Chemistry (CHEM)

Courses

CHEM 100   Preparation for Chemistry (3 Hours)

This course is designed for students who have never taken high school chemistry, are struggling with their current chemistry course or have anxiety about chemistry. It is intended to prepare students described above for CHEM 122 or CHEM 124; emphasis on study skills, scientific calculations, problem solving and basic chemical concepts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

CHEM 120   Chemistry in Society* (4 Hours)  

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

This course is designed for non-science majors who seek an understanding of the concepts of chemistry. Historical foundations of chemistry, applications to society and daily life, controversies of contemporary concern and current research topics are explored. Inquiry-based laboratory experiments will illustrate chemical principles. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 122   Principles of Chemistry* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry, with emphasis on general concepts of inorganic chemistry and sufficient study of organic chemistry to introduce the student to biochemistry. The student will learn basic definitions and theories of chemistry, solve numerical problems related to chemical principles and apply chemical concepts in laboratory work. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 122H   HON: Principles of Chemistry* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

CHEM 124   General Chemistry I Lecture* (4 Hours)  

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

Corequisites: CHEM 125.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 171 or placement test.

Students will relate atomic structure to chemical systems, calculate the amount of material used in chemical reactions, use the periodic table as an aid to understanding chemical systems and interpret chemical reactions. 5 hrs. lecture/wk.

CHEM 124H   HON: General Chemistry I Lecture* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

CHEM 125   General Chemistry I Lab* (1 Hour)  

Corequisites: CHEM 124.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 171 or an appropriate score on a placement test.

Experiments of a qualitative and quantitative nature that support topics from General Chemistry I Lecture will be carried out. 3 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 131   General Chemistry II Lecture* (4 Hours)  

Prerequisites: CHEM 124 and CHEM 125.

Corequisites: CHEM 132.

Chemistry 131 is the second semester of a two-semester course in general chemistry in which the student will develop a working knowledge of some of the fundamental concepts and quantitative relationships involved in the study of chemical reactivity. Topics include solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. 4 hrs./wk. CHEM 131 students are required to enroll concurrently in CHEM 132.

CHEM 131H   HON: General Chemistry II Lecture* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

CHEM 132   General Chemistry II Lab* (1 Hour)  

Prerequisites: CHEM 124 and CHEM 125.

Corequisites: CHEM 131 Note: Students who withdraw from GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LECTURE must also withdraw from the corresponding laboratory GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY. Students may not withdraw from the laboratory course GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY without withdrawing from CHEMISTRY II LECTURE.

The laboratory consists of qualitative and quantitative experiments designed to parallel and support General Chemistry II Lecture. 3 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 140   Principles of Organic & Biological Chemistry* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or BIOL 135 and either CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) or department approval.

This course covers nomenclature, theory and applications of basic organic chemistry and biochemistry in the area of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes. The lab activities reinforce the topics presented in the lecture. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 214   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher OR appropriate score on the math placement test OR department approval.

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

CHEM 215   Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

CHEM 220   Organic Chemistry I* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132.

Organic Chemistry I is an introduction to the theories and principles of the chemistry carbon compounds. The student will develop an understanding of organic chemistry, which will be useful in the studies of chemistry and related fields such as medicine, engineering and pharmacy. The laboratory is supportive in nature, with a strong emphasis on developing laboratory techniques. Representative compounds will be prepared and used to introduce the student to instrumental analysis. 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 220H   HON: Organic Chemistry I* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

CHEM 221   Organic Chemistry II* (5 Hours)

Prerequisites: CHEM 220.

Organic Chemistry II is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I, the nomenclature, principles and theories of organic chemistry, with emphasis on electronic theories and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory is supportive in nature with emphasis on developing laboratory techniques and preparation of representative compounds. Organic Chemistry II completes the study of organic chemistry designed to prepare the student for continued work in chemistry and related fields. 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

CHEM 221H   HON: Organic Chemistry II* (1 Hour)

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

CHEM 250   Biochemistry* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and CHEM 140 or CHEM 220.

This course is an introduction to the major topics in biochemistry. Topics include the major classes of biological molecules, such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acid; an overview of the major metabolic pathways; and developments and topics relating to molecular biology. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

CHEM 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

CHEM 100

  • Title: Preparation for Chemistry
  • Number: CHEM 100
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed for students who have never taken high school chemistry, are struggling with their current chemistry course or have anxiety about chemistry. It is intended to prepare students described above for CHEM 122 or CHEM 124; emphasis on study skills, scientific calculations, problem solving and basic chemical concepts. 3 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1.   Demonstrate effective study strategies when taking a chemistry course.
  2.   Describe matter and its measurement, including calculations done on measurements.
  3.   Apply concepts of matter and energy to physical and chemical changes.
  4.   Explain concepts of basic atomic theory and relate the theory to the periodic table.
  5.   Describe properties of molecules and compounds.
  6.   Demonstrate fluency in ionic and molecular nomenclature.
  7.   Express chemical composition in quantities of grams and moles.
  8.   Write and balance chemical reactions.
  9.   Represent compounds using Lewis structures.
  10.   Express solution quantities in units of mass percent and molarity.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Study Strategies

A. Identify course expectations by reading the syllabus.

B. Apply a reading-studying technique that includes pre-reading, reading with notetaking or textbook marking, and reviewing.

C. Write meaningful notes in class using an established system (Cornell or 2     column format, concept mapping).

D.  Apply cognitive strategies to learning chemistry concepts including elaboration, distinction, appropriate retrieval, and over-learning.

E.  Apply effective test-taking strategies.

F.  Utilize campus resource centers (Academic Achievement Center and Science Resource Center).

G.  Demonstrate the operation of a non-graphing calculator for basic mathematical operations.

H. Establish a professional relationship with the instructor and communicate difficulties appropriately.

I. Demonstrate an awareness of the student code of conduct.

II. Matter and Measurement

A.  Express numbers using scientific notation.

B.  Determine the number of significant figures in measured numbers.

C.  Calculate answers to the correct number of significant figures.

D.  State the basic units of measurement for length, mass, volume and temperature in the SI system.

E.  Solve problems using dimensional analysis, including conversion of units.

F.  Solve problems involving density.

III. Physical and Chemical Changes

A.  Distinguish among the three states of matter (solid, liquids, and gases).

B.  Classify matter according to its composition: elements, compounds and mixtures.

C.  Distinguish between physical and chemical properties and physical and chemical changes.

D.  Recognize and illustrate the law of conservation of mass and the law of conservation of energy.

IV. Atomic Theory and the Periodic Table

A.  Explain concepts of basic atomic theory.

B.  Describe the properties of protons, neutrons and electrons.

C.  State how elements are defined by their numbers of protons.

D.  Explain the periodic law and the arrangement of the periodic table.

E.  Demonstrate how main group elements form ions and predict charges that ions will form.

F.  Recognize that neutron variation leads to isotopes.

V. Molecules and Compounds

A.  Demonstrate the meaning of chemical formulas.

B.  Describe how atomic elements, molecular elements, molecular compounds and ionic compounds appear at the molecular level.

C.  Name ionic compounds, molecular compounds and acids using the appropriate nomenclature.

D.  Write the correct formulas for ionic and covalent compounds.

VI. Chemical Composition

A.  Calculate the molecular mass of a compound from its formula.

B.  Solve problems relating the mass of a compound to the number of moles of a compound.

C.  Solve problems relating the mass of a compound to the number of molecules.

VII. Chemical Reactions

A.  Identify reactants and products in chemical reactions.

B.  Write a balanced chemical equation given the reactants and products.

C.  Predict the products of precipitation reactions.

D.  Write balanced complete and net ionic equations.

VIII. Lewis Structures

A.  Determine the number of valence electrons for an atom and write its Lewis symbol.

B.  Draw Lewis structures for atoms, ions and covalent compounds.

C.  Predict the shapes of molecules using VSEPR theory.

D.  Predict molecular polarity from the molecular shape and the electronegativity of the atoms involved.

IX. Solutions

A.  Define terms associated with solutions.

B.  Describe the solution process for electrolytes and nonelectrolytes in water.

C.  Calculate the percent concentration of a solute in a solution and use percent concentration to calculate the amount of solute or solution.

D.  Calculate the molarity of a solution and use molarity as a conversion factor to calculate the moles of solute or the volume needed to prepare a solution.

E.  Calculate the concentration or volume of a solution before or after a dilution.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

50% - 60% of grade    3 – 6 Unit Exams

10% - 20% of grade    Homework and Quizzes

15% - 20% of grade    Final

5% - 10% of grade    Projects

100%                           Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 120

  • Title: Chemistry in Society*
  • Number: CHEM 120
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 2

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

Description:

This course is designed for non-science majors who seek an understanding of the concepts of chemistry. Historical foundations of chemistry, applications to society and daily life, controversies of contemporary concern and current research topics are explored. Inquiry-based laboratory experiments will illustrate chemical principles. 3 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Illustrate how chemistry is a scientific way of learning about the behavior of matter.
  2. Explain and contrast various atomic theories of matter.
  3. Explain reactions involving atomic nuclei and uses of nuclear reactions.
  4. Describe the formation of chemical bonds.
  5. Describe chemical compounds and reactions qualitatively with names and formulas as well as quantitatively.
  6. Classify characteristics of substances and chemical formulas as acid or base and write acid-base reactions.
  7. Explain oxidation and reduction reactions and their application in electrochemical cells and biological processes.
  8. Explain the chemical context of selected topics and controversies that currently relate to society.
  9. Describe the uniqueness and importance of the chemistry of polymers.
  10. Explain the composition of and regular changes in Earth's atmosphere.
  11. Describe the properties and uses of water.
  12. Describe sources and uses of energy. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Scientific Method of Learning

A. Investigate natural phenomena using scientific methodology, including:

1. Make observation

2. Construct hypotheses

3. State laws

4. Articulate theories

5. Develop models

B. Summarize information about risks and benefits relative to a scientific issue and compare risks and benefits.

C. Use the characteristics of critical thinking to analyze scientific claims, including:

1. Falsifiability

2. Logic

3. Replicability

4. Sufficiency

II. Atomic Theories of Matter

A. Describe the atomic theories of:

1. Democritus

2. Lavoisier

3. Proust

4. Dalton

B. List the four postulates of Dalton's atomic theory.

C. Explain the laws of:

1. Conservation of mass

2. Definite proportions

3. Multiple proportions

D. Locate the fundamental parts of an atom.

E. Describe the scientific process leading to the modern understanding of the atom, including experiments and/or theories of:

1. John Dalton

2. J. J. Thomson

3. Eugene Goldstein

4. Robert Millikan

5. Ernest Rutherford

6. Niels Bohr

F. Use the periodic table to determine the number of protons and electrons in an atom of any element.

G. Describe similarities and differences between the Bohr model of the atom and the quantum mechanical model.

H. Identify the charge and relative masses of the proton, the neutron and the electron.

I. List similarities or differences between elements in families and periods in the modern periodic table.

III. Atomic Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions

A. Calculate the number of neutrons, the number of protons or the nucleon number in an atom, given any two of these.

B. Supply the missing nuclide in any nuclear reaction.

C. Give the symbols and general characteristics (penetration and body-damaging powers) for:

1. Alpha radiation

2. Beta radiation

3. Gamma radiation

D. Identify nuclides that are isotopes.

E. Describe the relative mass and charge of subatomic particles, including:

1. Protons

2. Neutrons

3. Electrons

4. Alpha particles

5. Beta particles

6. Gamma rays

F. Distinguish between nuclear fission and fusion.

G. Given the fraction decrease in activity and the half-life of the isotope undergoing radioactive decay, calculate the age of an artifact.

