American Sign Language (ASL)

Courses

ASL 120   Elementary American Sign Language I (3 Hours)

This class will focus on the development of beginning American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. A minimum grade of "C" is required to continue in the ASL program. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 120 and FL 180 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

ASL 121   Elementary American Sign Language II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

This course will focus on continued development of elementary American Sign Language skills beyond those taught in Elementary ASL I. Students will work on developing communication competencies, concentrating on comprehension and production skills. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 121 and FL 181 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

ASL 122   Intermediate American Sign Language I* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

ASL 123   Intermediate American Sign Language II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

ASL 135   Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisities require a grade of "C" or higher.

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. lecture/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 145   Introduction to the Deaf Community* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180 with a grade of "C" or higher.

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs./wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 147   Fingerspelling I* (2 Hours)

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 150   American Sign Language Literature* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 with a grade of "C" or higher.

This course will provide introduction, discussion, and demonstration of literature in American Sign Language (ASL). The literature involves ASL Poetry, ASL Storytelling/Narratives, Deaf Humor, Deaf Folklore and other genres that have been passed on from one generation to another by culturally deaf people. Students will receive, analyze and retell a variety of ASL literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 150 and ASL 150 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

ASL 120

  • Title: Elementary American Sign Language I
  • Number: ASL 120
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Description:

This class will focus on the development of beginning American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. A minimum grade of "C" is required to continue in the ASL program. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 120 and FL 180 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mastery of basic skills in the visual/gestural medium as a channel for linguistic communication.
  2. Demonstrate a basic sign vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of vocabulary used for grammatical patterns in various sentence types.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Utilize Both Non-Verbal and Verbal Communication 
   A. Communicate the context of a message through eye contact, facial
expression and body language
   B. Demonstrate basic ASL signs 
   C. Practice manual and physical coordination
   D. Receive and express a message by communicating its content through
manual and physical coordination in ASL
        
II. Demonstrate Appropriate Vocabulary Used For Grammatical Patterns in
Various Sentence Types Including Time, Pronouns, Subject/Object
Relationships, Classifiers, SASSES, Plurals, Locatives, Temporal Aspects
and Distribution Aspects
   A. Introduce oneself
      1. Ask for and give names in ASL
      2. Confirm and correct information by using positive and negative
headshakes
      3. Use yes/no questions, Wh-questions, personal pronouns and
spatial
referencing
   B. Exchange personal information
      1. Ask if the person is deaf or hearing and where that person
learned sign language 
      2. Respond to information in ASL
      3. Use yes/no and Wh-questions and the not-negation in ASL
   C. Talk about surroundings
      1. Ask/tell where.  
      2. Express wants and correct information
      3. Use real - world orientation and non-manual markers
   D. Tell where you live
      1. Ask/tell where and how you come to class
      2. Use Wh-questions and real world orientation and noun-verb pairs
   E. Talk about your family
      1. Ask/tell about marital status and siblings
      2. Practice the number of siblings and family members involved
      3. Use possessive pronouns, yes/no questions, negative responses
and contrastive structure.
   F. Tell about activities
      1. Receive and express apologizing, giving reasons and opinions and
suggesting activities
      2. Using time signs, what-questions, dual pronouns, phrasing and
listing activities

III. Practice Producing and Receiving Numbers
   A. From 1 - 30
   B. Multiples of 5 (up to 100)

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive and receptive skill tests  75%
Quizzes                               10%
Class attendance/participation         7%
Response papers                        5%
Lab report                             3%
 Total                               100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 121

  • Title: Elementary American Sign Language II*
  • Number: ASL 121
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This course will focus on continued development of elementary American Sign Language skills beyond those taught in Elementary ASL I. Students will work on developing communication competencies, concentrating on comprehension and production skills. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. ASL 121 and FL 181 are the same course. Do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives


  1. Demonstrate mastery of basic skills in the visual/gestural medium as a channel for linguistic communication.
  2. Demonstrate conversational skills with various ASL sentence types and tense.
  3. Receive and express information by using varied types of signing structures.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Expressive and Receptive Communication Skills:
   A. Use varied sentence types (including Rhetorical and Conditional)
   B. Recognize and practice signs in ASL related to time
   C. Sign properly in pronouns and subject/object relationships in ASL
   D. Describe objects and people with sign classifiers, pluralization,
and locatives
   E. Acquire a basic understanding of temporal and distributional
aspects
in conversation

