Legal Studies (LAW)

Courses

LAW 120   Introduction to Paralegal Studies (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the paralegal profession and explain the role of the paralegal in a legal environment, including necessary skills, education and training, common duties, and representative tasks. The student should be able to explain the regulation of the legal profession and ethical issues relevant to attorneys and paralegals. The student should be able to draft a professional resume and design an effective job-search strategy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 121   Introduction to Law (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the structure and organization of the American legal system and explain its role, functions, and legal powers. The student should be able to explain the fundamental principles of the major subject areas of the law, including criminal law, tort law, contract law, business and employment law, family law, property law, and estate planning and probate law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 132   Civil Litigation* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 121 or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the various sets of court rules that regulate the civil litigation process and explain the stages of a civil lawsuit. The student should be able to describe the role of the paralegal in a civil litigation practice and be able to draft documents commonly used in the civil litigation process. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 132H   HON: Civil Litigation* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 134   Introduction to Legal Technology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the role of technology within a legal work environment, and use software customarily available in a modern legal work environment, including word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software. In addition, students will demonstrate the ability to create, edit and share common legal documents and forms, and to use the internet within a legal work environment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 134H   HON: Introduction to Legal Technology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 142   Tort Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the major principles of tort law and personal injury litigation. The student should be able to identify the elements of intentional torts, negligence torts and strict liability torts, as well as the types of damages available and defenses to each of these torts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 142H   HON: Tort Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 144   Contract Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the elements of a contract and explain the formation of a contract. The student should be able to discuss the ways in which a contract is discharged, including discharge by performance or breach, relevant defenses and available remedies. The student should also be able to explain the rights and obligations of third parties to a contract. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 148   Criminal Litigation* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal Program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the objectives, substantive principles and procedural rules of the criminal process in the Kansas and federal judicial systems. The student should be able to explain the role of the paralegal in criminal litigation practice and draft documents relevant to criminal litigation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 152   Real Estate Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the rights of property ownership and public and private limitations on those rights. In addition, the student should be able to describe the common types of real estate transactions, and be able to comprehend and prepare key documents commonly used in a real estate transactions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 162   Family Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the substantive and procedural principles of family law, including issues related to adoption, divorce, custody, support and visitation. The student should also be able to draft pleadings, including a petition for divorce, a petition for adoption, decrees, settlement agreements and motions for modification. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 162H   HON: Family Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 165   Forensic Science and the Law (3 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain legal constraints on the use of scientific evidence, including U.S. Supreme Court decisions and other legal rules. The student should be able to describe the major fields of forensic science and their applications, and explain current challenges facing the forensic science community and their implications for the application of forensic science to the law. The student should be able to explain career opportunities available to persons interested in a forensic-related career. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 195   Legal Research* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate sophisticated skills for the retrieval of information from authoritative legal literature sources, including both print and electronic media. The student should be able to manage the research process by utilizing a research model that will enhance the student’s efficiency and effectiveness as a legal researcher. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 195H   HON: Legal Research* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 201   Advanced Legal Technology* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: LAW 134 or BOT 106 or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate and use specialized legal software to perform customary tasks within a legal environment, including litigation support, discovery, case management, office management, file management, timekeeping and billing, docket control, and preparation of courtroom presentations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 201H   HON: Advanced Legal Technology* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 205   Legal Analysis and Writing* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 195 or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze case law, statutes and secondary legal authority. The student should be able to communicate research results, analysis and conclusions professionally and effectively. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 205H   HON: Legal Analysis and Writing* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 226   Immigration Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the various aspects of immigration law. The emphasis in the course is on the functions of the paralegal in an immigration law practice and on the preparation of related documents. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 226H   HON: Immigration Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 245   Elder Law and Estate Planning* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the legal aspects of aging. The student should be able to discuss financial planning, healthcare, personal planning and protection, taxation, housing and other legal matters affecting the elder client. The student should also be able to articulate the use of wills and trusts in estate planning. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 245H   HON: Elder Law and Estate Planning* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 247   Intellectual Property Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the types of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark and trade secrets. The student should be able to prepare documents related to the protection of intellectual property rights. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 247H   HON: Intellectual Property Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 266   Employment Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to classify the relationship between employer and worker. The student should be able to apply federal and state laws that address equal opportunity, workers' compensation, and employment protections and benefits. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 266H   HON: Employment Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 269   Bankruptcy Law* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the purpose of the federal Bankruptcy Code. The student should be able to prepare bankruptcy forms and documents, especially those related to Chapter 7, Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 269H   HON: Bankruptcy Law* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 271   Legal Ethics, Interviewing and Investigation* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 134 or department approval.

Prerequisites or corequisites: LAW 205.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain ethical rules and standards governing the legal profession, interview clients and witnesses, and investigate the facts as part of a legal analysis or proceedings. A major emphasis will be on recognition of ethical problems commonly encountered and the development of interviewing and investigating skills. The course is also designated as the capstone course for the paralegal program. The course will draw the student's paralegal learning and provide an opportunity to demonstrate that the student has accomplished the program's educational goals. This opportunity will focus on finalizing and reviewing the student's e-portfolio. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

LAW 271H   HON: Legal Ethics, Interviewing and Investigation* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

LAW 275   Paralegal Internship I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 120 and LAW 121 or department chair approval.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. It is designed to provide practice experience in a legal setting. The student must complete 120 hours of work at the internship site. Obtaining an internship is the responsibility of the individual student.

LAW 276   Paralegal Internship II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 275.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. It is designed to provide practice experience in a legal setting. The student must complete 120 hours of work at the internship site. Obtaining an internship is the responsibility of the individual student.

LAW 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

LAW 292   Special Topics:* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific paralegal topics related to law not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

LAW 120

  • Title: Introduction to Paralegal Studies
  • Number: LAW 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the paralegal profession and explain the role of the paralegal in a legal environment, including necessary skills, education and training, common duties, and representative tasks. The student should be able to explain the regulation of the legal profession and ethical issues relevant to attorneys and paralegals. The student should be able to draft a professional resume and design an effective job-search strategy. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the role and responsibilities of a paralegal.
  2. Describe the employment opportunities available to paralegals.
  3. Discuss the different types of paralegal education available, including formal academic programs and on-the-job training.
  4. Describe the major professional paralegal organizations and their benefit to paralegals.
  5. Discuss the regulation of the legal profession and the difference in regulatory schemes for attorneys and paralegals.
  6. Explain the major ethical issues for attorneys and paralegals.
  7. Demonstrate familiarity with a law library and authoritative legal informational resources.
  8. Explain the process of briefing statutes and court decisions.
  9. Describe methods of communication with clients and other individuals and the types of documents used in legal practice.
  10. Explain how technology is used in the law office.
  11. Describe how to conduct a paralegal job search.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Paralegal Profession

A. Describe the development of the paralegal profession.

B. Explain the role and function of a paralegal.

C. Describe the professional skills a paralegal must possess to function successfully in the workplace.

II. The Legal Workplace

A. Identify the types of private law practice arrangements.

B. Describe common fields of legal specialization.

C. Identify the office personnel commonly employed in a law firm.

D. Describe law office culture and interpersonal dynamics.

E. Identify common law office management issues.

F. Explain legal billing schemes and billable hours.

G. Describe typical compensation and benefits schemes commonly offered by employers of paralegals.

H. Discuss the use of technology in a law office environment.

III. Other Employment Opportunities

A. Describe employment opportunities for paralegals available in corporate legal departments.

B. Describe employment opportunities for paralegals available in the court system.

C. Identify employment opportunities for paralegals available in government agencies.

D. Describe what a freelance/independent paralegal does.

E. Identify other employment alternatives for paralegals.

IV. Paralegal Education

A. Explain the difference between academic and informal on-the-job paralegal training.

B. Discuss the American Bar Association approval process for academic paralegal programs.

C. Explain the requirements of the JCCC Paralegal Program.

D. Identify the various types of student services available at JCCC.

E. Describe opportunities available to paralegals for continuing legal education.

V. Professional Organizations

A. Identify the major national, state and local professional paralegal organizations.

B. Explain the role and contributions of professional paralegal organizations, including their professional publications and professional development activities.

