Religion (REL)

Courses

REL 120   Exploring World Religions (3 Hours)  

This course is a comparative study of the world's major religious traditions. The basic beliefs of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam will be explored. A comparative framework for religious studies will be provided, and essential differences between Eastern and Western religions will be noted. Literary texts and iconographic images will be studied as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

REL 120H   HON: Exploring World Religions* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

REL 125   Religions of the East (3 Hours)

Religions of the East is a detailed examination of the rich and diverse religious traditions of India, Tibet, China and Japan. Students will explore the histories, mutual influences, beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, the Jain religion, the Sikh religion, Confucianism, Daoism, the Tibetan religions, and Shinto, stressing the characteristics they share, as well as those that differentiate them from each other and from Western religions. Primary and secondary texts, as well as the iconographic and artistic traditions of these religions, will be examined as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

REL 125H   HON: Religions of the East* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

REL 126   Religions of the West (3 Hours)

Religions of the West is a detailed examination of the rich and diverse religious traditions that originated in the ancient Near East (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), examples of indigenous traditions of Africa and North America, and examples of "alternative religions" of modern/contemporary Western culture. The student will explore the histories, cultural influences, beliefs and practices of these religions, stressing the characteristics that they share and those that differentiate them, both from one another and from the religious traditions of South and East Asian cultures. The primary texts, as well as the iconographic and artistic traditions of these religions, will be examined as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

REL 126H   HON: Religions of the West* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

REL 150   Islam: Religion & Civilization (3 Hours)

This course covers the context in which Islam arose; the career of the Prophet Muhammad; the main teachings and practices of the religion; the Qur'an and other early Islamic literature; subsequent political developments in the religion and its spread; its main religious branches; its history during the Middle Ages; the Christian crusades and their consequences; the major components of Islamic civilization including law, the arts, literature, philosophy, science, and mathematics; Sufi; the effects of Western imperialism upon Islamic states; major developments in Islamic thought and practice since the seventeenth century; the Islamic diaspora; and Islam today. REL 150 is the same course as HIST 150 and HUM 150; enroll in one only. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

REL 150H   HON: Islam: Religion and Civilization* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

REL 292   Special Topics:* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: The student must be currently enrolled in, or successfully completed with a grade of 'C' or higher, any of the following core REL courses: REL120, REL 125 or REL 126.

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of religion, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

REL 120

  • Title: Exploring World Religions
  • Number: REL 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is a comparative study of the world's major religious traditions. The basic beliefs of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam will be explored. A comparative framework for religious studies will be provided, and essential differences between Eastern and Western religions will be noted. Literary texts and iconographic images will be studied as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define “religion” and describe the diversity of religious experience.
  2. Identify the major texts, central religious figures, and ideas of the world’s great religions.
  3. Recognize concepts and issues basic to the study of religions in a comparative framework.
  4. Identify the iconic and artistic traditions of the world’s religions.
  5. Apply critical methodologies for determining truth that permit correction and dialogue, and that subject the student’s cultural beliefs and values to critical, reflective thought.
  6. Describe the historical context and development of the world’s major religions and their systems of value. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Introduction to Religion
   A. Definition
   B. Approaches
   C. The Nature of Religious Experience

II. Primal Religions: Africa, the Americas, Australia
   A. Religion of Indigenous Peoples
   B. Shamanism

III. Religions of the Ancient World: Europe and Persia
   A. Religion in Prehistoric Cultures
   B. Egypt and the Near East; Greece and Rome
   C. Religion of Persia: Zoroastrianism

IV. Hinduism: India
   A. Pre-Vedic India
   B. The Vedas and Brahmanism
   C. Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita
   D. Spiritual Disciplines: Yogas and Gurus

V. Buddhism: Southeast Asia, China and Japan
   A. The Life of the Buddha
   B. The Dharma: Theravada (Hinayana) and Mahayana Buddhism
   C. Devotional Buddhism: Pure Land Buddhism
   D. The Spread of Buddhism: China and Tibet: Vajrayana Buddhism
   E. The Spread of Buddhism: Japan: Zen Buddhism

VI. Confucianism: China
   A. Master Kung’s (Confucius) Life
   B. The Analects
   C. Neo-Confucianism

VII. Taoism: China
   A. Indigenous Chinese Religion
   B. Lao-Tzu and the Tao Te Ching
   C. Immortals Taoism

VIII. Judaism: The Middle East and Eastern Europe
   A. Jewish History and the Tanakh
   B. Covenant and Prophesy
   C. Rabbinical Judaism: The Septuagint, Dead Sea Scrolls, Talmud
   D. The Holocaust and Contemporary Judaism

IX. Christianity: Europe and the West
   A. The Life and Times of Jesus: The Gospels
   B. The Apostolic Age: Acts and the Letters of Paul
   C. The Early Churches: Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox
   D. The Protestant Reformation
   E. Contemporary Trends in Christianity

X. Islam: the Middle East
   A. The Prophet Muhammad: the Qur’an
   B. The Five Pillars of Islam
   C. Sunni and Shi’ite sects; Sufism
   D. The Spread of Islam

XI. New Religious Movements
   A. Protodox Religions – Fundamentalism and Sectarian Movements
   B. Ectodox Religions – Imported Religious Traditions
   C. Neodox Religions – 19th and 20th Century Experiments
   D. Mystical Subjectivism – Contemporary Religious
Movements
 




Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Student grades will be based on a minimum of three examinations which
will constitute 50% to 75% of the final grade. In addition to these
examinations, 20% to 30% of the final grade will consist of other grading
methods which may include supplemental examinations, writing assignments,
research papers, class presentations, or field trips. The remaining
percentage will be left to the instructor’s discretion for such items as
attendance, participation in class discussion, or the like.

