, myths, and epics
         c. Modern fantasy and science fiction
         d. Poetry
         e. Modern fiction
         f. Historical fiction
         g. Biography
         h. Informational books
      2. List criteria for judging each of the types of children's
literature.
   B. Application
      1. Select, read, summarize, and evaluate works within each type.
      2. Identify significant authors within each type.
   C. Awards
      1. Identify major children's book awards including: 
         a. Newbery
         b. William Allen White
         c. Scott O'Dell
         d. Laura Ingalls Wilder
         e. Coretta Scott King
      2. List requirements for each award.

VI. Introducing Children to Literature and Encouraging Response
   A. Techniques
      1. Define and describe techniques for involving children with
literature, including:
         a. Storytelling
         b. Reading aloud
         c. Discussion groups
         d. Oral interpretation
         e. Theater/dramatics
         f. Readers' Theater
         g. Written response
   B. Application
      1. Demonstrate one of the above techniques in the classroom.
      2. Demonstrate one of the above techniques with children.

VII. Censorship
   A. Censored or challenged books
      1. Explain reasons some books are censored or challenged.
      2. Assess impact of censorship on children's literature and
children.
      3. List some commonly censored or challenged books and discuss their
content.
   B. Application
      1. Select, read, summarize and evaluate selected censored or
challenged books.
      2. Predict potential censorship problems within children's books.
      3. Prepare policy guidelines for censorship.
      4. Gather resources for consultation in case of challenge.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25%   Reading and evaluation: Students will read samples of each genre
and evaluate each selection. These critiques should be saved as a future
selection guide.
15%   Presentations: Students will prepare a report on a famous children's
author/illustrator; present a children's story to the class and/or a group
of children; and critique a library and/or bookstore.
25%   Quizzes and tests.
20%   Participation and in-class activities.
15%   Book production: Students will design, write, illustrate, and
construct a children's book.

All work is graded on a point system and computed into percentages. The
final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned at
semester's end.

   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
   <   60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students need transportation to a local children's library.
  2. Correct use of the English language is required on all papers. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 232H

No information found.

ENGL 235

  • Title: Drama as Literature*
  • Number: ENGL 235
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

This course introduces students to the analysis of plays as literature. Beginning with the Greek dramatists and ending with the contemporary scene, students will read full-length plays and the comments of playwrights, directors, actors and critics. They will analyze drama from psychological, historical, philosophical, structural and dramatic perspectives. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Identify important periods in dramatic history, including an understanding of the major writers, works, and dramatic methods of those periods.
  2. Describe the techniques that make drama a unique literature experience.
  3. Discuss the enduring themes found in dramatic literature from Classical times to the present.
  4. Appreciate drama as a literary art form by reading and evaluating plays.
  5. Write essays discussing plays in terms of historical context, structure, characterization, or theme. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction
   A. Identify and define the elements of drama:  plot, characterization,
setting, dialogue, music, movement, and theme.
   B. Apply the elements of drama to a one-act play, "Lady Gregory's 
Rising of the Moon".
   C. Identify and cite examples of the traditional genres of drama: 
tragedy, comedy, and tragicomedy.

II. Greek and Roman Drama
   A. Name and define the parts of the Greek and Roman theaters.
   B. Name and define the distinctive elements of Greek and Roman tragedy
and comedy.
   C. Define Old, Middle, and New Comedy, giving examples of each.
   D. Name the key figures in the development of Greek and Roman drama,
describing the contributions and major works of each.
   E. Explain Aristotle's theories of tragedy.
   F. Evaluate Antigone and Oedipus Rex as tragedies based on Aristotle's
criteria.
   G. Apply the criteria of Old Comedy to Lysistrata.
   H  Discuss the treatment of women in Lysistrata and Antigone.

III. Medieval Drama
   A. Describe the nature and elements of medieval drama.
   B. Define miracle and morality plays and identify examples of each.
   C. Compare the worldview of Everyman with that of Antigone.

IV. Renaissance Drama
   A. Identify the contributions of Italian drama to the English stage.
   B. Describe the physical and economic nature of theater during the
Renaissance.
   C. Name the major Elizabethan playwrights and identify the
contributions of each.
   D. Explain the role of meter, verse, rhyme, and other poetic elements
in Elizabethan drama.
   E. Evaluate Hamlet according to Aristotle's standards for tragedies.
   F. Discuss and evaluate critical interpretations of Hamlet from Dryden
to the present day.
   G. Compare and evaluate several screen and stage adaptations of
Hamlet.
   H. Evaluate A Midsummer Night's Dream according to the Greek comedy
genres.
   I. Discuss the treatment of women in Shakespeare's plays.
   J. Identify non-English dramatists working during this period.

V. Restoration Drama
   A. Identify the major distinctions of the Restoration stage.
   B. Identify and explain the contributions of the major Restoration
playwrights.
   C. Evaluate Congreve's The Way of the World as a latter-day New
Comedy.

VI. Victorian/Early Twentieth-Century Drama
   A. Identify the physical and economic nature of the theater during the
period 1850-1914.
   B. Name the major playwrights of the period and identify the
contributions of each.
   C. Evaluate Hedda Gabler as an Aristotelian tragedy.
   D. Discuss the role of women in Hedda Gabler.
   E. Explore the role of Freud and the rise of psychology in the drama of
Ibsen, Chekhov, and Shaw.

