Art (ART)

Courses

ART 124   Design 2D* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: CDTP 145.

This is an introductory study of the principles of visual perception, two-dimensional space organization and the visual elements of line, shape, texture and space. Concepts, materials and processes necessary to an understanding of two-dimensional form are explored using traditional and digital tools and techniques. Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 127   Design 3D* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 124.

This is a study of the function of three-dimensional organization in the development of visual ideas. Concepts, materials and processes necessary to an understanding of the three-dimensional relationships of space, form, form evolution and the dynamics of structure are explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 129   Design Color* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: CDTP 135.

This is a study of the nature of color, its physical properties and visual qualities. Basic theories, phenomena and their applications will be explored using pigment, colored paper and digital color systems. Working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 129H   HON: Design Color* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ART 130   Drawing I (3 Hours)  

This is an introductory course with an emphasis on the development of fundamental drawing skills, increased power of observation and an awareness of the personally expressive and compositional aspects of drawing. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 131   Drawing II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 130.

This course involves intermediate problems in drawing with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. Students will work from models, still-life, and conceptual presentations. A variety of media will be explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 135   Painting I (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of painting. Students will learn basic painting skills, color properties, color mixing, color relationships, applications and proper use of tools and equipment. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 136   Painting II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 135.

This course involves intermediate problems in painting with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 138   Digital Imaging for Artists I (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the use of the computer as a medium for making fine art. The course will emphasize developing the student's skill in making expressive visual statements using computer technology. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 142   Ceramics I (3 Hours)

This course is designed to build a conceptual and manual foundation for future ceramics education. Students will study the properties of clay, its preparation, hand and wheel techniques, surface design, firing methods, fundamental ceramic terms, principles of design, introductory ceramic history and orientation to safe practices for the ceramic artist. Emphasis will be on developing skills appropriate to the beginning student for the purpose of creative and technical expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 143   Ceramics II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 142.

This course covers more advanced methods and studio practices in creative ceramic wheel expression and glaze formation. Emphasis is on development of a sense of thrown form and creative decoration or optional creative non-wheel ceramic form development. The course focuses on advanced ceramic form production, aesthetic issues, investigative study and practice. Clay, glaze and firing techniques are investigated in depth. The student acquires a repertoire of studio skills, a deeper awareness of ceramic history and articulated criteria of judgment. Individual interpretation and conceptual development are expected. The study of aesthetics of ceramic form is undertaken. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 145   Sculpture I (3 Hours)

Students will explore and study natural and synthetic sculptural forms as they create work using traditional or contemporary media and techniques. Assignments require work in limestone, clay, wax, bronze, aluminum and steel, and involve carving, modeling and building up. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 146   Sculpture II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 145.

This continuation of ART 145 will focus on advanced methods and techniques with emphasis on materials, forms and the student's selection of an individual direction with individual material choices. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 148   Metal and Silversmithing I (3 Hours)

This course is a basic introduction to the terms, tools and techniques involved in creating jewelry and other wearables as they relate to the human figure. Casting, fabrication and construction will be explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 148H   HON: Metal and Silversmithing I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ART 149   Metal and Silversmithing II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 148.

Students will study advanced casting and construction techniques. Projects should show a higher degree of design and function. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 172   Watercolor Painting (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to transparent water media with emphasis on learning fundamental painting skills, the visual elements, composition, visual perception and an awareness of personal expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 231   Life Drawing I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 130.

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of drawing for students wanting a concentration in drawing the human figure. Students will acquire basic competence in developing drawings involving the human form. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 232   Life Drawing II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 231.

This course is an intermediate investigation of drawing from the human form. This class is for students wanting to concentrate on figure drawing beyond Life Drawing I. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 235   Studio Workshop I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 131 or ART 136.

This course involves advanced problems in painting (or drawing) with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 236   Studio Workshop II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 235.

This course involves advanced problems in painting (or drawing), above and beyond those experienced in Workshop I, with emphasis on individual expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 238   Digital Imaging for Artists II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 138.

This course is a continued study of skills learned in Digital Imaging for Artists. Students will concentrate on creating personal imagery using digital media. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

ART 244   Ceramics Workshop I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ART 143 and department approval.

Students will have the opportunity to pursue advanced individual research under the direction of the instructor. Emphasis is on creative expression and development of technical skills as well as the further pursuit of technical studies that have relevance for emerging personal specializations. Students will conduct a personal program of study on one aesthetic issue that emerges as personally significant and present the outcomes in an appropriate and acceptable manner at the close of the semester. Students should initiate and pursue studies in directions that inform and further their individual professional and creative growth, which leads to invention, innovation and refinement of their personal semester work, as agreed upon with the instructor. This course enables further pursuit of technical studies that have relevance for these emerging personal specializations. Skill refinement, three-dimensional imagination, with increased creative expression and creative product generation are anticipated. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

ART 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ART 124

  • Title: Design 2D*
  • Number: ART 124
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: CDTP 145.

Description:

This is an introductory study of the principles of visual perception, two-dimensional space organization and the visual elements of line, shape, texture and space. Concepts, materials and processes necessary to an understanding of two-dimensional form are explored using traditional and digital tools and techniques. Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the visual elements of line, shape, texture and space and demonstrate an understanding of the visual relationships that exist between them in class exercises/projects.
  2. Define the underlying principles of visual perception and form organization that provide the compositional foundation of all 2-dimensional images and demonstrate an understanding of them in class exercises/projects.
  3. Express and communicate abstract ideas using the design elements and principles using traditional, electronic and digital media.
  4. Explore, develop and demonstrate skills with a variety of traditional, electronic and digital tools, equipment, materials and techniques that are utilized by the visual designer.
  5. Demonstrate mastery of the specialized vocabulary relating to the course content by discussing class work in these terms.
  6. Demonstrate a level of problem solving skills that allow for the identification and generation of alternative solutions as well as the selection of an appropriate course of completion.
  7. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Visual Elements of Art and Design
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of, and visual sensitivity to, the
following elements of art and design by identifying, defining and using
them in class exercises/projects.
      1. Line
         a. Historic development as an element of art and design 
         b. As symbolic communication of both objects and abstract
concepts
         c. Physical characteristics of line: length, measure, type,
color, value and texture
         d. Linear directions: straight, angular, curved
         e. Natural and man-made lines: functional and imaginative
      2. Shape
         a. Kinds of shapes:  representational and non-representational,
natural and man-made, 2-dimensional and as illusions of 3-dimensional
forms, organic and geometric
         b. The process of abstraction
         c. Closure
         d. The meaning of shapes as signs and symbols
         e. The emotive qualities of shapes both active and static
         f. The compositional importance of the placement, balance,
texture, color and value of shapes
      3. Texture
         a. Kinds of texture: actual, simulated or imitative, man-made or
natural, invented and expressive
         b. The distinction between texture and pattern
         c. Principle factors in our perception of textures: variations in
reflection and absorption of light, differences in value and color, and the
degree of opacity, translucency or transparency
         d. Uses of texture in two-dimensional design: to describe
objects, to stimulate tactile response, as surface enrichment, as
clarification of spatial cues and to control the relative dominance of
pattern.
      4. Space   
         a. Spatial cues:  relative position in visual field, textural
density, relative size of elements in visual field
         b. Linear perspective
         c. Perspective of parallax:  binocular and motion
         d. Perspectives that are independent of the position or motion of
the observer including: aerial perspective (changes in color intensity,
value and detail,) perspective of blur, continuity of outline
(overlapping,) and transitions between light and shade.

II. The Principles of Visual Perception and Organization
   A. Demonstrate an understanding of, and visual sensitivity to, the
following principles of visual organization by identifying, defining and
using each of them in class exercises/projects. 
      1. Pictorial formats
         a. Picture plane
         b. Picture frame 
         c. Pictorial area
      2. Visual grouping 
         a. Proximity of visual grouping
         b. Similarity of elements
         c. Common movement
         d. Visual continuity of elements
         e. Closure
      3. Visual separation 
         a. Contrast
         b. Figure-ground
      4. Perceptual integration 
         a. Principles of good figures
         b. Principles of perceptual constancy
         c. Optical illusions
         d. Perception of movement
      5. Balance 
         a. Types of balance: physical versus ocular, symmetry versus
asymmetry
         b. Factors contributing to the relative weight of elements: size,
shape, texture, color, value and position
      6. Rhythm
         a. Rhythmic patterns: simple or repetitive, alternative,
progressive and flowing
      7. Pattern   
         a. Uses of pattern: as underlying pictorial structure, beat or
accent, figure-ground relationships, transitional patterns and motif
      8. Movement
         a. Indicators of movement: directional use of art elements,
tracing the path of a volume or shape, blurred contours, combining
multiple points of view, multiple images within one image, sequence and
transition within a series of images shape
      9. Contrast and emphasis 
         a. Methods of attaining contrast and emphasis: through line
quality and variation,  shape and textural variation, contrast of size,
color and value and changes in directional movement of elements

III. Tools, Materials and Techniques
   A. Demonstrate skills in the use and applications of the following by
identifying, and using each of them in class exercises and projects.
      1. Traditional tools  
         a. Artograph
         b. Compass
         c. T-square and triangle
         d. French curves and templates
         e. Ruling pen or Rapidograph pens
         f. Cutting tools
         g. Erasers
      2. Electronic and digital tools 
         a. Photocopier
         b. Computer
         c. Laser printer
         d. Scanner
      3. Materials
         a. Papers and boards
         b. Ink and gouache
         c. Adhesives and thinners 
         d. Protective sprays
      4. Techniques
         a. Overlays
         b. Refinement
         c. Scaling
         d. Transferring
         e. Computer software techniques

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects and tests   60 - 85% of grade
Studio performance   15 - 40% of grade
Total                  100%   
                      
Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade Scale:
      4.0  = A
      3.75 = A-
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D, or F.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is required.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 127

  • Title: Design 3D*
  • Number: ART 127
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 124.