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Students will be required to visit appropriate religious and cultural institutions in the Kansas City area.
  2. Students should also note that a substantial portion of their class grade will be based on writing. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

REL 120H

No information found.

REL 125

  • Title: Religions of the East
  • Number: REL 125
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Religions of the East is a detailed examination of the rich and diverse religious traditions of India, Tibet, China and Japan. Students will explore the histories, mutual influences, beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, the Jain religion, the Sikh religion, Confucianism, Daoism, the Tibetan religions, and Shinto, stressing the characteristics they share, as well as those that differentiate them from each other and from Western religions. Primary and secondary texts, as well as the iconographic and artistic traditions of these religions, will be examined as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify, compare, and contrast the basic issues and methodologies of Religious Studies.
  2. Contrast the basic differences in outlook between Eastern and Western religions, the diverse cultural backgrounds of the religions of India from those of China and Japan, and trace the patterns of geographical diffusion of Eastern Religions.
  3. Describe the religious revolution that ultimately transformed the Vedic religion into Jaina, Buddhism, and Hinduism.
  4. Describe the rise of Buddhism, its beliefs, practices, major schools, text formation, art and architecture, and history in India.
  5. Trace the development of the Hindu religion, and describe the roles played in it by its major texts, ritual and ascetic practices, deities, social and legal codes, tantra, bhakti devotionalism, iconography and architecture, Islamic and British conquests, export to the West, and modern nationalism.
  6. Describe the historical background, teachings, the role of Gurus, the practices, and the contemporary status of the Sikhs.
  7. Discuss how Theravada Buddhism spread into Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, and the roles in its development of the concept of the Bodhisattva king, merit-making, its syncretistic festivals, British imperialism, and its post-imperialistic revival.
  8. Describe the historical, general cultural, and popular religious background to the religions of China, and describe the Chinese tendency to blend religions
  9. State the basic teachings of Confucius, describe their institutionalization by the Chinese government, show their later elaboration and later synthesis with Daoism and Buddhism, and trace their decline and revival during the twentieth century.
  10. List the major exponents of Daoist (Taoist) philosophy and state their major concepts. Describe the beliefs and practices, historical development, texts, and iconography of religious Daoism (Taoism) and ways in which these complement popular Chinese religion.
  11. Describe the importation of Buddhism into China, its adjustments to Chinese values, the schools of Buddhism that arose in China, the persecution and decline of Buddhism, and its status today.
  12. Explore the Tantric (Vajrayana) tradition in India and its role in Tibetan religions, the diffusions of Buddhism into Tibet, the powerful schools of Tibetan Buddhism, the role of Lamas, and the status of Tibetan religions today.
  13. Describe the range of Japanese religious practices, including Shinto, Buddhism, and the New Religions, distinguishing their particular emphases, and indicating their status today. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify, compare, and contrast the basic issues and methodologies
of Religious Studies:
   A. Identify and compare the uses of the terms “religion” and
“religious”
   B. State the basic concepts used in Religious Studies
   C. Distinguish between and compare the major methodologies used in
Religious Studies
   D. Distinguish between religious doctrine and religious practices

II. Distinguish basic differences in outlook between Eastern and Western
religions, the diverse cultural backgrounds of the religions of India from
those of China and Japan, and trace the patterns of geographical diffusion
of Eastern religions
   A. Compare and contrast the major similarities and differences between
Eastern and Western Religions
   B. Distinguish religions arising in India from those arising in China
   C. Trace the pan-Asian patterns of religious diffusion

III. Describe the early Vedic religion of India and the components of the
religious revolution that transformed it into Jaina, Buddhism, and
Hinduism
   A. Describe the Vedic religious beliefs and practices of ancient India
      1. State the Aryan Hypothesis and describe its basis
      2. List the Four Vedas and state their purposes
      3. Identify the Vedic deities
      4. Compare the various Vedic creation myths
      5. Discuss the origins of varna and its religious and social
significance
      6. Relate the significance of the Vedic rituals for the deities, the
cosmos and ancestors
   B. Describe the religious revolution that ultimately transformed the
Vedic religion into Jaina, Buddhism, and Hinduism
      1. Analyze the historical and geographical reasons for this
revolution
         a. Identify and analyze the components of the internalization of
Vedic sacrifice that produced yoga
         b. Discuss the concept of  karma
      2. List the effects of this revolution in the Upanishads
      3. Describe Jaina and its basic beliefs and practices

IV. Describe the rise of Buddhism, its teachings, practices, major
schools, text formation, art and architecture, and history in India 
   A. Restate the results of the religious revolution and show how it
prepared the way for the career of Siddhartha the Buddha
   B. Discuss the life of Siddhartha
   C. Explain the significance of his enlightenment
   D. List the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path
   E. Describe and evaluate Buddhist concepts of the self and the law of
dependent co-arising
   F. Describe and evaluate the Buddhist concept of dharma
   G. Discuss the development of the Sangha, Vinaya, and monastic
training
   H. Show the role of royal and lay patrons in the success of Buddhism,
especially the Emperor Ashoka
   I. Describe the division of Buddhism into schools, and identify the
differences between the Theravada, the Mahayana, and the Tantric
   J. Identify the characteristics and roles of the Boddhisattvas in
Mahyana Buddhism
   K. Discuss the formation of the Buddhist scriptural canon
   L. Trace the rise of Buddhist architecture and iconography
   M. Describe the significance of relics and pilgrimages in Buddhist
practice
   N. Explain the decline of Buddhism in India