C. Discuss the benefits of participation in a professional paralegal organization, including opportunities for networking and continuing legal education.

VI. Regulation of the Legal Profession

A. Explain how attorneys are regulated.

B. Explain regulatory issues pertaining to the paralegal profession.

C. Distinguish between licensure and certification schemes.

D. Explain the regulatory schemes adopted by various states.

VII. Legal Ethics

A. Identify the major ethical issues for attorneys and paralegals.

B. Discuss confidentiality, conflict of interest and unauthorized practice of law as they pertain to paralegal practice.

C. Identify the entities with disciplinary authority over attorneys in the various states and types of sanctions for unethical professional conduct.

VIII. Information Literacy and Legal Analysis

A. Explain the organization of a law library and the classification of informational resources.

B. Describe the major types of authoritative legal informational resources.

C. Describe a model for managing the legal research process and gathering relevant legal information.

D. Identify the components of a statute and judicial opinion.

IX: Communication Skills

A. Explain how to conduct an interview of a client or witness.

B. Identify the types of written communications a paralegal might be responsible for drafting.

C. Identify the types of legal documents a paralegal might be responsible for drafting.

X. Professional Development

A. Prepare a professional resume.

B. Draft a cover letter.

C. Describe various job search strategies for the paralegal.

D. Describe interviewing techniques utilized by various law firms.

E. Identify career trends for paralegals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 121

  • Title: Introduction to Law
  • Number: LAW 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the structure and organization of the American legal system and explain its role, functions, and legal powers. The student should be able to explain the fundamental principles of the major subject areas of the law, including criminal law, tort law, contract law, business and employment law, family law, property law, and estate planning and probate law. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the significance of the U.S. Constitution and its functions.
  2. Explain the structure and organization of the American legal system.
  3. Identify the participants in the legal profession, their roles, and their ethical obligations.
  4. Distinguish between the civil litigation process, and alternative mechanisms for dispute resolution.
  5. Describe the criminal litigation process.
  6. Describe the elements of, and available defenses to, the various types of criminal conduct.
  7. Apply the fundamental legal principles of family law, property law, estate law, employment law, business law, and tort law.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The American Legal System

A. Explain the legal significance of the U.S. Constitution.

B. Differentiate between the major provisions and the legal rights and protections contained in the U.S. Constitution.

C. Explain the concepts of federalism, separation of powers, and checks and balances.

D. Evaluate the relationship between the federal government and the individual state governments.

II.  The Legislative Branch

A. Describe the function and the legal powers of the legislative branch of government.

B. Explain the interrelationship of the legislature to the judicial and executive branches of government.

III.  The Executive Branch

A. Break down the function and the legal powers of the executive branch of government.

B. Explain the interrelationship of the executive branch to the legislative and judicial branches of government.

IV.  The Judicial Branch

A. Describe the function and the legal powers of the judicial branch of government.

B. Explain the interrelationship of the court system to the executive and legislative branches of government.

C. Explain the role and selection of judges.

V.  Dispute Resolution and the Litigation Process

A. Apply the concept of jurisdiction, including subject matter jurisdiction and in personam jurisdiction.

B.Describe the stages in the civil litigation process, at both the trial and appellate levels.

VI.  The Legal Profession

A. Identify the members of the legal team and their roles and responsibilities.

B. Explain the importance of professional ethics and the regulation of the legal profession.

VII.  Criminal Law and Procedure

A. Explain the nature of the criminal law.

B. Describe the major types of criminal conduct.

C. Breakdown the elements of a crime.

D. Describe the major defenses to a criminal charge.

E. Describe the stages of the criminal litigation process.

VIII.  Tort Law

A. Identify the elements of strict liability.

B. Identify the elements of intentional torts.

C. Identify the elements of negligence.

D. Describe the legal remedies available in a tort action.

E. Apply tort law to  hypothetical factual situations.

IX. Contract Law

A. Identify the elements of a valid, enforceable contract.

B. Explain the various forms of discharge of a contract.

C. Describe the legal remedies available for breach of contract.

D. Apply contract law to hypothetical factual situations.

X.  Business and Employment Law

A. Describe the agency relationship and the rights and duties of the principal and the agent.

B. Describe the principle of respondeat superior.

C. Describe the forms of business organization.

D. Explain the tax and legal consequences of each form of the sole proprietorship, the partnership, and the corporation.

E. Discuss the statutory and regulatory protections provided to employees.

F. Apply business and employment law to hypothetical factual situations.

XI. Family Law

A. Explain the nature of marriage.

B. Distinguish between the ceremonial and common law methods of creating a marital relationship.

C. Explain the legal procedures for terminating a marital relationship.

D. Identify the factors considered by the Court when entering orders regarding division of marital assets and liabilities.

E. Explain the factors considered by the Court when entering orders regarding custody, visitation, and financial support of minor children.

F. Apply family law to hypothetical factual situations.

XII. Estates and Probate Law

A. Identify the major estate planning mechanisms and the legal documents utilized.

B. Identify the requirements of a valid will.

C. Describe the use of trusts.

D. Explain the purpose of advance directives.

E. Describe the steps in the probate process.

F. Apply estate and probate law to hypothetical factual situations.

XIII.  Property Law

A. Explain the difference between real property and personal property.

B. Describe the different ways in which ownership in real property can be acquired.

C. Describe the different ways in which multiple owners can share ownership of real property.

D. Explain the main types of intellectual property, including the rights of ownership and defenses available against claims of infringement.

E. Apply property  law to hypothetical factual situations.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 132

  • Title: Civil Litigation*
  • Number: LAW 132
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 121 or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to identify the various sets of court rules that regulate the civil litigation process and explain the stages of a civil lawsuit. The student should be able to describe the role of the paralegal in a civil litigation practice and be able to draft documents commonly used in the civil litigation process. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the structure and organization of the federal and state court systems.
  2. Explain the differences between civil litigation and criminal litigation.
  3. Identify the statutes and court rules that regulate the civil litigation process.
  4. Define litigation-related terminology.
  5. Explain the requirements of subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction and venue.
  6. Describe the procedures for managing the pre-trial, trial and post-trial stages of the litigation process.
  7. Explain the role of the paralegal in a litigation practice and common duties of a litigation paralegal.
  8. Demonstrate the drafting of documents commonly used in the civil litigation process.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to the U.S. Litigation System

A. Explain the origin of the U.S. litigation system.

B. Distinguish the concepts of "burden of proof" and "standard of proof" and their applications in civil and criminal litigation.

C. Discuss regulation of the civil litigation process and the significance of court rules.

II. The Federal and State Court Systems

A. Distinguish the functional and procedural differences between trial and appellate proceedings.

B. Apply subject-matter and personal jurisdictional requirements to a fact situation.

C. Explain venue requirements.

III. Roles and Functions of Legal Professionals

A. Describe the role of an attorney in a civil lawsuit.

B. Describe the function and duties of the paralegal in a civil litigation practice.

C. Explain the role of judges.

IV. Litigation-Related Terminology

A. Define litigation-related terminology.

B. Utilize litigation-related terminology appropriately in law-related communications.

V. Pre-Trial Proceedings

A. Analyze factors relevant to a client's claim or defense.

B. Describe the types of available civil remedies.

C. Describe the procedures for initiating a civil lawsuit.

D. Describe the types of responsive pleadings.

E. Explain the differences between pleadings and motions.

F. Describe the types of formal discovery mechanisms.

G. Draft pleadings and other documents commonly used in the civil litigation process.

VI. Trial

A. Describe the courtroom environment.

B. Explain the stages of a civil trial.

C. Describe an entry of judgment.

VII. Post-Trial Proceedings and Appeals

A. Describe post-trial alternatives.

B. Describe methods of enforcing a judgment.

C. Explain the procedures for appealing a civil judgment.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 132H

No information found.