H. List the principal sources of radiation.

I. Describe the use of radioisotopes in medicine.

1. List commonly used radioisotopes.

2. Match the isotopes with procedures in which they are used.

J. Explain what is meant by "nuclear winter."

IV. Chemical Bonds

A. Distinguish between compounds with different types of chemical bonds.

1. Ionic bonds

2. Polar covalent bonds

3. Nonpolar covalent bonds

B. Calculate simple combining ratios of atoms.

C. Draw electrons dot symbols for the first 20 elements in the periodic table.

D. Given the molecular formula, construct structural formulas for simple covalent compounds.

E. Using the periodic table, determine the number of bonds a nonmetal element will form.

F. Predict the shape of simple molecules using the VSEPR theory.

G. Describe transfer of electrons between atoms, which forms ions bonds.

H. Describe the sharing of electrons between atoms, which forms covalent bonds.

I. Explain the polarity of covalent bonds using electronegativity differences.

J. Explain the relationship between valence electrons and molecular shape using VSEPR theory.

K. Describe situations where dipole forces, hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces are important.

V. Chemical Compounds, Formulas and Reactions

A. Given positive and negative ions, write formulas and names for ionic compounds.

B. Given the name of a covalent compound, write the name.

C. Given a formula, convert between mass and number of moles of the substance.

D. Balance simple chemical equations.

E. Calculate mole ratios of reactants and products in a balanced chemical equation.

VI. Acids and Bases

A. Describe the properties of acids and bases.

B. Match pH values and acid or base character.

C. Describe acid-base chemistry as it applies to situations such as:

1. Acid rain

2. Antacids

VII. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions

A. Identify substances that are oxidized or reduced.

B. List applications of:

1. Reducing agents

2. Oxidizing agents

C. Describe oxidation and reduction in:

1. Electrochemical cells

2. Batteries

3. Corrosion

D. Describe the role of oxidation and reduction in biological processes.

Optional Content Outline and Competencies

VIII. Polymers

A. Match a given monomer with the polymer produced from it.

B. Describe the general types of polymers, including:

1. Addition

2. Condensation

3. Cross linked

C. List advantages and problems associated with use of plastics.

IX. Air

A. Describe the layers of the atmosphere and their chemical composition.

B. Describe the nitrogen and oxygen cycles.

X. Water

A. Describe the properties of water.

B. Sketch the water cycle.

C. Describe the sources and types of water contamination.

XI. Energy

A. Identify and use the units and terms of energy.

B. State the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

C. Give examples of effects of the laws of thermodynamics.

D. List sources of energy, including:

1. Fossil fuels

2. Nuclear

3. Solar

4. Hydroelectric

E. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of each energy source.

Lab:

I. Safety and Measurements

A. Work safely and effectively in performing laboratory experiments.

B. Follow written directions accurately.

C. Perform techniques used in laboratory experiments.

D. Acquire data using balances and volumetric equipment.

E. Estimate and verify the mass of an object.

F. Estimate and verify the length of an object.

G. Calculate the average of a series of data to the correct number of significant figures.

H. Write data and measurements to the correct number of significant figures.

II. Periodic Table

A. Group elements that have similar chemical properties.

B. Separate groups of elements by observing variations in chemical behavior.

C. Using experimental data and values from reference sources, verify the organization of the modern periodic table.

III. Separation of a Mixture

A. Using physical properties, separate chemicals from a mixture.

B. Write a laboratory report explaining procedures.

IV. Density

A. Calculate the density of a regular shaped object.

B. Calculate the density of an irregular shaped object.

V. Radioactivity

A. Test the shielding effect of a variety of materials against alpha and beta radiation.

B. Test the effect of distance from a radioactive source.

C. Determine the half-life of a radioactive isotope.

VI. Models

A. Use model kits to construct various shapes of molecules and ions.

VII. The Nitrogen Cycle in an Aquarium

A. Determine the concentration of ammonia in a sample of aquarium water.

B. Determine the concentration of nitrite in a sample of aquarium water.

C. Determine the concentration of nitrate in a sample of aquarium water.

D. Graph the concentrations of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate over time.

VIII. Water Hardness

A. Analyze the hardness of water samples using qualitative procedures.

B. Soften hard water using the following processes:

1. Heating

2. Neutralization

3. Ion exchanges

4. Washing soda

5. Chelating agents

IX. Chemical Reactions

A. Perform chemical reactions.

B. Observe and record changes that occur in chemical reactions.

C. Write balanced equations for chemical reactions.

D. Carry out chemical reactions to test consumer products for certain ions.

E. Identify an unknown substance using chemical tests.

X. Antacids

A. Quantitatively titrate acid with base.

B. Neutralize a commercial antacid.

C. Determine the efficacy of antacids.

XI. Redox/Stain Removal

A. Carry out a number of chemical reactions that involve the transfer of electrons.

1. Write accurate observations of the reactions.

2. List oxidizing agents in order of strength.

B. Investigate use of household cleansers as oxidizing agents.

1. Test a variety of stains with several oxidizing agents.

2. Evaluate the stain-removing efficiency of the oxidizing agents.

XII. Polymers

A. Identify different characteristics of polymers.

B. Match common products with the polymers from which they are made.

C. Synthesize a polymer.

XIII. Absorption of Ultraviolet Light by Caffeine

A. Determine the concentration of a solution.

B. Measure the absorbance of a caffeine solution using a UV-Vis Spectrophotometer.

C. Determine the concentration of an unknown caffeine solution using absorbance and Beer's Law.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

50%    A minimum of five examinations
15%    Final
15%    Assignments/Quizzes/Homework
20%    Laboratory

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer literacy: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Safety: Students entering this class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. Safety: Chemical hazards or use of equipment dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals or equipment are used.
  4. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 122

  • Title: Principles of Chemistry*
  • Number: CHEM 122
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 4
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.

Description:

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry, with emphasis on general concepts of inorganic chemistry and sufficient study of organic chemistry to introduce the student to biochemistry. The student will learn basic definitions and theories of chemistry, solve numerical problems related to chemical principles and apply chemical concepts in laboratory work. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Course Rationale:


Principles of Chemistry is required to supply chemical background for
students with a desire to pursue a career in a medical related field such
as nursing, dental hygiene, respiratory care, etc., or a need for a lab
science credit in a physical science.  These individuals need a general
understanding of selected portions of the vocabulary, theories and
practices of chemistry with an emphasis on those areas which are
applicable to the functions of the human body.

Content Outline and Competencies:

LECTURE

I. Conversion Problems and Atomic/Nuclear Structure

   A. Measurements

      1. Write the names and abbreviations for the metric (SI) units used

in measurements of length, volume and mass.

      2. Determine the number of significant figures in measured numbers.

      3. Adjust calculated answers to the correct number of significant

figures.

      4. Use the numerical values of prefixes to write a metric equality.

      5. Use a conversion factor to change from one unit to another.

      6. Calculate the density or specific gravity of a substance and use

the density or specific gravity to calculate the mass or volume of a

substance.

      7. Use units from mega to nano in conversion problems.

      8. Define terms associated with measurement.

      9. Compare and contrast related chemical terms.

   B. Atoms and elements

      1. Given the name of an element, write its correct symbol or vice

versa.

      2. Use the periodic table to identify the group and the period of an

element and whether it is a metal or a nonmetal.

      3. Describe the electrical charge, mass (amu) and location in an

atom for a proton, neutron and electron.

      4. Give the atomic number and mass number of an atom, state the

number of protons, neutrons and electrons.

      5. Give the number of protons, electrons and neutrons in the

isotopes of an element.

      6. Given the name or symbol of one of the first 20 elements in the

periodic table, write the electron arrangement and use it to explain the

periodic law.

      7. Indicate on the periodic table the appropriate families, groups,

periods or sections which are referred to by the following names: alkali

metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, rare gases, transition metals,

rare gases, transition metals, rare earth metals, semiconductors and

representative elements.  Given an element, indicate which term is

appropriate for the element.

      8. Describe the electromagnetic spectrum, including relationships

between wavelength, frequency and energy.

      9. Define terms associated with atomic structure and the periodic

table.

      10.   Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   C. Nuclear radiation

      1. Describe alpha, beta and gamma radiation.

      2. Write an equation showing mass numbers and atomic numbers for

radioactive decay.

      3. Write an equation for the formation of a radioactive isotope.

      4. Given a half-life, calculate the amount of radioisotope remaining

after one or more half-lives.

      5. Describe the processes of nuclear fission and fusion.

      6. Define terms associated with nuclear radiation.

      7. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

II. Compounds, Reactions and Energy

   A. Compounds and their bonds

      1. Using the periodic table, write the electron dot structure for a

representative element.

      2. Using the octet rule, write the symbols of the simple ions for

the representative elements.

      3. Using charge balance, write the correct formula for an ionic

compound.

      4. Given the formula of an ionic compound, write the IUPAC name;

given the IUPAC or common (older) name, write the correct formula.

      5. Diagram the electron-dot structure for a covalent molecule.

      6. Given the formula of a covalent compound, write its correct name;

given the name of a covalent compound, write its formula.

      7. Using electronegativity values, classify a bond as nonpolar

covalent, polar covalent or ionic.

      8. Write a formula of a compound containing a polyatomic ion; given

the formula of a compound containing a polyatomic ion, write the correct

name.

      9. Define terms associated with chemical compounds and bonding.

      10.   Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   B. Chemical quantities and reactions

      1. State a chemical equation in words and determine the number of

atoms in the reactants and products.

      2. Write a balanced chemical equation from the formulas of the

reactants and products for a reaction.

      3. Define oxidation and reduction as it occurs in inorganic

compounds (Loss or gain of electrons) and give an example.

      4. Given the chemical formula of a substance, calculate its molar

mass.

      5. Given the number of moles of a substance, calculate the mass in

grams; given the mass, calculate the number of moles.

      6. Define terms associated with chemical quantities and reactions.

      7. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   C. Energy and matter

      1. Describe some forms of energy.

      2. Identify the physical state of a substance as a solid, liquid or

gas.

      3. Describe the change of state between solid and liquid and also

between solid and gas.

      4. Describe the change of state between gas and liquid.

      5. Describe the energy in exothermic and endothermic reactions;

describe the function of a catalyst.

