Photography (PHOT)

Courses

PHOT 100 Photography Basics

Photography Basics covers camera operation, basic workflow, and preparing images for social media. Consumer grade cameras are covered including cell phones, point and shoot, and consumer DSLRs, accompanied by discussions, readings, and/or lectures regarding the historical, ethical, critical, and theoretical concerns of the medium.

PHOT 200 Foundations in Photography

Foundations in Photography covers camera operation, workflow, and digital / analog printing methods. Both digital and analog methods are explored and accompanied by lectures, readings, and discussions regarding the historical, ethical, critical, and theoretical concerns of the medium. A digital camera with full manual controls with RAW capabilities, and a 35 MM film camera with full manual controls are required. JCCC has cameras available for student check-out. Diverse artists and photographers are included in lectures and the ethical implications of photography and its representations of marginalized communities is discussed.

PHOT 201 Photography I

This is the first of the two-part foundational Photography sequence. This course provides students with a rigorous immersion into the formal, technical, and conceptual concerns and challenges of photography by way of the 4X5, large format, view camera. Embracing both the wet and digital darkrooms, students shoot and develop sheet film that is then utilized to produce both traditional and digital prints. Intermediate digital editing methods are introduced and explored. View cameras are provided. Prerequisite: PHOT 200.

PHOT 202 Photography II

This is the second of the two-part foundational Photography sequence. This advanced course builds upon the skills and knowledge learned in PHOT 201, Photography 1 with an additional emphasis on color, RAW workflow, and advanced methods for digital capture, manipulation, editing, and composition. Additionally, students work extensively with large-format, fine art, inkjet printers to create custom ICC printing profiles. A digital SLR (RAW capable) camera with full manual controls is required. JCCC has cameras available for student check-out. This class concentrates on both the development of craft and preparing students to more deeply examine their personal interests in the medium. Emphasis will be placed on exploring color photography historically, technically, and personally through presentations, readings, and photographing / studio work. Students will study advanced methods for digital capture, tonal and color correction, automatic file processing, large scale printing, and optimal ways to prepare digital files for a variety of reproduction processes. Prerequisite: PHOT 201.

PHOT 223 Studio Photography

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of studio lighting. Students will use professional camera and studio equipment, including studio electronic flash and hand-held light/flash meters. This course also includes advanced camera techniques for total image control. Students will use studio lighting to shoot photographs that will then be printed and finished for gallery presentation. The medium is explored for both its technical and conceptual merit as a medium of fine art. Applications of digital photography as they apply to studio photographic processes will also be explored. Ethical implications of photographs will be discussed. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of advanced studio assignments. Prerequisite: PHOT 200.

PHOT 224 Experimental Processes

Experimental Processes is an introduction to the understanding and production of image-based works utilizing experimental approaches and alternative processes in an interdisciplinary environment. The student will be creating images using historical, experimental, and alternative mediums and processes to create visual art. Prerequisite: PHOT 200.

PHOT 291 Independent Study

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience. Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

PHOT 292 Special Topics:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of photography, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Photography curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Photography for credit but only on different topics.

PHOT 293 Photography Seminar

Photography Seminar is an advanced photography class designed to aid students in the development of individual creative projects and bodies of work. This course will holistically instruct on the steps in portfolio development, image sequencing, exhibition preparation, and visual literacy. Students are required to submit a proposal and gain instructor permission for enrolling in this course. This course is repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: PHOT 202 and PHOT 223 and PHOT 224 and Department approval.

PHOT 100

  • Title: Photography Basics
  • Number: PHOT 100
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Photography Basics covers camera operation, basic workflow, and preparing images for social media. Consumer grade cameras are covered including cell phones, point and shoot, and consumer DSLRs, accompanied by discussions, readings, and/or lectures regarding the historical, ethical, critical, and theoretical concerns of the medium.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and utilize appropriate terms in the vocabulary of photographic imaging.
  2. Utilize the basic point and shoot cameras, cell phone cameras and DSLR automatic functions to shoot photos.
  3. Create photographs for social media platforms.
  4. Critically evaluate, discuss and critique photography in terms of its formal and conceptual merit.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding and awareness of visual literacy.
  6. Cite major artists, inventions and movements in photography.
  7. Identify ethical considerations, and produce artwork that exemplifies an understanding of these considerations.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Photography