VII. Twentieth-Century Drama and Beyond
   A. Identify and describe the major movements in drama during the
twentieth century.
   B. Discuss the effect of changing theatrical spaces and technological
developments on the presentation of old texts and the creation of new
ones.
   C. Discuss the move away from strict realism in The Glass Menagerie,
The Piano Lesson, and other plays.
   D. Analyze the thematic threads in The Piano Lesson.
   E. Describe the presence and function of symbolic elements in The Glass
Menagerie and The Piano Lesson.
   F. Identify some of the non-Western cultures that have contributed
significantly to the broadening of drama in the twentieth century.
   G. Discuss the important themes in drama in the contemporary theater.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   2 examinations:      30% of grade
   2 short papers:      30% of grade
   1 longer paper:      20% of grade
   In-class projects:   20% of grade
                       100% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 236

  • Title: British Literature I*
  • Number: ENGL 236
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

In this survey course, the student will study British literature written up to 1800, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon to the Augustan eras, including works by major authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. Such non-British literary works may be from Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe numerous works of British literature written prior to 1800.
  2. Identify important themes reflected in selected works of British literature that speak to British values, ideals and culture.
  3. Sketch the historical setting for selected works of British literature.
  4. Outline the history of the English language from the earliest times to modern English.
  5. Define several literary genres and literary devices employed by British writers.
  6. Speculate on the influence of the lives of selected British writers on their literary works.
  7. Evaluate the artistic and aesthetic achievement of individual works of British literature.
  8. Discuss the development of the British Empire through 1800.
  9. Compare British literature to several literary works from one other culture which was at one time controlled by the British Empire. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Anglo-Saxon Era

A. Outline the development of the Old English language.

B. Define the Oral Tradition and the Epic.

C. Discuss major literary works from the Anglo-Saxon era, such as Beowulf.

D. List the characteristics of oral-formulaic language.

II. Middle English Literature

A. Outline the development of Middle English.

B. Define the genres of the narrative, tale, legend, lyric, proverb, myth and other story elements.

C. Discuss the major works of medieval British literature, such as works by Chaucer, Mallory, the Robin Hood legend and the Pearl Poet.

D. Recount the history and purpose of The Crusades.

III. The 16th Century.

A. Outline the development of Renaissance English.

B. Recount the invention of the printing press.

C. Describe the production of the first English translations of the Bible.

D. Define the sonnet and recount its development in British literary history.

E. List poetic techniques and forms used in Renaissance poetry.

F. Discuss major literary works from the Renaissance, such as those by Spenser, Moore, Elizabeth I and Christopher Marlowe.

IV. Shakespeare

A. Recount important biographical details from Shakespeare’s life.

B. Define the patterns of tragedy and comedy he employs in his plays.

C. Describe the cultural milieu in which Shakespeare’s plays were performed.

D. Discuss several of Shakespeare’s major works, such as Hamlet, King Lear, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Part I, A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream or The Tempest.

E. Describe the British explorations of the New World.

V. The 17th Century

A. Recount the political and religious turmoil of this century, including the great plague and the great fire of London.

B. Identify significant biographical details in the lives of major writers from the 17th century.

C. Discuss the works of writers and poets, such as Lanyer, Herrick, Marvell, Milton and Bunyan.

D. Define the epic and apply this definition to Milton’s Paradise Lost.

VI. The 18th Century

A. Recount the development of modern English and discuss the relevance of Dr. Johnson’s Dictionary on it.

B. Define satire and speculate about the cultural and political conditions that give rise to it.

C. Discuss the British love of “travel” literature and its relevance to Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe.

D. List the key features of a “mock” epic and apply them to several works from the 17th century.

E. Recount the British expansion into the New World and the development of trade routes.

F. Discuss major writers of the 17th century, such as Dryden, Swift, Pope and Johnson.

G. Compare British culture to one other culture in the British Empire.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Essay Examinations
20-40%    Paper
10-20%    Quizzes
10-20%    Discussion

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 236H

No information found.

ENGL 237

  • Title: British Literature II*
  • Number: ENGL 237
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

In this survey course, the student will study British literature written from 1800 to the present. Major authors from the Romantic, Victorian and Modern eras, such as Austen, Blake, Wordsworth, the Shelleys, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, Eliot and Woolf, will be included. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. Such non-British literary works may be chosen from the traditions of Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. British Literature I is NOT a prerequisite for this course. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and describe numerous works of British literature written after 1775.
  2. Identify important themes reflected in selected works of British literature that speak to British values, ideals and culture.
  3. Sketch the historical setting for selected works of British literature.
  4. Define several literary genres and literary devices employed by British writers.
  5. Speculate on the influence of the lives of selected British writers on their literary works.
  6. Evaluate the artistic and aesthetic achievement of individual works of British literature.
  7. Discuss the development of the British Empire after 1775.
  8. Compare British literature to several literary works from one other culture which was at one time controlled by the British Empire. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Romantic Era (Early Romantic Poets)