      6. Describe energy changes in chemical reactions in terms of energy

diagrams for endothermic, exothermic, catalyzed and uncatalyzed

processes.

      7. Define terms associated with energy changes.

      8. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   D. Gases

      1. Describe the kinetic theory of gases.

      2. Describe the units of measurement used for pressure and change

from one unit to another.

      3. Define terms associated with gases and pressure.

      4. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

III. Introduction to Organic Chemistry

   A. Alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons

      1. From its properties, classify a compound as organic or

inorganic.

      2. Draw the complete and the condensed structural formula for an

alkane.

      3. Write the names and condensed and structural formulas of the

first ten unbranched alkanes.

      4. Write balanced chemical equations for the combustion of

hydrocarbons.

      5. Use the IUPAC system to write the names of branched-chained

alkanes.

      6. Write the structural formulas of alkanes and their isomers.

      7. Give the name for a cycloalkane and draw the condensed structural

and geometric formulas.

      8. Describe the bonding in benzene, name aromatic compounds and

write their structural formulas.

   B. Haloalkanes, alkene and alkynes

      1. Classify alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and aromatics according to

their functional groups.

      2. Give the name for a haloalkane or draw the structural formula

from the name.

      3. Write the IUPAC names for the structural formulas of alkenes,

cycloalkenes and alkynes or write their structural formulas from their

names.

      4. Write the names and structural formulas of alkenes that have

cis-trans isomers.

      5. Write the structural formulas and names for the products of the

addition reactions of alkenes.

      6. Given the name of common substituents, write the structure and

vice versa.

      7. Distinguish between complete and incomplete combustion and write

balanced equations for each.

      8. Define terms associated with hydrocarbons.

      9. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

IV. Organic Functional Groups and Reactions

   A. Alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones

      1. Name simple alcohols, phenols and thiols, draw their condensed

structural formulas and describe their solubility in water.

      2. Give the name of an ether and write the condensed structural

formula from the name.

      3. Name aldehydes and ketones and draw the condensed structural

formula from the name.

      4. Write the reactions and/or products for the oxidation and

reduction of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones.  Classify an alcohol as

primary, secondary or tertiary.

      5. Identify and name compounds containing difunctional groups (diol,

dial, dione).

   B. Carboxylic acids, esters, amines and amides

      1. Give the common names, IUPAC names and condensed structural

formulas of carboxylic acids.

      2. Give the common names, IUPAC names and condensed structural

formulas of esters.

      3. Write equations for the formation of an ester (esterification).

      4. Classify amines and give their names and condensed structural

formulas.

      5. Write equations for the formation of an amide (amidation).

      6. Write the common names, IUPAC names and condensed structural

formulas of amides.

      7. Identify and name compounds containing difunctional groups (Dioic

acid, diamine).

      8. Define terms associated with organic functional groups.

      9. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

V. Solutions, Acids and Bases

   A. Solutions

      1. Describe hydrogen bonding in water.

      2. Define solute and solvent and describe the formation of a

solution.

      3. Describe the solution process for electrolytes and

nonelectrolytes in water.

      4. Convert between grams, moles and equivalents.

      5. Define solubility and distinguish between an unsaturated and a

saturated solution.

      6. Identify an insoluble salt.

      7. Calculate the percent concentration of a solute in a solution and

use percent concentration to calculate the amount of solute or solution.

      8. From its properties, identify a mixture as a solution, a colloid

or a suspension.

      9. Calculate the molarity of a solution and use molarity as a

conversion factor to calculate the moles of solute or the volume needed to

prepare a solution.

     10. Complete and balance precipitation reactions.

     11. Write a balanced equation to show the deionization or

dissociation of electrolytes (salts) in water.

     12. Define terms associated with solutions.

     13. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   B. Acids and bases

      1. Describe acids and bases using the Arrhenius and Bronsted-Lowry

concepts.

      2. Use the ion product of water to calculate the [H3O+] and [OH-] in

a solution.

      3. Calculate pH from [H3O+] and given the pH, calculate [H3O+] and

[OH-] of a solution.

      4. Write an equation for the ionization of strong and weak acids.

      5. Given the molarity or percent concentration of the solution

describe the preparation

of a dilute solution.

      6. Write a balanced equation for the neutralization reaction between

an acid and a base.

      7. Describe the role of buffers in maintaining the pH of a

solution.

      8. Define terms associated with acids and bases.

      9. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   C. Carboxylic acids, amines

      1. Write equations for the ionization and neutralization of

carboxylic acids.

      2. Write equations for the ionization of an amine in water and

neutralization of an amine.

VI. Introduction to Biochemistry

   A. Carbohydrates

      1. Classify carbohydrates as monosaccharides, disaccharides and

polysaccharides.

      2. Classify a monosaccharide as an aldose or ketose and indicate the

number of carbon atoms.

      3. Given a Fischer Projection of a monosaccharide, draw the

corresponding mirror image and indicate whether it is a D or L isomer.

      4. Draw the open chain structures for D-glucose, D-ribose and

D-fructose.

      5. Identify alpha and beta structures of Haworth projections for

monosaccharides.

      6. Given the Haworth structure of a disaccharide, identify the type

of glycosidic bond.  For the disaccharides maltose, lactose and sucrose,

identify the monosaccharides

and type of glycosidic bonds.

      7. Describe polysaccharides, alpha and beta bonds and the

monosaccharide units in polysaccharides.

      8. Define terms associated with carbohydrates.

      9. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

   B. Lipids

      1. Identify a fatty acid as saturated or unsaturated.

      2. Describe the structure and functional groups of waxes, fats and

oils.

      3. Draw the structure of the product from the reaction of a

triglyceride with hydrogen, an acid or a base or an oxidizing agent.

Write the products of the saponification reaction.

   C. Amino acids, proteins and enzymes

      1. Write the general structural formula of an amino acid and given

the structural formula of the R group; be able to classify as nonpolar,

polar, acidic or basic based upon their R group side chains.

      2. Given the structure of two amino acids, write the structure of

the resulting dipeptide.

      3. Distinguish between the primary and secondary structures of a

protein.

      4. Distinguish between the tertiary and quaternary structures of a

protein.

      5. Describe denaturation of proteins.

      6. Describe the function of an enzyme as a catalyst.

      7. Define terms associated with proteins.

      8. Distinguish between related chemical terms.

LAB

I. Safety, Measurement, Conversions

   A. Safety

      1. State the safety rules for working in a chemistry lab.

      2. Know the location of safety equipment in the lab and state when

and how it is to be used.

      3. Learn the appropriate names of equipment and glassware in the

lab.

   B. Measurement

      1. Measure length of an object, estimating between the lines of the

measuring device.

      2. Measure volume of a liquid using a graduated cylinder, estimating

between the lines.

      3. Measure mass to the nearest milligram using a laboratory

balance.

      4. Determine the volume of a solid by direct measurement or volume

displacement.

      5. Read the specific gravity from a hydrometer.

      6. Given a table with two sets of data, plot the points on a graph.

   C. Conversions

      1. Use significant figures properly in all calculations.

      2. Convert between different units of length, volume or mass.

      3. Using two measured volumes or two measured masses, calculate the

conversion factor.

      4. Given items in a mixture, calculate percent of each.

      5. Calculate the density of an object.

      6. Use density or specific gravity to calculate the mass or volume

of a substance.

      7. From density values, identify an unknown solid or liquid.

      8. Calculate percent error from an experimental value and an

accepted value.

      9. Given percent and component(s), calculate total amount or

individual items in a mixture.

II. Atoms, Chemical Formulas and Chemical Reactions

   A. Atomic Structure

      1. Given the atomic number and mass number of an atom, state the

number of protons, neutrons and electrons.

      2. Light a Bunsen burner and adjust the flame to get a "noisy" light

blue cone indicating a hot flame.

      3. Identify an unknown cation from flame tests.

      4. Give the electron arrangement for the first 20 elements.

      5. Using the octet rule, write electron configurations of ions.

   B. Chemical Formulas

      1. Write the formula and name of representative ions, transition

metal ions and polyatomic ions.

      2. Write the formula and name of ionic compounds.

      3. Write the formula and name of covalent compounds.

      4. Using electron dot structures, diagram the bonds in covalent

compounds.

      5. Identify a compound as ionic or covalent.

      6. Calculate the molar mass of a substance from the chemical

formula.

      7. Work conversion problems between grams and moles.

      8. Given the mole: mole ratio of elements in a compound, determine

the formula.

   C. Chemical Changes

      1. Distinguish between a chemical and a physical change.

      2. Carry out a reaction according to directions and note evidence of

a chemical change.

      3. Balance a chemical reaction.

      4. Determine if a reaction is endothermic or exothermic using a

thermometer.

III. Organic Chemistry

   A. Simple Hydrocarbons

      1. Given a model of an organic compound, write the complete formula,

condensed formula and name.

      2. Compare the properties of organic and inorganic compounds.

      3. Use the CRC handbook to look up the properties of a compound.

      4. Given the molecular formula of an organic compound, write and

name all the isomers.

      5. Write and balance a combustion reaction for a hydrocarbon.

   B. Oxidation Reactions

      1. Know which alcohols are soluble in water.

      2. Classify an alcohol as primary, secondary or tertiary.

      3. Determine which aldehydes and ketones are soluble in water.

      4. Demonstrate the proper technique of smelling a chemical in lab.

      5. Draw the organic product of an oxidation reaction.

   C. Dehydration Reactions

      1. Given an alcohol and an acid, make a model of the resulting ester

and give the name.

      2. Write the structure of the sodium salt obtained by adding NaOH to

a carboxylic acid.

      3. Complete and balance a neutralization reaction involving a

carboxylic acid.

IV. Properties of Solutions

   A. Solution Concentrations

      1. Define saturated, unsaturated or supersaturated solutions.

      2. Given solubility, determine whether a solution is saturated or

not.

      3. Given a graph of solubility versus temperature, determine the

solubility for a given temperature or vice versa.

      4. Given volume and mass data for a solution and solute, calculate

the concentration as mass/mass percent, mass/volume percent and molarity.

   B. Qualitative Analysis

      1. Test an unknown solution for the presence or absence of the

following cations: Na+, K+, Ca+2, NH4+, Fe+3.

      2. Test an unknown solution for the presence or absence of the

following anions: Cl-, Br-, I-, PO4-3, CO3-2, SO4-2.

      3. Given a cation and anion in an unknown, write the formula and

name of the compound.

   C. Electrolytes and pH

      1. Given a solution and a conductivity meter, decide whether the

solution is a strong, weak or non-electrolyte.

      2. Write the equation for the dissociation of a strong, weak or

non-electrolyte.

      3. Use the pH meter to determine the pH of an unknown solution.

      4. Given [H+] and/or [OH-], calculate the other and determine the

pH.

      5. Decide whether an unknown solution is a buffer by adding small

amounts of acid or base and observing the pH change.

