Engineering (ENGR)

Courses

ENGR 121   Engineering Orientation (2 Hours)

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe careers in engineering and use fundamental concepts in engineering problem solving. Topics include engineering disciplines, aptitude and academic requirements, professional responsibilities, problem definition and solution, engineering design, and terminology. Students will meet professional engineers during field trips to engineering companies and work sites. The primary intent of this course is to introduce students to the engineering problem-solving process and to help each student make the best career decision. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGR 131   Engineering Graphics I:AutoCAD* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 130 or MATH 171 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 or MATH 241.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to apply graphic principles used in the engineering design process. The student will master graphics concepts using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. Topics include 2-D and 3-D CAD commands; geometric construction; multi-view, orthographic projection; sectional views; isometrics; dimensioning; and descriptive geometry. 3 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. open lab/wk.

ENGR 251   Statics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MATH 242.

Prerequisites or corequisites: PHYS 220.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and predict the conditions of rest and motion of bodies under the action of forces. The principles used will include vectors, force systems, equilibrium, free body diagram, centroids, moments of inertia, trusses, frame, and shear and moment diagrams. This course is typically offered in the summer and fall semesters. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGR 251H   HON: Statics* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGR 254   Dynamics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ENGR 251.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply the principles of dynamics, the branch of engineering mechanics that studies objects in motion. Topics covered will include unbalanced force systems (Newton's second law), displacement, velocity and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Computer applications may be included. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

ENGR 254H   HON: Dynamics* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

ENGR 121

  • Title: Engineering Orientation
  • Number: ENGR 121
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 2
  • Lecture Hours: 2

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe careers in engineering and use fundamental concepts in engineering problem solving. Topics include engineering disciplines, aptitude and academic requirements, professional responsibilities, problem definition and solution, engineering design, and terminology. Students will meet professional engineers during field trips to engineering companies and work sites. The primary intent of this course is to introduce students to the engineering problem-solving process and to help each student make the best career decision. 2 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the type of work performed in the major engineering disciplines such as chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, and mechanical.
  2. Describe which engineering programs are available at regional universities.
  3. Describe the personal qualities, scholastic abilities, and professional responsibilities expected of engineers.
  4. Visit various engineering related companies and schools.
  5. Apply the engineering method of analysis and problem solving to simple engineering problems.
  6. Graph and properly represent technical information.
  7. Perform basic calculations with engineering data.
  8. Describe basic concepts in various engineering disciplines.
  9. Apply the engineering design process to simple design problems. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Overviews of specific engineering disciplines including types of
work performed by engineers and required technical skills
   A. Summarize the field of chemical engineering
   B. Summarize the field of civil engineering
   C. Summarize the field of electrical engineering
   D. Summarize the field of mechanical engineering
   E. Summarize other engineering fields

II. Academic requirements
   A. List regional engineering colleges
   B. List graduation requirements
   C. Describe typical transfer procedures and requirements

III. Requirements for professional engineering
   A. List personal qualities
   B. List required scholastic abilities
   C. Summarize the Code of Ethics
   D. Define licensing and list requirements for licensing

IV. Field trips
   A. After visiting a consulting engineering firm, note the types of
projects involved and the various roles of engineering professionals in
the firm.
   B. After visiting a manufacturing company, power generating facility,
or construction site, describe the engineering work involved in the
production or construction process.
   C. After visiting an engineering school at a four-year university,
describe the entrance requirements, degrees offered, and lab facilities
available.

V. Engineering solutions
   A. Describe problem analysis
   B. Summarize the engineering method
   C. Describe and use proper solution presentation

VI. Manipulation of engineering data
   A. Describe and use estimation, approximation, and accuracy
   B. Define and use dimensions, units, and conversions
   C. Describe and use graphs and statistics

VII. Computing in engineering
   A. Use calculators in problem solving
   B. Describe the use of digital computers in problem solving
   C. Describe the use of application packages in problem solving
   D. Describe and use flow-charting in problem solving

VIII. Applied engineering concepts
   A. Describe the use of mechanics in problem solving
   B. Describe the use of chemistry in problem solving
   C. Describe the use of material balance in problem solving
   D. Describe the use of electrical theory in problem solving
   E. Describe the use of energy in problem solving
   F. Describe the use of engineering economy in problem solving