A. Recount the wars for independence and the rise of Napoleon.

B. Explain the significance of the printing press to the history of fiction.

C. Recount the expansion of the British Empire into Africa and the Middle East.

D. Discuss the advances in science and the problem of alienation.

E. Discuss major literary works from the Romantic era, including the writing of Blake, Wordsworth and Coleridge.

F. Discuss a major work by Jane Austen.

G. Speculate about the influence of the poets’ lives on their writing.

H. Define the idea of “Romanticism” and locate various literary devices and styles that give it expression.

II. The Romantic Era (Later Romantic poets)

A. Discuss the connection of the literary lives of these poets to Europe.

B. Recount the reign of Napoleon and his defeat.

C. Define the “sublime” and the “gothic” as aspects of literature.

D. Identify the major political ideals of Byron and Shelley.

E. Speculate about the influence of Keats’ life on his poetry.

F. Discuss the major literary works of the later Romantic era, such as poetry by Byron, Shelley and Keats.

III. The Victorian Novel and Essays

A. Discuss the rise of industrialism and the growth of cities.

B. Describe Queen Victoria and recount major events in her life.

C. List the important aspects of the Victorian novel.

D. Discuss a Victorian novel, by a writer such as Dickens, Emily Bronte, Elliot, Stevenson, Kipling and Carroll.

E. Describe the expansion of the British Empire in the Victorian era.

F. Discuss Victorian essays, such as those by Macaulay, Arnold, Darwin and Mill.

IV. Victorian Poetry

A. List some of the social and scientific advances in England with which Victorian poets struggled.

B. Identify and describe specific poetic techniques used by Victorian poets.

C. Discuss the poetry of the major poets of the Victorian era, such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Tennyson and Hopkins.

V. The Late 19th and Early 20th Century Drama and Fiction

A. Describe Wilde’s social milieu and major biographical events.

B. Discuss late Victorian plays, such as those by Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw.

C. Recount events leading up to England’s entry into World War I.

D. Identify and discuss the poetry of the Great War, such as works by Brooke and Owen.

E. List experimental techniques in fiction employed by such writers as Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce and Mansfield.

F. Discuss works of early 20th century fiction by such writers as Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce and Mansfield.

G. Discuss the poetic techniques and poetry of T.S. Eliot.

VI. Voices from the Empire

A. Recount the shrinking of the British Empire over the course of the 20th Century.

B. Research the contemporary literary milieu of one of the cultures once ruled by the British, such as Australia, India, various regions of Africa or the Middle East, paying particular attention to “marginalized” literary voices and languages.

C. Identify and discuss several literary works from this other culture.

D. Compare the British literary culture to another literary culture in the former British Empire.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Essay Examinations
20-40%    Paper
10-20%    Quizzes
10-20%    Discussion

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 237H

No information found.

ENGL 243

  • Title: Literature of Science Fiction*
  • Number: ENGL 243
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course examines the literature of science fiction, especially from 1960 through the present. Students explore the unifying concepts of science and technology, depicted through imaginative narratives of the past, present and future. Students read short stories and/or novels, view science fiction films and discuss key science fiction concepts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the science fiction genre by exploring the concepts of science and technology as used in science fiction.
  2. Explain the various sub-genres of science fiction.
  3. Explain the evolution of the science fiction genre.
  4. Explain the use of plot, character and setting in science fiction.
  5. Analyze themes, literary devices and symbols used in science fiction.
  6. Analyze the icons and metatexts of science fiction.
  7. Discuss influential authors, films and awards of science fiction. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Definitions and Concepts

A. Explain the controversy of defining the science fiction genre.

1. Trace the evolution of the science fiction genre.

2. Identify the sub-genres of science fiction.

B. Formulate and defend a definition of science fiction by analyzing and synthesizing elements of the controversy.

C. Explain the relationship between science fiction and science and technology.

II. Plot, Character and Setting

A. Analyze plot structures in science fiction.

B. Identify and discriminate among archetypes common to science fiction.

C. Analyze recurring settings in science fiction.

III. Themes, Literary Devices and Symbols

A. Analyze and discuss common themes in science fiction.

B. Identify and analyze literary devices common in science fiction, including allusion, analogy, allegory, metaphor and personification.

C. Identify and analyze the use of symbols in science fiction.

D. Discriminate between symbols and icons in science fiction.

IV. Icons and Metatexts

A. Identify common icons in science fiction.

B. Explain the significance and employment of iconography in science fiction.

C. Identify metatexts in science fiction.

D. Explain the relationship between metatexts and icons in science fiction.

E. Analyze the metatexts common to science fiction.

V. Authors, Films and Awards

A. Identify and read influential science fiction authors.

B. View and analyze influential science fiction films.

C. Compare written and film presentations.

D. Discuss and analyze the influence of literary awards on the genre, including the Nebula and Hugo awards.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Two 750-1,000 word essays
10-20%    Group discussions
15-30%    Mid-term exam
15-30%    Final exam

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 244

  • Title: Literature of American Popular Music*
  • Number: ENGL 244
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