LAW 134

  • Title: Introduction to Legal Technology*
  • Number: LAW 134
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the role of technology within a legal work environment, and use software customarily available in a modern legal work environment, including word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software. In addition, students will demonstrate the ability to create, edit and share common legal documents and forms, and to use the internet within a legal work environment. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the hardware, software and other technology used within a legal work environment.
  2. Explain the function of technology within a legal work environment.
  3. Create professional legal correspondence, memoranda and other common legal documents.
  4. Create spreadsheets commonly used in a legal work environment.
  5. Prepare documents commonly used to seek employment as a paralegal.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to conduct legal research and perform other tasks using the internet within a legal work environment.
  7. Explain how to electronically search for, file and retrieve documents from the court system's database.
  8. Explain the importance of professionalism and confidentiality in the use of technology in a legal work environment. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Technology in the Legal Environment

A. Explain how technology is used in a legal work environment.

B. Identify potential benefits, risks and issues arising out of the use of technology in a legal work environment.

C. Describe future trends in law office technology.

II. Legal Ethics and Technology Issues

A. Explain the impact of technology on the duty of confidentiality and legal privileges.

B. Describe the impact of technology on discovery.

C. Explain the impact of technology on the duty of competency.

III. Computer Hardware and Software

A. Identify the hardware and software used within a legal work environment.

B. Explain how to improve the process of introducing new technology into a legal work environment.

C. Demonstrate the ability to assemble and operate computer hardware commonly used in a legal work environment.

IV. Word Processing, PDF File Creation, and Document Assembly in the Law Office

A. Demonstrate the ability to create, edit, format, share and publish common legal documents of professional quality.

B. Demonstrate the ability to use the automated features in document creation and assembly.

C. Explain how word processing software is used by legal professionals.

V. Spreadsheet Software in the Law Office

A. Demonstrate the ability to create, use and format spreadsheets, including using formulas and creating charts and graphs.

B. Explain how spreadsheets are used by legal professionals.

VI. The Internet, Email, Emerging Technologies and Social Networking

A. Explain the use of the internet in a legal work environment.

B. Demonstrate the effective use of internet browsers and search engines in a legal work environment.

C. Demonstrate effective and professional use of email and other computer-based communication systems.

D. Explain the opportunities, advantages and risks associated with the use of the internet, email, social networking websites and emerging technologies in a legal work environment.

VII. Filing and Managing Cases Electronically with Court Database Systems

A. Describe the characteristics of electronic filing and case management.

B. Explain the process of searching for, filing and retrieval of documents electronically from the court system's database.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Tests and Assessments
15-30%    Homework
15-30%    Collaborative activities and class participation
10-20%    Special Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Students are advised that some projects may require completion at home or in an open computer lab outside regularly scheduled class time. Students should have basic computer skills, including a basic understanding of keyboarding, word processing, file management and formatting. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 134H

No information found.

LAW 142

  • Title: Tort Law*
  • Number: LAW 142
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the major principles of tort law and personal injury litigation. The student should be able to identify the elements of intentional torts, negligence torts and strict liability torts, as well as the types of damages available and defenses to each of these torts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish among the three categories of torts.

  2. Define the elements required to state prima facie cases for intentional torts, negligence torts and strict liability torts.

  3. Explain the possible defenses to negligence and intentional tort claims.

  4. Identify state case law and statutes relevant to tort law.

  5. Identify federal case law and statutes relevant to tort law.

  6. Analyze hypothetical facts to determine whether a prima facie case exists.

  7. Analyze hypothetical facts to identify possible defendants against whom tort actions could be filed.

  8. Draft legal documents that allege causes of action in intentional torts, negligence and strict liability.

  9. Explain the public policy objectives inherent in tort law.

  10. Discuss the history and current status of tort reform legislation.

  11. Identify the types and amounts of damages that may be awarded in specific tort claims.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Tort Law

A. Identify the three categories of torts and explain the primary differences among them, including intentional torts, negligence torts and strict liability torts.

B. Identify the sources of tort law, including common law, statutory law and the Restatements of Torts.

C. Explain the public policy objectives behind each type of tort.

II. Intentional Torts

A. Discuss the elements required in a prima facie case for various intentional torts.

B. Evaluate the defenses available to an intentional tort defendant in a hypothetical set of facts.

C. Analyze recent Kansas and federal case and statutory law relevant to intentional torts.

III. Negligence

A. Discuss the elements required in a prima facie case for negligence.

B. Assess the remedies available to the plaintiff in a negligence cause of action.

C. Evaluate the defenses available to a negligence defendant in a hypothetical set of facts.

D. Analyze recent Kansas and federal case and statutory law relevant to negligence.

IV. Strict Liability and Products Liability

A. Discuss the elements required in a prima facie case for strict liability.

B. Distinguish between the various theories that may be used in a products liability cause of action.

C. Analyze recent state and federal case and statutory law relevant to strict liability and products liability.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 142H

  • Title: HON: Tort Law*
  • Number: LAW 142H
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 144

  • Title: Contract Law*
  • Number: LAW 144
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the elements of a contract and explain the formation of a contract. The student should be able to discuss the ways in which a contract is discharged, including discharge by performance or breach, relevant defenses and available remedies. The student should also be able to explain the rights and obligations of third parties to a contract. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the elements required to form a contract under both the common law and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), along with defenses to the formation of a contract.
  2. Contrast performance obligations under the common law with performance obligations under the UCC.
  3. Contrast contract modification under the common law with contract modification under the UCC.
  4. Identify remedies for breach of contract and defenses to breach of contract under the common law and the UCC.
  5. Explain the rights and obligations of third parties to the contract, including assignments and delegations to outside parties.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Contract Law

A. Explain what a contract is.

B. Contrast various classifications of contract.

C. Identify sources of contract law.

D. Differentiate between the common law and UCC in contractual analysis.

II. Formation of Contracts

A. Explain the elements of a valid offer under both the common law and the UCC.

B. Identify circumstances that cause an offer to be revoked under both the common law and the UCC.

C. Explain the elements of a valid acceptance under both the common law and the UCC.

D. Identify circumstances under which an acceptance may be revoked under both the common law and the UCC.

E. Explain what constitutes consideration under both the common law and the UCC.

F. Discuss defenses to formation of a contract.

G. Explain quasi-contract and when it applies.

H. Discuss the elements of promissory estoppel.

III. Written Work

A. Identify agreements that fall within the statute of frauds.

B. Discuss the application of the parol evidence rule.

C. Interpret contract provisions accurately given a hypothetical set of facts.

D. Evaluate additional and missing terms of a written contract under both the common law and the UCC.

IV. Breach, Performance and Modification

A. Evaluate whether a contract has been breached under a hypothetical set of facts.

B. Discuss anticipatory repudiation.

C. Explain how a contract can be modified under both the common law and the UCC.

D. Discuss defenses to breach of contract.

E. Distinguish between partial performance and breach of contract.

F.  Identify remedies available for breach of contract under the common law.

G. Identify remedies available for breach of contract to a seller of goods and to a buyer of goods under the UCC.

V. Third Parties, Assignment and Delegation

A. Contrast the rights and obligations of intended and incidental beneficiaries.

B. Discuss the rights and obligations involved in an assignment.

C. Discuss the rights and obligations involved in a delegation.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation
Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 148

  • Title: Criminal Litigation*
  • Number: LAW 148
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal Program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the objectives, substantive principles and procedural rules of the criminal process in the Kansas and federal judicial systems. The student should be able to explain the role of the paralegal in criminal litigation practice and draft documents relevant to criminal litigation. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define criminal conduct and discuss its elements.
  2. Contrast the conceptual and practical differences between criminal litigation and civil litigation.
  3. Discuss the historical and constitutional foundations of criminal law.
  4. Explain the elements of, and defenses to, the major classifications of criminal conduct under common law, state law and federal law.
  5. Explain the procedural steps in the criminal process.
  6. Distinguish between the roles of the various participants in the criminal process.
  7. Explain the role of the paralegal during investigatory and adjudicatory phases of the criminal process.
  8. Evaluate the differences in the role of the paralegal as an aide to the prosecution or as an aide to the defense.
  9. Explain the ethical requirements for attorneys and paralegals engaged in the practice of criminal law.
  10. Explain landmark Kansas and federal cases governing criminal litigation.
  11. Draft documents commonly used in the criminal process. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Criminal Law