A. Identify major discoveries.

B. Identify inventions.

C. Explain changes in concepts and identify movements in photography..

D. Identify important photographers.

II. Consumer Camera Use

A. Utilize basic point and shoot cameras to shoot photographs.

B. Utilize cell phones to take photographs.

III. The Photograph for Social Media

A. Demonstrate the ability to edit and upload photographs to social media platforms.

B. Identify current social media sites.

C. Demonstrate the ability to share photographs between various social media sites.

D. Demonstrate an understanding of visual literacy and how photographs are used including political implications, familial implications, cultural implications, and social implications.

E. Critically evaluate, discuss and critique photography in terms of its formal and conceptual merit.

IV. Ethical Considerations Embedded in the Medium

A. Discuss copyright issues.

B. Demonstrate representation of marginalized communities.

C. Discuss legal issues.

V. Vocabulary

A. Define basic photography vocabulary such as aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.

B. Demonstrate an understanding of basic photography vocabulary such as aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%     Class presentations and assignments
75-90%     Critique of projects

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 200

  • Title: Foundations in Photography
  • Number: PHOT 200
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

Foundations in Photography covers camera operation, workflow, and digital / analog printing methods. Both digital and analog methods are explored and accompanied by lectures, readings, and discussions regarding the historical, ethical, critical, and theoretical concerns of the medium. A digital camera with full manual controls with RAW capabilities, and a 35 MM film camera with full manual controls are required. JCCC has cameras available for student check-out. Diverse artists and photographers are included in lectures and the ethical implications of photography and its representations of marginalized communities is discussed.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define and utilize appropriate terms in the vocabulary of photographic imaging.
  2. Utilize the mechanics, optics, and exposure controls of the camera, both analog and digital.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to use both traditional and digital imaging equipment, materials, processes and procedures.
  4. Create fine art prints.
  5. Critically evaluate, discuss and critique photography in terms of its formal and conceptual merit.
  6. Utilize and apply an understanding of contemporary conceptual, illustrative, expressive, and other communicative pursuits in the medium of photography.
  7. Prepare artwork for appropriate gallery presentation.
  8. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution in the creation of photography as a medium of fine art.
  9. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment, comply with health and safety rules.
  10. Cite major artists, inventions, and movements in Photography.
  11. Identify ethical considerations and produce artwork that exemplifies an understanding of these considerations.
  12. Demonstrate an understanding of unearned privilege and the effects photographic images can have on marginalized communities, both in terms of exploitation and representation intended to create positive social change.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Photography

A. Identify major discoveries.

B. Identify inventions.

C. Explain changes in concepts.

D. Identify important photographers and movements.

E. Identify historical processes.

F. Analyze the work of contemporary photographers including international, diverse and marginalized artists such as, but not limited to Carrie Mae Weems, Renee Cox, and Catherine Opie.

II. Film

A. Describe how light affects silver halides -- the “chemistry” of exposure.

B. Explain major characteristics of film emulsions:

1. Sensitivity

2. Grain

3. Format

III. Camera

A. Describe the major types of cameras, including:

1. View camera

2. Rangefinder camera

3. SLR

4. DSLR

B. Identify the major camera parts, describe and create photographs using the functions of the major parts in both digital and analog cameras.

1. Body

2. Lens

3. Shutter

4. Aperture

5. Focusing system

6. Film handling: advance and rewind mechanism

7. White balance

C. Use exposure controls

1. Shutter and its effect on recording motion

2. Aperture and its effect on depth of field

3. ISO and its effect on visible grain and pixels

IV. Lens

A. Distinguish lens types such as:

1. Normal

2. Wide-angle

3. Telephoto

4. Macro

B. Define lens terminology including terms such as:

1. Refraction

2. Focal length

3. Angle of view (determined by focal length)

C. Describe appropriate applications for various lens types.

D. Observe proper procedures for care of lenses.

V. Film Processing

A. Describe the nature and purpose of each film processing chemical.

B. Use correct film development procedures.

C. Control negative quality.

1. Explain how exposure affects negative density

2. Explain how development affects negative contrast

3. Describe the “normal” negative

4. Explain the development technique of “pushing” film -- its application and effect on quality

VI. Printing

A. List and describe the basic characteristics of photographic papers.

1. Sensitivity -- “speed”

2. Weight

3. Surface

4. Fiber-based vs. resin-coated

5. Image “color” and base “color” -- cold-tone, neutral, and warm-tone

B. List and describe the nature and purpose of each print processing chemical. Create prints using correct times and temperatures.

