Photography (PHOT)

Courses

PHOT 121   Fundamentals of Photography (3 Hours)

This course provides an introduction to the tools, procedures, concepts and application of photographic imaging. Students will use cameras, light meters and darkroom equipment for film developing and printing to make images to meet the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills, competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students' creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. Students must provide their own camera with adjustable focus, shutter speeds and aperture. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

PHOT 122   Advanced Photography* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PHOT 121.

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of photographic imaging, with an emphasis on black-and-white photography as a fine art. Students will use Zone System tests and procedures to produce prints of maximum quality. Students will use advanced techniques, such as split-developers for contrast control, multiple-imaging and archival processing, and print presentation. Several "alternative" printing processes will be discussed and demonstrated. This course also includes a basic introduction to medium format (2 1/4) and large format (4 x 5) camera equipment and technique. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of conceptually advanced, project/series-oriented assignments to stimulate the student's creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

PHOT 122H   HON: Advanced Photography* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

PHOT 123   Studio Photography* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PHOT 121.

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of studio and commercial photography. Students will use professional camera and studio equipment, including studio electronic flash and hand-held light/flash meters. This course also includes an introduction to professional medium format (2 1/4) and large format (4"x5") equipment and advanced camera techniques for total image control. Students will use studio lighting for various portraiture styles and for small-product, table-top photography. Applications of digital photography as they apply to studio photographic processes will be introduced. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of advanced studio assignments. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

PHOT 128   Digital Photography (3 Hours)

This course is an introduction to the concepts, tools and technology of digital imaging for photographers. Students will develop competence in the use of digital photographic equipment, software, storage devices and printers to produce digital photographic images satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills and competencies. Students will "capture," import, adjust, correct, transmit, store and output images. They will use digital imaging technology to produce photographs for visual communication and artistic expression. Ethics and cultural implications of the technology will be discussed. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab per/wk.

PHOT 129   Advanced Digital Photography* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: PHOT 128.

This course develops and expands upon the techniques, tools, procedures, and concepts that were introduced in the Digital Photography course. Students will learn to use a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera or its equivalent. Students will develop and use an archival image editing workflow. They will learn advanced image correction, modification and editing techniques to prepare photographic images for various output options including photographic prints and the web. They will employ file management routines and archival storage systems. Students will create original work that demonstrates an advanced proficiency in digital methods and an advanced understanding of the practice of photography. They will produce high quality prints. The work created is intended to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. 6 hrs. integrated lecture lab/wk.

PHOT 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

PHOT 292   Special Topics: (1-3 Hour)

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of photography, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Photography curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Photography for credit but only on different topics.

PHOT 121

  • Title: Fundamentals of Photography
  • Number: PHOT 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course provides an introduction to the tools, procedures, concepts and application of photographic imaging. Students will use cameras, light meters and darkroom equipment for film developing and printing to make images to meet the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills, competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students' creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. Students must provide their own camera with adjustable focus, shutter speeds and aperture. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define terms in the vocabulary of photographic imaging and darkroom technology.
  2. Use photographic equipment, materials and processes. Specifically: a) Operate camera; identify parts and their functions; b) Identify types and describe characteristics of various films. Select appropriate emulsions; c) Use light meters; distinguish types, determine camera settings. Apply appropriate exposure adjustments; d) Process negatives. Utilize developing equipment. Prepare chemicals. Apply quality controls. Analyze results; e) Print enlargements. Operate enlarger. Develop prints using both tray processing. Control print quality. Select appropriate manipulations. Evaluate results; f) Mount photographs. Operate dry mounting equipment. Determine appropriate presentation.
  3. Demonstrate the use of selective composition that is unique to the medium of photography. Apply the basic principles of visual organization which contribute to compositional unity.
  4. Produce photographic images that function as communication and self-expression.
  5. Define terms in the vocabulary of digital photography. Demonstrate understanding of basic digital imaging equipment and software. Special emphasis will be placed on the parts, functions, and operation of digital cameras. Apply basic image modification. “Save” to disk or removable media.
  6. Apply time management skills to accomplish the above and to meet project deadlines: a) Prioritize tasks, estimate time required; b) Determine the order and scheduling of activities.
  7. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution.
  8. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment, comply with health and safety rules. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Photography -- Note major discoveries, inventions,
concepts, photographers, and processes.

II. Film -- Identify and describe film types and their characteristics.
   A. Describe how light affects silver halides -- the “chemistry” of
exposure.
   B. Explain major characteristics of film emulsions:
      1. Sensitivity -- “speed,” rating systems:  A.S.A., D.I.N.,
I.S.O.
      2. Color response -- blue sensitive, orthochromatic, panchromatic,
infrared.
      3. Grain -- relation to speed and emulsion type, i.e., T-Grain.
   C. Identify types -- negative, reversal, instant, color, chromogenic.
   D. Define film “format” -- list major contemporary formats.

III. Camera
   A. Description the major types of cameras -- list their advantages and
disadvantages.
      1. View cameras -- monorail and flatbed/“field”
      2. Rangefinder cameras
      3. Single-lens-reflex -- “SLR”
   B. Identify the major camera parts.  Describe the functions of the
major parts.
      1. Body
      2. Lens
      3. Shutter
      4. Diaphragm/aperture
      5. Focusing system
      6. Film handling: advance and rewind mechanism
   C. Use exposure controls.
      1. Shutter. Identify type: leaf and focal plane.  Describe how they
function.
      2. Select appropriate setting to control duration of exposure.
      3. Select appropriate setting for rendering of motion.
      4. Aperture. Explain its relation to focal length, f-numbers.
      5. Select appropriate setting to control intensity of exposure.  
      6. Select appropriate setting to control depth of field.
      7. Describe the nature and function of depth of field.
      8. List the other factors that affect depth of field. 
      9. Locate lens depth of field scale.
     10. Define “hyperfocal distance.”  Explain how it can be used.