IX. Engineering design
   A. Work as a team member to solve an engineering problem using the
engineering design process
      1. Research and compile data for an engineering problem
      2. Collaborate with peers to formulate and implement an engineering
solution

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Attendance            20%
Team Project          20%
Exams and Assignments 60%
Total                100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Field trips are a required activity of the course. Local trips usually last 2-3 hours. Out-of-town trips may take longer. Students are expected to make provisions for attending field trips. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGR 131

  • Title: Engineering Graphics I:AutoCAD*
  • Number: ENGR 131
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 130 or MATH 171 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 or MATH 241.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to apply graphic principles used in the engineering design process. The student will master graphics concepts using computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. Topics include 2-D and 3-D CAD commands; geometric construction; multi-view, orthographic projection; sectional views; isometrics; dimensioning; and descriptive geometry. 3 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Produce freehand sketches of objects.
  2. Measure distances using an architect, engineering and metric scale.
  3. Identify parts of a graphics system and input devices and describe their function.
  4. List advantages of using a computer graphics system for drafting.
  5. Explain the syntax of a typical CAD command.
  6. Open a CAD system.
  7. Use appropriate commands to create, save and plot drawings.
  8. Select appropriate CAD commands from the keyboard, pull down menu and icons to create and edit objects.
  9. Use CAD commands to enhance productivity and query the graphics program.
  10. Use layers to organize drawings.
  11. Use blocks in a drawing.
  12. Set default settings for a CAD system.
  13. Define coordinate systems in CAD and use them to create a 3D model.
  14. Use appropriate commands to create and edit a 3D model with multiple views.
  15. Use appropriate commands to create a solid 3D model.
  16. Construct geometric shapes and determine tangency points for arcs and lines.
  17. Determine the proportional division of a line.
  18. Produce multi-view orthographic projections.
  19. Draw sectional views.
  20. Construct auxiliary views.
  21. Produce isometric drawings.
  22. Describe classifications of engineering dimensioning.
  23. Use the latest ANSI standards for dimension placement on a drawing to produce dimensioned drawings.
  24. Define ways that lines and planes can be represented.
  25. Draw the piercing point of a line and a plane.
  26. Draw the true size and shape of a plane and the show the edge view of a plane.
  27. Determine lines of intersection between various geometric shapes.
  28. Explain the purpose of an operating system.
  29. Use a standard file manager program to manage drawing files. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Manual Skill Development
   A. Produce freehand, orthographic and pictorial sketches of various
objects.
   B. Measure lines and distances using architectural, engineering and
metric scales.

II. Computer Graphics
   A. Identify the parts of a computer graphics system and describe their
functions.
   B. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using a computer
graphics system for drafting applications as compared with manual
methods.
   C. Explain the syntax of a typical CAD command.
   D. Identify the functions of keyboard symbols and control characters on
a computer keyboard.
   E. Log on to the CAD system, assign a drawing name, save a drawing file
and exit the system.
   F. Use CAD commands to create lines, circles, arcs, points, fillets,
text and dimensions in an electronic drawing.
   G. Use CAD commands to edit an existing drawing.
   H. Use CAD commands as aids in constructing drawing objects.
   I. Use CAD commands that enhance operator productivity.
   J. Use CAD commands to measure or verify properties of existing drawing
entities.
   K. Use screen control commands to position and scale the displayed
image to a convenient size for editing and for plotting.
   L. Use CAD commands to control various layering schemes for organizing
a drawing.
   M. Use CAD layering commands to selectively create, edit, view and
print portions of a drawing.
   N. Use CAD commands to set up a drawing with multiple views.
   O. Define, save and insert blocks into a CAD drawing.
   P. Demonstrate the ability to initiate CAD commands by use of the
keyboard, icons and pulldown menu.
   Q. Set default settings for the CAD system.
   R. Define and model space coordinate systems and apply them in creating
a 3D model.
   S. Set viewpoint coordinates to establish 3D views.
   T. Use CAD commands to create a simple 3D model with multiple views.
   U. Edit a 3D multi-view drawing.
   V. Integrate model space with paper space in a CAD drawing.
   W. Create a simple, solid 3D model.
   X. Produce a hardcopy print or plot of a finished drawing.