A. Define criminal law.

B. Identify the elements of crimes.

C. Explain mens rea and actus reus.

D. Distinguish between criminal litigation and civil litigation procedure.

E. Explain the Constitutional provisions related to criminal law.

II. Individual Crimes

A. Distinguish between person crimes and property crimes.

B. Distinguish between general intent and specific intent crimes.

C. Distinguish between felonies and misdemeanors.

D. Explain inchoate offenses of attempt, conspiracy and solicitation.

E. Explain defenses to crimes.

F. Identify state statutes related to person crimes and property crimes.

G. Apply criminal law to hypothetical factual situations.

III. Discovery and Pretrial Procedure

A. Explain the intake process.

B. Explain Fourth Amendment (search and seizure) issues.

C. Explain Fifth Amendment (self-incrimination) issues.

D. Distinguish between initial appearance, preliminary hearing and arraignment.

E. Draft selected documents commonly used in discovery and pretrial procedure.

IV. Trial Procedure

A. Explain due process requirements.

B. Evaluate the paralegal’s role at trial.

C. Explain the sequence of events at trial.

D. Apply sentencing guidelines and sentencing options to hypothetical factual situations.

E. Explain post-trial motions and appeals.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Tests and quizzes
40-60%    Assignments and projects
0-25%      Collaborative activities and class participation
Total: 100%       

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 152

  • Title: Real Estate Law*
  • Number: LAW 152
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the rights of property ownership and public and private limitations on those rights. In addition, the student should be able to describe the common types of real estate transactions, and be able to comprehend and prepare key documents commonly used in a real estate transactions. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain basic real estate vocabulary, concepts and transactions.
  2. Demonstrate the use of real estate surveys and descriptions.
  3. Distinguish among the different types of real estate deeds.
  4. Distinguish among the different types of laws, regulations and encumbrances that limit the use and enjoyment of real estate.
  5. Explain the process of acquiring and transferring real estate.
  6. Explain real estate financing and securitization.
  7. Distinguish between residential and commercial leases.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Real Estate Vocabulary, Concepts and Transactions

A. Identify sources of real estate law.

B. Differentiate between real and personal property.

C. Explain the rights of real property owners.

D. Differentiate between condominiums, cooperatives and townhomes.

E. Identify the methods of acquiring and transferring real property.

F. Identify various forms of title to real estate.

G. Explain joint ownership of real estate.

H. Explain the federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination in real estate.

II. Surveys and Descriptions of Real Property

A. Explain the importance of describing real property.

B. Distinguish between the major methods of surveying and describing real property.

C. Draft a legal description of real property.

III. Real Estate Deeds

A. Explain the key clauses of real estate deeds.

B. Distinguish between the different types of real estate deeds.

C. Explain the delivery and recording requirements for deeds.

D. Draft a real estate deed.

IV. Real Estate Ownership Laws, Regulations and Encumbrances

A. Describe how real property is assessed and taxed.

B. Explain zoning regulation and its use in real estate development and control.

C. Identify the state and federal laws regulating the use of real property.

D. Discuss the role of homeowners' associations in the regulation of residential property.

E. Distinguish the various types of private encumbrances.

F. Describe the process of condemnation of real property.

V. Real Estate Purchase and Sale

A. Explain the elements of an enforceable real estate contract.

B. Distinguish between the remedies available for breach of a real estate contract.

C. Identify the requirements for a real estate closing.

D. Prepare a real estate closing statement.

E. Explain the use of title examinations and title insurance in real estate transactions.

VI. Real Estate Finance

A. Identify the main sources of real estate financing.

B. Distinguish between the different types of real estate loans.

C. Explain the government’s role in real estate finance.

D. Distinguish between mortgages, deeds of trust, and security deeds.

E. Explain the clauses of mortgages and mortgage notes.

F. Trace the foreclosure process for defaulted mortgages.

VII. Leases

A. Distinguish between residential and commercial leases.

B. List the rights and obligations of a commercial lessor.

C. List the rights and obligations of a commercial lessee.

D. Explain when a tenant may assign or sublease the all or a portion of the property subject to the lease.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Quizzes and tests
30-50%    Homework and assignments
0-30%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 162

  • Title: Family Law*
  • Number: LAW 162
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe the substantive and procedural principles of family law, including issues related to adoption, divorce, custody, support and visitation. The student should also be able to draft pleadings, including a petition for divorce, a petition for adoption, decrees, settlement agreements and motions for modification. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the fundamental principles underlying family law.

  2. Identify the key Kansas statutes concerning domestic relations.

  3. Describe the difficulty of interacting with clients in the emotionally charged atmosphere often surrounding family law issues.

  4. Describe the mediation process and explain the use of mediation in family law matters.

  5. Prepare documents commonly used in the practice of family law.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Family Law

A. Explain historical changes in fundamental principles of family law.

B. Identify Kansas statutes concerning family law.

C. Explain the process of interacting with family law clients.

D. Demonstrate techniques for interacting with family law clients.

II. Marriage

A. Identify Kansas statutes and federal law relevant to marriage.

B. Explain the requirements for common law marriage.

C. Explain the requirements for ceremonial marriage.

D. Explain the rights and duties between spouses.

E. Draft documents normally prepared by paralegals concerning marriage and divorce.

III. Adoption

A. Identify Kansas statutes relevant to paternity and adoption.

B. Explain the procedural requirements for adoption.

C. Explain the child in need of care proceedings.

D. Explain the process and standards for terminating parental rights.

E. Draft documents normally prepared by paralegals concerning child custody and support.

IV. Divorce, Annulment, Separate Maintenance and Child Support

A. Distinguish between proceedings for divorce, annulment, separate maintenance and child support.

B. Identify grounds for divorce and annulment.

C. Explain Kansas statutes relevant to divorce, annulment and separate maintenance.

D. Explain Kansas statutes relevant to property division.

E. Explain Kansas statutes relevant to spousal support.

F. Explain Kansas statutes relevant to child custody and child support.

G. Describe the mediation process as it is used in family law matters.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Quizzes and tests
30-60%    Homework and projects
0-30%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 162H

No information found.

LAW 165

  • Title: Forensic Science and the Law
  • Number: LAW 165
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain legal constraints on the use of scientific evidence, including U.S. Supreme Court decisions and other legal rules. The student should be able to describe the major fields of forensic science and their applications, and explain current challenges facing the forensic science community and their implications for the application of forensic science to the law. The student should be able to explain career opportunities available to persons interested in a forensic-related career. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the history and development of forensic science.
  2. Examine the major fields of forensic science.
  3. Analyze the major challenges confronting the forensic science community and proposed solutions.
  4. Discover the differences between how forensic science works in the real world and how it is portrayed in popular culture.
  5. Examine the use of forensic science in civil and criminal litigation, military and international conflicts, human rights issues, and mass fatality events.
  6. Explain the legal restrictions on the use of scientific evidence and forensic expert witnesses.
  7. Explain the qualifications and training necessary for employment in the forensic job market.
  8. Perform research in forensic science literature.
  9. Collaborate in the development and delivery of class projects.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Forensic Science

A. Discover how science is used for law-related purposes.

B. Explain the multidisciplinary nature of forensic science.

C. Explain the history and development of forensic science.

II. Legal Applications of Forensic Science

A. Explain the applications of forensic science to criminal and civil law.

B. Investigate the applications of forensic science to the investigation of mass fatality events, military and international conflicts human rights issues and terrorist events.