IV. Lens
   A. Distinguish lens types: normal, wide-angle, telephoto, macro,
special purpose.
   B. Define lens terminology:
      1. Refraction
      2. Focal length
      3. Angle of view (determined by focal length)
      4. Magnification, size of image (determined by distance to subject
and by focal length)
      5. Perspective (determined by distance to subject --  not by focal
length)
   C. Describe appropriate applications for various lens types.
   D. Observe proper procedures for care of lenses, i.e., cleaning
technique.

V. Light Meter. Determine appropriate exposure setting using the light
meter.
   A. Describe how light meters function. Calibrated to “middle gray”
(a.k.a. 18% gray).
   B. Locate and identify parts and setting controls.
   C. Distinguish types:  reflected, incident, spot.  Explain advantages
and disadvantages of each.
   D. Use the meter to determine choices of camera settings for proper
exposure.
   E. Apply one or more of the following methods:
      1. Overall reading
      2. Brightness range
      3. Exposing for specific tones, zone systems
      4. Substitution: gray card, palm of hand
      5. Specific recommendations when using built-in meters
         a. Sensitivity pattern
         b. Automatic exposure, “modes”: manual, program, auto,
shutter/aperture priority
         c. “Overriding” and exposure compensation for non-middle
gray/non-average subjects

VI.  Film Processing
   A. Describe the nature and purpose of each film processing chemical:
      1. Pre-wet
      2. Developer
      3. Stop bath
      4. Fixer
      5. Hypo-clearing agent
      6. Photo-flo
   B. Use correct film development procedures.
   C. Control negative quality.
      1. Explain how exposure affects negative density.
      2. Explain how development affects negative contrast.
      3. Describe the “normal” negative.
      4. List possible negative problems -- causes and cures.
      5. Apply any needed processing adjustments to subsequent rolls of
film.
      6. Explain the development technique of “pushing” film -- its
application and effect on quality.
 
VII. Printing
   A. List and describe the basic characteristics of photographic papers.
      1. Sensitivity -- “speed”
      2. Weight
      3. Surface: glossy, luster, matte, special textures
      4. Fiber-based vs. resin-coated
      5. Image “color” and base “color” -- cold-tone, neutral, and
warm-tone
   B. List and describe the nature and purpose of each print processing
chemical. List correct times.
      1. Developer (Dektol)
      2. Stop bath
      3. Fixer
      4. Hypo-clearing agent (for fiber-based papers only)
      5. Final wash
   C. Operate print lab equipment. Maintain strict wet-side/dry-side
separation.
      1. Instructor demonstration: set up processing chemicals.
      2. Set up enlarger. Identify parts and controls.
      3. Focus and adjust enlarging lens.
      4. Set timer controls.
      5. Expose and process a contact sheet. Select negatives for
enlargement.
      6. Expose and analyze test prints.
      7. Apply “local controls”: dodging and/or burning-in.
      8. Use correct finishing sequence for final prints.
     
VIII. Finishing and Mounting Prints
   A. “Touch-up” prints using Spotone dyes.
   B. Mount prints using dry mounting tissue.
      1. Use mounting materials, tools, and equipment.
      2. Apply measuring guidelines, observe safety rules.
   
IX. Color Photography Module
   A. Identify types and characteristics of color films.
  
X. Electronic Photography Module
   A. List and describe characteristics and applications of electronic
photography -- advantages, limitations, applications.
   B. Identify tools and describe their function or purpose:
      1. Image capture or input:
         a. Digital cameras
         b. Digital film-backs and insers
         c. Film and flatbed scanners
      2. Image processing and/or manipulation:
         a. CPU and monitor
         b. Software
      3. Image output/presentation/storage:
         a. Printers
         b. Electronic file 
   C. Digital Camera 
      1. Description of major types of 35mm digital cameras—list their
advantages and disadvantages.
         a. Digital rangefinder
         b. Single-lens reflex  - digital “SLR”
      2. Identify major camera features. Describe their functions.      
         a. Image sensor
         b. White Balance
         c. ISO sensitivity and digital noise
         d. Exposure compensation
         e. Exposure modes
            1. Shutter-priority auto
            2. Aperture-priority auto
            3. Programmed-auto
            4. Manual
         f. Storage media
         g. Image size and compression
         h. File format
            1. JPEG
            2. TIFF
            3. RAW      
   D. Discuss Workflow Basics 
      a. Image  “capture”
      b. Image input: download to computer
      c. Image production: Photoshop 
      d. Image save and archive
   E. Discuss ethics issues -- authorship, copyright, alteration of
“reality,” implication for documentation.
   F. Observe a demonstration of the basic tools and techniques of digital
imaging. Instructor will demonstrate how (and may require students) to:
      1. Download images from a digital camera.
      2. Use scanner to import analogue images.
      3. Open file in software. 
      4. Apply basic image management and manipulation controls using
Photoshop software.
      5. Save image to removable media.