II. Demonstrate Vocabulary Used for Various Types of Language Functions
and Grammar:
   A. Give directions
      1. Ask/tell where, explain needs, interrupt conversations, confirm
and express uncertainty
      2. Use ordinal numbers, topic/comment structure and spatial
referencing in ASL
   B. Describe others
      1. Identify people who are present, confirming and correcting
      2. Use Wh-questions, descriptive classifiers, body part classifiers
and describe clothing 
   C. Make requests
      1. Describe locations and commands, offer assistance,
accept/decline
offers and ask for clarification
      2. Use spatial verbs, inflected verbs, spatial reference and role
shift
   D. Talk about family and occupations
      1. Explain relationships
      2. Ask/tell how long and how old
      3. Use possessive pronouns and dual personal pronouns
      4. List principle:  ranking family members      
   E. Attribute qualities to others
      1. Contradict opinions
      2. Use one-character role shifting
      3. Practice contrastive structure
   F. Talk about routines
      1. Solve conflicts
      2.Tell what time and when
      3. Use temporal sequencing, time signs and frequency 
   G. Practice producing and receiving numbers
      1. From 51-98
      2. Multiples of 5, 10, and 11 
      3. Related to money
      4. Related to time on a clock
      5. Related to age

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive and receptive tests  75% of grade
Quizzes                         10% of grade
Response papers                 10% of grade
Lab reports                      3% of grade
Class attendance/participation   2% of grade
 Total                         100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 122

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language I*
  • Number: ASL 122
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This course will focus on the development of intermediate American Sign Language communication skills. Comprehension skills and linguistic features of the language taught in context will be emphasized. 6 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections only are open to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 122, FL 270 and ASL 122 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate low/mid intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate an intermediate sign vocabulary (continuation of Elementary ASL II).
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversation at the low/mid intermediate level.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Non Verbal Communication
   A. Communicate the context of a message through appropriate eye
contact, facial expressions, body language and ASL

II. Demonstrate Intermediate ASL Verbal Communication Skills
   A. Read and receive intermediate ASL signs and grammar
   B. Express and send intermediate ASL signs and grammar

III. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL

IV. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversation
at the Low/Mid Intermediate Level
   A. Complain, make suggestions and requests
      1. Complain about others, make suggestions, make requests, ask for
permission, express concern, decline and explain why, agree with
condition, agree with shortcoming and ask for clarification
      2. Use recurring time signs, continuous time signs, temporal
aspects: recurring and continuous, inflecting verbs, role shifting,
conditional sentences and clock numbers
   B. Talk about the weekends
      1. Ask about the weekend, describe weekend activities, express
opinions/feelings
      2. Tell about disrupted plans, temporal sequencing, time signs with
durative aspect
      3. Use element classifiers
   C. Exchange personal information
      1. Ask/tell when, tell about life events (when clauses, phrasing
for
sequencing events)
      2. Ask nationality of name, narrate family immigration and history,
correct and elaborate
      3. Use possessive forms, descriptive and locative classifiers,
numbers, dates and addresses
   D. Locate things around the house
      1. Give reason and make request, ask where, give specific location,
correct and confirm information, open conversations
      2. Use topic-comment structure, weak hand as reference, locative
classifiers, yes/no questions, wh-questions
   E. Describe and identify objects
      1. Ask what a word means, give definition, describe object
      2. Use descriptive classifiers (for shapes, patterns and textures),
instrument classifiers, weak hand as reference, topic-comment structure,
non-manual markers and money numbers.
   F. Practice producing and receiving numbers
      1. From 120 – 1,000
      2. Ordinal: 101-109
      3. Multiples of 100 to 1,000

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests          60% of grade
Final Exam                          25% of grade
Papers on Deaf Social Functions and 
     Interviewing with Deaf People   3% of grade
ASL Storytelling                     2% of grade
Pop Quizzes                         10% of grade
 Total                             100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 123

  • Title: Intermediate American Sign Language II*
  • Number: ASL 123
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisites require a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

The course will continue study of intermediate American Sign Language. It is designed to develop further intermediate communication skills in American Sign Language. Information about the linguistic and cultural features will be included in the context of language learning experiences. 6 hrs. integrated lecture-lab/ wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 123, FL 271 and ASL 123 are the same courses; only enroll in one.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate mid/high intermediate skills in the receptive and expressive competencies in ASL grammar/structure.
  2. Demonstrate a mid/high intermediate sign vocabulary.
  3. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.
  4. Demonstrate increased awareness of specific influences on the culture and community of Deaf individuals.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Demonstrate Proficiency in Manual/Physical Coordination
   A. Communicate the context of a message using manual and physical
coordination in ASL 
   B. Demonstrate receptive and expressive competencies in ASL
conversations at the mid/high intermediate level.