C. Distinguish “junk science” from “legitimate science”.

III. The Forensic Job Market

A. Explore the career opportunities available for forensic scientists and the training and qualifications required.

B. Explain the role of forensic science-related professional organizations and certifying boards.

IV. Legal Issues Regarding the Use of Scientific Evidence

A. Explain the rules of evidence regarding the use of scientific evidence.

B. Compare the utilization of consulting and testifying experts.

C. Analyze the major Supreme Court decisions establishing standards of admissibility of scientific evidence.

D. Analyze the impact of legal rules on the collection, preservation and use of forensic evidence.

V. Specific Forensic Applications

A. Examine the uses of specific forensic applications.

B. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of specific forensic applications based on standards recently established by professional organizations and government agencies.

C. Classify specific forensic applications as “junk science” or “legitimate science”.

VI. Research in Forensic Science Literature

A. Utilize authoritative sources of forensic science-related information.

B. Synthesize information from authoritative forensic science-related literature.

C. Collaborate and perform projects on forensic-related issues.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 195

  • Title: Legal Research*
  • Number: LAW 195
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate sophisticated skills for the retrieval of information from authoritative legal literature sources, including both print and electronic media. The student should be able to manage the research process by utilizing a research model that will enhance the student’s efficiency and effectiveness as a legal researcher. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the principal types of legal informational resources.
  2. Generate a list of appropriate legal search terms and formulate a search query.
  3. Create a legal research plan.
  4. Retrieve legal secondary authority in appropriate print and electronic sources.
  5. Retrieve legal primary authority in appropriate print and electronic sources.
  6. Perform cite-checking of relevant legal authorities, in both print and electronic sources.
  7. Cite informational sources in written documents according to an accepted legal citation manual. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Legal Research in Print and Electronic Resources

A. Explain the general characteristics of print and electronic informational resources.

B. Differentiate the advantages and disadvantages of print and electronic media.

C. Use the major legal information services available in electronic format, such as LexisNexis and Westlaw, to locate legal information.

D. Explain the use of appropriate public-access Internet sites for locating legal information.

II. Development of a Research Plan

A. Analyze the underlying factual situation and identify the legal issues.

B. Generate search terms and formulate a legal query.

C. Identify relevant resources.

D. Use cite-checking resources, in both print and electronic formats.

III. Secondary Authority Resources

A. Explain the function of legal secondary authority.

B. Use legal reference materials, such as legal dictionaries, thesauri and encyclopedias.

C. Locate information on legal topics in legal treatises, including hornbooks and Restatements.

D. Explain the significance and use of attorney general opinions.

E. Locate information on legal topics in law journals.

F. Locate Uniform Laws and Model Acts.

G. Use practitioner materials, such as CLE publications.

H. Explain the nature of loose-leaf service publications.

I. Identify appropriate legal directories.

J. Retrieve legal secondary authority from print resources.

K. Retrieve legal secondary authority from electronic resources, including appropriate public-access internet sources and legal information services such as LexisNexis and Westlaw.

IV. Primary Authority Resources

A. Explain the function of legal primary authority.

B. Use federal and state constitutions.

C. Retrieve relevant legislation from federal and state statutory publications.

D. Retrieve relevant regulatory law from federal and state administrative agency publications.

E. Use federal and state court reporter publications to obtain relevant case law.

F. Retrieve legal primary authorities from print resources.

G. Retrieve legal primary authorities from electronic resources, including appropriate public-access Internet sources and legal information services such as LexisNexis and Westlaw.

V. Research Validation

A. Explain the objective of "cite-checking."

B. Use appropriate legal cite-checking tools, in both print and electronic formats.

VI. Citation of Informational Research

A. Identify sources of legal citation rules.

B. Use an accepted legal citation manual to construct citations for legal informational resources.

C. Apply local court rules governing citation form.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 195H

No information found.

LAW 201

  • Title: Advanced Legal Technology*
  • Number: LAW 201
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: LAW 134 or BOT 106 or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to evaluate and use specialized legal software to perform customary tasks within a legal environment, including litigation support, discovery, case management, office management, file management, timekeeping and billing, docket control, and preparation of courtroom presentations. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Evaluate the costs and benefits of specialized legal software and equipment.
  2. Demonstrate the use of office management software.
  3. Demonstrate the use of docket control software.
  4. Demonstrate the use of case and litigation management software.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of electronic discovery.
  6. Describe the effective use of technology within an electronic courtroom. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Specialized Legal Software and Equipment

A. Evaluate the different technologies available to solve common legal problems.

B. Assess the cost and benefits of using specialized legal software and equipment.

C. Explain the steps that should be taken to successfully integrate specialized legal software and equipment into a legal work environment.

D. Describe developing trends in legal technology.

II. Automated Litigation Support Systems

A. Evaluate litigation support software and features.

B. Explain the costs, risks and benefits of automated litigation support systems.

C. Explain the litigation support process and the legal assistant's role in that process.

D. Demonstrate entry, search and retrieval of documents and information using automated litigation support systems.

III. Legal Timekeeping and Billing Software

A. Evaluate automated timekeeping and billing systems.

B. Explain the different types of legal fee agreements.

C. Demonstrate entry of data, search and retrieval, and generation of timekeeping and billing records and of reports using automated timekeeping and billing systems.

IV. Docket Control, Case Management and Calendaring Systems

A. Evaluate docket control, case management and legal calendaring systems.

B. Explain the costs, risks and benefits of automated document control, case management and calendaring systems in a legal setting.

C. Demonstrate entry of data, search and retrieval, and generation of reminders and reports using automated docket control, case management and calendaring systems.

V. Electronic Discovery

A. Explain the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure relating to discovery of electronically stored information.

B. Describe the process of requesting, producing and reviewing electronically stored information.

C. Describe the costs, risks and benefits of electronic discovery.

D. Describe the process of preparing for electronic discovery.

VI. Electronic Courtroom

A. Describe the technology found in an electronic courtroom.

B. Demonstrate the use of courtroom presentation graphics.

C. Describe how technology is used in the presentation of a case.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-60%    Tests and Assessments
15-30%    Homework
5-15%      Collaborative activities and class participation
10-20%    Special Projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Students are advised that some projects may require completion at home or in an open computer lab outside regularly scheduled class time. 
  2. Students in the Paralegal program must take LAW 134 and students in the Legal Administrative Assistant Certificate program must take BOT 106.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 201H

No information found.

LAW 205

  • Title: Legal Analysis and Writing*
  • Number: LAW 205
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 195 or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to analyze case law, statutes and secondary legal authority. The student should be able to communicate research results, analysis and conclusions professionally and effectively. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the sources and hierarchy of law.
  2. Analyze statutes, legal decisions and secondary sources.
  3. Identify key facts, issues and the applicable law.
  4. Demonstrate effective, accurate and professional legal writing skills.
  5. Revise, reorganize, edit and proofread legal writing.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Mechanics of Writing

A. Identify the purpose of various documents.

B. Distinguish between various audiences.

C. Edit documents to correct grammar and punctuation errors.

D. Organize a document into appropriate paragraphs.

E. Demonstrate use of an outline as a tool to improve writing skills.

F. Use an introduction, transitional phrases and paragraph topic sentences when drafting legal documents.

II. Legal Analysis

A. Distinguish between primary and secondary sources of law.

B. Cite case law and statutory law correctly.

C. Brief an appellate court opinion.

D. Locate relevant authority.

E. Identify when a case is on point.

III. Statutory and Case Law Analysis

A. Identify the elements of a statute.

B. Identify the applicable statute or statutes when presented with a set of facts.

C. Summarize the holding and rule of law of an appellate decision.

D. Synthesize a rule of law from several cases.

IV. Legal Memorandum

A. Identify irrelevant, background and key facts.

B. Write a concise fact statement.

C. Identify the legal issues presented by a set of facts.

D. Draft an accurate analysis of the legal issues presented by a set of facts.

V. Legal Correspondence

A. Distinguish between correspondence to clients and correspondence written on behalf of clients.

B. Draft effective and professional legal communication.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

25-40%    Homework and projects
25-40%    Tests and quizzes
25-40%    Formal writing assignments
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 205H

No information found.