      6. Read a buret.

      7. Write a balance equation for an acid - base neutralization

reaction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Chemistry is a science requiring the application of problem-solving
techniques to a wide variety of different situations. Students must be
able to demonstrate a mastery of the vocabulary, theories and processes of
chemistry. In addition, they must be able to demonstrate an ability to
apply abstract and real logic through both verbal and mathematical
communication skills to the analysis and solution of selected problems.


Tests (75%)
  Unit Exams (all equal in value)
  Cumulative Final (equal in value to two unit exams, 50% covering Unit
VI)
  Announced and unannounced quizzes (not to exceed 15%)
Labs (20%)
Reports (10%)
Lab Tests (10%)
Reports (5%)
 

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59 % = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Attendance: Students are normally expected to be present and participate in scheduled class periods; there is no opportunity to make up missed labs after the week scheduled.
  3. Safety: Students entering physical science classes should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. The students should assume responsibility for conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  4. It is in the best interest of students who are pregnant to defer laboratory classes until after delivery.
  5. Safety: Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the laboratory.
  6. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 122H

  • Title: HON: Principles of Chemistry*
  • Number: CHEM 122H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 124

  • Title: General Chemistry I Lecture*
  • Number: CHEM 124
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 5

Requirements:

Prerequisites: RDG 126 or College Reading Readiness.
Corequisites: CHEM 125.
Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 171 or placement test.

Description:

Students will relate atomic structure to chemical systems, calculate the amount of material used in chemical reactions, use the periodic table as an aid to understanding chemical systems and interpret chemical reactions. 5 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe matter and its measurement, including calculations done on measurements.

  2. Demonstrate an understanding of basic chemical nomenclature.

  3. Explain concepts of basic atomic theory and relate the theory to the periodic table.

  4. Write chemical reactions and solve problems involving chemical stoichiometry.

  5. Describe the nature of aqueous solutions and reactions occurring in aqueous solution.

  6. Apply concepts of thermochemistry to physical and chemical changes.

  7. Describe the electronic structure of atoms and relate the electronic structure to atomic properties.

  8. Demonstrate an understanding of chemical bonding and its application to molecular structure.

  9. Describe the properties of solids, liquids and gases and relate those properties to intermolecular forces. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Describe Matter and Its Measurement, Including Calculations Done on
Measurements
   A. Distinguish among the three states of matter (solid, liquids and
gases).
   B. Distinguish among elements, compounds and mixtures.
   C. Distinguish between physical and chemical properties and physical
and chemical changes.
   D. State the basic units of measurement for length, mass, volume and
temperature in the SI system.
   E. Give the numerical equivalent of selected SI prefixes.  
   F. Convert temperatures between Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin scales.
   G. Express numerical answers to the correct number of significant
figures.
   H. Solve problems using dimensional analysis, including conversion of
units.
   I. Solve problems involving density.

II. Demonstrate an Understanding of Basic Chemical Nomenclature
   A. Write the name and symbol for selected elements.
   B. Write the name and symbol for selected polyatomic ions.
   C. Compare and contrast molecular compounds and ionic compounds.
   D. Write names and formulas for the following types of compounds: ionic
compounds, binary molecular compounds and acids.

III. Explain Concepts of Basic Atomic Theory and Relate the Theory to the
Periodic Table
   A. Recall the basic ideas in Dalton's atomic theory.
   B. Summarize the experiments of J.J. Thomson, Robert Millikan and
Ernest Rutherford that characterized the structure of the atom.
   C. Describe atoms in terms of electrons, protons and neutrons.
   D. Given the isotopic masses and fractional abundances for a naturally
occurring element, calculate its atomic weight.
   E. Identify the following areas of the periodic table: metals,
nonmetals and metalloids; main groups, transition metals, inner transition
metals; alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens and noble gases.
   F. Describe the formation of cations and anions and use the periodic
table to predict the charges of monoatomic ions.

IV. Write Chemical Reactions and Solve Problems Involving Chemical
Stoichiometry
   A. Calculate the molecular mass of a compound from its formula.
   B. Solve problems relating the mass of a compound to the number of
moles of a compound.
   C. Solve problems relating the mass of a compound to the number of
molecules.
   D. Calculate the percent composition of a compound from its formula.
   E. Determine the empirical formula of a compound from its percent
composition.
   F. Determine the molecular formula of a compound from its empirical
formula and molecular mass.
   G. Write a balanced chemical equation given the reactants and
products.
   H. Predict the product of the combustion reactions of hydrocarbons and
simple compounds having C, H and O.
   I. Identify chemical reactions by type: combination, decomposition,
combustion.
   J. Solve problems relating grams and moles of substances in balanced
chemical equations.
   K. Calculate theoretical yield and percent yield when actual yield is
given.
   L. Recognize the limiting reagent in a reaction and do calculations
with limiting reagent.

V. Describe the Nature of Aqueous Solutions and Reactions Occurring in
Aqueous Solution
   A. Explain how to make solutions of given concentration.
   B. Explain how to dilute solutions to a specified volume or
concentration.
   C. Solve solution stoichiometry problems.
   D. Distinguish among strong, weak and nonelectrolytes in solution.
   E. Write balanced complete and net ionic equations.
   F. List the common acids and bases and classify each as a strong or
weak electrolyte.
   G. Assign oxidation numbers to atoms in molecules and ions.
   H. Recognize oxidation-reduction reactions and identify oxidizing and
reducing agents.
   I. Balance simple oxidation-reduction reactions by the half-reaction
method.

VI. Apply Concepts of Thermochemistry to Physical and Chemical Changes
   A. Recognize and illustrate the law of conservation of energy.
   B. Distinguish between a system and its surroundings and describe the
energy changes in a system and its surroundings during a given reaction.
   C. State the first law of thermodynamics.
   D. Solve problems involving enthalpies for physical and chemical
changes.
   E. Solve calorimetry and heat capacity problems.
   F. Calculate enthalpy changes using Hess' law and measured enthalpies
of reaction.
   G. Calculate standard enthalpies of reaction from standard enthalpies
of formation.
   H. Determine the enthalpy of reaction using bond energies.

VII. Describe the Electronic Structure of Atoms and Relate the Electronic
Structure to Atomic Properties
   A. Solve problems relating frequency, wavelength and energy of
electromagnetic radiation.
   B. Explain the essential feature of Planck's quantum theory.
   C. Discuss how line spectra give evidence of energy quantization.
   D. Describe the wave mechanical model of the atom.
   E. Describe s and p orbitals and recognize d orbitals.
   F. Write a set of quantum numbers for any particular electron.
   G. Write the electron configuration of elements up to atomic number
57.
   H. Write electron configurations for ions of main group and transition
elements.
   I. Relate position on the periodic table to electron configuration and
quantum numbers.
   J. Describe the scientific contributions of Planck, Einstein, de
Broglie, Bohr, Schrodinger, Heisenberg, Pauli and Mendeleyev.
   K. Apply Periodic Trends in atomic radii to predict relative size of an
atom.
   L. Predict relative first ionization energies from periodic trends.
   M. Explain the observed changes in value of the successive ionization
energies for a given atom.
   N. Describe the periodic trends in metallic and nonmetallic behavior.
   O. Describe the general differences in chemical reactivity between
metals and nonmetals. 

VIII. Demonstrate an Understanding of Chemical Bonding and its Application
to Molecular Structure
   A. Determine the number of valence electrons for an atom and write its
Lewis symbol.
   B. Recognize when the octet rules applies to the arrangement of
electrons in the valence shell.
   C. Predict the relative size of anions and cations formed from an
atom.
   D. Use electronegativity differences between bonding atoms to classify
bonds as non-polar, polar covalent or ionic.
   E. Draw Lewis structures for atoms, ions and covalent compounds,
recognizing when multiple bonds, resonance structures, expanded valence
shells, incomplete valence shells and odd electrons are needed.
   F. Relate the number of electron pairs in the valence shell of an atom
in a molecule to the geometrical arrangement around that atom.
   G. Predict molecular geometry using the VSEPR model.
   H. Predict whether a molecule can have a net dipole moment from the
molecular shape and the electronegativity of the atoms involved.
   I. Describe covalent bonding using valance bond theory.
   J. Describe sp, sp2 and sp3 hybrid orbitals.
   K. Describe the bonding in a double and triple bond.

IX. Describe the Properties of Solids, Liquids and Gases and Relate Those
Properties to Intermolecular Forces
   A. Compare and contrast gases, liquids and solids.
   B. Convert between torr, mm Hg, standard atmosphere and Pascal.
   C. Demonstrate an understanding of the gas laws (Charles', Boyle's
ideal, etc.) by working problems with them.
   D. List the points of the kinetic molecular theory and describe how
this theory explains the common gas laws.
   E. Work stoichiometry problems involving gases and the gas laws.
   F. Describe how the relative rates of diffusion and effusion of two
gases depend on their molar masses (Graham's law).
   G. Describe how a real gas differs from an ideal gas.
   H. Employ the kinetic molecular model to explain the differences
between the gas, liquid and solid states.
   I. Recognize where dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonding and London
dispersion forces are important.
   J. Qualitatively explain the relationship between intermolecular forces
and properties of liquids and solids.
   K. Draw a phase diagram of a substance given proper data and use a
phase diagram to predict the phases present at a given temperature and
pressure.
   L. Given heating/cooling curves, calculate the heat associated when a
given substance changes from one condition to another.
   M. Compare and contrast crystalline and amorphous solids.
   N. Categorize crystalline solids as ionic, molecular, covalent network
and metallic solids.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

All exams will be taken in class (no take home exams will be given).
60% of grade     3-6 Unit exams        
20% of grade     Final exam           
20% of grade     Quizzes and homework   
100%

Grade Criteria:

Final grades will be determined with the following percentage scores:
90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

  2. Students entering physical science classes should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 124H

  • Title: HON: General Chemistry I Lecture*
  • Number: CHEM 124H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 125

  • Title: General Chemistry I Lab*
  • Number: CHEM 125
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Corequisites: CHEM 124.
Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 171 or an appropriate score on a placement test.

Description:

Experiments of a qualitative and quantitative nature that support topics from General Chemistry I Lecture will be carried out. 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Work in the laboratory in accordance with good laboratory practices.

  2. Gather and record qualitative and quantitative data accurately.

  3. Handle and evaluate data in logical, productive and meaningful ways.

  4. Correlate laboratory work with principal topics in Chemistry I lecture.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Work in the Laboratory in Accordance with Good Laboratory Practices
   A. Dress in an appropriate manner as to promote safety in the laboratory, wearing a lab coat and goggles when anyone is working with chemicals in the laboratory.
   B. Follow written directions accurately.
   C. Work safely and effectively, using equipment and chemicals carefully and correctly.
   D. Demonstrate use of required techniques.
   E. Dispose of waste products in a proper manner.

II. Gather and Record Qualitative and Quantitative Data Accurately
   A. Acquire data using balances and volumetric glassware.
   B. Make and record visual observations.
   C. Use computers, when appropriate, as data acquisition tools.
   D. List or describe experimental assumptions made and any deviations from the written  experimental procedures.