II. Demonstrate Receptive and Expressive Competencies in ASL Conversations
at the Mid/High Intermediate Level.
   A. Narrate unforgettable moments 
      1. Receive and express passing, throwing, spilling, tripping and
falling
      2. Receive and express information about injuries and mishaps
      3. Use appropriate language to express kissing, hugging and poking
in a Deaf culture setting.
      4. Receive and express information about unforgettable moments
   B. Share interesting facts
      1. Receive and express information about the whole-part of facts
      2. Receive and express listing facts and comparing facts
      3. Receive and express information about illustrating a fact
   C. Explain rules
      1. Receive and express information about different rules we live by
      2. Practice card games and group games
   D. Tell about accidents
      1. Receive and express information about accidents with horses
      2. Receive and express information about accidents with
transportation
      3. Describe an accident

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Expressive/Receptive Tests      60% of grade
Final Exam                      25% of grade 
Papers on Deaf Social Functions  3% of grade
Videotape Project                2% of grade 
Pop Quizzes                     10% of grade
 Total                         100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 135

  • Title: Intro to American Sign Language Linguistics*
  • Number: ASL 135
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 or FL 270. All prerequisities require a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This course introduces students to the structural and grammatical principles of ASL. Students will explore concepts of equivalency between English and ASL 3 hrs. lecture/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 135 and ASL 135 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic ASL linguistics with 70% accuracy by completing four exams based on text material.
  2. Create and present a lecture/review on selected text material.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Using Sentence Types
   A. Receive and express Yes-No Questions, Wh-word Questions, Rhetorical
Questions in ASL.
   B. Receive and express commands, conditionals, negation and assertion,
topicalization, relative clauses sentence types in ASL.

II. Understanding the Time concept in ASL
   A. Receive and express relative time- The "Time Line".
   B. Receive and express non-manual adverbs, incorporation of number,
passive hand as reference point.
   C. Receive and express regularity signs, duration-related signs,
repetition and duration-related signs, and tense using ASL.

III. Applying Pronominalization in ASL
   A. Receive and express pronouns referring to "present" people, things,
and places.
   B. Receive and express indexing, plural pronouns, eye-indexing,
possessive reference, reflexive/emphatic reference, demonstrative
reference, pronouns referring to "non-present" people, things, places.
   C. Receive and express setting up referents in space: What, Where, and
How, and setting up referents on the non-dominant hand in ASL.

IV. Utilizing Subjects and Objects in ASL
   A. Receive and express verbs, directionals, sign order and
topicalization.
   B. Receive and express body and gaze shifting, direct address, and what
are subjects and objects in ASL.

V. Understanding what Classifiers are in ASL and its' role.
   A. Receive and express classifiers that represent noun functions,
classifiers that represent singulars and pluralizations.
   B. Receive and express classifiers that represent size, shape,
depth,and texture (also known as descriptive classifiers) in ASL.

VI. Applying Locatives in ASL space.
   A. Receive and express different ways to express locative relationships
in ASL.
   B. Receive and express directional verbs, indexing, and separate
locative signs in ASL.

VII. Utilizing Pluralization in ASL
   A. Receive and express number agreement rules, ways to indicate
plurality with different types of signs, singular classifiers, plural
classifiers.
   B. Receive and express pronouns, number signs, and verbs in ASL.

VIII. Applying Temporal Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for temporal aspect
in ASL.

IX. Applying Distributional Aspect in ASL
   A. Receive and express four different inflections for distributional
aspect in ASL.

X. Understanding the History of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language
   A. Explain the meaning of a "language",  the history of American Sign
Language and how it affected deaf culture.
   B. Explain the history of using English in the Deaf Community and
compare it to ASL.
   C. Receive and express sign formations and variations, and selected
sign types in ASL.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Exams              58% of grade
Final exam         38% of grade
Review Activities   4% of grade
 Total            100%

Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% = A
 85 -  92% = B
 78 -  84% = C
 70 -  77% = D
  0 -  69% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 145

  • Title: Introduction to the Deaf Community*
  • Number: ASL 145
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ASL 120 or FL 180 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This course will prepare students to develop and recognize the diversity within the Deaf Community, significant events and figures in Deaf History, and basic norms and values of Deaf Culture. Students will examine and compare Deaf Culture and hearing culture in America. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. 3 hrs./wk. INTR 145 and ASL 145 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate understanding of cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community.
  2. Examine major events in Deaf history.
  3. Identify the well-known Deaf/deaf or hearing figures in the Deaf Community.
  4. Compare the language, values, norms, traditions, and Deaf identity associated with the community and non-Deaf (hearing) community.
  5. Describe the culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/community versus the pathological perspective.
  6. Demonstrate an awareness of pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Cultural diversity issues in the Deaf Community
   A. Examine the concepts of language and identity
   B. Discuss the language/mode continuum within the d/Deaf community
(Oral, cued speech, MCE, Contact Variety, ASL, etc)
   C. Examine the collectivistic nature of the d/Deaf community and
implications for diversity.
   D. Examine multiculturalism/diversity within the Deaf community (race,
gender, sexual orientation, etc)

II. Resources available in the Deaf Community
   A. Identify resources of the Deaf Community (organizations/clubs,
advocacy agencies and Commissions for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Deaf
residential schools)
   B. Describe Deaf Community organizations related to local and national
clubs and sports (sports, advocacy, religious, political, multi-cultural,
and social) 
   C. Examine how access and public awareness have changed the lives of
d/Deaf and hard of hearing people.  