Description:

This is a study of the function of three-dimensional organization in the development of visual ideas. Concepts, materials and processes necessary to an understanding of the three-dimensional relationships of space, form, form evolution and the dynamics of structure are explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts that are taught in this course, and that are inherent in all three-dimensional structures, by effectively applying them in course projects.
  2. Demonstrate skill in the use of a variety of tools and materials commonly used in the solution of three-dimensional design problems.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding and skill in the application, of basic structural principles by designing and constructing a variety of visually effective and structurally sound three-dimensional forms.
  4. Demonstrate an ability to plan and visually describe projected three-dimensional pieces through preliminary drawings.
  5. Describe the relationship between the specific structural qualities of a form, the physical properties of the materials used in its construction and the effectiveness of its intended function.
  6. Effectively organize time and materials, work well independently and meet class deadline.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Conceptual Foundations of Three-Dimensional Design
   A. List the three primary directions and basic views and discuss their
significance in the planning of 3-dimensional structures.
      1. Three primary directions
         a. Vertical
         b. Horizontal
         c. Transverse
      2. Three basic views
         a. Plane view
         b. Front view
         c. Side view
   B. List the four categories of three-dimensional design elements,
discuss their meaning and demonstrate their application in class
projects.
      1. Conceptual elements
         a. Point
         b. Line
         c. Plane
         d. Volume
      2. Visual elements
         a. Shape
         b. Size
         c. Color
         d. Texture
      3. Relational elements
         a. Balance/gravity
         b. Movement
         c. Proportion/scale
         d. Transition/direction
         e. Unity
         f. Position/opposition
         g. Distribution/space
         h. Variation
      4. Constructional elements
         a. Vertex
         b. Edge
         c. Face
   C. Identify and discuss different modes of both natural and man-made
structural/spatial organization and demonstrate their application in class
projects.
      1. Cellular
      2. Cylindrical/core structure
      3. Planar systems
      4. Trusses and space frames
      5. Rigid frame
      6. Slab
      7. Shell
      8. Cable
      9. Membrane/inflated
   D. Define and discuss the physical laws affecting structure.
      1. Weight (load)
      2. Balance (equilibrium/stability)
      3. Gravity
      4. Tension (lengthen)
      5. Compression (shorten)
      6. Torsion (shear)
   E. Discuss the relationship between the form and the function of
3-dimensional structures in each of the following categories:
      1. Scale and human dimensions
      2. Light modulation
      3. Multiples
      4. Applications in dimensional and environmental graphics

II. Materials: Types and Properties
   A. Demonstrate skill in the use of the following types of materials:
      1. Papers and boards
      2. Foams
      3. Paper pulp
      4. Rigid and flexible linear materials
   B. List materials that possess the following properties:
      1. Elastic
      2. Rigid
      3. Brittle
      4. Fluid

III. Structural Forms and Qualities
   A. Define and discuss relief structures and demonstrate an
understanding of their unique characteristics by applying them in the
design and construction of class projects.
      1. Bas relief or frontal view
      2. Modular forms used in their construction
         a. Platonic solids
         b. Archimedean solids
      3. Structural supports
   B. Define and discuss the qualities unique to full-round structures and
apply them in class projects.
      1. Multiple points of view
      2. Modular forms
         a. Serial planes
         b. Wall structures
         c. Prisms and cylinders
         d. Geometric solids
         e. Linear structures

IV. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and colleagues
appropriate to the professional designer and to the workplace including
giving and accepting criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits appropriate to the
professional designer and the workplace including: the ability to follow
verbal and written instructions, to demonstrate organizational skills,
attention to detail, adherence to schedules and deadlines, the timely 
completion of tasks and the maintenance of good attendance and
punctuality.
   C. Identify and develop individual or collaborative/teamwork skills
including solving problems independently by working alone or in groups,
building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects and tests   75 - 85% of grade
Studio performance   15 - 25% of grade
Total                  100%   
                      
Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade Scale:
      4.0  = A
      3.75 = A-
      3.25 = B+
      3.0  = B
      2.75 = B-
      2.25 = C+
      2.0  = C
      1.75 = C-
      1.25 = D+
      1.0  = D
below 1.0  = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D, or F.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 129

  • Title: Design Color*
  • Number: ART 129
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: CDTP 135.

Description:

This is a study of the nature of color, its physical properties and visual qualities. Basic theories, phenomena and their applications will be explored using pigment, colored paper and digital color systems. Working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop is required. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and explain the physical nature of color and light including: a) Sources of color, b) Major color, c) theories, d) Color perception and phenomena, d) Basic color qualities and terminology.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency with a specialized vocabulary that relates to the study of color.
  3. Utilize traditional and digital color systems and examine the visual characteristics of color mixes and the comparison of color palettes and ranges.
  4. Demonstrate through his/her work traditional and contemporary color theories relating to the objective and subject uses of color.
  5. Manipulate and control color effects and understand how they affect the creation and perception of figures and forms.
  6. Produce harmonious compositions.
  7. Demonstrate a level of problem-solving skills that promote the identification and generation of alternative solutions to color design problems and assist in the selection of an appropriate course of completion.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge and proficiency with the tools, materials and techniques necessary to the study of color in this course.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the studio/lab.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sources of Light and Color
   A. Define and explain the physical nature of color including
light/color sources.
      1. The light spectrum
         a. Sun
      2. Invisible light/energy
         a. Electric lights
         b. Fluorescent lamps
         c. Phosphorescence
         d. Luminescence
   B. Describe the similarities and differences of the following four
variations in illumination:
      1. Artificial light/daylight
      2. Brightness
      3. Lightness
      4. Shadow
   C. Define, compare and contrast light behavior and its resultant effect
on color and perception.
      1. Absorption/reflection of light from surfaces
      2. Transmission of light by
         a. Refraction (prism)
         b. Dispersion (scattering)
         c. Diffraction (point source)
         d. Interference (iridescence)
   D. Describe the physical mechanism for color perceptions.
      1. Eyesight/color blindness/color warning

II. Major Color Theories, Mixtures and Systems of Organization
   A. Define and describe the importance of three methods of logical color
arrangement:
      1. Color wheel
      2. Color system
      3. Color diagrams
   B. Define, compare and contrast additive, subtractive and partitive
color theories.
   C. Describe and explain the visual effects of color mixtures in prints,
pigment and dyes.
      1. Transparent
      2. Non-transparent
   D. Compare and contrast color theory utilized in photography, printing
and television.
   E. Identify, contrast, compare and  utilize the four following digital
color pallets:
      1. HSV
      2. RGB
      3. CMYK
      4. PANTONE

III. Basic Color Qualities
   A. Define and explain the color quality hue relating to color
organization, describe its use and explore in color exercises/projects.
      1. Definition
      2. The pigment spectrum
      3. The 12-color circle
         a. Primary triad
         b. Secondary triad
         c. Tertiary hues
   B. Define and explain the color quality value relating to color
organization, describe its use and explore in color exercises/projects.
      1. Definition
      2. “Normal” spectrum color values
      3. Used to define objects in three-dimensional space
      4. Light/pigment value variations
      5. As a compositional element
         a. Contrast and emphasis
         b. Balance
         c. Movement
         d. Structure
   C. Define and describe the color quality of intensity relating to color
organization, describe its use and explore in color exercises/projects.
      1. Definition
      2. Spectrum intensity, saturation or chroma
      3. Altering hue intensity
         a. Addition of black (shades)
         b. Addition of white (tints)
         c. Addition of achromatic neutral (grays)
         d. Addition of complement or other hue

IV. Color Perception and Phenomena
   A. Explain color perception and the phenomena of color illusion.
   B. Explain constancy theory.
   C. Describe and utilize various color illusions in color
exercises/projects
      1. After-images
      2. Vibrating boundaries
      3. The rule of simultaneous contrast
      4. The Purkinje phenomenon
      5. Synesthesia
      6. Spreading effect
   D. Explain and use simultaneous contrast with “see through quality”
in color exercises/projects.
      1. Transparency
      2. Translucency

V. Objective and Subjective Uses of Color to Demonstrate Color Principles
and Effects
   A. Explain and utilize in color exercises/projects to describe objects
using local color.
   B. Explain and utilize in color exercises/projects as a compositional
element.
      1. Plastic color
         a. Warm colors
         b. Cool colors
      2. Color balance (contrast of extension)
      3. Contrast and emphasis
   C. Explain and utilize in color exercises/projects to symbolize ideas.
   D. Explain and utilize in color exercises/projects to create moods and
express emotions.
      1. Psychological responses to color
      2. Emotive responses

VI. Color Relationships and Effects in Compositions
   A. Identify, describe and use in color mixing exercises/projects
traditional color schemes.
      1. Harmonious relationships: Monochromatic
      2. Harmonious relationships: Analogous
   B. Identify, describe and use in color mising exercises/projects
traditional schemes
      1. Contrasting relationships: Primary triad
      2. Contrasting relationships: Secondary triad
      3. Contrasting relationships: Complementary colors

VII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and colleagues,
appropriate to a  professional designer and the workplace including giving
and accepting criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits appropriate to the
professional designer and the workplace including: the ability to follow
verbal and written instructions, good organizational skills, attention to
detail, adherence to schedules and deadlines, completion of tasks and
maintaining good attendance and punctuality. 
   C. Identify and develop individual or collaborative/teamwork skills
including: solving problems independently by working alone or in groups,
building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Projects and tests:   60 - 85% of grade
Studio performance:   15 - 40% of grade
  Total:                100%   
                      
Grades for projects will be based on project objectives and competencies
evaluated in class critiques, evaluation forms and individual
conferences.

Studio performance grade is based on the student's attendance record,
degree of productivity, ability to work independently and level of
participation in class critiques. 

Grade Scale:
  4.0     = A
  3.75    = A-
  3.25    = B+
  3.0     = B
  2.75    = B-
  2.25    = C+
  2.0     = C
  1.75    = C-
  1.25    = D+
  1.0     = D
Below 1.0 = F

Semester Grade: total grade averaged to A, B, C, D, or F.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator is required.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 129H

No information found.

ART 130

  • Title: Drawing I
  • Number: ART 130
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This is an introductory course with an emphasis on the development of fundamental drawing skills, increased power of observation and an awareness of the personally expressive and compositional aspects of drawing. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures.
  2. Identify and use basic drawing tools in both wet and dry media.
  3. Distinguish and use value, texture, line, shape and gesture as discrete approaches to drawing.
  4. Differentiate between successful and unsuccessful composition.
  5. Combine value, texture, line, shape and gesture in more developed drawings.
  6. Differentiate among representational, abstract, and conceptual approaches to art.
  7. Combine approaches and techniques of basic drawing.
  8. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  9. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials and
supplies.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment and responding to
supervision. 

II. Drawing Tools
   A. Use dry media in drawing.
      1. Draw with charcoal.
      2. Sketch with graphite.
      3. Use Conte crayon.
      4. Utilize pastels.
      5. Explore and use other experimental dry mediums.
   B. Use wet media.
      1. Draw with india ink.
      2. Use acrylics and/or watercolor.
      3. Explore and use other experimental wet mediums.

III. Basic Techniques
   A. Practice and use value (light and dark contrast) in realistic and
abstract manner.
   B. Develop repetitive marks and patterns to achieve texture.
   C. Develop a patient, slow contour line to describe representational
form and to increase visual awareness.
      1. Practice and use blind contour.
      2. Practice and utilize varying line, weight, contour.
      3. Practice and use cross-contour.
      4. Practice and utilize cross hatching.
   
IV. The Elements of Composition
   A. Produce representational marks to structure the picture plane.
   B. Produce non-objective marks to structure the picture plane.
   C. Use non-objective shapes to structure the picture plane.
   D. Produce a value scale and assign values to shapes within the picture
plane to achieve visual balance.
   E. Draw the negative shapes of a representational form in order to
recognize its visual importance within a composition.

V. Drawings of a More Complex Nature
   A. Compose drawings of mixed complexity.
   B. Construct drawings exhibiting a more individual and personal
approach.