LAW 226

  • Title: Immigration Law*
  • Number: LAW 226
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the various aspects of immigration law. The emphasis in the course is on the functions of the paralegal in an immigration law practice and on the preparation of related documents. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the basic concepts of immigration law.

  2. List the various types of non-immigrants.

  3. Distinguish between relative-based and employment-based employment.

  4. Differentiate between the types of legal permanent residents.

  5. Explain the various benefits, obligations and requirements of American citizenship.

  6. Identify the various grounds for inadmissibility and removal.

  7. Demonstrate the legal procedures for refugee status and asylum.

  8. Identify the legal ethics applicable to the practice of immigration law.

  9. Draft forms used in a practice of immigration law. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Immigration Law

A. Explain the fundamental aspects of immigration law and policy.

B. Explain how the United States of America determines immigration law and policy.

C. Describe the functions of the United States agencies regulating and enforcing immigration laws and regulations.

D. Identify sources of immigration law and forms.

II. Basics of Non-Immigrant Status

A. Define non-immigrant status.

B. Explain the qualifying process for various types of non-immigrant status.

C. Identify persons qualifying for academic student visas.

D. Prepare application forms for non-immigrant status.

III. Immigrants: Relative-Based

A. Explain legal permanent resident (LPR) status.

B. Identify the various types of relatives necessary for obtaining LPR status.

C. Explain preferences requirements.

D. Appraise the importance of “priority date” in relative based immigration.

E. Compare laws and initiatives concerning relative-based immigration and status.

IV. Immigrants: Employment-Based

A. Explain the function of the U.S. Department of Labor in obtaining lawful permanent resident (LPR) status.

B. List the factors related to position qualification.

C. Differentiate among the five types of employment preferences.

D. Investigate the impact of illegal alien employees on employment.

V. Other Types of Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) Status

A. Explain the concept of diversity immigrants.

B. Explain obtaining LPR status through registry.

C. Explain the use of asylum in obtaining LPR status.

D. Differentiate between the different types of adjustments of status.

VI. United States Citizenship

A. Identify the key benefits and obligations of citizenship.

B. Differentiate between natural-born citizens and naturalization.

C. Explain loss of citizenship through denaturalization and expatriation.

VII. Inadmissibility and Removal

A. Define the term inadmissibility.

B. Explain the various grounds for inadmissibility.

C. Define the term removal.

D. Explain the various procedures related to removal.

VIII. Refugees and Asylum

A. Define the term refugee.

B. Differentiate among the various types of persons eligible for refugee status.

C. Explain the concept of asylum and the procedures required for obtaining it.

D. Contrast fraudulent and frivolous claims.

E. Explain the adjustment of status for refugees and persons seeking asylum.

IX. Legal Ethics in the Practice of Immigration Law

A. Apply legal ethics to the practice of Immigration law.

B. Discuss methods to avoid immigration fraud.

C. Discuss the benefits of paralegal foreign language skills.

X. Immigration Law Practice and Procedures

A. Differentiate between the methods which clients may obtain citizenship.

B. Identify appropriate immigration law forms for different client situations.

C. Demonstrate how to explain to the client the need for the necessary forms.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and assignments
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-25%      Collaborative activities and class participation
0-25%      Special projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 226H

No information found.

LAW 245

  • Title: Elder Law and Estate Planning*
  • Number: LAW 245
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the legal aspects of aging. The student should be able to discuss financial planning, healthcare, personal planning and protection, taxation, housing and other legal matters affecting the elder client. The student should also be able to articulate the use of wills and trusts in estate planning. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the various medical, personal, social, financial and legal factors that form the basis of elder law.

  2. Articulate the needs particular to the elder client and his or her family.

  3. Identify various government and private agencies that affect or support the needs of an elder person.

  4. Explain the various forms of healthcare and insurance available to help provide for the needs of the elder person.

  5. Identify various types of housing and hospital and nursing care available to elder persons.

  6. Discuss the problems of abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation particular to elder persons.

  7. Identify financial planning and tax matters affecting elder persons.

  8. Discuss the fundamental concepts of estate planning, including wills, trusts and advance directives.

  9. Explain other legal matters affecting elder persons, including discrimination and family law matters.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of the Practice of Elder Law

A. Identify people affected.

B. Identify medical reasons for development of elder law.

C. Explain the social and financial aspects of elder law.

D. Identify major legal issues of concern for the elder client.

E. Prepare for an initial client interview.

F. Assist the elder client in identifying important papers and documents.

G. Apply legal ethics to the elder client/attorney relationship.

II. Government and Private Agencies and Organizations

A. Identify federal agencies that affect elder persons.

B. Identify state and local agencies that affect elder persons.

C. Compile information about private agencies and organizations offering services to elder people.

III. Healthcare and Insurance

A. Explain the various types of insurance available including:

1. Life

2. Health

3. Long-term care

4. Medicare

5. Medigap

6. Long-term disability

B. Assist in the application of Medicare benefits.

C. Draft medical directives, such as medical powers of attorney, living wills and healthcare directives.

IV. Personal Care Needs

A. Evaluate various forms of living facilities available to elder persons.

B. Identify protective services in cases of abuse, neglect and exploitation.

V. Financial Planning

A. Identify various retirement benefits.

B. Draft financial powers of attorney.

C. Explain basic income tax provisions pertaining to elder persons.

D. Identify special exemptions and state tax benefits for elder persons.

E. Identify various public entitlement programs, including Social Security and Medicaid.

F. Assist in the application of Medicaid benefits.

G. Explain the basic concepts of Social Security benefits.

H. Identify situations where supplemental security income benefits would be available.

I. Provide information about veterans benefits.

VI. Estate Planning

A. Differentiate between testacy and intestacy.

B. Explain Kansas intestate succession statutes.

C. Explain the use of wills and trusts.

D. Explain Kansas probate statutes.

E. Identify legal requirements for a valid will.

F. Collect and assimilate relevant facts needed for the preparation of an estate plan.

G. Discuss post-death estate matters including estate administration.

H. Discuss the medical and legal ethics involved in end-of-life planning.

I. Explain federal estate and gift tax law.

VII. Other Legal Matters Pertaining to the Elder Client

A. Discuss age discrimination.

B. Explain the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

C. Identify family matters that affect some elder clients, including rights related to divorce and grandchildren.

D. Identify situations where the use of a guardianship or conservatorship would be appropriate.

E. Explain the judicial process for setting up and administering a guardianship and/or conservatorship.

F. Provide post-appointment monitoring and supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 245H

  • Title: HON: Elder Law and Estate Planning*
  • Number: LAW 245H
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 247

  • Title: Intellectual Property Law*
  • Number: LAW 247
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the types of intellectual property: patent, copyright, trademark and trade secrets. The student should be able to prepare documents related to the protection of intellectual property rights. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the basic concepts of intellectual property law.

  2. Discuss the elements of patent law, including rights, limitations and ownership.

  3. Discuss the elements of copyright law, including rights, limitations and ownership.

  4. Perform various functions involving copyright administration and protection.

  5. Discuss the elements of trademark law, including rights, limitations and ownership.

  6. Perform various functions involving trademark administration and protection.

  7. Explain the various aspects of trade secrets.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Intellectual Property Law

A. Identify the source of intellectual property rights.

B. Describe the types of intellectual property law.

C. Contrast the various registration and recordation requirements.

D. Differentiate between intellectual property and others forms of property.

E. Outline fundamental requirements for the protection of various types of intellectual property.

II. Patent Law

A. Explain the basis for patent protection.

B. Describe the various types of patents.

C. Explain exclusive rights and limitations under patent law.

D. Explain the patent search process.

E. Discuss patent infringement.

F. Identify types of injunctive relief available in patent litigation.

III. Copyright Law

A. Explain the basis for copyright protection.

B. Identify the applicable federal and state statutes that govern copyright law.

C. Describe the different categories of works, derivative works, and compilations.

D. Explain exclusive rights and limitations under copyright law.

E. Differentiate between various types of transfers of copyright ownership.

F. Understand methods for creation of works for hire

G. Explain procedures and requirements for recording transfers of ownership

H. Explain advantages of copyright registration.

I. Draft copyright registration and recordation applications for submission to the United States Copyright Office (USCO).