XI. Assignments. Produce photographic prints to satisfy the requirements
of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills. Select and
frame the subject; apply basic principles of visual organization; determine
the foreground-background relationship. Assignments will include a
combination of the following:
   A. Produce images demonstrating appropriate control of motion --
stopped and blurred. Explore expressive possibilities of rendering motion
for content, meaning and emphasis.
   B. Produce images demonstrating appropriate control of depth of field
-- long and narrow. Explore expressive possibilities of depth of field for
content, meaning and emphasis.
   C. Produce images demonstrating the importance of point of view.
Explore the creative possibilities of unusual (camera) point of view.
Observe how altered perspective can affect content, meaning and emphasis.
   D. Produce images demonstrating the importance of the qualities of
light and how it affects the subject.  Variations such as:
      1. Direction/time of day.
      2. Amount of diffuseness (determined by relative area of light
source).
         a. Direct, “specular” -- relatively small area light source
         b. Fully diffused, soft -- relatively large area light source
         c. Directional diffused or mottled
      3. Design potential of subject/lighting contrasts, patterns of light
and shadow, silhouette.
   E. Produce an image demonstrating an emphasis on design: line, shape,
or pattern.
   F. Produce an image demonstrating the expressive possibilities of
extended (longer than 10 seconds) time exposures. Apply Reciprocity
Failure exposure corrections.
   G. Produce images for additional instructor-selected topical
assignments.
   H. Produce a final portfolio or a final project of at least five (5)
non-assignment prints which demonstrates the students’ integration of
the course content.

XII. Critique. Discuss in class (and in writing -- at instructor’s
discretion) the potential of meaning in photographs -- how a variety of
factors contribute to and influence our interpretation of
photographs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests which stress factual knowledge (terminology, methods,
classifications) and fundamental principles and theories.  (10%-25%)

Assignments: Production of photographic prints satisfying the requirements
of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills,
competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students’ creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding.
(10%-25%)

Final Project or Portfolio: Production of a final portfolio or a final
project of non-assignment prints which demonstrates the students’
integration of the course content. (10%-25%)

Tests will be graded as follows:

90 - 100 %  = A
80 - 89  %  = B
70 - 79  %  = C
60 - 69  %  = D
0  - 59  %  = F
Projects, exercises, and presentation will be graded as follows:

A+ = 4.2
A  = 4.0
A- = 3.8
B+ = 3.2
B  = 3.0
B- = 2.8
C+ = 2.2
C  = 2.0
C- = 1.8
D+ = 1.2
D  = 1.0
D- =  .8
F  =  .5

FINAL GRADES WILL BE IN THE FORM OF A LETTER GRADE
A = 3.5+
B = 2.5 - 3.4
C = 1.5 - 2.4
D = 0.5 - 1.4
F = 0.0 - .4

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students must provide their own camera. Camera must have: a) Adjustable FOCUS; b) Adjustable SHUTTER SPEEDS (such as 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500); c) Adjustable APERTURES (such as 2.8, 4, 5.6, 11, 16)
  2. Cameras with automatic exposure are acceptable if they also allow manual control or override. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 122

  • Title: Advanced Photography*
  • Number: PHOT 122
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 121.

Description:

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of photographic imaging, with an emphasis on black-and-white photography as a fine art. Students will use Zone System tests and procedures to produce prints of maximum quality. Students will use advanced techniques, such as split-developers for contrast control, multiple-imaging and archival processing, and print presentation. Several "alternative" printing processes will be discussed and demonstrated. This course also includes a basic introduction to medium format (2 1/4) and large format (4 x 5) camera equipment and technique. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of conceptually advanced, project/series-oriented assignments to stimulate the student's creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define terms in the vocabulary of advanced photographic imaging, the Zone System, and special darkroom techniques.
  2. Use photographic equipment, materials and processes. Specifically: a) Apply the Zone System controls and techniques to obtain maximum negative and print quality; b) Use advanced darkroom processes and chemistry such as: two-bath film developing, Selenium and Sepia print toners, “A&B” print developers, and Farmer’s reducer. Analyze results; c) Use archival processing and procedures to produce fiber-based prints of maximum permanence; d) Observe demonstrations of at least two of the “alternative” printmaking processes. At instructor’s discretion, use one of the processes to create personal images; e) Use at least two multiple-imaging techniques -- in-camera exposures, multiple-negative printing, or digital compositing; f) Identify, describe, and explain the uses, advantages and disadvantages of medium and large format cameras; g) Produce photographs using medium format and large format cameras.
  3. Demonstrate the use of “selective composition” that is unique to the medium of photography. Apply the basic principles of visual organization which contribute to composition unity.
  4. Produce several project-oriented series of conceptually advanced photographic images that function as creative visual communication and self-expression.
  5. Operate basic digital imaging equipment and software.
  6. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution.
  7. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment, comply with health and safety rules. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Photography
   A. Trace the evolution of photography as a fine art.
   B. Describe aesthetic movements such as the “photo secession” and
“pictorialism.”
   C. List and describe various photographic styles.
   D. Describe the contributions of influential photographers and
organizations such as the F.S.A.

II. Zone System
   A. Define terms in the special vocabulary of the Zone System,
including:
      1. D-max.
      2. Film-base + Fog.
      3. True film speed -- “E.I.”
      4. Expansion, Compaction -- “N+” and “N–.”
      5. “S.E.T.”
      6. Zone.
      7. “Place” and “Fall.”
      8. H&D curves.
      9. Densitometer.
   B. Establish a personal “Standard Enlarging Time” -- “S.E.T.” 
Determine the minimum enlarger exposure time needed to print a “clear”
-- film-base+fog -- negative as maximum paper black.
   C. Determine “true film speed.” Establish a personal “Exposure
Index -- E.I.”
      1. Make a series of exposures, each representing a Zone I exposure
at a different film speed.
      2. Determine which exposure is optimum for Zone I -- indicating the
effective film speed -- by performing a printing test. 
   D. Test for “N” (normal) and “N-1” (compaction) film developing
times.
   E. Explain the use of camera filters for tone and contrast control.
   F. Produce a series of photographs applying the Zone System test
results information.