III. Handle and Evaluate Data in Logical, Productive and Meaningful Way
   A. Create notebooks and laboratory reports that are clear, understandable and accurate.
   B. Display computer data in a spreadsheet or graphically, as appropriate.
   C. Correlate observations with chemical or physical processes.
   D. Carry out suitable calculations with quantitative data, recognizing when data and calculations are within a reasonable range.
   E. Use observations of experimental data to present relevant conclusions pertaining to the experimental procedure.

IV. Correlate Laboratory Work with Principal Topics in Chemistry I, Lecture
   A. Measurements
   B. Chemical reactions and stoichiometry
   C. Thermochemistry
   D. Gas laws

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

   Written laboratory reports    40-60% of grade
   Quizzes (minimum of 8)        20-30% of grade
   Exam(s)                       20-30% of grade 
      Total                        100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

  2. Students entering physical science classes should be aware that they will be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.

  3. Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering (lab coats) will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the laboratory. Students will not be allowed to perform laboratory experiments without proper attire and lab coats (shorts will not be allowed).

  4. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated.

  5. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. Students will not be allowed in the laboratory unless an instructor is present at all times. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 131

  • Title: General Chemistry II Lecture*
  • Number: CHEM 131
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 124 and CHEM 125.
Corequisites: CHEM 132.

Description:

Chemistry 131 is the second semester of a two-semester course in general chemistry in which the student will develop a working knowledge of some of the fundamental concepts and quantitative relationships involved in the study of chemical reactivity. Topics include solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. 4 hrs./wk. CHEM 131 students are required to enroll concurrently in CHEM 132.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the characteristics of various mixtures.
  2. Explain concepts of chemical kinetics and interpret chemical reactions from kinetic data.
  3. Explain the concept of chemical equilibrium and the effect of various factors on equilibrium.
  4. Apply equilibrium concepts to aqueous acid-base systems and to solubilities.
  5. Apply concepts of chemical thermodynamics to calculations in processes of chemical or physical change.
  6. Explain oxidation and reduction in chemical reactions and apply to galvanic cells and electrolysis processes.
  7. Describe processes of nuclear reactions and their applications.
  8. Apply critical thinking skills to solve problems in chemical contexts.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Mixtures and Their Characteristics

A. Describe the processes by which solutes and solvents interact in forming solutions. Include terms about the nature of particles, the various forces and energy involved.

B. Solve concentration problems with molarity, mass percent, mole fraction, molality and ppm.

C. Solve problems with Henry's law.

D. Describe temperature effects on solubility.

E. Explain qualitatively the colligative properties, vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation and freezing point depression, and work quantitative problems.

F. Describe the process of osmosis and some applications and solve quantitative problems.

G. Describe how the colligative properties of solutions of electrolytes differ from those of solutions of non-electrolytes.

H. Describe the characteristics of colloids and give examples.

II. Chemical Kinetics and Interpretation of Chemical Reactions

A. Discuss the effect of concentration, temperature, catalysis and physical state upon rate of reaction.

B. Distinguish between average rate and instantaneous rate.

C. Describe the two types of rate laws (differential and integrated).

D. Distinguish between first and second order reactions.

E. Explain why a rate law must be determined experimentally.

F. Discuss and apply the method of initial rates.

G. Discuss the relationship between half-life equations and reaction order.

H. Use graphs and equations to determine the order of a reaction.

I. Draw a reaction profile to explain the progress of a reaction.

J. Describe the collision model and discuss the temperature dependence of reaction rates.

K. Define and calculate activation energy.

L. Discuss reaction mechanisms and explain the rate-determining step.

M. Explain the effect of a catalyst on a chemical reaction.

III. Chemical Equilibria and Applications

A. Explain how the terms reversible reaction and dynamic equilibrium are related.

B. Write the general equilibrium constant expression and explain its significance.

C. Explain why the concentrations of pure liquids and solids are never used in equilibrium constant expressions.

D. Show how the numerical value of the equilibrium constant changes when the stoichiometric coefficients are changed or the reaction is reversed.

E. Explain the differences between the terms Kc and Kp and the relation of either to Qc.

F. Explain the difference between an equilibrium position and equilibrium constant.

G. Given Keq and initial concentration of reactants and/or products, calculate the final concentrations of reactants and/or products.

H. List the external factors that can affect equilibria.

I. Explain how changes in temperature, pressure, volume or concentration affect the equilibrium position for a chemical reaction.

J. Describe the effect of a catalyst on a system as it approaches equilibrium.

IV. Chemical Equilibria in Aqueous Solutions

A. Explain the similarities and differences between terms such as: Ka and Kb, pH and pOH, and pKa and pKb.

B. Apply Brønsted-Lowry acid-base concepts to determine the relative strength of acids and their conjugate bases.

C. Name and list the common strong acids (HCl, HBr, HI, HNO3, H2SO4 and HClO4) and strong bases (i.e., any hydroxide base).

D. Relate [H+] and [OH-], pH and pOH. Calculate the pH for solutions of strong acids and bases.

E. Identify a weak acid or base and write a chemical equation to represent its ionization. Set up an equation for determining its ionization constant expression (Ka and Kb).

F. Calculate from appropriate data, ionization constants (Ka or Kb), concentration of the non-ionized acid or base, the concentration of ions in aqueous solution, the pH and the percent dissociation.

G. Relate acid strength to Ka and base strength to Kb.

H. Explain why certain salts give acidic, basic or neutral solutions and show how to calculate the pH of these solutions.

I. Describe the ionization of a polyprotic acid in aqueous solution.

J. Explain how bond strength and polarity affect acid-base properties.

K. Identify the Lewis acid and base in a chemical reaction.

L. Describe the effect of common ions on the ionization of weak acids or bases and calculate the concentration of species present in solutions of weak acids or bases with their common ion.

M. Explain why pure water cannot resist changes in pH as well as a buffered solution.

N. Use the Henderson-Hasselbach equation to determine the pH of a buffered solution.

O. Calculate the pH of a buffer solution from concentrations of the buffer components and a value of Ka and Kb, and describe how to prepare a buffer having a specific pH.

P. Determine the changes in pH of a buffer solution that result from addition of acids or bases.

Q. Determine the volume of a solution of known concentration required to titrate another solution of known volume and concentration.

R. Determine the concentration of a solute in a solution by titrating it against a known amount of another substance.

S. Sketch a titration curve for the titration of:

1. Strong acid with a strong base

2. Weak acid with a strong base

3. Weak base with a strong acid

4. Polyprotic acid or base

T. Write an equation to express the relationship between a solid solute and its constituent ions in a saturated solution.

U. Calculate the Ksp from molar solubility and molar solubility from Ksp.

V. Calculate the effect of a common ion on the molar solubility of a salt.

W. Predict whether precipitation will occur when salt solutions are mixed and determine the concentration of ions remaining in solution after precipitation.

X. Solve chemical equilibrium problems involving complex ions.

V. Thermodynamics in Chemical and Physical Processes

A. Explain the similarities and differences between such terms as enthalpy, entropy and free energy.

B. Apply the first, second and third law of thermodynamics to the analysis of chemical and physical processes.

C. Predict whether the entropy change in a given process is positive, negative or near zero.

D. Use data tables to determine enthalpy, entropy and free energy changes.

1. Use enthalpies of formation to calculate ∆H for a reaction (Hess’s Law).

2. Use standard molar entropies to calculate ∆S for a reaction.

3. Use Gibbs free energies of formation to calculate ∆G for a reaction.

E. Explain how ∆H, ∆S and ∆G are related to reaction spontaneity.

F. Explain how a knowledge of ∆H, ∆S and ∆G allows one to predict the conditions under which a reaction will occur.

G. Describe the relationship between the standard free energy of reaction and the equilibrium constant. Calculate Keq for a chemical reaction from ∆H°f and S° or ∆G°f.

H. Calculate ∆G for a chemical reaction that occurs under nonstandard conditions.

VI. Electrochemical Reactions and Applications

A. Describe oxidation-reduction reactions as electron loss and electron gain.

B. Using the half-reaction method, balance half-reactions in acidic and/or basic solutions to complete an oxidation-reduction equation.

C. Describe the components and operation of voltaic and electrolytic cells.

D. Using standard half-cell potentials, calculate cell potentials for both voltaic and electrolytic cells and make predictions about reaction spontaneity.

E. Using a table of standard reduction potentials, predict whether a selected reaction will occur (e.g., Will copper replace silver ion in solution?).

F. Explain the similarities and differences between terms such as anode and cathode, voltaic cell and electrolytic cell, electromotive force and voltage.

G. Relate cell potential, free energy change and equilibrium constant.

H. Using the Nernst equation, calculate the cell potential for reactions occurring under nonstandard conditions.

I. Solve stoichiometry problems involving electrolytic cells.

J. Describe practical applications for voltaic and electrolytic cells (batteries, corrosion and commercial electrolytic cells).

VII. Nuclear Reaction Processes

A. Explain the similarities and differences between such terms as alpha, beta and gamma radiation; binding energy and mass defect; fission and fusion.

B. Review and describe the composition of the nucleus.

C. Name the different types of radioactive decay (e.g., alpha decay) and describe the characteristics of each.

D. Write balanced equations for radioactive decay processes.

E. Calculate the rate of radioactive decay, the half-life or the number of atoms or moles in a sample of a radioactive nuclide if two of the three terms are known.

F. Write equations for nuclear transformation reactions.

G. Describe some of the practical and beneficial uses of radioisotopes.

H. Describe the processes of nuclear fission and fusion and discuss the problems with using either process as a source of energy.

I. Describe the difference between commonly used units of radiation (i.e., curie, rad, rem).

VIII. Critical Thinking Skills

A. Solve algebraic problems given new data.

B. Apply appropriate chemical theories in new situations to explain and predict.

C. Recognize and explain chemical phenomena in everyday occurrences.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A comprehensive final exam is required. All exams will be taken in class (no take-home exams will be given). The semester grade will be determined as follows:

60%    3-6 Unit exams
20%    Final exam
20%    Quizzes and homework

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 131H

  • Title: HON: General Chemistry II Lecture*
  • Number: CHEM 131H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 132

  • Title: General Chemistry II Lab*
  • Number: CHEM 132
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 3
  • Lecture Hours:
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 124 and CHEM 125.
Corequisites: CHEM 131 Note: Students who withdraw from GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LECTURE must also withdraw from the corresponding laboratory GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY. Students may not withdraw from the laboratory course GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY without withdrawing from CHEMISTRY II LECTURE.

Description:

The laboratory consists of qualitative and quantitative experiments designed to parallel and support General Chemistry II Lecture. 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Work in the laboratory in accordance with good laboratory practices.