J. Perform a search for copyright records on the USCO website.

K. Describe elements of copyright infringement.

L. Analyze the use of copyrighted works under fair use principles, including limitations on fair use for nonprofit and educational purposes.

M. Identify available remedies for copyright infringement.

IV. Principles of Trademarks

A. Explain the basis for trademark and service mark protection.

B. Identify the applicable federal and state statutes that govern trademark law.

C. Differentiate between a trademark, service mark, work certification mark, trade dress and goodwill.

D. Explain exclusive rights and limitations under trademark law.

E. Identify the elements used in evaluating a proposed trademark.

F. Explain advantages of trademark registration.

G. Draft federal trademark protection documents for submission to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

H. Perform a search for trademark records on the USPTO website.

I. Differentiate between trademark infringement and trademark dilution claims.

J. Identify available remedies for trademark infringement.

K. Analyze the use of trademark works under fair use principles.

V. Trade Secrets

A. Differentiate trade secret protection from copyright and patent protection.

B. Identify examples of trade secrets.

C. Locate sources of trade secret law.

D. Review a company's trade secret precautions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 247H

No information found.

LAW 266

  • Title: Employment Law*
  • Number: LAW 266
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to classify the relationship between employer and worker. The student should be able to apply federal and state laws that address equal opportunity, workers' compensation, and employment protections and benefits. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Distinguish between an employee and an independent contractor.

  2. Identify federal equal employment (anti-discrimination) laws.

  3. Apply equal employment laws to a hypothetical set of facts.

  4. Identify the major federal and state statutes concerning an employment relationship.

  5. Explain federal labor relations laws.

  6. Identify various employee protections and benefits provided by federal and state law.

  7. Summarize the procedures involved in determining coverage and benefits under workers' compensation.

  8. Evaluate the impact of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration on the workplace.

  9. Prepare documents commonly drafted by paralegals working in employment law.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Employment Relationship

A. Distinguish between the relationships of an employer-employee and a principal-independent contractor.

B. Discuss employer liability for tort and contract claims against employees and independent contractors.

C. Identify appropriate and inappropriate hiring criteria and recruitment procedures.

D. Explain the purpose of pre-employment testing.

II. Equal Opportunity Laws – Race, Color, National Origin Discrimination

A. Explain equal employment opportunity and affirmative action as related to race, color and national origin discrimination.

B. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in race, color and national origin discrimination cases.

C. Identify federal and state equal opportunity statutes that relate to race, color and national origin.

D. Apply anti-discrimination laws that relate to race, color and national origin to a hypothetical set of facts.

III. Equal Opportunity Laws – Sex and Sexual Orientation Discrimination and Sexual Harassment

A. Explain equal employment opportunity and affirmative action as related to sex discrimination.

B. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in sex discrimination cases.

C. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in sexual orientation discrimination cases.

D. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in sexual harassment cases.

E. Identify federal and state equal opportunity statutes that relate to sex discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination and sexual harassment.

F. Apply anti-discrimination laws that relate to sex discrimination and sexual orientation to a hypothetical set of facts.

G. Apply laws that relate to sexual harassment to a hypothetical set of facts.

IV. Equal Opportunity Laws – Religious Discrimination

A. Explain equal employment opportunity and affirmative action as related to religious discrimination.

B. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in religious discrimination cases.

C. Identify federal and state equal opportunity statutes that relate to religious discrimination.

D. Apply anti-discrimination laws that relate to religion to a hypothetical set of facts.

V. Equal Opportunity Laws – Disability Discrimination

A. Explain equal employment opportunity and affirmative action as related to disability discrimination.

B. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in disability discrimination cases.

C. Identify federal and state equal opportunity statutes that relate to disability discrimination.

D. Apply anti-discrimination laws that relate to disability to a hypothetical set of facts.

VI. Equal Opportunity Laws – Age Discrimination

A. Explain equal employment opportunity and affirmative action as related to age discrimination.

B. Describe the elements and defenses that apply in age discrimination cases.

C. Identify federal and state equal opportunity statutes that relate to age discrimination.

D. Apply anti-discrimination laws that relate to age to a hypothetical set of facts.

VII. Equal Opportunity Laws – Other Work-Family Laws

A. Explain other work-family laws, including the Family and Medical Leave Act and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

B. Apply work-family laws to a hypothetical set of facts.

VIII. Employee Protection and Benefits

A. Discuss issues related to work privacy.

B. Apply laws related to the terms and conditions of employment, including federal labor relations laws, wage and hour laws, Occupational Safety and Health Act and workers' compensation laws, to a hypothetical set of facts.

C. Discuss retirement and employee benefits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 266H

No information found.

LAW 269

  • Title: Bankruptcy Law*
  • Number: LAW 269
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain the purpose of the federal Bankruptcy Code. The student should be able to prepare bankruptcy forms and documents, especially those related to Chapter 7, Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain how the bankruptcy laws are designed to benefit both debtors and creditors.

  2. Describe the organization and structure of the federal Bankruptcy Court system, and applicable procedural rules.

  3. Identify other legal rules and principles that are applicable to bankruptcy proceedings.

  4. Use specialized bankruptcy law terminology appropriately.

  5. Explain the role of the paralegal in a bankruptcy legal practice.

  6. Research bankruptcy law in both primary and secondary authority resources.

  7. Explain the role of the participants in the bankruptcy process.

  8. Describe the nature, consequences, and eligibility requirements for filing Chapter 7, 11, 12 and 13 bankruptcy.

  9. Prepare drafts of appropriate forms and assist in the filing of Chapter 7, 11 and 13 bankruptcy.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overview of Bankruptcy Law

A. Identify the origins of the bankruptcy system.

B. Describe the bankruptcy alternatives available to individuals and entities under the Bankruptcy Code.

C. Explain how the bankruptcy laws are designed to offer protection to both debtors and creditors.

D. Describe the structure and operation of the Bankruptcy Court system.

E. Demonstrate the ability to use bankruptcy terminology.

F. Describe the functions of the paralegal in a bankruptcy practice.

II. Research in Bankruptcy Law

A. Utilize applicable sections of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure and local rules.

B. Apply relevant court decisions to hypothetical facts.

III. Participants in the Bankruptcy Process

A. Define the role of the debtor in the bankruptcy process.

B. Define the role of the creditor and the role and authority of the creditor's committee in the bankruptcy process.

C. Explain the role and authority of the Bankruptcy Court judge and the District Court judge in the bankruptcy process.

D. Distinguish between the role and authority of the U.S. Trustee and the role and authority of the bankruptcy trustee.

IV. Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

A. Explain the nature and consequences of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing.

B. Evaluate a debtor's eligibility to file under Chapter 7.

C. Prepare documents used in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding.

D. Explain the timing and consequences of the automatic stay.

E. Describe the rights and duties of a debtor under a Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding.

F. Describe the rights and duties of a creditor under a Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding.

G. Explain the purpose and effect of a Chapter 7 discharge, and the grounds for denial of discharge.

H. Identify provisions for gathering, liquidating and distributing the non-exempt property of the estate as a dividend.

I. Explain the treatment of secured claims, priority claims and unsecured claims in a Chapter 7 case.

J. Explain the criteria that trigger, and the procedures for, dismissal, conversion or closing of a Chapter 7 case.

V. Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

A. Explain the nature and consequences of a Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing.

B. Evaluate a debtor's eligibility to file under Chapter 13.

C. Compare and contrast the procedures, purpose and outcomes of a Chapter 13 bankruptcy filing with a Chapter 7 filing.

D. Prepare documents used in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding.

E. Describe the rights and duties of a debtor under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding.

F. Describe the rights and duties of a creditor under a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding.

G. Describe the duties of the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy proceeding.

H. Explain the content, function and duration of a Chapter 13 plan.

I. Identify the criteria and process for obtaining confirmation of a Chapter 13 plan.

J. Describe the procedures for closing a Chapter 13 case and obtaining a discharge.

VI. Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

A. Explain the nature and consequences of a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing.

B. Evaluate a debtor's eligibility to file under Chapter 11.

C. Compare and contrast the procedures, purpose and outcomes of a Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing with Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 filings.