VI. Representational, Abstract, and Conceptual Approaches to Drawing
   A. Use the strategies involved in representational drawing.
   B. Use the strategies involved in abstract drawing.
   C. Use the strategies involved in conceptual drawing.

VII. Drawings Combining Techniques
   A. Complete a drawing in stages with several techniques.
   B. Construct a drawing converting combined techniques into a more
complex layering process.

VIII. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence through practice and critique of
one’s own artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development.

IX. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss the importance of objective art criticism.
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of drawings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade.  The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 131

  • Title: Drawing II*
  • Number: ART 131
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 130.

Description:

This course involves intermediate problems in drawing with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. Students will work from models, still-life, and conceptual presentations. A variety of media will be explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures.
  2. Produce drawings using a variety of mediums singly and mixed.
  3. Compose drawings demonstrating the interaction of abstract and representational form.
  4. Use and combine various elements of drawing to achieve visual congruity.
  5. Develop structured compositions from a variety of sources.
  6. Demonstrate picture plane relationship to format modification.
  7. Create compositions exploring traditional and contemporary concepts through drawing.
  8. Recognize on a more advanced level the importance for autonomous decision making
  9. Demonstrate a more mature ability to critique artwork than demonstrated in Drawing I.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials and
supplies utilized in Drawing II.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision.

II. Drawing Mediums
   A. Intermediate exploration in using dry media in drawing.
      1. Draw with charcoal.
      2. Sketch with graphite.
      3. Use Conte crayon.
      4. Utilize pastels.
      5. Explore and use other experimental dry mediums.
   B. Intermediate exploration in using wet media.
      1. Sketch with markers.
      2. Draw with india ink.
      3. Utilize collage.
      4. Explore other experimental wet mediums.

III. Interaction of Abstract and Representational Form
   A. Generate drawings demonstrating perception of formal pattern
organization.
   B. Create drawings applying basic form simplification.
   C. Produce drawings incorporating stylization for artistic organization
or expression.

IV. Visual Congruity
   A. Produce compositions recognizing and organizing visual differences.
   B. Create drawings developing a plan or approach to organization.
   C. Construct compositions integrating basic elements of drawing.
   D. Devise compositions employing the principles of organization such as
balance, economy, dominance, volume, movement, proportion and space.

V. Compositions from a Variety Of Sources
   A. Create a drawing from a perceptual source.
   B. Devise a composition engaging the imagination.
   C. Originate a drawing from a remembered event.
   D. Develop a composition that employs chance.

VI. Format and Picture Plane Modifications
   A. Construct a drawing employing a shaped format.
   B. Compose a drawing demonstrating a harmonious relationship between
the picture plane and format.

VII. Traditional and Contemporary Concepts 
   A. Construct a drawing exploring and using primary forms.
   B. Compose a drawing exploring and using optical illusions.
   C. Develop a drawing exploring and using movement with kinetic forms.
   D. Originate a drawing exploring and using materials to produce a
collage.
   E. Construct a drawing exploring and using language for conceptual
notions for drawing.

IX. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence, at a more sophisticated level
than exhibited in Drawing I, through practice and critique of one’s own
artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate more self-assurance than demonstrated in
Drawing I through the discussion and criticism of other students’
artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development.

X. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss in depth the importance of art criticism.
   B. Review and explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Review and clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of drawings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade.  The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 135

  • Title: Painting I
  • Number: ART 135
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of painting. Students will learn basic painting skills, color properties, color mixing, color relationships, applications and proper use of tools and equipment. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures.
  2. Prepare painting surfaces.
  3. Demonstrate two basic approaches to painting.
  4. Practice value perception from observation.
  5. Execute projects using appropriate color properties and harmonies.
  6. Mix colors from observation.
  7. Construct compositions illustrating an awareness of shape relationships.
  8. Manipulate paint to create real, simulated and invented textures.
  9. Create paintings employing the elements of composition and design.
  10. Develop paintings employing various pictorial space concepts.
  11. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  12. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision.

II. Surface Preparation
   A. Assemble stretcher
   B. Stretch canvas
   C. Gesso canvas
   D. Prepare paper as a painting surface
   E. Explore and utilize other non-traditional painting surfaces

III. Paintings Utilizing Two Basic Approaches to Painting
   A. Generate a painting using the direct (alla prima) method of
painting.
   B. Create a painting using the indirect (imprimatura) method of
painting.

IV. Perception of Value Based on Observation
   A. Produce a ten step achromatic value scale.
   B. Create a painting from observation utilizing the achromatic scale.

V. Color Properties and Harmonies
   A. Execute a project using all three color properties of hue, value,
and intensity.
   B. Construct a project or projects utilizing color harmonies.
      1. Use complementary colors
      2. Use split complementary colors
      3. Use triadic colors
      4. Use analogous colors

VI. Color Mixing
   A. Create projects demonstrating proper color mixing.
   B. Compose paintings from observation illustrating relevant color
perception and color relationships.

VII. Shape Relationships
   A. Devise compositions utilizing effective negative and positive shape
relationships.
   B. Illustrate objective and non-objective forms.
   C. Employ geometric and biomorphic forms. 

VIII. The Importance of Texture
   A. Apply collage for real texture.
   B. Manipulate paint to simulate texture.
   C. Manipulate paint through experimentation for invented texture.

IX. The Elements of Composition and Design
   A. Create paintings using harmony and variety.
   B. Construct compositions employing balance, economy, dominance,
volume, movement and proportion.
   C. Produce compositions to accomplish form unity.

X. Space Concepts
   A. Create a composition defining deep space.
   B. Produce a work showing shallow space.
   C. Generate a painting depicting flat space.
   D. Compose a painting showing ambiguous space.

XI. Autonomous Decision Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence through practice and critique of
one’s own artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other students’ artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development.

XII. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss the importance of objective art criticism.
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of paintings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade.  The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 136

  • Title: Painting II*
  • Number: ART 136
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 135.

Description:

This course involves intermediate problems in painting with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures.
  2. Use various surface supports and take advantage of their particular characteristics.
  3. Demonstrate a variety of technical paint applications.
  4. Develop paintings showing a variety of space and color relationships.
  5. Produce work employing various compositional strategies.
  6. Generate paintings showing an awareness of aesthetic coherence.
  7. Identify historical and contemporary styles relevant to the course.
  8. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  9. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment and responding to
supervision. 

II. Various Surface Supports
   A. Use canvas and/or other fabric materials as a painting support.
   B. Utilize wood and/or other related surfaces as a support.
   C. Explore and use glass and/or Plexiglas as a painting ground.
   D. Explore and utilize a variety of metals as supports for painting.

III. Differing Paint Applications
   A. Generate a painting or paintings employing traditional mark-making.
   B. Produce a painting or paintings employing non-traditional
mark-making.

IV. Various Space and Color Relationships
   A. Explore and use color relationships that advance in space.
   B. Explore and utilize color relationships that recede in space.
   C. Explore and use color relationships that have neutral and/or static
associations.
   D. Explore utilize a combination of these color relationships.

V. Compositional Strategies
   A. Create a work utilizing a closed, open, or radical format
relationship.
   B. Compose a painting using symmetrical balance.
   C. Produce a painting using asymmetrical balance.
   D. Create a painting utilizing effective figure/ground relationship.
   E. Execute a painting which differentiates picture plane location.

VI. Aesthetic Coherence
   A. Generate a work which has been developed from an artistic experience
in terms of form.
   B. Produce a painting employing psychological considerations.
   C. Execute a composition incorporating intellectual and symbolic
content.    
   D. Create a painting utilizing the interrelationship of basic visual
elements into a harmonious unity.

VII. Historical and Contemporary Styles Relevant to the Painting Projects
   A. Identify and discuss Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada,
Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Neo-Realism, New Image,
Neo-Expressionism, Neo-Abstraction and Desconstructionism.
   B. Compare and contrast Modernism and Post-Modernism. 

VIII. Autonomous Decision Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence, at a more advanced level than
Painting I, through practice and critique of one’s own artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate more self-assurance than demonstrated in
Painting I through the discussion and criticism of other students’
artwork.
   C. Build comprehension of the decision-making process through study of
professional artist’s means of image development.

IX. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss in depth the importance of art criticism.
   B. Review and explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Review and clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of paintings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade.  The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 138

  • Title: Digital Imaging for Artists I
  • Number: ART 138
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is an introduction to the use of the computer as a medium for making fine art. The course will emphasize developing the student's skill in making expressive visual statements using computer technology. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe lab procedures.
  2. Define and demonstrate the use of basic computer hardware.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the use of the operating system.
  4. Explain and demonstrate the use of specific imaging software.
  5. Define and demonstrate the way color is manipulated on the computer.
  6. Use a variety of input devices and explain the differences between them.
  7. Use a variety of output devices and explain the differences between them.
  8. Create an edition of digital prints and explain the role of multiples in reference to art making.
  9. Explain and discuss the difference in the archival quality of the various media utilized in digital imaging.
  10. Develop digital images employing various compositional strategies.
  11. Generate digital images showing an awareness of aesthetic coherence.
  12. Produce digital images involving a variety of space and color relationships.
  13. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  14. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision.

II. Operating Basic Hardware
   A. Define and use the CPU.
   B. Explain the function of the monitor.
   C. Define and demonstrate the use of the keyboard and mouse.
   D. Describe and demonstrate the use of peripheral devices.

III. Using the Operating System
   A. Open and utilize menu options, i.e., Apple menu, File, Edit, View,
Special, Help.
   B. Open the hard disk folder, view content list, and close it (without
modification!).
   C. Employ find file.
   D. Create a new folder on the desktop.
      1. Name or rename the folder.
      2. Open the folder, resize the window, close the window.
      3. Drag to a new position, then to the trash, empty the trash.
   E. Perform a forced restart.
   F. Shut down the computer.

IV. Using Specific Imaging Software (Adobe Photoshop)
   A. Open the software.
   B. Open a new file.
   C. Open an existing file.
   D. Define and discuss the various menu and submenu items.
   E. Organize palettes and palette options.
   F. Utilize online help.
   G. Explore the various software tools.
      1. Use the selection tools.
      2. Utilize the paint tools.
      3. Manipulate the special tools.
      4. Use the screen tools.
   H. Explain and utilize masks and mask options.
   I. Define and use the navigator, info, and options functions.
   J. Describe and utilize the color, swatches, and brush functions.
   K. Explain and use the history and actions functions.
   L. Define and work with layers and layer options.
   M. Describe and use a variety of filters and filter options.

V. Manipulating Color on the Computer
   A. Define and use grayscale mode.
   B. Explain and utilize duotone mode.
   C. Identify and use indexed color mode.
   D. Define and utilize RGB mode.
   E. Explain and use CMYK mode.

VI. Using a Variety of Input Devices
   A. Digitize an image or object(s) using a flatbed scanner.
   B. Digitize a transparency using a slide scanner.
   C. Take a picture of an image utilizing a digital camera.
   D. Capture an image from the Web.