Students read, analyze, evaluate and discuss the literature surrounding American popular music. No less than any other form of literature, all genres of American popular music are intertwined, engaged in dialogue and revealing of the American experience. By engaging with, comparing and evaluating the conversations between popular music and fiction, poetry and criticism, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Through this process, students will discover, analyze, synthesize and evaluate the ongoing negotiations between a great diversity of cultural aesthetics, political interests and public opinions in the shaping of American identity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discover, identify, compare/contrast and analyze the muscial and social catalysts for the literary products of major U.S. musical forms.
  2. Identify, compare/contrast and analyze the critical, literary, cultural, and historical contexts of key musicians, writers and critics.
  3. Explain, describe and evaluate the influence of music on literature and the corresponding influence of literature on music.
  4. Discover and differentiate between major popular American musical genres.
  5. Describe and appraise the varied aesthetics of selected musical artists, writers and critics.
  6. Identify, review, assess and compare/contrast key documents in the field of popular music criticism.
  7. Describe and use a variety of critical approaches to analyze and evaluate the deep structure of specific musical works.
  8. Formulate individual student aesthetics in the context of diverse schools of musical, literary and critical thought.
  9. Review, describe and evaluate the manner in which musical artists confront their American-ness and how these engagements have been analyzed and appraised by music critics. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Roots of Jazz in Story and Song

A. Identify and analyze the impact of the blues, work songs, minstrelsy, vaudeville and medicine shows on the literature of its day.

B. Read, compare and analyze literature by great American authors such as Whitman, Twain, DuBois and Ellison which contemplates the significance of these origins.

II. The Jazz Age

A. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Ragtime, Hot Jazz, Early Tin Pan Alley, the Broadway Musical, Big Band and Western Swing.

B. Read, compare and analyze writers such as Fitzgerald, Agee, Hughes, Giddens and Baillett, who analyze and probe the significance of the beginnings of an American mass musical culture.

III. The Origins of Rock and Roll

A. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Race and Hillbilly records as well as the advent of BeBop, Jump Blues, Boogie Woogie and Bel Canto.

B. Read, compare and analyze the literature of writers such as Gleason, Baraka, Murray, Hentoff, Kerouac, Mailer, Baldwin and Malone.

IV. The Rock and Roll Era

A. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for rockability, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, doo wop, Motown, Brill Building, Nashville Sound, the girl group era, the folk revival and the British Invasion.

B. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the literature of writers such as Gillette, Marcus, Werner, Mason, Ehrenreich, Escott and Bond.

V. The Rise of Rock and Rockism

A. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Blues Rock, Album Rock, Art Rock, Arena Rock, Countrypolitan and Outlaw Country, as well as the parallel development of soul.

B. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the criticism of critics such as Flippo, Marsh, Landau, Christgau, Willis, George and Nelson.

VI. The Punk and Hip-Hop Era

A. Identify, describe and differentiate between the cultural contexts for the evolution away from the rock hegemony, including the development of Philly Soul, funk, hip-hop and punk rock.

B. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the works of writers such as McNeil, Rockwell, Tosches, Toops, Tate, Eric-Dyson, Hornsby, Foster-Wallace, Lethem and Chang.

VII. Present

A. Discover, identify, and appraise the cultural contexts for the students' own aesthetics.

B. Explain, analyze and evaluate individual works of music based upon the students' aesthetics, informed by the cultural contexts provided by the course.

C. Compare/contrast, describe and evaluate how contemporary artists synthesize the cultural contexts of the literature of American popular music.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Essays
10-20%    Journals and Participation
30-50%    2 to 4 exams

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Consistent attendance and preparation is required for success in the course.  

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 246

  • Title: American Literature I*
  • Number: ENGL 246
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This survey course is a stand-alone course that presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the pre-Colonial Period through the post-Civil War era. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced America's national literary identity. 3hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and define the genres, literary approaches, and methods for literary scholarship relevant to the study of the Colonial period through the post-Civil War era of American literature.
  2. Identify and evaluate key foundational documents written by the earliest European arrivals to North America.
  3. Explain the cultural and historical forces that shaped later Colonial literature, including the influence of Puritanism and the emerging understandings of America.
  4. Discuss the consensus and divergences in matters such as democracy, independence, and self-reliance among the writers of the Revolutionary period.
  5. List the influences of distinctly American forces, including those of Native Americans, as well as the residual forces of European artistic sensibilities in the writers of the Early Republic.
  6. Describe the Transcendentalist message of individuality and self-trust, and trace that message to later social and political movements.
  7. Discuss the complex view of human nature found in the American Renaissance authors, including their consideration of gender, race and political differences.
  8.  Trace and describe the developments in understanding of nation, race, and freedom during the periods before, during and just after the Civil War

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Competencies

A. Identify and give examples of the genres used in American literature.

B. Employ different literary approaches in the analysis of assigned course readings.

C. Demonstrate the ability to write knowledgeably about assigned literature, employing the most significant standards of literary scholarship.

II. Foundational Era: Smith, Bradford and Other Writers

A. Contrast the views of exploration and the New World demonstrated by John Smith, William Bradford and other early settlers.

B. Identify the attitudes toward Native American people expressed in these writings.

III. Colonial Era: Bradstreet, Wheatley, Edwards and Other Writers

A. Discuss Bradstreet's notions of America.

B. List major influences on the literary development of Bradstreet, Wheatley, Edwards and other writers of this period.

C. Explain the influence of or resistance to New England Puritanism in Colonial-era writers.

IV. Revolutionary Era: Franklin, Jefferson and Other Writers

A. Identify several literary devices used by Franklin, Jefferson and perhaps other writers as well.

B. Describe the cultural and historical contexts that fostered these writers and formed their points of view.

C. List the qualities that Franklin (and perhaps other relevant writers of this period) identified as leading to personal success in America.