  2. Gather and record qualitative and quantitative data accurately.

  3. Handle and evaluate data in logical, productive and meaningful ways.

  4. Correlate laboratory work with principal topics in Chemistry II, Lecture.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Students Will Work in the Laboratory in Accordance with Good Laboratory Practices

A. Dress appropriately on lab days, wearing long pants and shoes will enclosed toes. Wear a lab coat and goggles when anyone in the laboratory is using chemicals.

B. Follow written directions accurately.

C. Work safely and effectively, using equipment and chemicals carefully and correctly.

D. Demonstrate use of required techniques.

E. Obtain samples from stock reagents that are correct substance, concentration and sample size.

F. Dispose of waste products appropriately.

II. Students Will Gather and Record Qualitative and Quantitative Data Accurately

III. Students Will Handle and Evaluate Data in Meaningful Ways

A. Keep notebooks and worksheets that are neat, clean, understandable and accurately represent work done.

B. Display computer data in a spreadsheet or graphically, as is relevant.

C. Correlate observations with chemical reactions.

D. Carry out suitable calculations with quantitative data, recognizing when data and calculations are within a reasonable range.

E. Use applicable theories to draw experimental conclusions and explain observations.

IV. Students Will Correlate Laboratory Work with Principal Topics in Chemistry II, Lecture, Including:

A. Chemical kinetics

B. Chemical equilibria

C. Acid-base chemistry

D. Electrochemical reactions

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

40-50%    Written laboratory reports
20-30%    Quizzes (minimum 8)
20-30%    Exam(s)

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Students entering physical classes should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the laboratory.
  4. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated.
  5. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 140

  • Title: Principles of Organic & Biological Chemistry*
  • Number: CHEM 140
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 7
  • Lecture Hours: 4
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or BIOL 135 and either CHEM 122 or (CHEM 124 and CHEM 125) or department approval.

Description:

This course covers nomenclature, theory and applications of basic organic chemistry and biochemistry in the area of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes. The lab activities reinforce the topics presented in the lecture. 4 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of organic chemistry and biochemistry which will be useful in medically related studies.
  2. Use the IUPAC system of nomenclature for the major functional groups of organic compounds.
  3. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to each category of organic compound.
  4. Describing the structure, draw isomers for different classes of organic compounds such as alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amines and amides.
  5. Describe the process and predict the products of specific organic chemical reactions.
  6. Classify lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids to their structure, shape and function.
  7. Relate organic and biochemical knowledge to current issues such as over-the-counter drugs, waste management and environmental contamination, in both the lecture and the laboratory.
  8. Where appropriate, apply basic biochemistry to physiological issues.
  9. Recognize and demonstrate productive attitudes and work habits in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I.  Classification of Compounds as Bond Structures, Shape and Functional Groups

A. Describe the structure of the atom and write the electronic structure of the atoms.

B. Compare and contrast related terms such as ionic and covalent bonding, sp, sp2 and sp3 hybrid orbitals.

C. Use VSEPR theory to describe the molecular geometry and shape.

D. Use electronegativity and molecular shape to describe polar and nonpolar molecules.

E. Draw Lewis structures of selected compounds.

F. Recognize and draw all of the common functional groups of organic compounds.

G. Solve problems and recognize the type of hybrid orbital of the C or N atom of each functional group.

H. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to bonding and geometry.

II. Alkanes and Cycloalkanes

A. Name and draw structures for alkanes and cycloalkanes by the IUPAC system.

B. Predict and explain the general trends in the physical properties of alkanes.

C. Draw and name the structural isomers for alkanes.

D. Show the conformation of small alkanes and the cis-trans isomerism of cycloalkanes.

E. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to alkanes and cycloalkanes.

III. Alkenes and Alkynes

A. Use the IUPAC system to name and draw selected alkenes and alkynes.

B. Discuss the bonding and electronic structure of alkene.

C. Apply the sequence rules to classify alkenes as E or Z isomers.

D. Determine the degree of unsaturation for organic compounds using their molecular formula.

E. Predict the outcome of symmetrical and unsymmetrical addition reactions of alkenes.

F. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to alkenes and alkynes.

IV. Alcohols and Ethers

A. Predict trends in physical properties of alcohols, phenols, ethers and thiols based on structure and bond.

B. Name alcohols and ethers using the IUPAC system of naming.

C. Classify alcohols as primary, secondary and tertiary.

D. Describe the condition and the product of oxidation of alcohols.

E. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to alcohols and ethers.

V. Aldehydes and Ketones

A. Describe the structure and properties of aldehydes and ketones.

B. Name aldehydes and ketones using the IUPAC system of nomenclature.

C. Propose methods for the preparation of aldehydes and ketones.

D. Predict reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

E. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to aldehydes and ketones.

VI. Carboxylic Acids and Esters

A. Name (by IUPAC) and draw structures for both carboxylic acids and esters.

B. Discuss the physical properties of carboxylic acids and esters.

C. Propose synthetic methods for the preparation of carboxylic acids and esters.

D. Predict chemical reactions of esters.

E. Predict polymerization reactions to form polyesters.

F. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to carboxylic acids and esters.

VII. Amines and Amides

A. Describe the structure of amines and amides including hybrid orbital overlap and approximate bond angles.

B. Use common or IUPAC prefixes and suffixes to name amines and amides.

C. Classify amines as primary, secondary and tertiary.

D. Predict trends in physical properties of amines based on structure, bond polarity and hydrogen bonding.

E. Describe conditions and predict products of reaction of amines with acids.

F. Predict polymerization reactions to form polyamides.

G. Describe the conditions and predict products for the formation of amides, also the hydrolysis of amides.

H. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to amines and amides.

VIII. Carbohydrates

A. Name the monosaccharides having 3 to 6 carbons.

B. Recognize chiral compounds and differentiate between enantiomers and diastereomers.

C. Describe the D and L sugars.

D. Draw the Fischer and Haworth projection for monosaccharides.

E. Describe the process and the results of mutarotation.

F. Describe the oxidation, reduction and formation of glycosides from monosaccharides.

G. Describe the use of Benedict and Tollen's reagents in determining whether a sugar is a reducing or nonreducing sugar.

H. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to sugars.

IX. Lipids

A. Describe the common properties of all lipids.

B. Describe the different classes of lipids and list examples of the common classes.

C. Describe the structure, properties and chemical reactions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

D. Describe and draw the formulas for the triglycerides (fats and oils) and phosphoglycerides.

E. Predict trends in physical properties of triglycerides on structure, bond polarity and isomerism.

F. Describe the hydrogenation of oils and the hydrolysis and saponification of triglycerides.

G. Describe the structure and draw formulas for sphingolipids, steroids and waxes.

H. Describe the general structure and the function of lipoproteins.

I. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to lipids.

X. Amino Acids, Proteins and Enzymes

A. Describe in detail the general structure of alpha amino acids, including the chirality of the alpha carbon and the zwitterion, types of amino acids based on the side chain change.

B. Describe the relative acidity and basicity of amino acids for different side groups.

C. Describe in detail the peptide bond (amide bond).

D. Describe in detail the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins.

E. Describe the effect of change in pH, temperature change and adding specific reagents on protein structure.

F. Use the enzyme classification and naming of enzymes.

G. Discuss the mechanism of enzyme catalysis including the enzyme and substrate complexes, active sites and the rate of reaction.

H. Discuss how the concentration of enzyme or substrate, pH and temperature affects the function of enzyme.

I. Recognize the function of vitamins in enzyme activity.

J. Identify the importance of enzyme activity in metabolic processes.

K. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to proteins and enzymes.

XI. Nucleic Acids

A. Identify the different types of nucleotides.

B. Recognize nucleic acid structure.

C. Identify the base pair interactions present in DNA.

D. Outline the steps in replication, transcription and translation.

E. Describe mechanisms that cause mutations.

F. Identify the methods utilized in genetic engineering

G. Correctly define, explain and use the terms and concepts related to nucleic acids, DNA, and RNA.

XII. Attitudes and Work Habits

A. Identify and develop positive attitudes toward tasks and fellow students appropriate for the laboratory, including giving and accepting criticism and praise.

B. Identify and develop productive work habits, including attending to detail, completing tasks, maintaining the work setting and recording data.

C. Identify and develop collaborative/teamwork skills, including solving problems in groups, building consensus and responding to supervision.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Three to five unit exams will be given along with a comprehensive final.

There will be 10-12 quizzes given during the semester.

Homework will be assigned and may be graded.

Laboratory: A written lab report is required for each experiment and the report grade is based on completeness, organization, quality and writing style.

The semester grade will be determined as shown below:

50-70%    Exams
10-20%     Quizzes/Homework
20-30%    Laboratory (Reports and lab test)
Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

  1. COMPUTER LITERACY EXPECTATIONS: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. SAFETY: Students entering a science class should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Students should assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. It is in the best interest of pregnant students to defer laboratory classes until after delivery.
  4. Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and lab coats will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the lab.
  5. No food or drinks are allowed in the laboratory.
  6. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 214

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science I*
  • Number: CHEM 214
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of "C" or higher OR appropriate score on the math placement test OR department approval.

Description:

This course allows math and science students to explore and develop an appreciation for teaching as a career. To support their learning, students will be introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver quality instruction. They will plan and implement lessons of an inquiry-based curriculum in an elementary classroom during the semester. MATH 214, ASTR 214, BIOL 214, CHEM 214, GEOS 214, PHYS 214 and PSCI 214 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Determine if teaching is a viable career path.
  2. Identify strategies for effective lesson planning and utilize these strategies to design and deliver inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of personality and learning differences and discuss the implications for both teaching and learning.
  4. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students' acquisition of knowledge.
  5. Revise lesson plans to reflect the needs of learners based on field experience gained in cooperation with a practicing classroom teacher.
  6. Research  and identify relevant state and national teaching standards.
  7. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of technology for teaching, communicating, and collaborating.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Teaching as a Career

A. Determine suitability/interest in teaching as a career through thoughtful self-reflection.

B. Explore pathways to a career in teaching.

C. Identify personal learning styles and discuss their implications for classroom interactions.

II. Strategies for Practical Lesson Design

A. Design and deliver inquiry-based hands-on lessons.

B. Write performance objectives for each lesson, including mathematics and/or science connections, and appropriate assessments for those objectives.

C. Use technology and the Internet to enhance classroom lessons, collaborate, and communicate.

III. Concepts and Components of Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional strategies that meet the needs of diverse learners.

B. Distinguish between learner-centered and teacher-centered instructional strategies.

C. Discuss state and national science and mathematics standards and their implications for curriculum decisions.

D. Identify current issues in the theory and practice of teaching.

IV. Components of a Field Experience

A. Observe a math-science lesson taught by a cooperating teacher.

B. Interact with a population of diverse student learners in a school setting while teaching a lesson in an elementary school classroom.