VII. Using a Variety of Output Devices
   A. Illustrate the function and purpose of images output to the
monitor.
   B. Define and demonstrate the differences output to various printers.
      1. Print and explain the properties of an image produced from an
inkjet printer.
      2. Print and define the properties of an image produced from a laser
printer.
      3. Print and explain the properties of an image produced from a
dye-sublimation printer.
      4. Print and define the properties of an image produced from a
thermal-wax printer.
      5. Output and explain the properties and reasons for creating an
image from a film recorder.

VIII. The Archival Qualities of Various Inks and Papers or Supports
   A. Identify and discuss fugitive inks.
   B. Classify and explain fugitive papers or supports.
   C. Identify and discuss permanent inks.
   D. Classify and explain permanent papers or supports.

IX. The Basic Visual Elements and the Elements of Composition
   A. Create images utilizing the software employing the basic visual
elements including line, shape, texture, value, and color.
   B. Using the software, develop images with clear figure/ground
relationships.
   C. Using the software, structure images that have a strong sense of
harmony and contrast.
   D. Create compositions using the software that demonstrate balance,
economy, dominance, volume, movements, proportion, and space.
   E. Using the software, devise compositions that accomplish a strong
sense of form unity.

X. Autonomous Decision Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence through practice and critique of
one’s own artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other students’ artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development.

XI. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss the importance of objective art criticism.
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final Portfolio: Production of a group of digital prints and images on
disk satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments to develop
specific skills and competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding.

Written Tests: Stressing factual knowledge of hardware, software, and
related vocabulary to the production of digital imaging.

Out-of-Class Assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research Project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class Participation and Attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade.  The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 142

  • Title: Ceramics I
  • Number: ART 142
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is designed to build a conceptual and manual foundation for future ceramics education. Students will study the properties of clay, its preparation, hand and wheel techniques, surface design, firing methods, fundamental ceramic terms, principles of design, introductory ceramic history and orientation to safe practices for the ceramic artist. Emphasis will be on developing skills appropriate to the beginning student for the purpose of creative and technical expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish and define the origins, properties and types of various clay bodies, including earthenware and stoneware.
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the techniques of clay preparation and handling.
  3. Demonstrate a proficiency in the fundamental techniques used in hand-built ceramics such as pinch, coil and slab construct appropriate to the beginning student.
  4. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the basic techniques of wheel-thrown ceramics such as centering, opening, pulling up, shaping and trimming, to include a proficiency in basic forms, i.e., cylinder and bowl.
  5. Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of various methods to enhance ceramic wares through surface design such as texture and embellishment appropriate to the beginning student.
  6. Define the different means and methods used in firing ceramic wares, to include bisque and glaze firings.
  7. Demonstrate an ability to use the fundamental vocabulary of ceramic artists that describes ceramic form, function, anatomy, techniques and processes.
  8. Demonstrate an ability to use the principles of design to create, develop and describe ceramic forms appropriate to the beginning student.
  9. Distinguish and describe historical ceramic wares and firing methods by culture and/or region, i.e., early uses, Mediterranean, Orient, Africa, America and Europe appropriate to the beginning student.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to exercise safe practices for the ceramic artist, such as identifying hazardous materials, protective measures and disposal of those materials.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Distinguishing and Defining the Origins, Properties and Various
Types of Clay Bodies, Including Earthenware and Stoneware
   A. Trace the origin of clay, including:
      1. Primary
      2. Residual
      3. Sedimentary
   B. Describe and use the properties of clay in projects, including:
      1. Plasticity
      2. Tooth
      3. Hardness
      4. Porosity
   C. Identify and use appropriate clay bodies in individual projects,
including:
      1. Earthenware
      2. Stoneware
      3. Porcelain

II. Preparation and Handling of Clay
   A. Prepare clay using appropriate techniques for both wheel and
non-wheel methods of
manipulation, including:
      1. Wedging
      2. Storage
      3. Reclaiming
   B. Handle clay using appropriate techniques for both wheel and
non-wheel methods, including:
      1. Wet clay/plastic
      2. Leather-hard
      3. Bone-dry
      4. Bisque-fired
      5. Glazes

III. Hand-Built Ceramics
   A. Use the pinch technique to produce ceramic ware, including:
      1. Pinching open form
      2. Pinching onto form
   B. Use the coil construction technique to produce ceramic ware,
including:
      1. Hand-rolled
      2. Extruded
   C. Use slab construction techniques to produce ceramic ware,
including:
      1. Hand-rolled
      2. Machine-rolled
      3. Methods of joining
   D. Apply molds to slab construction to produce ceramic ware,
including:
      1. Drape-slump and hump
      2. Press molds

IV. Wheel Techniques for Producing Ceramic Ware, Including Cylinders,
Jars, and Bowls
   A. Prepare clay for the throwing process.
      1. Use the kneading process of clay preparation
      2. Use the wedging process of clay preparation
   B. Center clay
   C. Open clay
   D. Spiral pull-up practice
   E. Shape or form clay
   F. Trim clay

V. Surface Design Techniques
   A. Identify the appropriate surface techniques for each stage of the
clay:
      1. Techniques for the plastic stage, including:
         a. Slip marbling, feathering and trailing
         b. Embossing
      2. Techniques for the leather hard stage, including:
         a. Sgraffito
         b. Slip applications
      3. Techniques for bone dry stage, including:
         a. Terra sigillata
         b. Incising
      4. Techniques for bisque fired stage, including:
         a. Stains and Oxides
         b. Glazes
      5. Specific glaze application techniques
         a. Describe the purpose of glazes, including function and
decorative aspects
         b. Describe the characteristics of the various types of glazes,
including glossy, matte,
crackle, transparent and opaque.
         c. Outline the application methods, including spray, dip and
pour.
         d. Explain temperature ranges and the impact on glazes, including
low and high fire
ranges.
   B. Apply appropriate surface techniques, listed above, to enhance a
variety of individual ceramic ware projects in the studio.

VI. Firing Ceramic Ware
   A. Define and use a variety of glazes, including:
      1. Low fire glazes
      2. High fire glazes
   B. Describe and demonstrate various types of firing fuels and methods,
including:
      1. Electric
      2. Gas
    
VII. General Principles of Design
   A. Define form and its elements, including:
      1. Contrast
      2. Gesture, including rhythm and movement
      3. Unity
   B. Define surface quality and describe its elements, including:
      1. Texture
      2. Decoration
   C. Apply appropriate design principles to enhance a variety of
individual ceramic projects in the studio.

VIII. Ceramic Form and Design
   A. Describe the various elements of form in ceramic ware, including
formal and informal analysis.
   B. Define and describe the anatomy of form as its relates to vessels
and non-vessels, including:
      1. The vessel lip, neck, shoulder, belly and foot
      2. The sculptural elements of organic/geometric, mass/void and
surface
      3. The role of profile and volume in vessel forms

IX. Historical Ceramics
   A. Describe and identify historical ceramic ware and their firing
methods by culture and/or
regions, including:
      1. Early uses/prehistory
      2. Mediterranean
         a. Egypt
         b. Asia
         c. Greece
      3. Orient
         a. China
         b. Korea
         c. Japan
         d. Persia
      4. Africa
      5. Americas
         a. Mesoamerican
         b. Isthmus
         c. South
         d. North
      6. Europe
   B. Describe and identify historical ceramic ware and their firing
methods for contemporary
America, including:
      1. United States
         a. Early pottery
         b. 1920 through 1940
         c. Contemporary, 1950 to present
   C. Describe specific cultural and technological influences for each era
and locale.

X. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the ceramics
studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the
ceramic studio setting.
   C. Describe and follow protective measures for:
      a. Inhalation
      b. Direct contact/absorption
      c. Ingestion

XI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the
studio, including giving and accepting criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

 Examinations           20-40% of grade
   Projects/Assignments   60-80% of grade
                            100%

Attendance: 21 or more unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in
receiving a grade of failure in the course; 10 to 20 unexcused
studio/lecture hours will result in the reduction of the final grade.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades.  In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: Critiques, Demonstrations,
Class discussions, Studio maintenance, Safe practices

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: Fundamental ceramic vocabulary, Ceramic
history, Ceramic materials, Techniques/processes

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
Clay preparation, Building techniques (pinching, coiling, slab, wheel),
Decoration techniques

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: Ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, Development of a range of possible
solutions, Exploration of possible solutions in a two- to
three-dimensional medium, Implementation leading to a final result,
Evaluation of the result.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability, which will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Although care will be taken with individual student work, the process of drying, firing and glazing may sometimes result in loss of that work.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 143

  • Title: Ceramics II*
  • Number: ART 143
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 142.

Description:

This course covers more advanced methods and studio practices in creative ceramic wheel expression and glaze formation. Emphasis is on development of a sense of thrown form and creative decoration or optional creative non-wheel ceramic form development. The course focuses on advanced ceramic form production, aesthetic issues, investigative study and practice. Clay, glaze and firing techniques are investigated in depth. The student acquires a repertoire of studio skills, a deeper awareness of ceramic history and articulated criteria of judgment. Individual interpretation and conceptual development are expected. The study of aesthetics of ceramic form is undertaken. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Create and express original ideas, functional and nonfunctional, in clay appropriate to a second level ceramics course.
  2. Produce a number of creative, original, well designed and executed ceramic forms beyond that of the specific course assignments.
  3. Initiate practice with the creation of larger volumetric studies with forms.
  4. Initiate practice with the creation of additional height with forms.
  5. Obtain sophisticated form development including closure of forms with lids, combinations of different forms into an unity, and variations of a specific form.
  6. Exhibit conceptual expression, including the communication of ideals or ideas with form.
  7. Exhibit a historical awareness of the ceramic discipline by producing ceramic ware which reflects and responds to the historical firing methods and styles found in ceramic history.
  8. Create specific decorative techniques designed for specific forms.
  9. Initiate glaze research.
  10. Initiate an individual critique criterion of judgment of ceramic art.
  11. 1Begin to utilize in one’s own ceramic ware good, sound formal qualities, including: shape, proportion, size, weight, contour, curve, and decorative design.
  12. Develop an increasing awareness within one’s own work of the notions including: metaphor, concept, vessel-sculptural issues, etc.
  13. Begin to use additional tool utilization in one’s own working processes including: wooden ribs, rubber ribs, throwing sticks, templates, etc.
  14. Demonstrate the making of a wide range of ceramic form including: jars, spheres, bottles, plates, lidded vessels, teapots, etc.
  15. Demonstrate more sophisticated throwing techniques including: throwing “off the hump” and duplicate forms in terms of scale and sense of form.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Development of Individual Form and Decoration
   A. Perform wheel throwing appropriate to advanced ceramic level
application, including:
      1. Emphasis on scale in terms of height
         a. Practice with spiral pulling of taller forms
         b. Join multiple thrown forms to obtain height
      2. Emphasis on scale in terms of volume
         a. Practice with larger masses of centered clay
         b. Increase width of thrown form
      3. Create a wide based range of thrown forms, including:
         a. Bowls
         b. Jars
         c. Plates
         d. Vases
   B. Identify and use appropriate decorative techniques.