D. List the contributions that Franklin and Jefferson, among others, made to American democracy.

V. Early Republic: Cooper, Irving, Longfellow and Other Writers

A. Explain the impact of Native American subject matter and the American landscape on these writers.

B. Discuss the dependence of these writers on the traditions and forms of Europe as well as the ways these writers deviated from those traditions and forms.

VI. Transcendentalism: Emerson, Thoreau and Other Writers

A. Identify formative life influences on the literary work of Emerson and Thoreau and perhaps other writers as well.

B. Critique the significance and the relevance of Emerson's message (and perhaps other relevant writers' messages) regarding individual autonomy, personal responsibility and self-trust.

C. Define the influences of leading Transcendentalists on such later movements as abolition, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

VII. American Renaissance: Hawthorne, Melville, Poe and Other Writers

A. Identify formative life influences on the literary works of Hawthorne, Melville and Poe, and perhaps other writers as well.

B. Explain the ways Hawthorne and perhaps other writers adapted the history of a specific place as the focus of his novels and short stories.

C. Discuss the complexity of Melville's (and perhaps other writers') perception(s) of racial, national and/or legal matters in his novels.

D. List Poe's (and perhaps other writers') contributions to various genres such as the mystery, the detective story and science fiction, as well as incorporation of gothic elements in his literary work.

VIII. Civil War (1850-1870): Whitman, Dickinson, Lincoln, F. Douglas, and Other Writers

A. Identify poetic and rhetorical devices in these authors' works.

B. Define common forms in their work.

C. Describe the relationship between the personal lives of Whitman and Dickinson and perhaps other writers and their literary development.

D. Discuss Whitman's and perhaps other writers' notions of patriotism and America's greatest achievements.

E. Explain the mutual influences of the Civil War and the question of slavery in the literary works of Lincoln, Douglas and perhaps other writers as well.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-50%    Two or three objective and essay exams
10-25%    One or two impression/reaction essays
20-25%    One written research project to include oral presentation in class
10-25%    Attendance at one public reading of a published poet or fiction writer and submission of a written description and critique of that experience
10-25%    Quizzes and participation in class discussion

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 247

  • Title: American Literature II*
  • Number: ENGL 247
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This survey course is a stand-alone course which need not be taken after American Literature I, covering the pre-Colonial period through the post-Civil War era. American Literature II presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the post-Civil War era to the present. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced and are still influencing America's national literary identity. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify and define the genres, literary approaches, and methods for literary scholarship relevant to the study of American literature from the post-Civil War period through the present.
  2. Describe the broadening scope of American literature during the Realist period, considering both geographic and cultural diversity.
  3. Contrast the approaches to literature, including the emerging use of psychology, in the transition from Realism to Naturalism.
  4. Describe the many expressions of Modernism in American literature, including the central changes wrought by industrialization, shifting gender roles, deteriorating traditions and World War I.
  5. Identify the social, political and stylistic elements found in the emerging minority voices of the Harlem Renaissance.
  6. Define and describe the key contributions of several of the new regional, ethnic, and stylistic movements of the pre-, during and post-World War II periods.
  7. List and analyze the complex cultural and aesthetic connections created by Post-Modern and ethnic writers.
  8. Describe various contemporary American authors, poets, and playwrights, emphasizing both their innovative and traditional characteristics.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. General Competencies

A. Identify and give examples of the genres used in American literature.

B. Employ different literary approaches in the analysis of assigned course writings.

C. Demonstrate an ability to write knowledgeably about literature, employing the most significant standards of literary scholarship.

II. Emergence of Realism: Twain, L.M. Alcott, James and Other Writers

A. Identify ways in which Alcott's and perhaps other writers' novels and short stories serve as transition between the literature of the Post-Civil War Period and the nineteenth century.

B. Explain Alcott's and Twain’s and perhaps other writers’ contributions to both the literary market place and the introduction of the theme of interracial relationships.

C. Describe the developing expansion of the view of writers from this period both in its reappraisal of the American-European relationship and the Western expansion.

D. Depict the relationship between formative life experiences and the works of Twain and other writers.

III. Realism to Naturalism: James, Crane, and Other Writers

A. Differentiate the perceptions of family life, especially parent-child relationships, as depicted in the literary works by these authors.

B. Explain the importance of regionalism as a governing idea.

C. Identify the use of autobiographical elements by these authors in each work.

D. Exemplify the increasing use of psychology to delineate character and explain motivation.

E. Identify the use of literary devices and learn the ways each author used other literary works as models or prototypes for these authors' literary works.

F. Explain the use of cultural and economic diversity by each author as a means of making a statement about American society.

IV. World War I and Modernism: Frost, Moore, Chopin, Gilman, Fitzgerald, Hemingway and other writers such as Jewett, Wharton and Cather

A. Differentiate the perceptions of family life, especially parent-child relationships, as depicted in the literary works by these authors.

B. Identify the distinctly American aspects of Modernism in these authors' works as well as those aspects held in common with the larger movement.

C. Explain the use of cultural and economic diversity by each author as a means of making a statement about and impacting American society.

D. List the forces that precipitated Modernism in addition to explaining the impact of World War I on that movement and the broader culture.