1. Developer

2. Stop bath

3. Fixer

4. Hypo-clearing agent

5. Final wash

C. Operate print lab equipment.

D. Demonstrate the ability to print digitally using fine art printers.

VII. Finishing / preparing prints for gallery presentation

A. Demonstrate the ability to “touch-up” prints using Spot-tone dyes.

B. Demonstrate the ability to properly mount prints.

C. Demonstrate the ability to properly mat prints.

D. Apply appropriate alternative presentation methods.

VIII. Digital Photography

A. List and describe characteristics and applications of digital photography.

B. Identify digital photography tools and describe their function or purpose:

1. Image capture:

a. Digital cameras

b. Digital film-backs and inserts

c. Film and flatbed scanners

2. Create prints utilizing current photo editing software

3. Image output/presentation/storage:

a. Printers

b. Electronic files and file management

C. Utilize Digital Cameras.

1. Identify major camera features and parts

2. Image sensor

3. White Balance

4. ISO sensitivity and digital noise

5. Exposure compensation

6. Image size and compression

7. File format

a. JPEG

b. TIFF

c. RAW

D. Create photos using basic digital workflow methods.

E. Discuss ethical considerations embedded in the medium.

F. Create photos / images as a medium of Fine Art.

G. Critique and defend artwork verbally and in writing.

IX. Ethical considerations

A. Discuss unearned and earned privileges.

B. Explain how privilege and hierarchical power structures are embedded in photography.

C. Discuss the impact of photography on marginalized groups including:

1. the camera as a tool of exploitation

2. the camera as a tool for positive social change

D.  Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges present in various historical photographic movements and fields.

E.  Identify various gazes and describe how these are exemplified and defined in photography.

1.  Male gaze

2.  Female gaze

3.  Heteronormative gaze

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%    Tests which stress factual knowledge (terminology, methods,
classifications) and fundamental principles and theories.
75-90%    Critique of projects and assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 201

  • Title: Photography I*
  • Number: PHOT 201
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 200.

Description:

This is the first of the two-part foundational Photography sequence. This course provides students with a rigorous immersion into the formal, technical, and conceptual concerns and challenges of photography by way of the 4X5, large format, view camera. Embracing both the wet and digital darkrooms, students shoot and develop sheet film that is then utilized to produce both traditional and digital prints. Intermediate digital editing methods are introduced and explored. View cameras are provided.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate and apply mechanics of photography such as controlling the frame, perspective and focal plane, etc., with clear intentionality.
  2. Create properly exposed and optimally processed black and white sheet film for digital scanning and for traditional, wet lab printing.
  3. Produce quality, exhibition-ready black and white prints.
  4. Critically discuss and critique view-camera photographs in terms of formal and conceptual merit.
  5. Utilize and intentionally apply technical and critical understanding towards conceptual, illustrative, expressive, and communicative photographic pursuits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The View Camera and Sheet Film

A. Demonstrate the ability to use and shoot with a large format, 4X5 view camera.

B. Demonstrate the ability to develop sheet film.

C. Demonstrate and apply mechanics of large format photography such as controlling the frame, perspective and focal plane, etc., with clear intentionality.

D. Create properly exposed and optimally processed black and white sheet film for digital scanning and for traditional, wet lab printing.

II. The Exhibition Print

A. Produce exhibition quality digital prints using professional scanners and printers.

B. Produce exhibition quality traditional/wet lab prints in the darkroom.

III. The Critique

A. Discuss photographs in terms of technical and formal qualities.

B. Discuss photographs in terms of their content and conceptual merit.

C. Defend artwork both orally and in writing.

D. Critically discuss and critique view-camera photographs in terms of formal and conceptual merit.

E. Utilize and intentionally apply technical and critical understanding towards conceptual, illustrative, expressive, and communicative photographic pursuits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%     Presentations and class assignments
75-90%     Critique of projects and assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 202

  • Title: Photography II*
  • Number: PHOT 202
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 201.