V. Trace the development of the Hindu religion, and describe the roles
played in it by its major texts, ritual and ascetic practices, deities,
social and legal codes, tantra, bhakti devotionalism, iconography and
architecture, Islamic and British conquests, export to the West, and
modern nationalism
   A. Restate the results of the religious revolution and show how it
prepared the way for the rise of Hinduism
   B. Cite and evaluate the Bhagavad Gita and show how they are a response
to Buddhism
   C. Discuss the main teachings of yoga
   D. List the Four Stages of Life and show how they attempt to reconcile
the Brahmanic householder tradition with the ascetic
   E. Discuss and evaluate the code of life laid down in the Law of Manu
and the Dharmasutras
   F. Identify the major deities: Vishnu and his major avatars, especially
Rama and Krishna; Shiva; and the forms of the Goddess
   G. Trace the range of Hindu iconography and architecture
   H. Discuss the major components of Tantra
   I. Discuss the bhakti devotionalism, and its rituals and devotional
poetry
   J. Explain how British imperialism aided the Hindu revival of the
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and list its major figures
   K. Discuss the exportation of Hinduism to the West
   L. Identify the major doctrines of late-twentieth century Hindu
fundamentalism, show how it is a product of ethnic strife and
post-independence nationalism, and evaluate its current impact on Indian
society

VI. Describe the historical background, teachings, the role of Gurus, the
practices, and the contemporary status of the Sikh Religion
   A. Describe the cultural background of Sixteenth-Century India
   B. Trace the career of Guru Nanak
   C. Outline and evaluate the major teachings of the Adi Granth
   D. Describe the early history and subsequent persecution of the Sikhs
under the subsequent nine human gurus and their replacement by the Adi
Granth
   E. Describe major Sikh temples, rituals, and community practices
   F. Compare and contrast Sikh beliefs and practices with those of
Hinduism, describe the place of the Sikhs in contemporary Indian society
   G. Trace the Sikh diaspora through Southeast Asia, and into Europe and
North America
  
VII. Discuss how Theravada Buddhism spread into Sri Lanka and Southeast
Asia, and the roles of the Boddhisattva king, merit-making, its
syncretistic festivals, British imperialism, and its post-imperialistic
revival in its development. 
   A. Cite the reasons for Buddhism spread to these areas
   B. Review the major differences between Theravada and Mahayana
Buddhism
   C. Characterize the ideal of the Dharmaraja or Boddhisattva ruler and
his role is Southeast Asian countries
   D. Discuss how merit-making binds householders and rulers to
monasteries
   E. Examine the syncretistic nature of the rituals and festivals of
these countries
   F. Evaluate the role of British imperialism in the creation of
“Protestant Buddhism” in Sri Lanka
   G. Examine the various strands of Buddhist revival in twentieth-century
Southeast Asia

VIII. Describe the historical, general cultural, and popular religious
background to the religions of China, and the Chinese tendency to blend
all religions
   A. Review the difference in outlook between Indian and Chinese
cultures
   B. Examine the traditional religious rituals, cosmic beliefs,
divinatory practices, and deities of the Chinese peoples
   C. State an overview of how Chinese religions have blended
   D. Describe the Christian missionaries’ inadvertent inspiration of
the Taiping Rebellion, based on a syncretistic blend of Chinese values and
Christianity

IX. State the basic teachings of Confucius, describe their
institutionalization by the Chinese government, show their later
elaboration and later synthesis with Daoism and Buddhism, and trace their
decline and revival during the Twentieth Century  
   A. Outline the life of Confucius and the context in which he developed
his philosophy
   B. List and evaluate his major teachings transmitted in The Analects
   C. List and evaluate the later contributions of Mencius and Xunzi
   D. Describe the institutionalization of Confucian teachings during the
Han Dynasty, the deification of Confucius, and the governmental role of
Confucianism in Chinese religion
   E. Characterize the Neoconfucian synthesis during the Sung Dynasty
   F. Examine the recent development of New Confucianism in China and the
United States

X. List the major exponents of Daoist (Taoist) philosophy and state their
major concepts, describe the beliefs and practices, historical
development, texts, and iconography, of religious Daoism (Taoism) and how
the latter complement popular Chinese religion  
   A. Show the obscure origins of the Daoist (Taoist) tradition
   B. List and evaluate the major teachings of Laozi (Lao Tse)
   C. List and evaluate the major teachings of Zhuangzi (Chuang Tse)
   D. Trace the origins of the Daoist Religion, and its schools and canon,
and its competition with Chinese Buddhism
   E. Show the interpenetration of Daoist and religious practices in
popular religion
   F. Discuss Daoist geography, temples, deities, iconography, rituals,
and festivals

XI. Describe the importation of Buddhism into China, its adjustments to
Chinese values, the schools of Buddhism that arose in China, the
persecution and decline of Buddhism, and its status today
   A. Trace Buddhism’s importation into China, the translation and
production of its canon, and its competition with Daoism for royal
patronage
   B. Describe how Buddhism found a role among the other religions of
China, especially the adjustments Buddhism made to Chinese family values
   C. Discuss Buddhist iconography, geography, monasteries, and temples
   D. Name and differentiate among the Esoteric, Pure Land, and Chan
(Ch’en) schools of Chinese Buddhism, and evaluate their theological
positions
   E. State the reasons for the imperial attack on Buddhism in 845 C.E.
and indicate Buddhism’s status thereafter
   F. Describe the persecutions of Chinese religions during the regime of
Mao Zedong (Mao tse Tung) and state the reasons for their revival since
the 1980’s