D. Prepare documents used in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding.

E. Describe the rights and duties of a debtor in possession under a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding.

F. Describe the rights and duties of a creditor under a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding.

G. Identify the criteria for appointing a bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding.

H. Explain the duties of the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding.

I. Identify the criteria and process for obtaining confirmation of a Chapter 11 plan.

J. Explain the cram down process in Chapter 11, and distinguish it from the cram down process used in Chapter 13.

K. Describe the criteria for and consequences of an unsuccessful Chapter 11 case.

L. Describe the procedures for closing a Chapter 11 case.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Homework and projects
30-60%    Tests and quizzes
0-20%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%


 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 269H

No information found.

LAW 271

  • Title: Legal Ethics, Interviewing and Investigation*
  • Number: LAW 271
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 134 or department approval.
Prerequisites or corequisites: LAW 205.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to explain ethical rules and standards governing the legal profession, interview clients and witnesses, and investigate the facts as part of a legal analysis or proceedings. A major emphasis will be on recognition of ethical problems commonly encountered and the development of interviewing and investigating skills. The course is also designated as the capstone course for the paralegal program. The course will draw the student's paralegal learning and provide an opportunity to demonstrate that the student has accomplished the program's educational goals. This opportunity will focus on finalizing and reviewing the student's e-portfolio. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Explain the importance of the model ethical code from the American Bar Association.
  2. Compare and contrast the major paralegal associations’ codes of ethics, the National Federation of Paralegal Associations and the National Association of Legal Assistants.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to apply the Kansas Rules of Professional Conduct for attorneys to factual situations.
  4. Explain the major components of the lawyer’s code of ethics, including competency, conflict of interest, fee arrangements, diligent representation, work product and confidentiality.
  5. Demonstrate the skill of interviewing clients and witnesses.
  6. Demonstrate the skill of investigating a claim.
  7. Prepare a professional resume reflecting skills obtained through the paralegal program.
  8. List resources available through JCCC helpful in finding a paralegal position.
  9. Demonstrate the mastery of paralegal knowledge and skills by completion of an e-portfolio, showcasing the student's paralegal education and work within the program.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Legal Ethics

A. Demonstrate an understanding of the American Bar Association’s model code of ethics.

B. Compare and contrast the codes of ethics developed by the National Federation of Paralegal Associations and the National Association of Legal Assistants.

C. Apply the Kansas Rules of Professional Conduct to common legal ethical problems.

II. Interviewing Skills

A. Explain communication skills used in interviewing clients and witnesses.

B. Distinguish the types of communication and forms of verbal and non-verbal communication.

C. Demonstrate an effective legal interview.

III. Investigative Techniques

A. Identify sources of information available for a legal investigation.

B. Prepare a plan of investigation.

IV. Career Development

A. Describe career development resources available through JCCC.

B. Draft a professional resume.

V. Professional e-portfolio of work and growth

A. Explain the importance of creating and maintaining an e-portfolio.

B. Select work for the e-portfolio.

C. Assemble a professional e-portfolio.

D. Present the student's e-portfolio to the professor and class.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-60%    Tests and quizzes
30-50%    Homework and assignments
10-30%    Class presentations
0-25%      Collaborative activities and class participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and internet searching skills.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 271H

No information found.

LAW 275

  • Title: Paralegal Internship I*
  • Number: LAW 275
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 120
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 120

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 120 and LAW 121 or department chair approval.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. It is designed to provide practice experience in a legal setting. The student must complete 120 hours of work at the internship site. Obtaining an internship is the responsibility of the individual student.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify paralegal job opportunities.
  2. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training situation.
  3. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward position and work.
  4. Maintain accurate records of hours worked and tasks performed.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply classroom knowledge to the job.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Paralegal Internship Position

A. Identify potential paralegal employers.

B. Identify required job skills for internship position.

C. Revise resume, cover letter and other application materials.

D. Prepare self-assessment of readiness for internship position.

II. Professional Attitude

A. Create goals and objective for internship.

B. Review goals throughout the internship and update as needed.

C. Maintain a professional image in appearance and attitude.

D. Consult with instructor as required by the instructor.

III. Evaluation of Job Experience

A. Provide employer’s evaluation.

B. Prepare student's evaluation of internship experience.

IV. Accurate Record-Keeping

A. Prepare weekly logs of hours worked.

B. Prepare weekly logs of nature of major assignments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The student will work a minimum of 120 hours under the supervision of a licensed attorney.  The evaluation of the student's progress and performance on the job is a cooperative effort between the supervisor, the instructor and the student.

20-30%    Preparation of weekly logs
20-50%    Employer’s Evaluation
20-30%    Student self-assessments
10-20%    Identifying and obtaining appropriate job

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

  1. Student must have transportation to and from work.
  2. Student must have a wardrobe appropriate for a professional legal workplace.
  3. Student must have basic word processing and internet search skills.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 276

  • Title: Paralegal Internship II*
  • Number: LAW 276
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 120
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 120

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program. LAW 275.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work situation. This course consists of supervised work experience in an approved training situation. It is designed to provide practice experience in a legal setting. The student must complete 120 hours of work at the internship site. Obtaining an internship is the responsibility of the individual student.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify paralegal job opportunities.
  2. Apply for and secure a position in an approved training situation.
  3. Demonstrate a mature and professional attitude toward position and work.
  4. Maintain accurate records of hours worked and tasks performed. 
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply classroom knowledge to the job.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Paralegal Internship Position

A. Identify potential paralegal employers.

B. Identify required job skills for internship position.

C. Revise resume, cover letter and other application materials.

D. Prepare self-assessment of readiness for internship position.

II. Professional Attitude

A. Create goals and objective for internship.

B. Review goals throughout the internship and update as needed.

C. Maintain a professional image in appearance and attitude.

D. Consult with instructor as required by the instructor.

III. Evaluation of Job Experience

A. Provide employer's evaluation.

B. Prepare student's evaluation of internship experience.

IV. Accurate Record-Keeping

A. Prepare weekly logs of hours worked.

B. Prepare weekly logs of nature of major assignments.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

The student will work a minimum of 120 hours under the supervision of a licensed attorney.  The evaluation of the student's progress and performance on the job is a cooperative effort between the supervisor, the instructor, and the student.

20-30%    Preparation of weekly logs
20-50%    Employer’s Evaluation
20-30%    Student self-assessments
10-20%    Identifying and obtaining appropriate job

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

  1. Student must have transportation to and from work.
  2. Student must have a wardrobe appropriate for a professional legal workplace.
  3. Student must have basic word processing and internet search skills.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

LAW 291

No information found.

LAW 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: LAW 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 1 - 3
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Admission to the Paralegal program or department approval.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific paralegal topics related to law not usually taught in the curriculum to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recall key terms explaining and applying concepts within the scope of the special topic.
  2. Demonstrate conceptual understanding of the special topic.
  3. Explain information relevant to the special topic.
  4. Locate information relevant to the special topic.
  5. Evaluate information relevant to the special topic.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course content outline and competencies will vary depending on the special topic being offered. The Special Topics course outline must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course content outline and competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Paralegal program faculty prior to being offered. The Paralegal program faculty, program chair and the Business Division dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered, approve the course content and determine when the course should be offered. 

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluations will be accomplished using the methods typically used within the program for other courses, including discussions, written assignments, research results, individual and group projects, testing and other appropriate assessment methods depending on the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Any specific Special Topics class may not be repeated within any two-year sequence.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).