III. Advanced Chemical Darkroom Processes
   A. Use special toners to alter print color and/or to enhance
permanence, including:
      1. Sepia toner.
      2. Selenium toner.
      3. “Split-toning.”
   B. Control negative contrast using a two-bath development process, such
as:
      1. D-23 (low contrast formula) with a Kodak (sodium metabisulfite)
or Borax second-bath.
      2. D-76 or HC-110 with a water second-bath.
      3. Diafine (tm) A&B.
   C. Control print contrast using a split development process, such as:
      1. “A&B” print developing using the Beer’s formulas.
      2. Two-bath development using Dektol and Selectol-Soft developers.
      3. Dektol and a water second-bath.
   D. Bleach prints using Farmer’s reducer (potassium ferricyanide and
sodium thiosulfite).
   E. Archival processing and presentation.
      1. List and describe the procedures for archival processing.
      2. Process prints for maximum permanence using archival processing
chemicals and procedures.
      3. Cut at least three bevel-edged window over-mats for archival
print presentation. 

IV. Alternative Printmaking Processes  
   A. Use one of the  alternative” processes to create personal images.
Select appropriate manipulations and evaluate results. Some choices:
      1. Polaroid transfer.
      2. Gum bichromate.
      3. Ortho (Litho) fil for extreme contrast.
      4. Cyanotype -- “blueprinting.”
      5. Direct-positive B&W slides.
   B. Produce expressive images using a multiple-imaging technique, such
as those listed below. Choose at least one to apply to personal images.
      1. In-camera multiple exposures. 
      2. Multiple-negative printing.
         a. Sandwich negatives.
         b. Use multiple enlargers.
      3. Digital image compositing.
         a. Use one or more of the Photoshop techniques for combining
images -- cut and paste, cloning, multiple layers, etc.
         b. Print out a hard copy.

V. Medium-Format Cameras
   A. Explain the uses, advantages and disadvantages of various
medium-format cameras.
   B. Make photographs using a medium-format camera.

VI. Large-Format Cameras
   A. Identify camera types -- formats (4x5, 5x7, 8x10, etc.), monorails,
flatbed / field.
   B. Explain the uses, advantages and disadvantages of various
large-format cameras.
   C. Demonstrate the use of large-format cameras.
   D. Describe the controls for focal-plane orientation (Scheimpflug
principle) and perspective “correction.”

VII. Produce several project-oriented series (5-15 images each) of
conceptually advanced photographs that function as creative visual
communication and self-expression. Explore the subject emphasizing the
idea of a coherent set or group of images contributing to the meaning of
core concepts or issues.

VIII. Produce a final portfolio of 5-10 non-assignment prints that
demonstrate the application and integration of the course content.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests: 3 to 5 quizzes and a final exam which stress factual knowledge
(terminology, methods, classifications) and fundamental principles and
theories. (10% - 25%)

Assignments: Production of photographic prints satisfying the requirements
of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills,
competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students’ creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding. (50% - 80%)

Final Project or Portfolio: Production of a final portfolio or a final
project of non-assignment prints which demonstrates the students’
integration of the course content. (10% - 25%)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students must provide their own camera with adjustable focus, shutter speeds and aperture. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 122H

No information found.

PHOT 123

  • Title: Studio Photography*
  • Number: PHOT 123
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 121.

Description:

This course provides an introduction to advanced techniques, tools, procedures and concepts of studio and commercial photography. Students will use professional camera and studio equipment, including studio electronic flash and hand-held light/flash meters. This course also includes an introduction to professional medium format (2 1/4) and large format (4"x5") equipment and advanced camera techniques for total image control. Students will use studio lighting for various portraiture styles and for small-product, table-top photography. Applications of digital photography as they apply to studio photographic processes will be introduced. Students will apply the above to make images for a series of advanced studio assignments. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Define terms in the vocabulary of advanced studio and commercial photography.
  2. Use the view camera. Produce photographs illustrating applications of the unique view camera adjustments -- the “movements” -- to control perspective correction and focal plane positioning. Describe and explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of view cameras.
  3. Use a professional medium format camera. Identify types -- twin-lens, SLR, special purpose. Describe and explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of medium format cameras.
  4. Use studio artificial lighting equipment. Set up and operate lighting equipment -- stands, photofloods, quartz-halogen, electronic flash, diffusers, scrims, gobos, and gels.
  5. Produce professional quality studio portraits. Set up lighting to produce a variety of standard portrait lighting schemes -- i.e., broad, narrow, butterfly, Rembrandt.
  6. Produce professional quality studio product illustration. Demonstrate the use of artificial lighting to solve the problems and enhance the qualities inherent in a variety of subjects -- transparent, reflective, translucent, textured, flat and three-dimensional.
  7. Use large format transparency film. Select appropriate film emulsions and corrective filtration for a variety of lighting conditions.
  8. Operate digital imaging equipment and software. Scan negatives, prints, and transparencies. Apply intermediate-level controls and modifications to prepare an image file for reproduction by a service bureau. “Save” to disk or removable media. Review the “Digital Module” from Fundamentals of Photography.
  9. Apply time management skills to accomplish the above and to meet project deadlines; a) Prioritize tasks, estimate time required; b) Determine the order and scheduling of activities.
  10. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution.
  11. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment, comply with health and safety rules. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Vocabulary. Define terms in the vocabulary of advanced studio and
commercial photography.
   A. Names of view camera parts, terms and adjustments, such as:
      1. Zero position.
      2. Rail, Front and Rear Standard.
      3. Ground glass.
      4. Bellows
      5. Shift, Rise and Fall (drop).
      6. Tilt and swing.
      7. Scheimpflug.
      8. Bellows Extension Factor.
   B. Lighting equipment and terms, such as:
      1. Lighting ratio.
      2. Main (key), fill, back/hair, background and detail lights.
      3. Diffuser/scrim, Soft-box.
      4. Gobos and flags.
      5. Tungsten, quartz-halogen, and strobe (electronic flash). 
      6. Inverse-Square Law.
      7. Specular.
      8. Cookie.