III. Major events in Deaf history
   A. Examine historical events 
   B. Identify well-known Deaf/deaf and hearing figures

IV. Significant features of Deaf Culture.
   A. Identify and examine social interaction rules, values, language and
tradition, group identity
   B. Compare and contrast features of Deaf culture with mainstream,
non-Deaf American culture. 
      1. identify elements of high context culture and low context
culture
      2. identify differences between collectivistic and individualistic
cultures
   C. Discuss and reflect on individual reactions and pre-conceived
ideas.

V. Culturally-oriented views of the Deaf Culture/Community versus the
pathological perspective.
   A. Examine the term “disability” by identifying connotations,
assumptions, stigma, etc.
   B. Examine what it means to be a cultural/linguistic minority within
mainstream, American society. 
   C. Discuss the terms hearing, d/Deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing
impaired
   D. Compare and contrast views of various stakeholders within Deaf
Education (parents, administrators, teachers of the Deaf, Special
Educators, etc).
   E. Examine philosophies of Manual Communication and the Oral Method 
   F. Examine the phenomenon of Cochlear Implants and the effects on
mainstream views of Deaf people as well as effects within the d/Deaf
community.

VI. Pedagogical, social and political issues within the Deaf Community
   A. Discuss implications of the diverse range of educational choices for
parents (Oral, Aural, cued speech,  mainstream, residential)
   B. Examine the influences of media on the d/Deaf community 
   C. Examine the role of national and local service agencies and
providers in legislation and politics related to d/Deaf people

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

1 Oral Presentation   15%
7 Reaction Papers     10%
1 Biography Research  25%
2 Written Exams       50%
            Total    100%
 
Grading Criteria:
 93 - 100% A
 85 -  92% B
 78 -  84% C
 70 -  77% D
  0 -  69% F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 147

  • Title: Fingerspelling I*
  • Number: ASL 147
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASL 121 or FL 181 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

Students will work on developing beginning expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills based on word recognition principles. 3 hrs. integrated lecture/lab/wk. The daytime sections are open only to students in the interpreter training program. INTR 147 and ASL 147 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Perceive fingerspelled words and numbers of common, familiar topics, objects and activities.
  2. Demonstrate individual fingerspelled words and numbers accurately.
  3. Demonstrate comprehension of lecture material on performance exams.
  4. Engage in practice of fingerspelling presentations, games and videotapes available in the Language Resource Center.
  5. Perceive and demonstrate common fingerspelled-loan signs.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. The appropriate use of fingerspelling in ASL discourse.
   A. Recognize and produce titles and names of people, places, books,
movies, programs, etc. 
   B. Recognize and produce numerical and alphabetical information related
to locations and addresses.
   C. Recognize and produce fingerspelling for expression of words that do
not have lexical signs (technical words, acronyms, specialized
vocabulary).
   D. Recognize ways that fingerspelling is sometimes used for other
communicative purposes (emphasis, surprise, clarification).

II. Skills related to comprehension and production of fingerspelling
   A. Comprehend and produce fingerspelled words from identified topic
categories (i.e., food, beverages, cities/towns, nature, automobiles,
etc.).
   B. Comprehend and produce numerical information (addresses, phone
numbers, personal information, basic math).
   C. Comprehend and produce lexicalized loan signs.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

3 Receptive Skill Tests   45% of grade
3 Expressive Skill Tests  30% of grade 
  Projects/Assignments     5% of grade
  Final Exam              20% of grade
                         100%
Grade Criteria:
A = 100%-93%   
B =  92%-85% 
C =  84%-78% 
D =  77%-70% 
F =  69%-0%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ASL 150

  • Title: American Sign Language Literature*
  • Number: ASL 150
  • Effective Term: 2017-18
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: INTR 122 or ASL 122 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

This course will provide introduction, discussion, and demonstration of literature in American Sign Language (ASL). The literature involves ASL Poetry, ASL Storytelling/Narratives, Deaf Humor, Deaf Folklore and other genres that have been passed on from one generation to another by culturally deaf people. Students will receive, analyze and retell a variety of ASL literature. 3 hrs. lecture/wk. INTR 150 and ASL 150 are the same course; do not enroll in both.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).