II. Aesthetic and Creative Research
   A. Demonstrate and apply appropriate design principles to enhance a
variety of individual ceramic projects in the studio.
   B. Obtain sophisticated form development including closure of forms
with lids, combinations of different forms into an unity, and variations
of a specific form.
   C. Research variations of a theme and evolution of an idea.

III. Individual Interpretation and Conceptual Development
   A. Demonstrate the development of a series of ceramic ware which employ
specific conceptual form and color unification.
   B. Initiate the manufacture of a specific ware which reflects an
individual style or concept.

IV. Critique Criterion Development
   A. Develop an individual critique criterion which describes ceramic
ware in general.
      1. Participate in group critique sessions.
      2. Participate in individual critique sessions.
   B. Develop an individual critique criterion which reflects a
self-critiquing of the student’s own ceramic ware.

V. General Studio Work
   A. Demonstrate an individual approach to specific advanced ceramic
technologies, including:
      1. Technological process involved with kiln firing, including:
         a. Low fire
         b. High fire
      2. Firing schedules, including:
         a. Bisque fire
         b. Glaze fire
      3. Types of firings, including:
         a. Electric
         b. Gas
   B. Demonstrate an individual approach to specific advanced decorative
techniques, including:
      1. Slips
      2. Oxides
      3. Stains
      4. Terra sigillata

VI. Individual Development of Ceramic Ware
   A. Create individual ware for the specific assignments.
   B. Create individual ware for the open work assignment.

VII. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the ceramics
studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the ceramic studio setting.
   C. Describe and follow protective measures for:
      1. Inhalation
      2. Direct contact/absorption
      3. Ingestion

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be
accomplished using the following methods:
   Examinations           20-40% of grade
   Projects/Assignments   60-80% of grade
                            100%

Attendance: 21 or more unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in
receiving a grade of failure in the course; 10 to 20 unexcused
studio/lecture hours will result in the reduction of the final grade.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: Critiques, Demonstrations,
Class discussions, Studio maintenance, Safe practices

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: Advanced ceramic vocabulary, Ceramic
history and its relationship to their individual work, Ceramic materials,
Advanced techniques/processes

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
Clay preparation, Building techniques (pinching, coiling, slab, wheel),
Decoration techniques

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: Ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, Development of a range of possible
solutions, Exploration of possible solutions in a two- to
three-dimensional medium, Implementation leading to a final result,
Evaluation of the result

Student grades will also be based on at least the following:
1. Overall semester assessment of student work based on technique, design,
and creativity of ceramic form, and process of development and growth. 
2. Semester progress and growth evidenced from starting point of semester
through the end of the semester of form development as represented by the
assignments.
3. Creation of ceramic work that indicates a process of growth, an
evidence of consistency, a quality and concern for both thought and
action, originality and uniqueness, and a development of aesthetic values
and analytical skills conducive to sound works of art.
4. Specific assignment evaluations, as well as additional studio work and
research. 
5. Specific assignment evaluations, in addition to extra work created
beyond that of the assigned work.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability, which will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Although care will be taken with individual student work, the process of drying, firing and glazing may sometimes result in loss of that work.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 145

  • Title: Sculpture I
  • Number: ART 145
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Students will explore and study natural and synthetic sculptural forms as they create work using traditional or contemporary media and techniques. Assignments require work in limestone, clay, wax, bronze, aluminum and steel, and involve carving, modeling and building up. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of achieving volumetric form through a construction of planes.
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the technique of utilizing the substitution process using wax and bronze casting approaches, or another material choice.
  3. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of achieving volumetric form through line.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to exercise safe practices for the sculpture artist, such as identifying hazardous materials, protective measures and disposal of those materials.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Carving Method of Manipulation
   A. Use the carving method of manipulation (direct carving with
subtraction methods) to produce sculpture forms, including:
      1. Sandstone
      2. Limestone
      3. Plaster carving

II. Modeling Method of Manipulation
   A. Use the modeling method of manipulation to produce sculpture forms,
including:
      1. Modeling with focus on clay construction
      2. Wax for later bronze casting

III. Addition (Building Up) Method of Manipulation
   A. Use the addition (building up) process to produce sculpture forms,
including:
      1. Welded steel
      2. Other welded metals and materials

IV. Substitution Method of Manipulation
   A. Use the substitution process to produce sculpture forms, including:
      1. Cast bronze
      2. Cast aluminum

V. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the sculpture
studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the sculpture studio setting.
   C. Describe and follow protective measures for:
      1. Inhalation
      2. Direct contact/absorption
      3. Ingestion

VI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: Excessive unexcused absences from studio/lecture hours
will result in the reduction of the final grade or receiving a grade of
failure in the course.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: Critiques, Demonstrations,
Class discussions, Studio maintenance, Safe practices

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: Fundamental sculpture vocabulary,
Sculpture history, Sculpture materials, Techniques/processes

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
Equipment utilization; Carving, modeling, and welding techniques;
Presentation of forms (bases, surface closure, etc.)

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: Ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, Development of a range of possible
solutions, Exploration of possible solutions in a two- to
three-dimensional medium, Implementation leading to a final result,
Evaluation of the result.

Grading: 
Assigned major projects and various minor projects: 60-80%
Quizzes and tests: 20-40%

Student grades should be based at least on the following:

1. The process and product of the basic assigned methods of manipulation:
   a. Sandstone, limestone or plaster carving
   b. Modeling in clay or wax
   c. Cast bronze or aluminum
   d. Collage or welded steel form
2. Class participation in critiques and general discussion.
3. Development of individual criteria of aesthetics of form.

Additionally, student grades should be based on at least the following:

1. Studio performance and demonstration of knowledge on tests or in group
critiques will be evaluated. Studio progress will be evaluated in the
regular class critiques as well as individual conferences. Both product as
well as process will be evaluated.
2. The experiences a student has in the art studio should assist that
student in establishing an interior critical dialogue in relation to the
work...failure to do so leads to imprisonment in the moment of execution.
3. Students should not be lacking in critical perspective. Through
critiques and written comments each will be expected to articulate clearly
their ideas on both their creative product as well as their creative
process.
4. Evaluation focuses on the student’s involvement with creative
expression as well as technical insight. Emphasis is placed on both
meaning and structure of their aesthetic growth and development of
self-identity and their attitude of creative confidence.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability that will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Anything left in studio after noon on the last day of class will be discarded.
  3. Anyone who may be pregnant or plans to become pregnant during the semester should not enroll in this course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 146

  • Title: Sculpture II*
  • Number: ART 146
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 145.

Description:

This continuation of ART 145 will focus on advanced methods and techniques with emphasis on materials, forms and the student's selection of an individual direction with individual material choices. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the intermediate student of the technique of achieving volumetric form through a construction of planes.
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the intermediate student of utilizing the substitution process using wax and bronze casting approaches, or another material choice.
  3. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the intermediate student of achieving volumetric form through line.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to exercise safe practices for the sculpture artist, such as identifying hazardous materials, protective measures and disposal of those materials.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Totality Through Volume Achieved as a Construction of Planes
   A. Use volume achieved as a construction of planes utilizing welded
steel, or another material
choice to create a sculptural form and supporting research including:
      1. Define planes on a written test.
      2. Utilize all phases of oxygen-acetylene processes by displaying
knowledge of this in written form as well as actual usage with instructor
supervision.
      3. Utilize all phases of arc welding processes by displaying
knowledge of this in written form as well as actual usage of the equipment
with instructor supervision.
      4. Complete a three-foot or larger welded steel sculpture form.
      5. Achieve a unity of totality through steel planes in their steel
form.
      6. Observe more complicated forms and how to both see and feel the
planes that compose it and define it.
      7. Begin to make conceptual statements through their art forms.
      8. Discuss in critique the importance and significance of executing
the steel form as to student’s success in making judgments, developing
confidence from these judgments, and arriving at independent thinking and
action.

II. Substitution Process Utilizing Wax and Bronze Casting Approach, or
Another Material Choice
   A. Use substitution process involving wax and bronze or Styrofoam and
aluminum to create a
sculptural form and supporting research including:
      1. Discuss the four kinds of molds and their potentials as relating
to the bronze casting experience.
      2. Model a wax form.
      3. Demonstrate the spruing systems utilized in the bronze casting
process including both gating and venting systems.
      4. Assist in investing procedures and become familiar with the
ceramic shell investment process.
      5. Assist in the bronze pouring process.
      6. Research the various finishing techniques for bronze casts,
including patinas, wire brushing, chasing, etc.

III. Totality Through Volume Achieved by Lines
   A. Use totality through volume achieved by lines to create a sculptural
form and supporting
research including:
      1. Define in written form, space, volume, positive space, negative
space, form and linear form as these apply to assigned sculpture.
      2. Become aware of positive and negative form by achieving these in
sculptural forms.
      3. Create a sculpture which embodies an open, linear form with parts
being utilized in a spatial tension.
      4. Determine what material or materials will best achieve one’s
idea.
      5. Discuss in critique the importance of executing a sculptural form
which is displaying a totality achieved through volume utilizing lines with
emphasis upon negative and positive space.


IV. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the sculpture
studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the sculpture studio setting.
   C. Describe and follow protective measures for:
      a. Inhalation
      b. Direct contact/absorption
      c. Ingestion

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the
studio, including giving and accepting criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Examinations            20-40% of grade
   Projects/Assignments    60-80% of grade
                             100%
        
Attendance: Excessive unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in the
reduction of the final grade or receiving a grade of failure in the
course.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: Critiques, Demonstrations,
Class discussions, Studio maintenance, Safe practices

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: Advanced sculpture vocabulary, Sculpture
history, Sculpture materials
Techniques/processes

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
Equipment utilization; Carving, modeling, and welding techniques;
Presentation of forms (bases, surface closure, etc.)

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: Ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, Development of a range of possible
solutions, Exploration of possible solutions in a two- to
three-dimensional medium, Implementation leading to a final result,
Evaluation of the result

Student grades should be based at least on the following:

1. A proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the technique of
achieving totality through volume achieved as a construction of planes.
2. A proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the technique of
utilizing the substitution process using wax and bronze casting
approaches, or another material choice.
3. A proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the technique of
achieving totality through volume achieved by lines.
4. Class participation in critiques and general discussion.
5. Development of individual criteria of aesthetics of form.