II. View Camera
   A. Compare and contrast to “standard” cameras.  Identify types. 
Describe and explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of large
format cameras.
   B. Produce photographs illustrating applications of the unique view
camera adjustments.
      1. Apply the Scheimpflug principle to alter the position of the
focal plane to render a receding subject plane perfectly focused at
maximum -- wide open -- lens aperture.
      2. Apply the Scheimpflug principle to alter the position of the
wedge-shaped area of focus to render in total focus a subject that
includes areas that deviate from the plane of focus.
      3. Alter the shape of the subject (perspective “correction”)
using the back tilt or swing to neutralize the apparent convergence of
parallel lines so the lines appear parallel in the print.
      4. Make a photograph that is a 1:1 copy of a subject that is
physically flat so the image is exactly the same size as the subject area
that was photographed.
      5. Use Reciprocity Failure exposure corrections for long-time
exposures.  Produce properly exposed images at times exceeding 1 second.
   C. Identify and analyze problems and subjects for which the view camera
is particularly suited.
   D. Use large format Polaroid film for problem solving and image
previewing.
   E. Handle, process, and print sheet film.  Use a service bureau to
process 4x5 transparencies.

III. Medium Format Camera
   A. Identify types -- twin-lens, SLR, special purpose.  Describe and
explain the uses, advantages and disadvantages of medium format cameras.
   B. Identify and analyze problems and subjects for which medium format
cameras are particularly suited.
   C. Use medium format Polaroid camera back and film and for problem
solving and image previewing.
   D. Handle, process and print 120-size roll film. Use a service bureau
to process 120 transparencies.

IV. Studio Lighting
   A. Explain the major characteristics of light. Compare and contrast
natural and artificial light.  Define lighting terminology.
   B. Set up and operate lighting equipment -- stands, photofloods,
quartz-halogen, electronic flash, diffusers, scrims, gobos and gels.
   C. Portraiture.
      1. Calculate and control various lighting ratios.
      2. Set up lighting to produce a variety of standard portrait
lighting schemes, i.e., broad, narrow, butterfly, Rembrandt. Use
appropriate lighting ratios.
      3. Distinguish face and body types to select appropriate lighting
and posing techniques.
      4. Produce at least three portraits that demonstrate the integration
of the above. 
   D. Product illustration.
      1. Analyze a variety of subject qualities and determine appropriate
lighting.
      2. Produce photographs demonstrating the use of artificial lighting
to solve the problems and enhance the qualities inherent in a variety of
subjects.
      3. Demonstrate the integration of the above by setting up, lighting
and photographing at least two different “product shots.”

V. Large Format Transparency Film
   A. Describe basic color theory of light -- additive and subtractive. 
Define color-temperature and color-balance.  Identify various white-light
sources and their location on the Kelvin scale.
   B. Select appropriate film emulsions and corrective filtration for a
variety of lighting conditions.
   C. Produce color transparencies.

VI. “On-Location” Lighting
   A. Explain the techniques for using portable supplemental flash,
reflectors, and scrims.
   B. Photograph on-location using some of the demonstrated techniques.
 
VII. Digital Imaging.  Operate equipment and software.
   A. Scan negatives, prints, and transparencies (including 4x5).
   B. Apply image controls and modifications.
   C. “Save” to disk or removable media.

VIII. Problem Solving
   A. Apply time management skills to accomplish the above and to meet
project deadlines.  Prioritize tasks, estimate time required.  Determine
the order and scheduling of activities.
   B. Identify important information needed to solve a problem, generate
alternative solutions and select the best or most appropriate solution.

IX. Safety  
   A. Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment.
   B. Comply with health and safety rules.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests: 2 to 5 quizzes and a final exam which stress factual knowledge
(terminology, methods, classifications) and fundamental principles and
theories. (10% - 25%)

Assignments: Production of photographic prints satisfying the requirements
of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills,
competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students’ creative
capacities for problem solving, visual communication and collaboration. 
(50% - 80%)

Final Project or Portfolio: Production of a final portfolio of images
which demonstrates the students’ integration of the course content. (10%
- 25%)

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 128

  • Title: Digital Photography
  • Number: PHOT 128
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This course is an introduction to the concepts, tools and technology of digital imaging for photographers. Students will develop competence in the use of digital photographic equipment, software, storage devices and printers to produce digital photographic images satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills and competencies. Students will "capture," import, adjust, correct, transmit, store and output images. They will use digital imaging technology to produce photographs for visual communication and artistic expression. Ethics and cultural implications of the technology will be discussed. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab per/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the development of photography as an expressive medium.
  2. Define terms in the vocabulary of digital photography.
  3. Describe and demonstrate the use of basic computer hardware and the operating system.
  4. Explain and demonstrate the use of digital imaging software.
  5. Demonstrate a proficiency in the fundamental techniques of digital photography and image editing.
  6. Create an image editing workflow and describe its importance.
  7. Create photographs for a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills and competencies using digital photographic technology.
  8. Apply those skills to produce images for personal/artistic expression.
  9. Identify and analyze ethical issues related to digital imaging including those of copyright, fair use, and authorship.
  10. Critique work objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. History of Photography
   A. Describe the development of photography.
   B. List and describe the contributions of influential photographers.

II. Vocabulary of Digital Photography
   A. Develop and maintain vocabulary list throughout the semester.
   B. Define terms on written test.