XII. Explore the Tantric (Vajrayana) tradition in India and its role in
Tibetan religions, the diffusions of Buddhism into Tibet, the powerful
schools of Tibetan Buddhism, the role of Lamas, and the status of Tibetan
religions today
   A. Describe and evaluate the Tantric beliefs and rituals
      1. Define mudra and mandala and describe their roles in Tantric
practices
      2. Trace the rise of Tantric in Hindu Shavism and its influence upon
Buddhism
   B. List the components of traditional Tibetan religion prior to the
arrival of Buddhism, especially those that survive in practice today.
   C. Trace the First Diffusion of Buddhism in Tibet
     1. Discuss the competition between Indian and Chinese Chan Schools
among early Tibetan Buddhists
      2. Show how a combination of Buddhist and traditional Tibetan
religions led to Bon
   D. Trace the Second diffusion of Buddhism in India and the creation of
further schools of Buddhism, especially the Gelug, and powerful
monasteries, and universities
   E. Describe the role of lamas in Tibetan religion and how concept of
“tulku” evolved as a means of selecting new lamas
   F. Summarize the relations between Tibet and its powerful neighbors,
the Mongols and the Chinese and show how these have influenced Tibetan
religion
   G. Outline the role of the Dalai Lama as both religious and spiritual
leader and the politico-religious role of the Dalai Lama since his flight
from Tibet in 1959

XIII. Describe the range of Japanese religious practices, including
Shinto, Buddhism, and the New Religions, distinguishing their particular
emphases, indicating and their status today
   A. Examine Shinto and Japanese folk religion
      1. Describe the mythology and the major ritual practices and
festivals of Shinto, and define “kami.”  Evaluate a religion that is
more aesthetic than ethical.
      2. Describe the practice and role of ancestral rites in Japanese
religion
      3. Describe the practices of Japanese folk religion, shugendo, and
show their intermingling with Shinto
      4. Discuss the creation of State Shinto during the Meiji
Restoration; examine its political role in supporting the imperial throne
and Japanese nationalist ambitions, and its destruction after World War
II
   B. Examine Buddhism in Japan
      1. Describe the introduction of Buddhism into Japan and its imperial
patronage of monasteries, temples, and art
      2. Characterize the Buddhist, Daoist, and folk origins of shugendo
      3. Account for the later arrivals of missionaries returning from
China proclaiming new Buddhist schools
      4. Briefly review the Esoteric, Pure Land, and Chan (Ch’en,
Japanese Zen) Schools of Buddhism and their practices
      5. Discuss and evaluate the distinctively Japanese additions to
these Chinese Schools
      6. Trace the political roles of Buddhist monasteries from the Heian
to the Momoyama periods of Japanese history
      7. Show how Tokogawa Ieyesu tamed and utilized Buddhism and
Neoconfucianism to support his shogunate
   C. Discuss the new religions created by the Japanese during the
nineteenth and twentieth centuries
   D. Show how Shinto, Daoist, and Confucian ideas and practiced have
blended in Japanese religion
   E. Outline the history of Christian missions in Japan
   F. Characterize and evaluate the popularity of Zen among Westerners
   G. Discuss and evaluate the seemingly diminished role of Japanese
religions today

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations         50 %
(Student writing will constitute at least 25% of each exam.)
Projects/Assignments 50 % (to include writing assignments)
Total:              100 %

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 - 100%
 B = 80 -  89%  
 C = 70 -  79%   
 D = 60 -  69%  
 F =  0 -  59%   

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

REL 125H

No information found.

REL 126

  • Title: Religions of the West
  • Number: REL 126
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

Religions of the West is a detailed examination of the rich and diverse religious traditions that originated in the ancient Near East (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), examples of indigenous traditions of Africa and North America, and examples of "alternative religions" of modern/contemporary Western culture. The student will explore the histories, cultural influences, beliefs and practices of these religions, stressing the characteristics that they share and those that differentiate them, both from one another and from the religious traditions of South and East Asian cultures. The primary texts, as well as the iconographic and artistic traditions of these religions, will be examined as appropriate. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Define the basic terminology, concepts, and issues of religious studies.
  2. Describe and analyze the beliefs and ritual practices of indigenous traditions of Native America and Africa.
  3. Identify and compare the artistic traditions of the indigenous religions of Native America and Africa.
  4. Describe the historical context, important individuals, and cultural development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
  5. Identify and compare the major textual sources and literary traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
  6. Describe and analyze the doctrines and ritual practices of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
  7. Identify and compare the artistic expressions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
  8. Describe and analyze some examples of the development, doctrines, and ritual practices of “Alternative Religions” in contemporary Western culture. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Define the basic terminology, concepts, and issues of religious
studies.
   A. Discuss the variety of ways in which we apply the terms
“religion” and “religious.”
   B. Define basic terminology, e.g., myth, ritual, and symbol.
   C. Distinguish and compare some basic methodologies, e.g.,
structuralism, functionalism, and phenomenalism.
   D. Recognize the distinctions between “doctrine” and
“practice.”