Additionally, student grades should be based on at least the following:

1. Studio performance and demonstration of knowledge on tests or in group
critiques will be evaluated. Studio progress will be evaluated in the
regular class critiques as well as individual conferences. Both product as
well as process will be evaluated.
2. The experiences a student has in the art studio should assist that
student in establishing an interior critical dialogue in relation to the
work...failure to do so leads to imprisonment in the moment of execution.
3. Students should not be lacking in critical perspective and through
critiques and written comments each will be expected to articulate clearly
their ideas on both their creative product as well as their creative
process.
4. Evaluation focuses on the student’s involvement with creative
expression as well as technical insight. Emphasis is placed on both
meaning and structure of their aesthetic growth and development of
self-identity and attitude of creative confidence.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability that will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Anything left in studio after noon on the last day of class will be discarded.
  3. Anyone who may be pregnant or plans to become pregnant during the semester should not enroll in this course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 148

  • Title: Metal and Silversmithing I
  • Number: ART 148
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is a basic introduction to the terms, tools and techniques involved in creating jewelry and other wearables as they relate to the human figure. Casting, fabrication and construction will be explored. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish and define the elements of design as they relate to jewelry and metalsmithing forms.
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the beginning student of the techniques and processes of jewelry/silversmithing and express self visually with metal.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to use the fundamental vocabulary of metalsmithing artists of the common terms used in jewelry/silversmithing.
  4. Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of aesthetic awareness expressed in individual jewelry/silversmithing ware.
  5. Demonstrate the proper and safe utilization of jewelry/silversmithing tools, equipment and processes.
  6. Define and identify the various types and forms of non-ferrous metals.
  7. Distinguish and describe historical and contemporary jewelers and their ware.
  8. Demonstrate a proficiency in the fundamental techniques used in jewelry/silversmithing methods of manipulation including casting, fabrication, and construction.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to exercise safe practices for the jewelry/silversmithing artist, such as identifying hazardous materials, protective measures and disposal of those materials.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Designing Projects
   A. Define and describe the elements of design.
   B. Define and describe the principles of organization.
   C. Utilize simple planning.

II. Understanding Materials and Processes
   A. Use wire as a basis for a jewelry form.
   B. Use sheet construction with flat metals as a basis for a jewelry
form.
   C. Use the techniques and processes for lost wax and cuttlefish bone
casting as a basis for a jewelry form.

III. Steps in Metal Construction
   A. Use the studio equipment and tools safely.
   B. Exhibit a proficiency with sawing.
   C. Exhibit a proficiency with filing.
   D. Exhibit a proficiency with piercing.
   E. Exhibit a proficiency with bending.
   F. Exhibit a proficiency with annealing.
   G. Exhibit a proficiency with soldering.
   H. Exhibit a proficiency with buffing and polishing.
   I. Define and use the appropriate technical terms.

IV. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the
jewelry/silversmithing studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the jewelry/silversmithing studio setting.

V. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations           20-40% of grade
Projects/Assignments   60-80% of grade
                            100%

Attendance: Excessive unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in the
reduction of the final grade or receiving a grade of failure in the
course.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: class participation, studio
maintenance, safe practices, and design sketchbook/journal.

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: fundamental jewelry/silversmithing
vocabulary, jewelry/silversmithing materials, and jewelry/silversmithing
techniques/processes.

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
casting, fabrication, and construction.

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, development of a range of possible
solutions, exploration of possible solutions in a two to three dimensional
medium, implementation leading to a final result, and evaluation of the
result.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability that will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Students are expected to purchase any basic tools necessary to complete the course requirements.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 148H

No information found.

ART 149

  • Title: Metal and Silversmithing II*
  • Number: ART 149
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 148.

Description:

Students will study advanced casting and construction techniques. Projects should show a higher degree of design and function. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish and define the elements of design as they relate to advanced jewelry and metalsmithing forms.
  2. Demonstrate a proficiency appropriate to the advanced student of the techniques and processes of jewelry/silversmithing and express self visually with metal in a higher degree of design and function.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to use the vocabulary of metalsmithing artists of the advanced terms used in jewelry/silversmithing.
  4. Demonstrate a proficiency in the use of aesthetic awareness expressed in individual jewelry/silversmithing ware.
  5. Demonstrate the proper and safe utilization of advanced jewelry/silversmithing tools, equipment and processes.
  6. Distinguish and describe historical and contemporary jewelers and their ware.
  7. Demonstrate a proficiency in the advanced techniques used in jewelry/silversmithing methods of manipulation including casting, fabrication, and construction.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to exercise safe practices for the jewelry/silversmithing artist, such as identifying hazardous materials, protective measures and disposal of those materials.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge in purchasing supplies and equipment.
  10. Demonstrate a proficiency in the design and manufacture of an original piece utilizing sterling silver which is not jewelry.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Designing Projects
   A. Define and describe the elements of design.
   B. Define and describe the principles of organization.
   C. Utilize more advanced design planning.

II. Fabrication
   A. Choose from the following advanced techniques to create jewelry
works of art, including:
      1. Chainmaking
      2. Chasing/Repousse
      3. Marriage of metals
      4. Raising
      5. Photoetching
      6. Reticulation
      7. Stone setting

III. Sterling Silver Project Other Than Jewelry

IV. Casting
   A. Utilize the lost wax process in creating a cast jewelry project,
including:
      1. Centrifugal cast process
      2. Vacuum cast process
   B. Utilize the cuttlebone process in creating a cast jewelry project.
   C. Utilize the Tiffa stone process in creating a cast jewelry project.
   D. Utilize the charcoal block process in creating a cast jewelry
project.

V. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the
jewelry/silversmithing studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the jewelry/silversmithing studio setting.

VI. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations           20-40% of grade
Projects/Assignments   60-80% of grade
                            100%

Attendance: Excessive unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in the
reduction of the final grade or receiving a grade of failure in the
course.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities: studio maintenance, safe
practices, and design sketchbook.

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: fundamental jewelry/silversmithing
vocabulary, jewelry/silversmithing materials, and jewelry/silversmithing
techniques/processes.

Studio Project Skills: Students will be evaluated in the following skills:
casting, fabrication, and construction.

Studio Project Problem Solving: Students will be evaluated on the
following components of the problem solving process: ability to analyze
the problem’s requirements, development of a range of possible
solutions, exploration of possible solutions in a two to three dimensional
medium, implementation leading to a final result, and evaluation of the
result.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability which will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Students are expected to purchase any basic tools necessary to complete the course requirements.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 172

  • Title: Watercolor Painting
  • Number: ART 172
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is an introduction to transparent water media with emphasis on learning fundamental painting skills, the visual elements, composition, visual perception and an awareness of personal expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate practice safe studio practices
  2. Prepare water media surfaces
  3. Demonstrate a variety of approaches to water based media
  4. Practice value perception from observation
  5. Execute projects using appropriate color properties and harmonies
  6. Mix colors from observation
  7. Construct compositions illustrating an awareness of shape relationships
  8. Manipulate paint to create real, simulated, and invented texture
  9. Employ the elements of composition and design in paintings
  10. Develop watercolors employing various pictorial space concepts
  11. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously
  12. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies
   B. Practice safe studio procedures
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision

II. Surface Preparation
   A. Prepare paper for use as a watercolor surface
   B. Explore other non-traditional water media surfaces

III. Basic Approaches to Watercolor Painting
   A. Generate a painting using wet brush method
   B. Create a composition using the wet into wet technique
   C. Produce a painting using the dry brush approach
   D. Develop a water media work using additives (i.e., salt)
   E. Generate a composition combining techniques

IV. Perception of Value Based on Observation
   A. Produce a ten step achromatic value scale using water media
   B. Create a painting from observation utilizing the achromatic scale

V. Color Properties and Harmonies
   A. Execute a project using all three color properties of hue, value,
and intensity
   B. Construct a project or projects utilizing color harmonies
      1. Use complementary colors
      2. Use split complementary colors
      3. Use triadic colors
      4. Use analogous colors

VI. Color Mixing
   A. Create a project demonstrating proper color mixing
   B. Compose a painting from observation illustrating effective color
perception and color relationships

VII. Shape Relationships
   A. Devise compositions utilizing effective negative and positive shape
relationships
   B. Illustrate objective and non-objective forms
   C. Employ geometric and biomorphic forms

VIII. The Importance of Texture
   A. Apply collage for real texture
   B. Manipulate water media to simulate texture
   C. Manipulate water media through experimentation for invented texture

IX. The Elements of Composition and Design
   A. Create paintings using harmony and variety
   B. Construct compositions employing balance, economy, dominance,
volume, movement, and proportion
   C. Produce compositions to accomplish form unity

X. Space Concepts
   A. Create a composition defining deep space
   B. Produce a work showing shallow space
   C. Generate a painting depicting flat space
   D. Compose a painting showing ambiguous space

XI. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Acquire confidence through practice and critique of one’s own
artwork
   B. Develop and demonstrate assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development

XII. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss the importance of objective art criticism
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques
   E. Perform individual and group critiques

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: production of a group of water based media paintings
satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific
skills and competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding

Out-of-class assignments: production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content

Research project: a written research project to supplement the course
objectives

Class participation and attendance: active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class Grades: The final portfolio is, by
far, the major means of evaluation in the course, representing 60-80% of
the grade. The other listed student activities account for the remaining
20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 231

  • Title: Life Drawing I*
  • Number: ART 231
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 130.

Description:

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of drawing for students wanting a concentration in drawing the human figure. Students will acquire basic competence in developing drawings involving the human form. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures
  2. Produce drawings of the human figure using a variety of mediums
  3. Compose drawings of the human figure utilizing the basic art elements of line, shape, value, texture, and color
  4. Create sketches and drawings of the human figure employing the elements of composition and design
  5. Produce gesture drawings of the human figure
  6. Generate drawings stressing the general planes and masses of the model
  7. Construct a drawing of the human skeleton in proportion
  8. Compose drawings of the muscles of the human figure
  9. Compose drawings of the human figure in a variety of environments
  10. Recognize the importance for autonomous decision-making
  11. Demonstrate a basic ability to critique artwork objectively

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies
   B. Practice safe studio procedures
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision

II. Drawing Mediums
   A. Use dry media in drawing the figure
      1. Draw with charcoal
      2. Sketch with graphite
      3. Use conte’ crayon
      4. Utilize pastels
      5. Explore other experimental dry mediums
   B. Use wet media in portraying the figure
      1. Draw with india ink
      2. Use acrylics and/or watercolors
      3. Explore and utilize other experimental wet mediums

III. The Basic Art Elements
   A. Generate figure drawings using line
   B. Create drawings of the model utilizing shape
   C. Draw the human form using value
   D. Sketch the figure using texture
   E. Produce drawings containing color to draw the model

IV. The Human Figure and the Elements of Composition and Design
   A. Produce compositions utilizing effective figure/ground
relationships
   B. Create drawings using harmony and variety involving the figure
   C. Construct compositions of the model or models employing balance,
economy, dominance, volume, movement, proportion, and space
   D. Devise compositions involving the figure to accomplish form Unity

V. Gesture Sketches
   A. Discuss the attributes of gesture sketches
   B. Explain the dynamics of gesture sketches
   C. Originate limited-time gesture sketches

VI. Drawings Using Planes and Masses
   A. Create drawings diagramming the general planes of the figure
   B. Construct drawings illustrating the simple masses of the human
figure

VII. Human Anatomy
   A. Construct drawings of the human skeleton
   B. Draw the human form illustrating knowledge of the major muscle
forms

VIII. Life Drawings in a Variety of Environments
   A. Create drawings of the figure in an interior environment
   B. Produce drawings of the model in an exterior environment
   C. Generate compositions of the figure in imaginary or abstract
Environments

IX. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence through practice and critique of
one’s own artwork
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development

X. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss the importance of objective art criticism
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of drawings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content 

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade. The other listed student

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 232

  • Title: Life Drawing II*
  • Number: ART 232
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 231.