III. Computer Work Environment
   A. Identify the hardware components.
      1. CPU
      2. Monitor
      3. Keyboard and mouse
      4. Scanners
      5. Printers
      6. Peripheral storage devices
   B. Start up hardware in correct sequence.
   C. Locate and identify desktop components.
   D. Identify and apply a "forced restart" and the normal computer shut
down procedure.

IV. Digital Camera
   A. Identify and describe the major types of digital cameras.
      1. Digital single lens reflex (DSLR)
      2. Digital rangefinder
      3. Medium format
      4. Large format camera scanning backs
   B. Identify and describe the major parts and functions and controls of
a digital single-lens reflex camera.
      1. Body
      2. Lens
      3. Aperture
      4. Shutter
      5. Focusing system
      6. Storage media
      7. Image sensor
   C. Describe and set appropriate camera settings.
      1. Resolution
      2. Bit-depth
      3. Sharpness/contrast
      4. White balance
      5. ISO
      6. Menus
   D. Describe and apply camera exposure controls.
      1. Shutter speed--control of time
      2. Aperture--control of illumination
      3. Exposure compensation
   E. Create photographs and import them to the computer.
      1. Open Photoshop
      2. Save images to removable external storage
      3. Delete images from camera memory

V. Lens
   A. List and describe appropriate applications for various lens types.
      1. Normal
      2. Wide-angle
      3. Telephoto
      4. Prime vs. Zoom
      5. Macro
      6. Special purpose
   B. Observe proper procedure for care of lenses.
   C. Describe image formation.
      1. Refraction
      2. Focal length
      3. Angle of view
      4. Magnification
      5. Focal length crop factor
   D. Describe and apply depth of field controls.
      1. Aperture
      2. Focal length
      3. Distance to subject

VI. Light and Exposure
   A. Explain light capture by a digital sensor.
      1. Major sensor types
      2. Analog to digital conversion
   B. Describe the relationship of pixels to resolution.
      1. Pixels per inch
      2. Re-sampling
      3. Noise
   C. Describe the function and importance of an exposure meter.
   D. Identify and describe types of meters.
      1. Reflected
      2. Incident
      3. Electronic flash
      4. Color temperature
   E. Analyze and use meter readings to determine proper exposure
setting.
      1. Normal contrast
      2. Low contrast
      3. High contrast
   F. Describe and apply metering methods.
      1. Overall reading
      2. Brightness range
      3. Substitution ( e.g., gray card, palm of hand)
      4. Exposing for specific tone(s) i.e., Zone System
   G. Interpret and use histogram readings in determining exposure.
   H. Explain how a digital sensor captures color.
      1. White balance
      2. Define the difference between the additive primaries and the
subtractive primaries.
   I. Interpret and apply the information contained in histograms.
      1. Exposure control
      2. Image editing

VII. Digital Darkroom
   A. List and describe the primary components of the digital darkroom.
      1. Capture
      2. Editing
      3. Storage
      4. Transmission
   B. Define Image Resolution.
      1. Pixel count and pixel dimensions
      2. Bit depth
      3. Image size
      4. Device specificity
   C. Define and describe major file formats.
   D. List and describe the features of film and print scanners.
      1. Optical vs. interpolated resolution
      2. Dynamic range
      3. Bit depth
      4. Focusing
   E. Explain the significance of color management.
      1. Color space
      2. Color gamut
      3. Color calibration
         a. Monitor
         b. Printer

VIII. Basic Image Editing
   A. Adjust and define computer and Photoshop preference settings.
   B. Organize the workspace.
      1. Palette displays
      2. Dialog boxes
   C. Locate and describe tools and menu items.
   D. Identify and apply basic photo corrections.
      1. Image size and resolution
      2. Straighten and crop
      3. Dust removal
      4. Automatic image adjustments
      5. Color cast
   E. Adjust image for tone and contrast using levels.
      1. Histogram
      2. White point
      3. Black point
      4. Gamma or mid-point
   F. Adjust image for tone and color using curves.
      1. Combined RGB channel
      2. Individual color channels
   G. Make selections and apply adjustments.
      1. Global effect
      2. Local effect
   H. Describe and use sharpening techniques.
      1. Sharpen for image content
      2. Sharpen for image output
   I. Create an editing workflow and explain its importance.

IX. Advanced Image Editing
   A. Customize and reset Photoshop preferences.
   B. Explain the advantages of working with layers and apply adjustment
layers to artwork.
      1. Create a new layer
      2. View and hide layers
      3. Select layers
      4. Reorder layers
      5. Apply modes to layers
      6. Flatten layers
   C. Identify and apply advanced layer techniques and options.
      1. Guides
      2. Layer masks
      3. Clipping groups
      4. Layer effects
      5. Grids
      6. Special effects
   D. Use editing selection tools.
      1. Marquee
      2. Lasso
      3. Magic wand
      4. Quick mask
   E. Select an active image area and apply various selection options.
   F. Demonstrate the use of the painting tool.
   G. Retouch a photograph using a variety of tools to repair/replace
areas of an image.

X. Camera Raw
   A. List and describe the characteristics, advantages and disadvantages,
of Camera Raw files.
      1. Digital negative
      2. Exposure and linear capture
   B. Correct and adjust images using Camera Raw tools.

XI. Printers and Displays
   A. Compare and evaluate various printer types.
   B. List and describe the characteristics of inkjet photographic
papers.
   C. Set-up soft-proofing and select appropriate printer profiles.
   D. Mount prints for display.

XII. Organization and Storage
   A. Create a storage system for digital files and explain its
importance.
      1. Internal hard drive
      2. External hard drive
      3. Optical disk
      4. Online system
   B. Use metadata, keywords, and cataloging applications for locating
files.
   C. Establish an archival workflow.