C. Receive and synthesize feedback from a cooperating teacher as a peer and mentoring colleague in order to improve techniques.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

This course uses non-standard grading criteria:
90-100% = A
80-89% = B
75-79% = C
70-74% = D
0-69% = F

10-20%    Active classroom participation
20-30%    Lesson planning and associated activities
30-40%    Completion of field experience and associated activities
20-25%    Related assignments/homework

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a "C" in the prerequisite course(s) or earn an appropriate score on a placement exam. If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 215

  • Title: Introduction to Teaching Math and Science II*
  • Number: CHEM 215
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1.25
  • Lecture Hours: 1.25

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ASTR 214 or BIOL 214 or CHEM 214 or GEOS 214 or MATH 214 or PHYS 214 or PSCI 214 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Description:

Students learn about the middle school environment and work on math and science inquiry-based lesson analysis, design and assessment. Student partners will plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons in a middle school. The course emphasizes writing 5E lesson plans with a focus on the importance of using appropriate questioning and assessment strategies throughout the lesson, as well as how to analyze and modify a lesson based on personal reflections and observer feedback. By the completion of the course, students should be able to reflect on their personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science, and develop a feasible pathway to a career in teaching. MATH 215, ASTR 215, BIOL 215, CHEM 215, GEOS 215, PHYS 215 and PSCI 215 are the same course; enroll in only one. 1.25 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Design inquiry-based middle school lesson plans, utilizing resources from exemplary inquiry-based science and mathematics lessons.
  2. Implement effective middle school teaching strategies based on the unique attributes of adolescents.
  3. Construct effective classroom learning activities using appropriate technology.
  4. Analyze data gained from pre- and post-assessments to evaluate student learning as a basis for revising lesson plans and teaching strategies.
  5. Employ techniques that offer educational equity among a population of diverse learners.
  6. Identify personal suitability/interest in teaching secondary math or science.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Practical Lesson Design

A. Design inquiry-based lessons using the 5E Instructional Model.

B. Write measurable performance objectives for each lesson.

C. Develop applicable pre- and post-assessments for the performance objectives.

D. Analyze student data acquired through pre- and post-assessments to improve future lesson planning.

E. Incorporate technology into at least one lesson in a manner that encourages enhanced student interaction and learning.

II. Teaching Theory

A. Identify instructional approaches that meet the needs of diverse middle school learners.

B. Develop questioning strategies to effectively interact with students with varying abilities and learning styles in a middle school classroom.

C. Develop achievable solutions to preserve instructional equity in the classroom environment.

III. Field Experience

A. Reflect upon observations of lessons taught by an experienced math/science teacher.

B. Teach three inquiry-based lessons to a middle school math or science class.

C. Use probing questions to elicit feedback to determine students’ acquisition of knowledge.

D. Synthesize feedback from both mentor teachers and master teachers in order to improve teaching techniques.

E. Reflect on teaching experiences in order to enhance future classroom interactions.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

15-25%    Active classroom participation and attendance
20-30%    Lesson planning and preparation
30-40%    Field experiences, reflections and associated activities
10-20%    Other assignments

100%        Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
75 – 79% = C
70 – 74% = D
0 – 69% = F

Caveats:

To successfully complete the prerequisite(s) for this course, a student must earn at least a “C” in the prerequisite course(s).  If a student is found not to have successfully fulfilled the prerequisite(s) for this course, the student will be dropped from the course.

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 220

  • Title: Organic Chemistry I*
  • Number: CHEM 220
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 9
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132.

Description:

Organic Chemistry I is an introduction to the theories and principles of the chemistry carbon compounds. The student will develop an understanding of organic chemistry, which will be useful in the studies of chemistry and related fields such as medicine, engineering and pharmacy. The laboratory is supportive in nature, with a strong emphasis on developing laboratory techniques. Representative compounds will be prepared and used to introduce the student to instrumental analysis. 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the structure of molecules through the application of chemical bonding theories.
  2. Predict properties of organic molecules on the basis of molecular structure.
  3. Analyze organic reactions in terms of physical organic principles.
  4. Use the IUPAC system of nomenclature and parts of the common naming system.
  5. Describe the structure and reactions of alkanes and cycloalkanes.
  6. Describe the structure and reactions of alkenes, alkynes and conjugated dienes.
  7. Describe the structure and reactions of alkyl halides.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of stereochemistry.
  9. Apply general chemical principles to analyze aliphatic substitution and elimination reactions.
  10. Interpret selected chemical reactions using appropriate mechanisms.
  11. Identify unknown structures with the use of infrared spectra and other data.
  12. Demonstrate critical thinking skills pertaining to the analysis of organic reactions.
  13. Work in the laboratory in accordance with good laboratory practices.
  14. Gather and record qualitative and quantitative data accurately.
  15. Handle and evaluate data in logical, productive and meaningful ways.  

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Molecular Structure and Chemical Bonding Theories
   A. Draw Lewis electron dot structures for molecules.
   B. Draw resonance forms for a molecule having delocalized bonding.
   C. Determine the relative stability of resonance forms using formal
charges.
   D. Apply the VSEPR model to describe molecular geometry and shape.
   E. Draw a three-dimensional representation of a given molecule.
   F. Discuss the formation of a covalent bond.
   G. Identify bonds as covalent or ionic. 
   H. Describe the electronic structure of molecules using valence bond
theory.
   I. Predict the hybridization state of atoms in a molecule.
   J. Apply the theory of resonance to show the unusual stability of the
allyl radical and other conjugated pi-bonded species.
   K. Explain the unusual stability of the allyl radical and other
conjugated pi-bonded species in terms of molecular orbital theory.

II. Structure and Properties of Organic Molecules
   A. Predict whether a molecule has a net dipole moment.
   B. Identify the type(s) of intermolecular forces which operate between
molecules.
   C. Predict general trends in boiling points and solubilities based on
intermolecular forces.
   D. Predict relative acidities and basicities based on structure,
bonding and resonance forms of conjugate acid-base pairs.
   E. Predict the direction of Brönsted-Lowry acid-base reactions.
   F. Identify Lewis acids and bases.
   G. Identify by name the following type of compounds (given a condensed
structural formula): alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic hydrocarbons,
alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids,
esters, amides, amines and phenols.
   H. Draw condensed structural formulas for the following types of
compounds: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkyl
halides, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters,
amides, amines and phenols.

III. Analysis of Organic Reactions
   A. Classify organic reactions as addition, elimination, substitution or
rearrangement.
   B. Distinguish between polar and radical mechanisms.
   C. Identify reagents as electrophiles and nucleophiles.
   D. Apply thermodynamic concepts to the analysis of organic chemical
reactions.
   E. Calculate the enthalpy change for a reaction from a table of bond
energies.
   F. Relate the equilibrium constant for a chemical reaction to the
standard free energy change for that reaction.
   G. Apply qualitative ideas from transition state theory to the analysis
of organic chemical reactions.
   H. Draw and interpret an energy diagram for a chemical reaction.
   I. Discuss the meaning of the term activation energy.

IV. Nomenclature
   A. Given the structure, provide correct IUPAC names for alkanes,
cycloalkanes, alkenes,   alkynes, dienes and alkyl halides.
   B. Given the name, draw correct condensed structural formulas for
alkanes,
cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes and alkyl halides.
   C. Draw and use common names for all 3- and 4-carbon alkyl groups.

V. Alkanes and Cycloalkanes
   A. Name and draw structures for alkanes and cycloalkanes by the IUPAC
system.
   B. Identify carbon and hydrogen as being primary, secondary or
tertiary.
   C. Draw all possible isomers given the molecular formula.
   D. Draw Newman projections of different conformations of molecules and
predict their relative stability.
   E. Discuss the applicability of Bayer strain theory to the stabilities
of cycloalkanes.
   F. Compare and contrast the terms ring and angle strain.
   G. Draw structures for both boat and chair cyclohexane.
   H. Distinguish (by drawing) the difference between axial and equatorial
positions in
cyclohexane.
   I. Recognize cis and trans isomers of disubstituted cyclohexanes.
   J. Predict the stability of substituted cyclohexanes by estimating
steric interactions.

VI. Alkenes, Alkynes and Conjugated Dienes
   A. Name and draw structures for alkenes and alkynes by the IUPAC
system.
   B. Determine the degrees of unsaturation of an organic compound from
its molecular formula.
   C. Discuss the bonding and electronic structure of alkenes.
   D. Draw and name cis-trans isomers of alkenes.
   E. Apply the sequence rules to classify alkenes as E or Z isomers.
   F. Use heats of hydrogenation to determine the relative stability of
alkenes.
   G. Show by reaction the preparation of alkenes, alkynes and conjugated
dienes.
   H. Predict the products of reactions of alkenes, alkynes and conjugated
dienes.
   I. Discuss the bonding and electronic structure of alkynes.
   J. Compare and contrast the reactions of alkenes and alkynes.
   K. Explain why the terminal hydrogen in terminal alkynes is acidic.
   L. Explain the unusual stability of conjugated dienes.

VII. Alkyl Halides
   A. Name and draw structures for alkyl halides by the IUPAC system.
   B. Show by reaction the preparation of  alkyl halides.
   C. Predict the products of reactions of alkyl halides.

VIII. Stereochemistry
   A. Recognize the difference between constitutional isomers and
stereoisomers.
   B. Determine if an object or molecule is chiral.
   C. Apply the RS system of nomenclature to stereoisomers.
   D. Compare and contrast, using examples if necessary, the following
terms: enantiomers,
diasteromers and meso compounds.
   E. Draw Fischer projections of chiral compounds.
   F. Explain the difference between relative and absolute
configurations.
   G. Predict the theoretical number of stereoisomers.
   H. Predict the stereochemical outcome of selected reactions.

IX. Substitution and Elimination Reactions
   A. Discuss the kinetics involved with nucleophilic substitution
reactions.
   B. Classify reactions as SN1, SN2, E1 or E2.
   C. List a set of ideal conditions for SN1, SN2, E1 or E2 reactions.
   D. Discuss the factors that can influence the rates of SN1, SN2, E1 or
E2 reactions.
   E. Predict the products of  SN1, SN2, E1 or E2 reactions.
   F. Explain the limitations placed upon elimination reactions that
involve the cyclohexane ring.

X. Mechanisms
   A. Draw and explain the radical mechanism for the halogenation of
alkanes.
   B. Explain the relationship of the structure of free radicals to
stability.
   C. Draw and discuss each step of the mechanism of an alkene addition
reaction.
   D. Explain the relationship of carbocation structure to stability.
   E. Recognize when carbocation rearrangement is likely to occur.
   F. Apply the Hammond postulate to the analysis of a reaction
mechanism.
   G. Draw and explain the mechanism for a SN1, SN2, E1 or E2 reaction.
   H. Compare and contrast kinetic and thermodynamic control of 1,2- and
1,4-addition reactions of conjugated dienes.

XI. Spectral Interpretation
   A. Identify functional groups by their infrared absorptions.
   B. Correlate the infrared spectrum of a known organic compound to its
structure.
   C. Propose a structure for an unknown consistent with its infrared
spectrum and other data such as the molecular formula.