II. Describe and analyze the beliefs and ritual practices of indigenous
traditions of North America and Africa.
   A. Cite parallels and differences between the mythological narratives
of various indigenous traditions of Native America and Africa.
   B. Explore the profound significance of “place” and “location”
in the mythological narratives of indigenous traditions of Native America
and Africa.
   C. Examine and discuss the importance of ritual enactment as a
rehearsal of the mythology that is intrinsic to the cultural foundation of
a given indigenous tradition.
   D. Explain the significance of the term “indigenous” in the context
of religion.
   E. Describe the nature and purpose of shamanism in indigenous
religions.
   F. Explain what it means to emphasize “place” over “time” in
indigenous religions.
   G. Explain what it means to emphasize “orality” over “text” in
indigenous religions.

III. Identify and compare the artistic traditions of the indigenous
religions of Native America and Africa.
   A. Describe the nature and function of the mask in indigenous ritual
practice.
   B. Identify and describe the significance of other visual
iconic/artistic expressions in indigenous ritual practice.

IV. Describe the historical context, central individuals, and cultural
development of Judaism.
   A. Explain the centrality of linear history.
   B. Describe the cultural influences of ancient Mesopotamian, Canaanite,
and Persian/Zoroastrian religions on Judaism.
   C. Describe the early development of the Hebrew religion and Judaism;
specifically:
      1. The “patriarchal history” 
      2. Mosaic Yahwism
      3. The rise and fall of the Israelite monarchy
      4. The exile and diaspora
      5. The effects of hellenization
      6. The development of the synagogue system
      7. The Eastern European Hassidic movement of the 18th-19th century 
      8. The origins of the basic sects of contemporary Judaism, i.e.,
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, as well as the mystical tradition of
Judaism (“Kabbalah”).
   D. Identify and explain the socio-political issues that are faced by
contemporary Jews in:
      1. Israel, and
      2. The United States

V. Identify and compare the major texts and literary traditions of
Judaism.
   A. Cite parallels between Hebrew mythological narrative and that of
earlier Mesopotamian cultures.
   B. Explain the similarities between Hammurabic law and Hebrew
covenantal law.
   C. Describe how early Mesopotamian suzerainty treaty forms served as
models for the Hebrew covenantal form.
   D. Identify the content and origins of the textual/literary components
of the Hebrew Tanakh (the Torah, the Nevi’im, the Khetuvim).
   E. Identify essential elements of later Judaic religious literature
(i.e., Talmud, Mishnah).
   F.  Identify and discuss the writings of some of the contemporary/20th
century figures in Jewish thought, e.g., Martin Buber, Elie Wiesel.

VI. Describe and identify the doctrines and ritual practices of Judaism.
   A. Explain the nature of ethical monotheism.
   B. Identify the origins, components, and imperatives of the Hebrew
covenant.
   C. Describe the significant ritual practices of the Jewish synagogue
and home. 
   D. Explain the centrality of ritual practice as an expression of Jewish
identity.

VII. Identify and compare the artistic traditions of Judaism.
   A. Identify and discuss examples of both traditional and contemporary
literary works and authors.
   B. Describe the architectural and spatial configurations of the
synagogue in its respective sectarian forms.

VIII. Describe the historical context, important individuals, and cultural
development of Christianity.
   A. Describe the cultural milieu of 1st century CE Palestine.
   B. Describe the content and significance of the “mystery religions”
of the 1st century CE cultural milieu.
   C. Describe what is meant by the terms “Jesus of History” and
“Christ of Faith,” as well as the historical problems that they
present.
   D. Outline the development of the Christian church; specifically:
      1. The “Jewish Christians” in Jerusalem
      2. Paul and the gentiles
      3. The church of Constantine
      4. The split between East and West
      5. The medieval papacy
      6. The Protestant Reformation
      7. The Roman Counter-Reformation
      8. The cultural characteristics of European and American
Protestantism, e.g., denominational schisms, the 18th century Great
Awakening, 19th century Fundamentalism, Darwinian theory vs. creationism.
   E. Identify and explain the socio-political issues that are faced by
contemporary Christianity.

IX. Identify and compare the major texts and literary traditions of
Christianity.
   A. Identify and describe the literary/textual components of the
Christian canon, i.e., the “New Testament.”
   B. Identify and describe examples of the extracanonical literature of
the Christian tradition.
   C. Identify and discuss the writings of some of the primary figures in
medieval Christian theology, e.g.
      1. Augustine
      2. Anselm
      3. Thomas Aquinas
   D. Identify and discuss the writings of some of the contemporary/20th
century figures in Christian thought, e.g., Rudolf Bultmann, Dietrich
Bonhoeffer, Paul Tillich, Liberation Theology, Feminist Theology.

X. Describe and identify the essential doctrines and ritual practices of
Christianity.
   A. Identify and explain the basic teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
   B. Compare and contrast the teachings of Paul with those of the
gospels.
   C. Define the nature and meaning of “sacraments” and explain their
centrality in Christian ritual practice.
   D. Identify and explain the essential doctrinal differences between
Christian sects, e.g., Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy,
Protestantism, and Messianic Judaism. 

XI. Identify and compare the artistic traditions of Christianity.
   A. Identify the traditional iconographies of Roman and Orthodox
churches.
   B. Describe the traditional architectural and spatial configurations of
Roman, Orthodox and Protestant churches.