XIII. Ethics and Digital Photography
   A. List and describe ethical issues as they relate to digital
photography.
      1. Authorship
      2. Copyright
      3. Fair use
      4. Manipulation of reality

XIV. Artwork
   A. Create original work for a series of instructor directed
assignments.
      1. Photographic prints
      2. Image files on external storage device
   B. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the artwork for particular
assignments.
   C. Identify and analyze the basic visual choices made in photographing
a subject.
      1. Frame
      2. Background
      3. Depth of field
      4. Time and motion
      5. Point of view
      6. Compositional strategies
   D. List and explain the terms used to describe the graphic elements of
a photograph.
      1. Light qualities
      2. Focus
      3. Motion
      4. Contrast and tone
      5. Texture
      6. Viewpoint
      7. Perspective
      8. Line
      9. Balance

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

Tests: 3 to 5 quizzes and a final exam which stress factual knowledge
(terminology, methods, classifications) and fundamental principles and
theories. (10%-25%)

Assignments: Production of photographic images satisfying the requirements
of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills,
competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students’ creative
capacities for personal expression and self-understanding. (50%-80%)

Final Project or Portfolio: Production of a final portfolio or a final
project of non-assignment images which demonstrates the students’
integration of the course content. (10-25%)

Grading Criteria:
Tests will be graded as follows:
90-100% = A
80- 89% = B
70- 79% = C
60- 69% = D
 0- 59% = F
Projects, exercises, and presentation will be graded as follows:
A+ = 4.2
A  = 4.0
A- = 3.8
B+ = 3.2
B  = 3.0
B- = 2.8
C+ = 2.2
C  = 2.0
C- = 1.8
D+ = 1.2
D  = 1.0
D- =  .8
F  =  .5
Finals grades will be it the form of a letter grade:
A, B, C, D, F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It will be helpful for students to be familiar with basic computer operations before enrolling in this course. The following courses would provide that introduction: a) CPCA 105 Introduction to Personal Computing (Windows); b) CPCA 106 Introduction to Personal Computing (Macintosh).
  2. It would be helpful for students to have a camera which has: a) Adjustable FOCUS; Adjustable SHUTTER SPEEDS (such as 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500); Adjustable APERTURES (such as 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22).
  3. Digital SLR cameras are preferred as are cameras that allow manual control or override of exposure. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 129

  • Title: Advanced Digital Photography*
  • Number: PHOT 129
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: PHOT 128.

Description:

This course develops and expands upon the techniques, tools, procedures, and concepts that were introduced in the Digital Photography course. Students will learn to use a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera or its equivalent. Students will develop and use an archival image editing workflow. They will learn advanced image correction, modification and editing techniques to prepare photographic images for various output options including photographic prints and the web. They will employ file management routines and archival storage systems. Students will create original work that demonstrates an advanced proficiency in digital methods and an advanced understanding of the practice of photography. They will produce high quality prints. The work created is intended to stimulate the student’s creative capacities for personal expression, communication and self-understanding. 6 hrs. integrated lecture lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the development of electronic imaging in photography.
  2. Define terms in the vocabulary of advanced digital photography.
  3. Operate a digital single lens reflex (SLR) camera or its equivalent.
  4. Explain and demonstrate the importance of color management procedures in producing images of maximum quality.
  5. Describe the essential evolution of color in the history of photography.
  6. Demonstrate a proficiency in using advanced digital image enhancement tools and techniques through a series of assignments.
  7. Describe, create and use an archival image editing workflow.
  8. Create a cohesive set of photographs that demonstrate an advanced proficiency in digital methods and an advanced understanding of the practice of photography.
  9. Identify and analyze ethical issues related to digital imaging.
  10. Produce professional quality photographic prints and/or interactive presentation (i.e., web page via Photoshop/slideshow).
  11. Develop and use skills in critiquing work objectively, individually and in groups.

Content Outline and Competencies:


I. History of Electronic Imaging in Photography A. Describe the development of electronic imaging in photography. B. List and describe the contributions of the major pioneers. II. Vocabulary of Advanced Digital Photography A. Develop and maintain list throughout the semester. B. Define terms on written tests. III. Digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) Camera A. Identify and describe the major parts and controls and functions of the digital single lens reflex camera. 1. Body 2. Lens 3. Shutter 4. Aperture 5. Focusing system 6. Storage media B. Program and camera settings. 1. Focus mode 2. Custom white balance 3. Sharpness/contrast 4. Color space 5. Camera menus 6. Image size 7. Image quality C. Review the basic exposure controls. 1. Describe how the shutter functions. 2. Select appropriate setting to control duration of exposure. 3. Select appropriate exposure for rendering of motion. 4. Define aperture and explain its relationship to focal length. 5. Select appropriate exposure to control intensity of exposure. 6. Select appropriate exposure to control depth of field. IV. Color Theory and Color Management A. Describe the structure of color and how the eye perceives color. B. Describe the essential evolution of color in the history of photography. C. Identify and describe the key principles of color management. D. Implement a color managed workflow from image capture to various outputs. V. Advanced Image Enhancement Methods A. Define raw processing and identify its advantages and disadvantages. B. Describe the interrelationship between Camera Raw, (or other image processing software such as Lightroom) Adobe Bridge, Photoshop, and the digital negative (DNG). C. Describe, locate and use Camera Raw tools to edit a file. 1. Camera Raw adjustment panels 2. Main control finishing buttons 3. Workflow options 4. Camera Raw evaluation tools D. Define and create High Dynamic Range (HDR) files. E. Adjust image using advanced layer techniques and options. F. Adjust image using channels. G. Adjust image using masks and layer masks. H. Adjust image to increase and decrease depth of field. I. Analyze and use various sharpening methods and strategies. J. Sharpen for image content and sharpen for image output. K. Stitch together several images to create a panorama. L. Define and use smart objects. M. Convert a color image to black and white and/or duo-tone image. N. Describe batch processing and implement a batch action command. VI. Scanning A. Identify and describe the functions of the major types of scanners. B. Describe and analyze scanning considerations. C. Identify scanning controls and create a scanning workflow for print scans. D. Identify scanning controls and create a scanning workflow for negative and/or transparency scans. VII. Output A. List and describe key output options (for example, inkjet printing, web publication). B. Prepare four types of images for distribution on the Web. C. Create a series of steps and prepare images for fine inkjet printing. D. Produce hardcopy images implementing a fine art printing protocol. VIII. Archiving, Storing, Cataloging, and Retrieving A. Describe the importance of having an archiving strategy. B. List and analyze the key elements in an archival workflow. C. Create, set up, and use an archival workflow. D. Distinguish between archiving files and creating a backup for files. E. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of various media choices for archiving and backing up digital files. IX. Advanced Digital Photographic Images A. Create original works for a series of instructor directed assignments. B. Create original works that demonstrate technical and conceptual mastery of the material in advanced digital photography. C. Create a coherent "body of work" and an artist statement that demonstrates an advanced level of understanding of the practice of photography. D. Output images as hardcopy and/or web application and save to an external storage devise. E. Critique results to determine effectiveness of results and how images could be improved. F. Make adjustments and improvements as needed. X. Imaging Ethics in the Digital Age A. Discuss ethics issues related to digital imaging technology, i.e., authorship/ownership, "copyright," "fair use," and manipulation of "reality." B. Debate the limits of acceptability in making extensive changes in a photograph.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests (minimum of two) which stress factual knowledge (terminology, methods, classifications) and fundamental principles and theories. (10-25%)

Assignments (minimum of three): Production of photographic images satisfying the requirements of a series of assignments designed to develop specific skills, competencies and points of view and to stimulate the students' creative capacities for personal expression and self-understanding. (50-80%)

Final Project: Production of a final project that demonstrates the student's integration of the course content with an advanced understanding of the practice of photography. (10-25%)

Tests will be graded as follows:
A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
D = 60-69%
F - 0-59%

Projects, exercises, and presentation will be graded as follows:
A+ = 4.2
A  = 4.0
A- = 3.8
B+ = 3.2
B  = 3.0
B- = 2.8
C+ = 2.2
C  = 2.0
C- = 1.8
D+ = 1.2
D  = 1.0
D- = .8
F  = .5

FINAL GRADES WILL BE IN THE FORM OF A LETTER GRADE
A = 3.5+
B = 2.5 - 3.4
C = 1.5 - 2.4
D = 0.5 - 1.4
F = 0.0 - .4

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. It will be helpful for students to be familiar with basic computer operations before enrolling in this course. The following courses would provide that instruction: a)CPCA 105 Introduction to Personal Computing (Windows); b)CPCA 106 Introduction to Personal Computing (MacIntosh).
  2. A digital single lens reflex (DSLR) or equivalent (see instructor) is required.
  3. Portable external storage devises.
  4. JCCC is not liable for damaged or stolen work or personal property in classroom or hallway exhibition areas.
  5. Students working in the studio are expected to acquaint themselves with the efficient and safe use of equipment and materials.
  6. "Student Health: The college does not provide on-campus medical services, nor does it assume responsibility for injuries you may incur while participating in college activities. The college does not provide health and accident insurance for students. You must contract for this coverage on an individual basis. See the course catalog for more information."
  7. All JCCC students are issued a college e-mail account that is accessed through MyJCCC. This account is used by the college to communicate course, grade, financial aid, enrollment and other important college information. It is your responsibility to check your JCCC e-mail account regularly for important information.
  8. Any student artwork or art supplies not picked up 4 weeks after the end of the semester will be considered abandoned and the department will dispose of the work or material as it sees fit. Exceptions can be made for students who lend their artwork for student exhibitions or other special arrangements have been made between a student and their instructor.
  9. No student may enroll in any course for the third time without approval of the academic department. Grades and credit for repeated courses will be determined in accordance with Grade Information procedures stated in the Student Handbook.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

PHOT 291

No information found.

PHOT 292

  • Title: Special Topics:
  • Number: PHOT 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 2 - 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 2 - 6

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of photography, not usually taught in the curriculum. Due to the breadth and depth of the discipline, this course may expand upon a topic introduced in a current course, synthesize topics that cross-cut existing courses, or explore a topic not addressed currently in the Photography curriculum. Students may repeat Special Topics in Photography for credit but only on different topics.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Be conversant with the relevant readings within the selected topic.
  2. Define and explain key terms and concepts within the selected topic.
  3. Demonstrate appropriate research methodology relevant to the selected topic. 
  4. Relate the special topic to essential issues and themes in photography and /or society.
  5. Articulate a critically informed perspective on the selected topic drawn from qualitative and/or quantitative evidence.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Content Outline and Competencies will vary because they are dependent upon the special topic being offered.  The outline and competencies will follow the standard format for JCCC courses and will be written in outcomes-based language.  The Special Topics course proposal will first be reviewed and approved by the Photography faculty.  The Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review and approve each Special Topics course proposal.  Scheduling of Special Topics courses will be the responsibility of the Department Chair.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of evaluation will vary depending on the special topic being offered.  Standard methods of evaluation may be employed, such as readings, discussions, written assignments, creative projects, critiques, individual or group projects, presentations and service learning.  Other methods may be utilized to assess student mastery of competencies based upon the needs of the special topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

A topic offered under a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).