III. Geometric Construction
   A. Construct geometric shapes.
   B. Determine the proportional division of a line.
   C. Draw arcs tangent to lines and other arcs and locate points of
tangency.

IV. Multi-view Orthographic, Auxiliary, Isometric Projection
   A. Produce multi-view drawings using orthographic projection.
   B. Draw orthographic sectional views in full section, half section and
aligned section.
   C. Draw true size and shape of a surface using an auxiliary view.
   D. Produce isometric pictorial drawings with circular features.

V. Dimensioning
   A. Describe the classifications of engineering drawing dimensioning.
   B. List general rules for dimension placement on a drawing.
   C. Dimension views for size and location including width, height and
depth using the latest ANSI standards.

VI. Descriptive Geometry
   A. Define the four ways a line can be represented.
   B. Define the four ways a plane can be represented.
   C. Determine the dimensional and spatial properties of lines and
planes; angles and intersections.
   D. Draw the piercing point of a line and a plane.
   E. Draw the true size and shape of a plane.
   F. Draw the edge view of a plane.
   G. Determine lines of intersection between various geometric shapes.

VII. Introduction to Computer Operating System
   A. Explain the purpose of a microcomputer operating system.
   B. Use a file management program to manage disk files.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Lab projects and/or class projects 50-70%
Exams                              10-30%
Final exam                            20%
Total                                100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGR 251

  • Title: Statics*
  • Number: ENGR 251
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 242.
Prerequisites or corequisites: PHYS 220.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to describe and predict the conditions of rest and motion of bodies under the action of forces. The principles used will include vectors, force systems, equilibrium, free body diagram, centroids, moments of inertia, trusses, frame, and shear and moment diagrams. This course is typically offered in the summer and fall semesters. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe equilibrium.
  2. Calculate forces in space.
  3. Resolve forces into components.
  4. Draw a free body diagram.
  5. Determine moments, couples, and equivalent systems of force for a rigid body.
  6. Analyze equilibrium in two and three dimensions for a rigid body.
  7. Determine centroids.
  8. Analyze trusses, frames, and machines.
  9. Analyze shear and moments in beams and produce shear and moment diagrams.
  10. Define friction and relate it to static problems.
  11. Calculate moments of inertia. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Statics of Particles
   A. Add and resolve forces
   B. Calculate rectangular components
   C. Describe the equilibrium of a particle
   D. Calculate forces in space
   E. Describe equilibrium in space
   F. Draw a free body diagram

II. Rigid Bodies, Equivalent Systems of Force
   A. Determine the moment of a force about a point using a vector
product
   B. Determine the moment of a force about an axis using a scaler
product
   C. Describe couples
   D. Determine equivalent systems of forces

III. Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies
   A. Analyze equilibrium in two dimensions
   B. Analyze indetermenent reactions and partial constraints
   C. Analyze equilibrium in three dimensions

IV. Centroids and Centers of Gravity
   A. Calculate centroids of areas and lines
   B. Calculate centriods by integration
   C. Calculate centroids of beams and submerged surfaces
   D. Calculate centroids of volumes

V. Analysis of Structures
   A. Analyze trusses by method of joints
   B. Analyze joints under special loading conditions
   C. Analyze space trusses
   D. Analyze trusses by method of sections
   E. Analyze combined trusses
   F. Analyze frames
   G. Analyze machines

VI. Internal Forces
   A. Analyze internal forces in beams
   B. Produce shear and moment diagrams by free body diagram
   C. Produce shear and moment diagrams by integration

VII. Friction
      A. Define the laws of friction
      B. Apply the laws of friction to static problems

VIII. Moments of Inertia
      A. Calculate moments of inertia of areas
      B. Calculate moments of inertia for composite areas

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams and Homework Approximately 67%
Final Exam Approximately         33%
Total                           100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGR 251H

No information found.

ENGR 254

  • Title: Dynamics*
  • Number: ENGR 254
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ENGR 251.