Description:

This course is an intermediate investigation of drawing from the human form. This class is for students wanting to concentrate on figure drawing beyond Life Drawing I. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures
  2. Produce drawings of the human figure using a wider array of mediums than demonstrated in Life Drawing I
  3. Construct drawings of the human figure utilizing the art, design, and compositional elements with more acuity than in Life Drawing I
  4. Develop sketches and drawings emphasizing strong expressive elements of the human figure
  5. Identify historically some of the basic differences in the way the figure has been depicted from the traditional to the contemporary
  6. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously
  7. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies
   B. Practice safe studio procedures
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision

II. Drawing Mediums
   A. Intermediate exploration in using dry media to draw the figure
      1. Draw with charcoal
      2. Sketch with graphite
      3. Use conte’ crayon
      4. Utilize pastels
      5. Explore other experimental dry mediums
   B. Intermediate exploration in using wet media to portray the figure
      1. Sketch with markers
      2. Draw with india ink
      3. Use acrylics
      4. Explore other experimental wet mediums

III. Art, Design, and Compositional Elements
   A. Generate figure drawings using line, shape, value, texture, and
color with more acuity than Life Drawing I
   B. Create drawings of the model utilizing effective figure/ground
relationships with more competency than in Life Drawing I
   C. Produce sketches and drawings with better harmony and contrast than
demonstrated in Life Drawing I
   D. Construct compositions integrating balance, economy, dominance,
volume, movement, proportion, and space with more acumen than in Life
Drawing I
   E. Devise compositions involving the figure to accomplish a strong
sense of form unity

IV. Expressive Elements Incorporating the Human Form
   A. Discuss the compositional elements that create expressive
communication
   B. Discuss the expressive elements of the human figure in relation to
subject matter and content 
   C. Explain the integration of composition and subject matter
   D. Produce drawings which demonstrate expressive elements 

V. The basic differences in the way the figure has been depicted from the
traditional to the contemporary
   A. List and explain some of the traditional depictions of the figure in
art
   B. List and explain some of the contemporary depictions of the figure
in art
   C. Generate drawings that illustrate the differences in traditional and
contemporary approaches of drawing the human figure

VI. Autonomous decision-making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence through practice and critique of
one’s own artwork
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development

VII. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss in depth the importance of art criticism
   B. Explain the significance of individual critiques
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students
   D. Clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of drawings satisfying the
requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific skills and
competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for
personal expression and self-understanding

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade. The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models will be used extensively in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.
  4. If you are a student with a disability, and if you will be requesting accommodations, it is your responsibility to contact Special Services. Special Services will recommend any appropriate accommodations to your instructor and his/her director. The instructor and director will identify for you which accommodations will be arranged.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 235

  • Title: Studio Workshop I*
  • Number: ART 235
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 131 or ART 136.

Description:

This course involves advanced problems in painting (or drawing) with emphasis on individual expression based on historical as well as contemporary concerns and approaches in art. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures.
  2. Use a variety of surface supports beyond those undertaken in Painting II, Drawing II, or Watercolor.
  3. Demonstrate a variety of advanced technical paint or drawing applications extending the explorations attempted in Painting II, Drawing II, or Watercolor.
  4. Develop compositions showing further exploration of a variety of space and color relationships.
  5. Produce work employing a variety of advanced compositional strategies.
  6. Generate works showing a greater awareness of aesthetic coherence than demonstrated in Painting II, Drawing II, or Watercolor.
  7. Identify historical and contemporary styles relevant to the coursework.
  8. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  9. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies at an advanced level.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision.

II. Surface Supports
   A. Use traditional supports, depending on the course of study,
emphasizing advanced techniques in the specific medium undertaken.
   B. Use nontraditional supports, depending on the course of study,
emphasizing advanced techniques in the specific medium undertaken.

III. Advanced Techniques Involving Paint Or Drawing Applications
   A. Generate paintings or drawings exploring advanced techniques
employing traditional mark making.
   B. Generate paintings or drawings exploring advanced techniques
employing nontraditional mark making.

IV. Space And Color Relationships Beyond Those Undertaken In The
Prerequisite Course
   A. Generate compositions that use color relationships that advance in
space.
   B. Create compositions that use color relationships that recede in
space.
   C. Generate works that use color relationships that have neutral and/or
static associations.
   D. Produce compositions that use a combination of these color
relationships.

V. Advanced Compositional Strategies
   A. Create a work utilizing advanced strategies for a closed, open, or
radical format relationship.
   B. Using a complex subject, compose a painting or drawing using
symmetrical balance.
   C. Utilizing a complicated theme, produce a painting or drawing using
complex asymmetrical balance.
   D. Employing an advanced compositional approach, execute a painting
utilizing an intricate and effective figure/ground relationship.

VI. Cohesive Aesthetic Harmony
   A. Generate a complex work which has been developed from an artistic
experience in terms of form exhibiting an advanced sensibility.
   B. Produce a painting employing enigmatic psychological
considerations.
   C. Execute a composition incorporating more difficult intellectual and
symbolic content than those attempted in the prerequisite course.

VII. Historical And Contemporary Styles Relevant To The Painting Projects
   A. Identify and discuss in depth one or more of these historical
styles: Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Abstract
Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Neo Realism, New Image, Neo
Expressionism, Neo Abstraction, and Deconstructionism.
   B. Compare and contrast, in depth, Modernism and Post Modernism.

VIII. Autonomous Decision Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence, at a more advanced level than
the prerequisite course, through practice and critique of one’s own
artwork.
   B. Develop and demonstrate self assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development.

IX. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss in depth the importance of art criticism.
   B. Review and explain the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Review and clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of paintings or drawings
satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific
skills and competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class Grades: The final portfolio is, by
far, the major means of evaluation in the course, representing 60-80% of
the grade. The other listed student activities account for the remaining
20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 236

  • Title: Studio Workshop II*
  • Number: ART 236
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 235.

Description:

This course involves advanced problems in painting (or drawing), above and beyond those experienced in Workshop I, with emphasis on individual expression. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe studio procedures
  2. Use a variety of surface supports beyond those undertaken in Studio Workshop I.
  3. Demonstrate a variety of advanced technical paint or drawing applications extending the explorations attempted in Workshop I.
  4. Develop compositions showing further exploration of a variety of space and color relationships than those considered in Workshop I.
  5. Produce work employing compositional strategies of a more personal nature than those attempted in Workshop I.
  6. Identify historical and contemporary styles relevant to the coursework.
  7. Recognize on a more advanced level than Workshop I the importance for autonomous decision-making.
  8. Demonstrate a more mature ability to critique artwork than demonstrated in Workshop I.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies at an advanced level
   B. Practice safe studio procedures
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision

II. Surface Supports
   A. Use a traditional or non-traditional support, depending on the
course of study, emphasizing a more individual technique over and above
that attempted in Workshop I
   B. Use a traditional or non-traditional support never tried before
emphasizing advanced techniques over and above those attempted in Workshop
I

III. Advanced Techniques Involving Paint or Drawing Applications
   A. Generate paintings or drawings exploring advanced techniques in an
attempt to develop a more individual imagery
   B. Generate paintings or drawings exploring advanced techniques not
attempted in previous courses

IV. Space and Color Relationships
   A. Generate compositions that use color relationships that are inspired
by more individual considerations
   B. Create compositions that use color relationships not considered in
previous courses

V. Compositional strategies that are of a more personal nature
   A. Create a work utilizing a compositional strategy that is inspired by
a personal narrative
   B. Compose a painting or drawing using a complex composition and
generated from a personal interest
   C. Utilizing a complicated theme, produce a painting or drawing
employing personal symbols or language

VI. Historical and contemporary styles relevant to the painting Projects
   A. Identify and discuss in depth (one or more not researched in
Workshop I) one or more of these historical styles: Impressionism,
Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism,
Neo-Realism, New Image, Neo-Expressionism, Neo-Abstraction, and
Deconstructionism
   B. Compare and contrast in more depth than Workshop I the concepts of
Modernism and Post-Modernism

VII. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Acquire and demonstrate confidence, at a more advanced level than
the prerequisite course, through practice and critique of one’s own
artwork
   B. Develop and demonstrate self-assurance through the discussion and
criticism of other student’s artwork
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists’ means of image development

VIII. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Define and discuss in depth the importance of art criticism
   B. Review and explain the significance of individual critiques
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students
   D. Review and clarify the meaning and purpose of group critiques
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Final portfolio: Production of a group of paintings or drawings
satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments to develop specific
skills and competencies and to stimulate the student’s creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding.

Out-of-class assignments: Production of a series of out-of-class projects
to supplement the in-class assignments which demonstrates the student’s
integration of the course content.

Research project: A written research project to supplement the course
objectives.

Class participation and attendance: Active participation and attendance is
a mandatory requirement for this class.

Grades: The final portfolio is, by far, the major means of evaluation in
the course, representing 60-80% of the grade. The other listed student
activities account for the remaining 20-40% of the grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. Students should realize nude models may be used in this course and decide if they are comfortable with this aspect of the class.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 238

  • Title: Digital Imaging for Artists II*
  • Number: ART 238
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 138.

Description:

This course is a continued study of skills learned in Digital Imaging for Artists. Students will concentrate on creating personal imagery using digital media. 6 hrs. integrated lecture studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Review and demonstrate safe lab procedures.
  2. Assess and determine an effective and efficient digital workflow.
  3. Create digital images that demonstrate an understanding of the synthesis between effective expressive content, composition, and technical approach.
  4. Define and demonstrate a further understanding of technical skills in digital imaging beyond those covered in Digital Imaging for Artists.
  5. Define and demonstrate an advanced ability to use Tools in Adobe Photoshop.
  6. Define and demonstrate an advanced ability to use the items included in the Panels in Adobe Photoshop.
  7. Define and demonstrate an advanced ability to use the actions included in the Menus in Adobe Photoshop.
  8. Define and create an image using High Dynamic Range (HDR).
  9. Create complex 3D objects.
  10. Display the ability to explore a variety of surfaces to print on.
  11. Exhibit the capacity to explore both two and three-dimensional alternatives for presenting digital images.
  12. Demonstrate the capability to present works of exhibition quality.
  13. Generate digital images showing an awareness of aesthetic coherence.
  14. Make aesthetic decisions autonomously.
  15. Critique artwork objectively, individually and in groups with acumen.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Studio Procedures
   A. Explain and demonstrate proper use of equipment, materials, and
supplies.
   B. Practice safe studio procedures.
   C. Identify and develop productive work habits, including completing
projects, maintaining the studio environment, and responding to
supervision.