Description:

This is the second of the two-part foundational Photography sequence. This advanced course builds upon the skills and knowledge learned in PHOT 201, Photography 1 with an additional emphasis on color, RAW workflow, and advanced methods for digital capture, manipulation, editing, and composition. Additionally, students work extensively with large-format, fine art, inkjet printers to create custom ICC printing profiles. A digital SLR (RAW capable) camera with full manual controls is required. JCCC has cameras available for student check-out. This class concentrates on both the development of craft and preparing students to more deeply examine their personal interests in the medium. Emphasis will be placed on exploring color photography historically, technically, and personally through presentations, readings, and photographing / studio work. Students will study advanced methods for digital capture, tonal and color correction, automatic file processing, large scale printing, and optimal ways to prepare digital files for a variety of reproduction processes.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the ability to effectively shoot color photographs.
  2. Demonstrate and apply advanced digital post-production and printing methods to create fine art prints..
  3. Utilize proper color management procedures in producing images of maximum quality.
  4. Demonstrate a proficiency in using advanced digital image techniques through a series of assignments.
  5. Produce quality, exhibition-ready color prints.
  6. Critically discuss and critique photographs in terms of formal and conceptual merit.
  7. Utilize and intentionally apply technical and critical understanding towards conceptual, illustrative, expressive, and communicative photographic pursuits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Shooting Color

A. Demonstrate the ability to compose scenes with color as a primary focus.

B. Apply an understanding of the emotional impact of color when creating a scene.

C. Apply an understanding of the symbolic meaning embedded in colors when photographing.

II. The Exhibition Print and Color

A. Create and implement color profiles.

B. Utilize proper color management procedures in producing images of maximum quality.

C. Demonstrate and apply advanced digital post-production methods.

III. Printing Fine Art Prints

A. Produce exhibition quality digital prints using professional scanners and printers.

B. Produce exhibition quality color prints from digital RAW files.

C. Demonstrate and apply advanced color printing methods to create fine art prints.

D. Produce quality, exhibition-ready color prints.

IV. The Critique

A. Discuss photographs in terms of technical and formal qualities.

B. Discuss photographs in terms of their content and conceptual merit.

C. Defend artwork both orally and in writing.

D. Demonstrate a proficiency in using advanced digital image techniques through a series of assignments.

E. Utilize and intentionally apply technical and critical understanding towards conceptual, illustrative, expressive, and communicative photographic pursuits.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%     Presentations and class assignments
75-90%     Critique of projects and assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 223

  • Title: Studio Photography*
  • Number: PHOT 223
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 200.

Description:

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of studio lighting. Students will use professional camera and studio equipment, including studio electronic flash and hand-held light/flash meters. This course also includes advanced camera techniques for total image control. Students will use studio lighting to shoot photographs that will then be printed and finished for gallery presentation. The medium is explored for both its technical and conceptual merit as a medium of fine art. Applications of digital photography as they apply to studio photographic processes will also be explored. Ethical implications of photographs will be discussed. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of advanced studio assignments.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define terms in the vocabulary of studio lighting photography.
  2. Use studio artificial lighting equipment. Set up and operate lighting equipment -- stands, photofloods, quartz-halogen, electronic flash, diffusers, scrims, gobos, and gels.
  3. Demonstrate the use of artificial lighting to solve the problems and create photographs as a medium of fine art.
  4. Operate digital imaging equipment, software, and printers.
  5. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution.
  6. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment, comply with health and safety rules.
  7. Discuss ethical implications of the photographic image.
  8. Create a body of work utilizing studio photography to create artwork.
  9. Critique and defend work orally and in writing.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Professional Vocabulary

A. Demonstrate an understanding of the correct terminology by properly identifying equipment such as, but not limited to, flags, soft-box and cookies.

B. Utilize correct vocabulary to describe various lighting techniques such as, but not limited to, rim light, key light, diffuse, shadow and highlight.