Description:

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to apply the principles of dynamics, the branch of engineering mechanics that studies objects in motion. Topics covered will include unbalanced force systems (Newton's second law), displacement, velocity and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse and momentum. Computer applications may be included. This course is typically offered in the spring semester. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the rectilinear motion of an object using equations for acceleration, velocity and displacement.
  2. Describe the curvilinear motion of an object using components of the motion vectors.
  3. Use Newton's second law of motion to describe the acceleration of an object acted on by a force system.
  4. Apply the methods of energy and momentum to describe the motion of an object not in equilibrium.
  5. Use Newton's laws to describe the motion of a system of particles.
  6. Describe the kinematics for particles forming a rigid body.
  7. Describe the relationship between forces acting on a rigid body, the shape and mass of the body, and the motion produced.
  8. Apply energy and momentum methods to describe the motion of rigid bodies and systems of rigid bodies. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Kinematics of Particles
   A. Rectilinear motion of particles
      1. Determine position, velocity and acceleration
      2. Determine motion of a particle
      3. Describe uniform rectilinear motion
      4. Describe uniformly accelerated rectilinear motion
      5. Analyze motion of several particles
   B. Curvilinear motion of particles
      1. Determine position vector, velocity and acceleration
      2. Calculate the derivative of vector functions
      3. Calculate rectangular components of velocity and acceleration
      4. Analyze motion relative to a frame in translation
      5. Calculate tangential and normal components
      6. Calculate radical and transverse components

II. Kinetics of Particles
   A. Newton's second law
      1. Explain Newton's second law of motion
      2. Describe the linear momentum of a particle
      3. Describe systems of units
      4. List equations of motion
      5. Describe dynamic equilibrium
      6. Describe the angular momentum of a particle
      7. Determine radial and transverse components
      8. Describe the conservation of angular momentum
      9. Explain Newton's law of gravitation
   B. Energy and momentum methods
      1. Determine the work of a force
      2. Explain the principle of work and energy
      3. Apply the principle of work and energy to particles
      4. Define and determine power and efficiency
      5. Define and determine potential energy
      6. Explain the principle of conservation of energy
      7. Analyze motion under a conservative central force
      8. Explain the principle of impulse and momentum
      9. Describe impulsive motion
      10. Analyze impact
      11. Analyze direct central impact
      12. Analyze oblique central impact

III. Systems of Particles
   A. Discrete systems of particles
      1. Explain Newton's laws and describe effective forces
      2. Describe linear and angular momentum
      3. Determine the motion of a mass center
      4. Determine the angular momentum of a system of particles about its
mass center
      5. Explain conservation of momentum for a system of particles
      6. Determine the kinetic energy of a system of particles
      7. Explain the work-energy principle and the conservation of energy
for a system of particles
      8. Explain the principle of impulse and momentum for a system of
particles
   B. Stream systems of particles
      1. Describe variable systems of particles
      2. Describe a steady stream of particles

IV. Kinematics of Rigid Bodies
   A. Pure motion in a plane
      1. Describe translation
      2. Describe rotation about a fixed axis
      3. List equations defining the rotation of a rigid body about a
fixed axis
   B. General plane motion
      1. Determine absolute and relative velocity in plane motion
      2. Determine the instantaneous center of rotation in plane motion
      3. Determine the absolute and relative acceleration in plane motion

V. Plane Motion of Rigid Bodies
   A. Forces and accelerations
      1. List equations of motion for a rigid body
      2. Determine the angular momentum of a rigid body in plane motion
      3. Determine the plane motion of a rigid body using D'Alembert's
principle
      4. Analyze the motion of a rigid body
      5. Analyze the motion of systems of rigid bodies
      6. Describe constrained plane motion
   B. Energy and momentum methods
      1. Explain the principle of work and energy for a rigid body
      2. Determine the work of forces acting on a rigid body
      3. Determine the kinetic energy of a rigid body in plane motion
      4. Determine the work and kinetic energy of systems of rigid bodies
      5. Explain the principle of conservation of energy
      6. Calculate power
      7. Explain the principle of impulse and momentum for the plane
motion of a rigid body
      8. Determine the impulse and momentum for systems of rigid bodies
      9. Explain the principle of conservation of angular momentum
      10. Analyze impulsive motion
      11. Analyze eccentric impact

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams                    60 - 90% of grade
Assignments and Homework   10 - 40% of grade
               Total      100%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ENGR 254H

No information found.