V. Harlem Renaissance: Dunbar, Cullen, Hurston and Hughes

A. Discuss adaption of minority points of view and communities.

B. Define each writer's social message.

C. Describe the social implications of these writers' literary works.

D. Identify these writers' use of dialect and comment on its effectiveness.

VI. World War II and Mid-Century Perspectives: Wright, T. Williams, Miller, O'Neill, Brooks, Baldwin, Kerouac, Ginsburg and Other Writers

A. Provide examples of innovative use of literary forms.

B. Identify experimental use of language.

C. Discuss the origin and nature of the Beat Movement and other literary schools of this period.

D. Extrapolate from literary images significant life experiences.

VII.Post-Modernism and Ethnic Literatures: Cisneros, Silko, Erdrich, Morrison, Alexie and Other Writers

A. Describe key characteristics of the confessional style.

B. Identify striking/shocking images.

C. Determine effectiveness of message.

D. Discuss willingness of these writers to be candid.

E. Provide specific examples of unique mixtures of cultures and their expression in various ethnic literatures.

VIII. Post-Post-Modernism and Contemporary Perspectives: Wallace, Oates, Kushner and Other Writers

A. Identify significant writers working today and in recent years.

B. Explain the ways in which these writers participate in earlier American literary traditions as well as the ways they innovate.

C. Describe the changing economic situation for literary writers and discuss how that shapes their output and their career choices.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grades will be based on written essays, research, and critique; objective and essay exams; and daily quiz/discussion class participation.  Regular attendance and participation will be expected. The study of literature also requires attention to detail, a willingness to read and reread some selections numerous times, and a degree of interest and enthusiasm in the subject matter. Above all, students are expected to study assigned literary works before each class and to be courteous and receptive to interpretations other than their own.

25-50%    Two or three objective and essay exams
10-25%    One or two impression/reaction essays
20-25%    One written research project to include oral presentation in class
10-25%    Attendance at one public literary reading of a published writer and submission of written description and critique of that experience
10-25%    Quizzes and participation in class discussion

Total:  100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 250

  • Title: World Masterpieces*
  • Number: ENGL 250
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 122.

Description:

World Masterpieces introduces students to literary study using major literary works composed from the times of Homer to Shakespeare that have been influential in shaping and expressing values of Western culture. Students will read selections representative of the epic, tragic, comic and lyric traditions primarily to gain knowledge of the works assigned. In addition, students will analyze the assigned texts as literary works and as cultural artifacts and influences. Finally, students will compare and contrast contemporary understandings of the individual and society with those expressed in the works studied. In completing the course objectives, students will learn the conventions of writing about literature and become familiar with general reference materials useful in studying literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the library and electronic resources to find and read about Western and non-Western literature.
  2. Describe in writing important characteristics of Western literature from the ancient, medieval, and Renaissance periods.
  3. List characteristics of epic, tragic, comic, and lyric poetry and describe how these literary forms changed over time from classical Greek and Roman literature to Renaissance literature.
  4. Apply literary terms relevant to the assigned texts in describing and discussing the literature studied.
  5. In group discussions, identify major themes found in the works studied.
  6. In class discussions and in writing, describe human values as revealed in the literature from the time periods studied.
  7. Compare or contrast the authors' presentation of human values and themes in the assigned texts with contemporary views.
  8. Find examples of lyric poetry from the ancient, medieval and Renaissance periods and compare and contrast them in writing.
  9. Discuss in writing the influence of major works studied on later artistic expressions.
  10. Discuss in writing some of the issues a translator must consider in translating a text.
  11. After comparing and contrasting different translations of the same text, explain in writing why one translation might be preferred.
  12. Name several major works from non-Western literature from the periods studied and describe their significance for their respective cultures.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Library and Electronic Sources to Study Literature
   A. Attend an orientation tour of the library to learn about important
sources related to the assigned texts.
   B. Prepare a bibliography of sources texts and literary periods.
   C. Prepare a bibliography of electronic sources including online
databases and the WWW useful to learn about the assigned texts and
literary periods.
   D. Summarize one article on each of the historical periods covered in
the course.
   E. Find lyric poems for each of the major historical periods studied
and compare and/or contrast their characteristics.

II. Ancient Greek and Latin Literature
   A. Greek epic poetry, Homer
      1. Recall and summarize details of The Odyssey.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Odyssey by Homer.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Odyssey.
      4. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Odyssey.
      5. Compare several translations of The Odyssey and consider their
respective merits.
   B. Greek tragedy, Sophocles and Euripides
      1. Recall and summarize details of the assigned dramas.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to
tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in the assigned
tragedies.
      4. Describe historical development of classical tragedy.
      5. Review the major points of Aristotle's definition of tragedy and
discuss the implications of that definition for one's understanding of
tragedy.
      6. Compare several translations of one of the tragedies assigned and
describe the effects of each.
   C. Greek comedy, Aristophanes
      1. Recall and summarize details of the assigned plays.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to a comedy
by Aristophanes.
      3. Contrast comedy and tragedy.
   D. Read in small groups examples of ancient Greek lyric poetry.
   E. Latin epic poetry, Virgil
      1. Recall and summarize details of The Aeneid.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Aeneid.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Aeneid.
      4. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Aeneid.
   F. Latin poetry, Ovid
      1. Recall and summarize myths from The Metamorphoses.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Metamorphoses.
      3. Compare The Metamorphoses to epic and lyric poetry.
      4. Describe significant themes present in The Metamorphoses.
      5. Identify influences of The Metamorphoses on later artistic
expressions.
   G. Survey in class qualities of Latin tragedy, comedy, and lyric
poetry.
      1. Take notes on characteristics of Latin tragedy, comedy and lyric
poetry.
      2. Contrast Latin and Greek and contemporary attitudes toward epic,
tragic, comic, and lyric poetry.