II. Studio Lighting

A. Explain the major characteristics of light.

B. Set up and operate lighting equipment -- stands, photofloods, quartz-halogen, electronic flash, diffusers, scrims, gobos and gels.

C. Produce photographs demonstrating the use of artificial lighting to solve the problems and enhance the qualities inherent in a variety of subjects.

III. “On-Location” Lighting

A. Explain the techniques for using portable supplemental flash, reflectors and scrims

B. Photograph on-location using some of the demonstrated techniques

IV. Digital Imaging

A. Scan negatives

B. Apply image controls and modifications

C. Utilize appropriate file management for archiving images

D. Create fine art prints using large-format inkjet printers

V. Safety 

A. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment.

B. Comply with health and safety rules.

VI. Artwork

A. Create a body of fine artwork.

B. Defend work orally and in writing .

C. Create written artist statements.

D. Give presentations on created work.

VII. Ethical considerations

A. Explain copyright laws.

B. Discuss implications of “taking” a photograph.

C. Discuss impacts on marginalized communities of images in media.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%    Tests which stress factual knowledge (terminology, methods, classifications) and fundamental principles and theories
75-90%    Critique of projects and assignments

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 224

  • Title: Experimental Processes*
  • Number: PHOT 224
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 200.

Description:

Experimental Processes is an introduction to the understanding and production of image-based works utilizing experimental approaches and alternative processes in an interdisciplinary environment. The student will be creating images using historical, experimental, and alternative mediums and processes to create visual art.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Recognize and demonstrate safe and responsible procedures
  2. Define and demonstrate the use of chemical procedures related to processes
  3. Generate artwork that is ready to hang in a gallery
  4. Critique work objectively, individually and in groups
  5. Defend work verbally and in writing

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Experimental Processes and Alternative Media

A. Create chemigram/photogram prints.

B. Develop luman prints.

C. Make large-scale/mural prints.

D. Demonstrate the creating of cyanotypes.

E. Apply gum bichromate process to make prints.

F. Recognize and demonstrate safe and responsible procedures.

II. Safe Studio Practices

A. Demonstrate the separation of wet and dry work areas.

B. Evaluate the work area for potential hazards.

C. Maintain and demonstrate proper darkroom safety policies.

D. Recognize and demonstrate safe and responsible procedures.

III. Critique

A. Analyze work formally and conceptually.

B. Evaluate and articulate assessment of the work created both verbally and in writing.

C. Critique the work verbally.

D. Describe the work through writing artist statements.

E. Recognize and demonstrate safe and responsible procedures.

F. Critique work objectively, individually and in groups.

G. Defend work verbally and in writing.

IV. Final Presentation for Gallery Hanging

A. Demonstrate the ability to matte prints.

B. Apply mounting techniques.

C. Employ alternative presentation methods.

D. Generate artwork that is ready to hang in a gallery.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

10-25%      Tests which stress factual knowledge (terminology, methods,
classifications) and fundamental principles and theories

75-90%      Critique of projects and assignments

Grade Criteria:

90 - 100% = A
80 - 89% = B
70 - 79% = C
60 - 69% = D
0 - 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 291

No information found.

PHOT 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: PHOT 292
  • Effective Term: 2020-21
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 2 - 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2 - 6

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of photography, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Photography curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Photography for credit but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Be conversant with the relevant readings within the selected topic.
  2. Define and explain key terms and concepts within the selected topic.
  3. Demonstrate appropriate research methodology relevant to the selected topic. 
  4. Relate the special topic to essential issues and themes in photography and /or society.
  5. Articulate a critically informed perspective on the selected topic drawn from qualitative and/or quantitative evidence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Content Outline and Competencies will vary because they are dependent upon the special topic being offered.  The outline and competencies will follow the standard format for JCCC courses and will be written in outcomes-based language.  The Special Topics course proposal will first be reviewed and approved by the Photography faculty.  The Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review and approve each Special Topics course proposal.  Scheduling of Special Topics courses will be the responsibility of the Department Chair.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of evaluation will vary depending on the special topic being offered.  Standard methods of evaluation may be employed, such as readings, discussions, written assignments, creative projects, critiques, individual or group projects, presentations and service learning.  Other methods may be utilized to assess student mastery of competencies based upon the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

A topic offered under a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 293

No information found.