XII. Describe the historical context, important individuals, and cultural
development of Islam.
   A. Identify the common root of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  
   B. Describe the cultural milieu of the 7th century CE Arabian
Peninsula.
   C. Outline the early historical development of Islam; specifically:
      1. The life and call of the Prophet Muhammed
      2. The development of the primary sects of Islam (Shiite, Sunni,
Sufi)
      3. The migration of Islam into Africa, Spain, and South Asia, and
Southeast Asia
      4. The effects of medieval European Christendom.
   D. Cite the major scientific and philosophical contributions of Muslim
culture.
   E. Identify examples of modern Islamic revivalist movements.
   F. Identify and explain the socio-political issues that are faced by
contemporary Islam.
   G. Outline the history and characteristics of the Black Muslim movement
and the Nation of Islam in the United States.

XIII. Identify and compare the major texts and literary traditions of
Islam.
   A. Describe the literary content and character of the Quran.
   B. Describe the literary content and character of Hadith.
   C. Contrast Quranic teaching with that of Hadith.
   D. Identify and discuss the writings of some of the contemporary/20th
century figures and/or movements in Islamic thought.  

XIV. Describe and identify the doctrines and ritual practices of Islam.
   A. Define and explain the Five Pillars of Faith.
   B. Identify and explain some of the major doctrinal elements and
perspectives of Islam: e.g., the nature of God; the nature of the self;
gender issues, jihad.
   C. Identify the doctrinal differences between the Shiite, the Sunni,
and the Sufi.

XV. Identify and compare the artistic traditions of Islam.
   A. Describe the traditional architectural and spatial configurations of
the mosque.
   B. Identify the graphic design forms that have been developed and
utilized by Muslim cultures. 
   C. Identify examples of narrative and poetic literary forms that have
been produced by Muslim cultures.

XVI. Describe and analyze some examples of the development, doctrines, and
ritual practices of “Alternative Religions” in modern/contemporary
Western culture.
   A. Define and explain the term “Alternative Religions.”
   B. Describe the cultural contexts and circumstances that led to the
development of alternative religions.
   C. Define the families or categories in which alternative religions may
be classified. 
   D. Cite some parallels between the doctrines and ritual practices of
mainline Western religions and those of alternative religions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations  50 % of grade (student writing will constitute at least
25% of each exam)
 
Projects/Assignments 50% of grade (to include student writing assignments)
 

Grade Criteria:
 A = 90 - 100%  
 B = 80 -  89%  
 C = 70 -  79%   
 D = 60 -  69%   
 F =  0 -  59%   

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

REL 126H

No information found.

REL 150

  • Title: Islam: Religion & Civilization
  • Number: REL 150
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course covers the context in which Islam arose; the career of the Prophet Muhammad; the main teachings and practices of the religion; the Qur'an and other early Islamic literature; subsequent political developments in the religion and its spread; its main religious branches; its history during the Middle Ages; the Christian crusades and their consequences; the major components of Islamic civilization including law, the arts, literature, philosophy, science, and mathematics; Sufi; the effects of Western imperialism upon Islamic states; major developments in Islamic thought and practice since the seventeenth century; the Islamic diaspora; and Islam today. REL 150 is the same course as HIST 150 and HUM 150; enroll in one only. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Analyze the religious and political dynamics of the Near East just prior to the rise of Islam.
  2. Discuss the life of the Prophet Muhammad in its Arabian context.
  3. Explain the main teachings and practices of Islam, and the status and textual history of the Qur’an.
  4. Describe the history and significance of the Qur’an, the earliest written biography (sira) of Muhammad, and the Hadith.
  5. Assess the political significance of Islam in its Arabian context and summarize early succession struggles; describe subsequent Islamic conquests, and the establishment of the Ummayad and Abbasid caliphates.
  6. Identify and compare the main branches of Islam.
  7. Describe political developments during the Abbasid caliphate, its disruption by Turks and Mongols, the spread of Turkic and Persian Muslim rule to India, and the Christian Crusades and their consequences.
  8. Identify the major developments in Islamic civilization during its classical period: law, the Arabic language, calligraphy, architecture, art, literature, philosophy, medicine, science, and mathematics.
  9. Explain the role and significance of Sufi practices and literature.
  10. Describe Islamic civilization in Persia, Central Asia, The Caucuses, India, and Southeast Asia.
  11. Describe the significance of the Mamluks and the Ottoman Empire; and identify and assess the impacts of western imperialism on Islamic civilization.
  12. Discuss and evaluate the major developments in Islamic thought and practice from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries C.E. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The Religious and Political Dynamics of the Near East just Prior to
the Rise of Islam.
   A. Analyze the struggle of the Byzantine Empire and the Persian
Sassanid Empire for control of the Near East
   B. Discuss the emerging close relationships between religion and the
state during the early Common Era.
      1. Compare the relationship of the Orthodox Church and the Byzantine
Empire to that of the Zoroastrian religion and the Sassanid Empire.
      2. Examine parallel movements in near-eastern Judaism.
   C. Explain the significance of the pro-Byzantine Ghassanid and the
pro-Sassanian Lakmid kingdoms on the northern edge of the Arabian
Peninsula.
   D. Consider the significance of the term “holy war,” as used by the
Byzantine emperor Heraclius in his successful struggle against the
Sassanids.
   E. Describe the campaigns of the Ethiopians, the pro Byzantine Kinds
tribe, and the Sassanids around Mecca in the period of Muhammad’s
birth.
   F. Examine the pockets of Jewish influence in the Arabian Peninsula.
   G. Explain the religious situation in Mecca prior to Muhammad’s
Prophecy.
 