III. Medieval Literature
   A. Dante
      1. Recall and summarize details of The Inferno.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Inferno.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Inferno.
      4. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Inferno.
      5. Compare several translations of The Inferno and describe the
virtues of each.
      6. Identify important literary qualifies of Dante's Divine Comedy.
   B. Chaucer 
      1. Recall and summarize details of The Canterbury Tales.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Canterbury Tales.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Canterbury
Tales.
      4. Identify important literary qualifies found in The Canterbury
Tales.
      5. Compare several translations of The Canterbury Tales and describe
the virtues of each.
   C. Medieval lyrics
      1. Find in the library or on electronic sources examples of medieval
lyric poetry.
      2. Take notes on the development and practice of lyric verse during
the Middle   Ages.
      3. Compare and contrast medieval lyrics with the Greek and Latin
lyrics read.

IV. Renaissance Literature
   A. Marlowe
      1. Examine Dr. Faustus as a Renaissance figure.
      2. Recall and summarize details of The Tragical History of Dr.
Faustus.
      3. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The
Tragical History of Dr. Faustus.
      4.  Discuss in class important themes evident in Dr. Faustus.
   B. Shakespeare
      1. Recall and summarize details of the assigned dramas.
      2. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to
tragedies by Shakespeare.
      3. Discuss in class important themes evident in the assigned
tragedies.
      4. Take notes on the relation of Elizabethan tragedy to Senecan
tragedy.
      5. Describe historical development of Elizabethan tragedy.
   C. Renaissance lyrics
      1. Find in the library or on electronic sources examples of
Renaissance lyric poetry.
      2. Take notes on the development and practice of Renaissance lyric
verse.
      3. Compare and contrast Renaissance lyrics with the medieval and
Greek and Latin lyrics read.

V. Non-Western Literature
   A. Use the library and electronic sources to identify major non-Western
literary works.
   B. Compare or contrast one of the Western texts read with a non-Western
text.
   C. Describe reasons a contemporary Western reader might have
difficulties understanding a non-Western text.
   D. Consider the effects of establishing a literary canon.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 10%  Attendance and sharing in class
  5%  Bibliographies
 15%  Summary of articles
 10%  Report on non-Western literature
 30%  Objective exams over assigned texts and lectures
 30%   Essays
100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 250H

No information found.

ENGL 254

  • Title: Masterpieces of the Cinema*
  • Number: ENGL 254
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

This course examines the development of cinema from the early experiments in the late 1800s up to the present day, presenting the history and art of both American and international cinema. Students read the textbook, view short and full-length films, and discuss important cinematic techniques and concepts. Students verify their judgments by summarizing and analyzing these important concepts, using discussions, and writing effective, well-organized essays in response to specific films. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Describe the development of modern day cinema: American and international.
  2. Describe the major technological advances in cinema.
  3. Define the important film terms used in the making of movies.
  4. Explain the importance of the director, the producer and the writer of films.
  5. Analyze the components of a good film: editing, camera angle, special effects, acting, costuming, setting, shot, sequence, scene, montage, etc.
  6. Analyze the narrative techniques of film: plot, characterization, theme, conflict, climax, denouement, flashback, foreshadowing, etc.
  7. Identify the artistic elements of film: beauty, continuity, transitions, context, framing, coloration, composition, etc.
  8. Identify the major genres: western, horror, film noir, etc.
  9. Explain the importance of the cinema.
  10. Demonstrate effective group discussion techniques such as listening, expressing and elaborating.
  11. Demonstrate effective writing techniques such as outlining, summarizing, paraphrasing, analyzing, quoting, and synthesizing. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Course Overview
   A. Review the course outline and methods of instruction.
   B. Review the course objectives, competencies and timelines.
   C. Discuss the course prerequisites.
   D. Describe the evaluation system to be used.

II. The Early Years of Cinema
   A. List the early inventions: kinetoscope, black maria, vitascope,
etc.
   B. Discuss the producer/directors: Edison, Lumiere, Melies, etc.
   C. Describe the early films.

III. D.W. Griffith and Other Early Directors
   A. Discuss C.B. De Mille.
   B. Discuss the artistic innovations of Griffith.
   C. Describe the comedies of Mack Sennett.
   D. Identify the early classic films: Birth of a Nation, etc.

IV. The Silent Era in the Twenties
   A. Identify the early comedians and their styles: Chaplin, Langdon,
Laurel and Hardy, etc.
   B. Explain the techniques of silent film.
   C. Describe the beginnings of the talkies, the difficulties of changing
to sound film.

V. The Development of Cinema in Europe
   A. Define the importance of Eisenstein and editing.
   B. Point out the uses of expressionism.
   C. Explain the innovations found in Metropolis and Nosferatu.
   D. Explain realism and Dadaism.

VI. The Hollywood Studio System
   A. Discuss the importance of money in making films.
   B. Explain the studio system.
   C. Describe how the star system developed.
   D. Point out the different film genres and their components.