II. Digital Workflow for the Fine Artist
   A. Define and research projects.
   B. Employ Photoshop to develop the image.
   C. Save and back up images on a regular basis.
   D. Assess the results as a rough draft and edit.
   E. Consider the possibility of using other mediums/materials to enhance
the image.
   F. Print the image.
   G. Create a final presentation.

III. Synthesis: Expression, Composition, and Technical Approach
   A. Research purpose of expression in a work of art.
   B. Review the principles of effective composition.
   C. Develop stronger understanding of how technique contributes or
distracts from a work of art.

IV. Developing Advanced Technical Skills
   A. Display advanced skills in using digital tools.
      1. Move
      2. Marquee
         a. Rectangular
         b. Elliptical
      3. Lasso
         a. Polygonal
         b. Magnetic
      4. Magic wand and Quick selection
      5. Crop
      6. Eye dropper
         a. Color sampler
         b. Ruler
         c. Note
         d. Count
      7. Patch
         a. Healing brush
         b. Spot healing brush
         c. Red eye
      8. Brush
         a. Pencil
         b. Color replace
      9. Stamp
         a. Clone
         b. Pattern
     10. Brush
         a. History
         b. Art history
     11. Eraser
         a. Background
         b. Magic
     12. Paint bucket and gradient
     13. Blur
         a. Sharpen
         b. Smudge
     14. Dodge
         a. Burn
         b. Sponge
     15. Pen
         a. Freeform
         b. Add point
         c. Delete point
         d. Convert point
     16. Type
         a. Horizontal
         b. Vertical
         c. Horizontal type mask
         d. Vertical type mask
     17. Selection
         a. Path
         b. Direct
     18. Rectangle
         a. Rounded rectangle
         b. Ellipse
         c. Polygonal
         d. Line
         e. Custom shape
     19. 3D rotate
         a. Roll
         b. Rotate
         c. Slide
         d. Scan
     20. 3D Orbit
         a. Roll
         b. Pan
         c. Walk
         d. Zoom
     21. Hand and rotate view
     22. Zoom
   B. Demonstrate an advanced understanding of panels.
      1. 3D
      2. Actions
      3. Adjustments
      4. Animation
      5. Brushes
      6. Channels
      7. Clone source
      8. Color
      9. Histogram
     10. History
     11. Info
     12. Layer comps
     13. Layers
     14. Masks
     15. Navigator
     16. Notes
     17. Paragraph
     18. Paths
     19. Styles
     20. Swatches
     21. Tool presets
   C. Exhibit an advanced understanding in using menus.
      1. Photoshop
      2. File
      3. Edit
      4. Image
      5. Layer
      6. Select
      7. Filter
      8. Analysis
      9. 3D
     10. View
     11. Window
     12. Help

V. High Dynamic Range (HDR).
   A. Explain and demonstrate an image in HDR using three image
manipulation.
   B. Explain and demonstrate an image in HDR using one image
manipulation.

VI. 3D
   A. Establish a proficiency in manipulating 3D objects.
   B. Demonstrate the ability to adjust lighting and surface texture on a
3D object.
   C. Show how to merge 3D layers
   D. Exhibit an understanding of how to paint on a 3D object.
   E. Define and demonstrate adding 3D text to an image.
   F. Show an understanding of how to manipulate 3D postcards.

VII. Experimental Surfaces
   A. Define differences between traditional and alternative print
surfaces.
   B. Demonstrate knowledge of how to apply and print on pre-coated
surfaces.
      1. Paper
      2. Canvas
      3. Metal
   C. Exhibit the ability to print on alternative surfaces.
      1. Paper with no digital coating
      2. Paper with digital coating (applied by hand)
      3. Cloth with no digital coating
      4. Cloth with digital coating (applied by hand)
      5. Thin board with no digital coating
      6. Thin board with digital coating (applied by hand)
      7. Metal with no digital coating
      8. Metal with digital coating (applied by hand)
      9. Other surfaces to be determined through experimentation

VIII. Professional Presentation of Digitally Related Images
   A. Demonstrate traditional approaches to presentation.
      1. Matting
      2. Mounting
   B. Experiment and exhibit non-traditional approaches to presentation.

IX. Autonomous Decision-Making
   A. Improve confidence through practice and critique of one's own
artwork.
   B. Increase self-assurance through the discussion and criticism of
other student's artwork.
   C. Build and demonstrate comprehension of the decision-making process
through study of professional artists' means of image development.

X. Critiquing Artwork Objectively
   A. Review and discuss the importance of objective art criticism.
   B. Assess the significance of individual critiques.
   C. Judiciously accept criticism from fellow art students.
   D. Clarify the  meaning and purpose of group critiques.
   E. Perform individual and group critiques without bias.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

65-75% Final Portfolio
5-15% Out-of-Class Assignments
5-15% Research Project
5-15% Class Participation

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  2. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  3. "Student Health: the college does not provide on-campus medical services, nor does it assume responsibility for injuries you may incur while participating in college activities. The college does not provide health and accident insurance for students. You must contract for this coverage on an individual basis. See the course catalog for more information."
  4. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information.
  5. Any student artwork or art supplies not picked up 4 weeks after the end of the semester will be considered abandoned and the Visual Arts Department will dispose of the work or materials as it sees fit. Exceptions can be made for students who lend their artwork for student exhibitions or other special arrangements have been made between a student and their instructor.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 244

  • Title: Ceramics Workshop I*
  • Number: ART 244
  • Effective Term: 2018-19
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ART 143 and department approval.

Description:

Students will have the opportunity to pursue advanced individual research under the direction of the instructor. Emphasis is on creative expression and development of technical skills as well as the further pursuit of technical studies that have relevance for emerging personal specializations. Students will conduct a personal program of study on one aesthetic issue that emerges as personally significant and present the outcomes in an appropriate and acceptable manner at the close of the semester. Students should initiate and pursue studies in directions that inform and further their individual professional and creative growth, which leads to invention, innovation and refinement of their personal semester work, as agreed upon with the instructor. This course enables further pursuit of technical studies that have relevance for these emerging personal specializations. Skill refinement, three-dimensional imagination, with increased creative expression and creative product generation are anticipated. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/studio/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Focus emphasis on individual development of advanced ceramic skills involving individual directions and ideas.
  2. Achieve individual development of idea expression by completing a volume of work showing these ideas manifested in form.
  3. Develop an appreciation of ceramic art as an useful and expressive art of men and women, reflecting our culture from prehistory to the present.
  4. Gain a more advanced working knowledge of glazes and various methods of kiln firing approaches by participating in the kiln firing process.
  5. Develop an individual approach to ceramic form making involving skill refinement, three-dimensional imagination leading to an increased creative expression and creative product generation.
  6. Develop a semester plan for specific assignments and directions with the approval of the instructor.
  7. Develop an individual critique criterion for evaluation of ceramic ware.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Individual Development of Advanced Ceramic Skills Involving Ceramic
Techniques and Processes
   A. Perform wheel throwing techniques which are appropriate to the more
advanced ceramic level application, including:
      1. Individual sense of wheel thrown form involving the vessel.
      2. Individual sense of decorative closure.
   B. Perform non-wheel manipulation techniques which are appropriate to
the more advanced ceramic level application, including:
      1. Individual sense of sculptural form with non-wheel manipulation
techniques.
      2. Individual sense of closure with glaze and non-glaze surfaces.

II. Individual Development of Idea Expression
   A. Produce ceramic ware which reflects variations on a theme
including:
      1. Multiple series researching matching sets.
      2. Individual ceramic ware which exhibits a style.
   B. Initiate the evolution of a conceptual basis for ceramic ware
including:
      1. Scale variations.
      2. Variations of volume and height.

III. Historical Influence and References in Individual Student Ceramic
Ware
   A. Produce ceramic ware which reflects historical references.
   B. Produce ceramic ware which exhibits firing methods reflecting
cultural and regional influences.

IV. Creative Expression with Ceramic Ware
   A. Establish a personal repertoire and palette by emerging a clay,
surface, glaze, and firing combination that works best for their
individual direction. (Magazine, book, and journal readings as required
and appropriate for their individual research should be completed.)
   B. Establish the content of this course largely in a self motivated
fashion after establishing an over-all semester direction with permission
of the instructor. (Study, reading and research with the task of preparing
an acceptable proposal leading to a final presentation of work at the close
of the semester is expected. Study is complemented and catalyzed by various
directed reading, exhibit viewing, guest speakers, tutorial discussions and
individual advice and critique by the instructor.)
   C. Develop specific course content by consultation with the instructor.
(The number of projects to be completed and the standards expected will be
clearly established at the beginning of the semester in individual
critique and conferences.)

V. Students Will Demonstrate Proficiency in a Range of Research Directions
Including But Not
Limited to:
   A. Advanced ceramic design.
   B. Individualized decorative style development.
   C. Advanced glazes; researching their properties and reactions.
   D. Glaze calculation and formulation; utilization of computer
technology is encouraged.
   E. Advanced ceramic wheel throwing techniques.
   F. Kiln design and firing research.
   G. Computer/liquid light images on ceramic ware.

VI. Development of an Individual Critique Criterion
   A. Analyze, evaluate and critique specific ceramic ware including
historical and peer ceramic examples.
   B. Demonstrate the basic elements of art and ceramic form which leads
to more clearly defined notions of what is creative form, good form, or
bad form.
   C. Critique ceramic ware with specific articulation stated in written
analysis and group critique discussions.

VII. Safe Studio Practices
   A. Identify hazardous materials and processes common to the ceramics
studio.
   B. Safely handle hazardous materials, including their disposal, and
apply safe processes in the ceramic studio setting.
   C. Describe and follow protective measures for:
      1. Inhalation
      2. Direct contact/absorption
      3. Ingestion

VIII. Attitudes and Work Habits
   A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow
students appropriate for the studio, including giving and accepting
criticism and praise.
   B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to
detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording
data.
   C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including
solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to
supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance: 21 or more unexcused studio/lecture hours will result in
receiving a grade of failure in the course; 10 to 20 unexcused
studio/lecture hours will result in the reduction of the final grade.

Attitude and Work Habits: Although attendance is essential, productive
attitudes and work habits affect morale, efficiency, accuracy and safety
in the studio and will be a factor in determining grades. In addition,
collaboration and teamwork will be expected and evaluated.

Participation: Students will be assessed on their degree of participation
in the following collaborative activities:
Group critiques, Demonstrations, Class discussions, Studio maintenance,
Safe practices

General Competencies: Students will be evaluated through testing or studio
behavior in the following areas: Fundamental ceramic vocabulary, Ceramic
history, Ceramic materials, Techniques/processes

Grading:
Assigned major projects and various minor projects: 60-80% of grade.
Quizzes and tests: 20-40% of grade.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor of any disability which will require special accommodation in this course.
  2. Although care will be taken with individual student work, the process of drying, firing & glazing may sometimes result in loss of that work.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ART 291

No information found.