II. The life of the Prophet Muhammad in its Arabian context.
   A. Describe the context of Muhammad’s birth, youth, and early
career.
   B. Discuss the revelation of the Qur’an to Muhammad and how this was
recorded in the later text.
   C. Explain the reasons for and the consequences of Muhammad’s Hejira
(flight) to Yathrib (henceforth Medina) in 622.
   D. Describe the struggle for the control of Mecca, 624-630.

III. The main teachings and practices of Islam, and the status and textual
history of the Qur’an.
   A. Define “Islam” and “Muslim.”
   B. Identify the Five Pillars of Islam and explain the significance of
each.
      1. The Shahadah.
      2. Salah
      3. Zakat
      4. Sawm
      5. The Hajj
   C. Define and explain the significance of the following Islamic
concepts:
      1. “shirk”
      2. “jihad”
      3. “umma”
      4. The names of God: tanzih versus tashbih
      5. The Night Journey and the Seventh Heaven
      6. The Jinn
      7. Paradise and Hell
   D. Evaluate the significance of the prior Prophets and Maryam (the
Virgin Mary), and their roles in Qur’anic narrative and Islam
   E. Summarize Muhammad’s “Night Journey.”
   F. Discuss the history and role of Mecca and the Ka’ba in Islam.

IV. The history and significance of the Qur’an, the earliest written
biography (sira) of Muhammad, and the Hadith.
   A. Delineate various views as to the oral transmission and writing down
of the Qur’an
   B. Describe the status and authority of the Qur’an in Islam.
   C. Summarize the arguments used for the Qur’an’s
“inimitability.”
   D. Discuss the significance of Ibn Ishaq’s life of Muhammad (sira)
and other early texts on the subject.
   E. Compare the several versions of hadith and describe their
significance as sources for the life of Muhammad and Islamic law.

V. The political significance of Islam in its Arabian context, early
succession struggles, subsequent Islamic conquests, the establishment of
the Ummayad and Abbasid caliphates.
   A. Analyze Muhammad as prophet, military leader, and statesman, and
show how Islam created a new identity for the Arabian tribes.
   B. Explain the significance of Muhammad’s wives, children, and cousin
Ali, in the development of Islam.
   C. Show how the Caliph Abu Bakr ultimately united the rival Arabian
tribes and, under Caliph Omar, Damascus and the Byzantine Middle East were
seized.
   D. Describe the struggles for succession that occurred upon the murder
of the Caliph Othman, the subsequent establishment of the Ummayad
caliphate at Damascus, and the significance of the death of Husayn at
Karbala.
   E. Outline the subsequent Islamic conquests of North Africa, Spain,
Persia, and beyond in the late 600’s and early 700’s, and offer
reasons for their success.

VI. The main branches of Islam.
   A. Identify the theological positions of Khawarij and other Islamic
movements of the eighth century C.E. and show their significance to the
formation of subsequent Islamic identity. 
   B. Relate the development of Shia and Sunni branches of Islam to
rebellions against the Ummayad caliphate.
   C. Discuss the significance of the establishment of the Abbasid
caliphate to theological developments within Islam.
   D. Show how Sunni emerged in reaction to Shia identity.
   E. Contrast the differences between Shia and Sunni theology, practice,
and institutions.
   F. Compare the doctrinal differences among the several branches of Shia
Islam:  the Zaydi (“Fiver-Imam”), the Ithna ‘ashariyyah
(“Twelver-Imam”), and the Ismaili (“Seveners”).

VII. Political developments during the Abbasid caliphate, its disruption
by Turks and Mongols, the spread of Turkic and Persian Muslim rule to
India, and the Christian Crusades and their consequences.
   A. Discuss the establishment of the Abbasid caliphate.
      1. Analyze the Abbasid theory of kingship, the significance of the
construction of Baghdad as the capital, and the administration of
government.
      2. Describe Baghdad during the reign of Harun al-Rashid.
   B. Show how Islam spread into Central Asia and China.
   C. Outline the challenges to Abbasid rule provided by the Fatimids,
various Turkic peoples, the Mongolians, and Tamerlane.
   D. Summarize the effects of the Christian crusades on the Near East and
their continuing impact on Islamic-Christian relations.
   E. Outline the major Islamic political concepts of rulership and
society.
   F. Define the role the ulama in Islamic learning and politics.

VIII. Major developments in Islamic civilization during its classical
period: law, the Arabic language, calligraphy, architecture, art,
literature, philosophy, medicine, science, and mathematics.
   A. Describe the development of Islamic law, and show its significance
for Muslim lives.
      1. Analyze the relationship between Islamic law and previous legal
systems.
      2. Identify the four main schools of Islamic law, show their
geographical distribution, and contrast their major differences. 
   B. Discuss the early history of the Arabic language.
      1. Evaluate the significance of the rise of Islam for the spread and
development of Arabic.
      2. Assess the influence of Arabic on other western languages,
including English.
   C. Explain the significance of calligraphy in Islamic civilization and
its religious role.
   D. Survey the major developments of Islamic architecture in the
following areas:
      1. Jerusalem and Syria
      2. North Africa and Spain
      3. Persia
      4. Central Asia
      5. India
   E. Describe the impact of Islam on the pictorial arts.
      1. Review modern theories of Islamic aesthetics and the issue of
icons.
      2. Show the significance of decoration in Islamic art and
architecture.
      3. Survey Islamic pictorial art.
   F. Trace the origins of Arabic literary forms and describe their
Islamic developments.
   G. Summarize the achievements of Ibn Khaldun.
   H. Discuss the background of Islamic philosophy, identify its major
schools, and indicate the basic outlook of each; summarize developments in
medicine, science, and mathematics.
      1. Summarize the heritage of ancient Greek philosophy on Islamic
thought.
      2. Show the role of the Mu’tazilites (rationalists) in
transmitting Greek philosophy before and during the Abbasid caliphate and
its influence on Twelver-Imam Shia.
      3. Assess the influence of neo-Platonism and Gnosticism on the
theology of the Seveners.
      4. Describe the issue of God and “the created,” and its
significance for Muslim philosophy.
      5. Describe the issue of universalism versus nominalism and its
significance for Muslim philosophy.
      6. Summarize the synthesis of Plato and Aristotle in the
philosophies of al-Kindl and al-Farabi.
      7. Briefly summarize the philosophical achievements of Ibn Sina
(Avicenna), Algazel, and Averroes.
      8. Summarize the major Islamic achievements in medicine, science and
mathematics.