VII. The 1930s in Hollywood
   A. Explain censorship and the Production Code.
   B. Discuss the different genres: gangster, musical, screwball comedy.
   C. Examine the techniques of Busby Berkeley and Fred Astaire.
   D. Discuss the major directors: Capra, Wyler, Hawks and Ford.


VIII. The Pre-War Years
   A. Define propaganda and its uses by Germany and other countries.
   B. Describe the problems faced by immigrant directors: Lang and von
Sternberg.
   C. Explain the film techniques of Alfred Hitchcock.
   D. Define the impact of the French directors: Renoir and Dreyer.

IX. The War Years
   A. Explain the decline of the Hollywood studios.
   B. Describe the impact of war on American films: Casablanca, To Be or
Not To Be.
   C. Discuss film noir, and the role of Humphrey Bogart.
   D. Explain the greatness of Orson Welles and his difficulties with the
studios.

X. Europe During World War II
   A. Explain the development of neo-realism in Italy.
   B. Discuss the spy film: The Third Man, etc.
   C. Describe the film techniques of de Sica and Rossellini.

XI. After the War in America
   A. Discuss the inventions of CinemaScope, Cinerama, and 3-D films.
   B. Explain the HUAC pressures during the Cold War: Elia Kazan.
   C. Discuss the blacklist and the Red Scare.
   D. Define social realism.
   E. Explain method acting and Stanislavsky.
   F. Discuss Monroe, Brando, Newman, etc.
   G. Point out Hitchcock's importance.

XII. Cinema in Europe and Japan After the War
   A. Discuss the differences between American films and the Japanese:
modern vs. traditional.
   B. Explain Kurosawa's impact.
   C. Define Bergman's psychological approach.
   D. Dissect Fellini.
   E. Define New Wave films.

XIII. The 60s Revolution
   A. Compare American films to the upheaval of the 1960s.
   B. Describe the sexual revolution.
   C. Describe the anti-Vietnam War mood.
   D. Describe the Civil Rights marches.
   E. Explain the breaking of the Production Code.
   F. Describe the films by Nichols, Hopper, Penn and Peckinpah.

XIV. Europe in the 60s
   A. Define the New Wave and Truffaut.
   B. Describe political film-making by Costa-Gavras.
   C. Explain the Marxist approach to film.
   D. Define  kitchen sink" films.
   E. Discuss the increased sexuality in film: Romeo and Juliet.

XV. The Watergate Era
   A. Discuss Kent State, political assassinations.
   B. Explain increased violence in films: The Deer Hunter.
   C. Discuss Polanski, Charles Manson, All the President's Men.
   D. Define revisionism in film genres.
   E. Discuss the important directors: Altman, Coppola, Lucas, Spielberg,
Scorsese and Allen.

XVI. New Voices and Themes in Europe
   A. Explain new themes: homosexuality, offbeat humor, rock musicals.
   B. Discuss German films: revisiting Nazi Germany.
   C. Point out the improvement of Australian film: Peter Weir, Bruce
Beresford.

XVII. New Technology of the 1980s in the USA
   A. Discuss widescreen, Dolby sound.
   B. Discuss the focus on science fiction and special effects.
   C. Explain the new censorship of the Reagan years.
   D. Discuss the maverick directors: Lynch, Cronenberg, Demme, Stone,
Hughes, Lee and Sayles.

XVIII. High Production Values in Europe
   A. Explain the  Masterpiece Theater" approach of British films.
   B. Define  male weepies": Chariots of Fire.
   C. The production values of James Ivory.
   D. Compare/contrast left wing films and right wing films.
   E. Discuss the mature sexual films of France: Manon of the Spring.

XIX. The Dominance of American Films in the 1990s
   A. Explain the victory of special effects and stunts.
   B. Discuss the European emphasis on depth and plot.
   C. Discuss the films about the holocaust.
   D. Define the rise of Disney and animation.
   E. Explain the emphasis on computer graphics.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Two 500-750 word essays 30% of grade
Mid-term exam           30% of grade
Final exam              30% of grade
Daily grade/ quizzes    10% of grade

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGL 254H

No information found.

ENGL 291

No information found.

ENGL 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: ENGL 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGL 121.

Description:

English 292 is a 200-level thematic literature and writing course. In this class, students will have the opportunity to refine their critical reading and writing skills by investigating in-depth a single important theme, topic or genre (e.g., environmental literature, the literature of illness, detective fiction, travel literature, the documentary film tradition, creative non-fiction). Students will engage with a wide range of texts, including those from print, film, and other media. The course may also include selections drawn from various national literatures in translation and a range of historical periods. Special Topics in Literature and Composition may be repeated for credit but only on different topics. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Undertake complex readings and research in the designated topic.
  2. Define key terms and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic.
  3. Utilize research and analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study.
  4. Engage in a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the Special Topic.
  5. Develop a personal point of view about the Special Topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research, and other means.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the English faculty prior to its being offered. The English Department Curriculum Committee, the English Department Chair, and the English & Journalism Division Curriculum Committee will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The E & J Division Dean will determine when and if the course may be taught based on the instructional needs of the department and the division. Individual faculty members are responsible for the creation of Special Topics courses and for seeking approval to teach them. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a four-semester sequence.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods: Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to four-year institutions as elective credit.
  2. A class offered as a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).