IX. The role and significance of Sufi practices and literature.
   A. Discuss the philosophical background and origins of Sufi.
   B. Identify the purpose and major ritual practices of the Sufi.
   C. Describe the establishment of Sufi orders and their spread
throughout the Islamic world.
   D. Summarize the relationship between Sufi and the main branches of
Islam.
   E. Identify the attitudes of various Islamic governments towards Sufi.
   F. Show the significance of the following Sufi authors in the
movement’s history:  al-Hallaj, Attar, Ibn Arabi, and Rumi.

X. Islamic civilization in Persia, Central Asia, the Caucasus, India, and
Southeast Asia.
   A. Show the impact of Islam on Persian history and civilization.
      1. Briefly trace the heritage of Persian civilization prior to the
arrival of Islam.
      2. Describe the architecture, art, philosophy, and literature of
Islamic Persia.
      3. Assess Persian civilization during the reign of Shah Abbas I.
   B. Show the impact of Islam on India.  
      1. Outline the gradual Islamic conquest of India.
      2. Analyze the special challenges Islam has faced in India and how
they have been addressed.
      3. Describe the intellectual, architectural, and artistic
accomplishments of Mughal India.
   C. Trace the spread of Islam throughout Southeast Asia, the special
challenges it faced, and how they were addressed.

XI. The significance of the Mamluks and the Ottoman Empire; the impacts of
western imperialism on Islamic civilizations.
   A. Characterize Mamluk rule and civilization in Syria and Egypt.
   B. Trace the rise and expansion of the Ottoman Empire, its conflict
with Safavid Persia, and its conquests in Christian Europe.
   C. State the Ottoman structure of political and religious authority,
and note the role of Sufi in maintaining it.
   D. Describe the architectural and artistic achievements of the
Ottomans.
   E. Summarize the political consequences of the military conflicts
between the Ottoman Empire and developing European nations, and the
gradual breakup of the empire.
   F. Discuss how western “Orientalism” viewed Islam.

XII. The major developments in Islamic thought and practice from the
seventeenth to the twentieth centuries C.E.
   A. Outline the main tenets of Wahhabi Islam and note its significance
today.
   B. Contrast the differences between modernist, secular-nationalist,
revivalist, and Pan-Islamic movements in the following Islamic dominions:
      1. The Ottoman Empire
      2. Iran
      3. Egypt
   C. State and evaluate the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948
on Muslims and Islamic states.
   D. Show the roles of Islamic nations in the Cold War and the Arab
political concepts that emerged from that conflict.
   E. Outline the causes and course of the Islamic revolution in Iran, and
discuss its consequences throughout Islam.
   F. Analyze the causes and consequences of the Islamic diaspora,
including that to the United States.
   G. Discuss the challenges Islam faces in the post-Cold War period and
the state of Islam today.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations 50% of grade
Projects/Assignments 50% of grade
   Total 100%

Grade Criteria:
  A = 90 – 100%    
  B = 80 –  89%  
  C = 70 –  79%  
  D = 60 -  69%  
  F =  0 –  59%  

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

REL 150H

No information found.

REL 292

  • Title: Special Topics:*
  • Number: REL 292
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: The student must be currently enrolled in, or successfully completed with a grade of 'C' or higher, any of the following core REL courses: REL120, REL 125 or REL 126.

Description:

This course periodically offers specialized or advanced discipline-specific content related to the study of religion, not usually taught in the curriculum, to interested and qualified students within the program.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Undertake complex readings and research in the designated topic 
  2. Define key terms and both explain and apply concepts within the scope of the topic 
  3. Utilize research and analysis skills relevant to the area and issues of study 
  4. Engage in a reasoned and scholarly discussion about the Special Topic 
  5. Develop a personal point of view about the Special Topic that can be supported with textual evidence, research, and other means.

Content Outline and Competencies:

Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor, and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the Philosophy and Religion faculty prior to its being offered. The Arts, Humanities and Social Science Division Curriculum Committee and the Division Dean will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. The AHSS Division will also determine when and if the course may be taught.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods: Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor.

Grade Criteria:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Course work may transfer to four-year institutions as elective credit. 
  2. A student cannot take more than two Special Topics in Religion courses that are not cross-listed with HUM, PHIL, or HIST. This does not include unique and non-cross listed Special Topics 
  3. A class offered as a Special Topics course may not be offered more than once every two years.

NOTES: Can be cross-listed with HUM, PHIL, or HIST.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).