XII. Critical Thinking
   A. Devise a reasonable synthetic pathway for producing a desired
compound from a specific starting material.
   B. Propose a reaction mechanism to explain the outcome of a reaction
you have never seen before.
   C. Determine the structure of an unsaturated compound from its
molecular formula and its cleavage and/or hydrogenation products.

XIII. Students Will Work in the Laboratory in Accordance with Good
Laboratory Practices
   A. Dress appropriately on lab days, wearing long pants and shoes with
enclosed toes, and wear a lab coat and goggles when anyone in the
laboratory is using chemicals.
   B. Follow written directions accurately.
   C. Work safely, using equipment and chemicals carefully and correctly.
   D. Obtain samples from stock reagents that are the correct substance,
concentration and sample size.
   E. Dispose of waste products appropriately.

XIV. Students Will Gather and Record Qualitative and Quantitative Data
   A. Record data in a concise and accurate fashion, reporting visual
observations, such as color, state and speed of reaction.
   B. Demonstrate required techniques, which include:
      1. Assembly of microscale glassware
      2. Use of milligram balance
      3. Use of automatic pipet
      4. Monitoring and controlling the temperature of a reaction vessel
      5. Filtration
      6. Crystallization
      7. Determination of melting point and boiling point
      8. Extraction
      9. Use of drying agents
     10. Reflux
     11. Simple and fractional distillation
     12. Thin-layer chromatography
     13. Column chromatography
     14. Gas chromatography
     15. Refractometry
     16. Infrared sample preparation
     17. Operation of infrared spectrometer
   C. List or describe experimental assumptions made.

XV. Students Will Handle and Evaluate Data in Meaningful Ways
   A. Create notebooks and laboratory reports that are clear,
understandable and accurately represent the work done.
   B. Correlate observations with appropriate chemical and/or physical
processes.
   C. Carry out suitable calculations with quantitative data, recognizing
when data and calculations are within a reasonable range.
   D. Use applicable theories to draw experimental conclusions and explain
observations.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

All exams will be taken in class (no take home exams will be given)
 
 40% of grade         3-6 Unit Exams                  
 20% of grade         Final Exam             
 10% of grade         Quizzes and/or Homework      
 30% of grade         Laboratory    
100%

Grading Scale:
   90% - 100% = A
   80% -  89% = B
   70% -  79% = C
   60% -  69% = D
    0% -  59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Students entering physical science classes should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Students must assume responsibility in conducting themselves in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering (lab coats or approved substitute) will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the laboratory. Students will not be allowed to perform laboratory experiments without proper attire and lab coats (shorts will not be allowed).
  4. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated.
  5. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. Students will not be allowed in the laboratory unless an instructor is present at all times. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 220H

  • Title: HON: Organic Chemistry I*
  • Number: CHEM 220H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 221

  • Title: Organic Chemistry II*
  • Number: CHEM 221
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 5
  • Contact Hours: 9
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 6

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 220.

Description:

Organic Chemistry II is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I, the nomenclature, principles and theories of organic chemistry, with emphasis on electronic theories and reaction mechanisms. Laboratory is supportive in nature with emphasis on developing laboratory techniques and preparation of representative compounds. Organic Chemistry II completes the study of organic chemistry designed to prepare the student for continued work in chemistry and related fields. 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Use the IUPAC system of nomenclature and parts of the common naming system.
  2. Interpret reactions using appropriate mechanisms.
  3. Predict the products of chemical reactions relating to topics covered.
  4. Write chemical reactions as demonstrated by the use of synthesis problems.
  5. Use spectroscopy methods to aid in the interpretation of molecular structure as a result of lecture and laboratory study.
  6. Relate organic chemistry to sources, uses and industrial preparations.
  7. Relate physical properties of organic molecules to structure and /or thermodynamic data.
  8. Relate reactivities of organic molecules to structure and /or thermodynamic data.
  9. Apply valance bond and/or molecular orbital theory to properties of organic molecules.
  10. Apply valance bond and/or molecular orbital theory to structure of organic molecules.
  11. Apply valance bond and/or molecular orbital theory to reactivity of organic molecules.
  12. Apply resonance theory to structure and reactivity of organic molecules.
  13. Apply theories of tautomerism in reactivities of certain organic molecules.
  14. Work in the laboratory in accordance with good laboratory practices.
  15. Gather and record qualitative and quantitative data in the laboratory.
  16. Evaluate data recorded in the laboratory. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Structure Determination by Spectroscopy
   A. Mass spectroscopy
      1. Use mass spectroscopy data to interpret molecular structure.
      2. Interpret mass spectral fragmentation patterns.
      3. Use mass spectra to determine molecular weights and base peaks
and to distinguish between hydrocarbons.
      4. Write molecular formulas corresponding to a given molecular ion.
   B. Infrared spectroscopy
      1. Identify the regions of the electromagnetic spectrum used for
infrared spectroscopy.
      2. Relate energy, frequency and wavelength for electromagnetic
radiation to infrared spectroscopy.
      3. Interpret infrared spectra relating to functional groups in
organic molecules.
      4. Interpret infrared spectra for hydrocarbons.
   C. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
      1. Describe how NMR signals are obtained.
      2. Interpret chemical shift patterns relating to chemical
structure.
      3. Interpret 1H NMR peak areas using integration techniques in
relationship to proton counting.
      4. Use spin-spin splitting of 1H NMR signals to interpret molecular
structure in organic molecules.
      5. Relate and use the number of 1H NMR absorptions to proton
equivalency in a molecule.
      6. Relate and use chemical shifts in 1H NMR spectroscopy to
determine chemical structure in organic molecules.
      7. Use 1H NMR spectra to determine the chemical structure of a
compound.
      8. Interpret 13C NMR spectroscopy relating to functional groups in
organic molecules.
      9. State the uses of 1H NMR spectra.   

II. Benzene and Aromaticity
   A. State sources of aromatic hydrocarbons.
   B. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for aromatic compounds.
   C. Recognize and be able to use the names and structures for toluene,
phenol, aniline,
acetophenone, benzaldehyde and benzoic acid.
   D. Explain how Kekule accounted for the unusual properties of benzene.
   E. Use thermodynamic data to show that benzene is more stable than the
hypothetical compound 1,3,5-cyclohexatriene.
   F. Compare the reactivity of benzene to cyclohexene.
   G. List the four postulates of resonance theory.
   H. Use molecular orbital (MO) theory to describe the bonding in benzene
and other aromatic compounds.
   I. Relate aromaticity to Huckel's rule and MO theory.
   J. Predict aromaticity of heterocylic compounds.
   K. Predict aromaticity of ions.
   L. Describe the bonding in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
   M. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for aromatic compounds
for use in structural determination of organic molecules.

III. Chemistry of Benzene:  Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution
   A. Draw and explain the general mechanism for electrophilic aromatic
substitution.
   B. Predict the products and/or write mechanisms for electrophilic
aromatic substitution reactions studied.
   C. Use the above listed reactions in synthesis.
   D. Explain how substituents affect the reactivity of aromatic rings.
   E. Discuss ortho-para and meta directors, giving some characteristics
and examples of each.
   F. Predict the orientation of incoming groups in disubstituted benzene
rings.
   G. Predict the orientation of incoming groups in trisubstituted benzene
rings.
   H. Recognize the conditions necessary for nucleophilic aromatic
substitution to occur.
   I. Draw and explain the addition-elimination mechanism and the
elimination-addition mechanism in nucleophilic aromatic substitution
reactions.
   J. Use oxidation reactions of aromatic compounds.
   K. Use reduction reactions of aromatic compounds.
   L. Identify the difference in reactivity between the aromatic ring and
a substituted side-chain in oxidation and radical bromination reactions.
   M. Use the reactions learned for electrophilic aromatic substitution to
work synthesis problems.

IV. Alcohols and Thiols
   A. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for alcohols.
   B. Identify sources and uses of simple alcohols.
   C. Compare the physical properties of alcohols to alkanes and alkyl
halides.
   D. Show how to use acid-base reactions to prepare alkoxide ions.
   E. Show how alcohols are prepared from alkenes, aldehydes, ketones,
esters and carboxylic acids.   
   F. Prepare alcohols from reduction of carbonyl groups.
   G. Show how the Grignard reaction can be used to make 1o , 2 o or 3 o
alcohols.
   H. Describe the limitations of the use of the Grignard reaction in
synthesis or organic compounds.
   I. Show how alkenes, alkyl halides and tosylates can be prepared from
alcohols.
   J. Show how alcohols may be oxidized to carbonyl compounds.
   K. Use the alcohol reactions studied in synthesis reactions.
   L. Discuss the use of protecting groups in organic synthesis.
   M. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for alcohols for use in
structural determination of organic molecules.
   N. Describe the similarities of thiols to alcohols.

V. Ethers, Epoxides and Sulfides
   A. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for ethers.
   B. Compare the physical properties of ethers to alkanes of comparable
molecular weights.
   C. Describe the industrial preparation of ethers.
   D. Prepare ethers via the Williamson ether synthesis.
   E. Prepare ethers via alkoxymercuration-demercuration of alkenes.
   F. Predict the products formed in an acid-induced cleavage of an
ether.
   G. Name cyclic ethers:  epoxides.
   H. Show by equations how epoxides are produced.
   I. Show the mechanism and predict the product formed (with correct
stereochemistry) in the acid-catalyzed and base-catalyzed ring opening
reactions of epoxides.
   J. Use the ether and epoxide reactions studied in synthesis.
   K. Discuss the use of crown ethers in organic synthesis.
   L. Identify the Spectroscopic regions of the IR for ethers and epoxides
for use in structural determination of organic molecules.
   M. Describe the similarities of Sulfides to ethers.

VI. Aldehydes and Ketones:  Nucleophilic Addition Reactions
   A. Compare the physical properties of aldehydes and ketones to alkanes
and alcohols of comparable molecular weights.
   B. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for aldehydes and ketones.
   C. Recognize and use the following common names: formaldehyde,
acetaldehyde and ketones.
   D. Show the general mechanism for nucleophilic addition at the carbonyl
group.
   E. Show by equations the preparation of aldehydes and ketones.
   F. Show by reactions how aldehydes and ketones react with oxidizing and
reducing agents.
   G. Predict the products of nucleophilic addition reactions with a
variety of reagents studied for aldehydes and ketones.
   H. Use the above listed reactions in synthesis.
   I. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for aldehydes and
ketones for use in structural determination of organic molecules.

VII. Carboxylic Acids
   A. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for both mono and dicarboxylic
acids.
   B. Recognize and use the following common names: formic acid, acetic
acid, benzoic acid and oxalic acid.
   C. Discuss the structure and physical properties of carboxylic acids.
   D. Discuss the acidity of carboxylic acids and the factors that affect
the stability of the carboxylate anion.
   E. Discuss substituent effects on acidity of benzoic acids and
substituted benzoic acids.
   F. Show by equations the preparation of carboxylic acids.
   G. Predict the products of reactions of carboxylic acids.
   H. Predict the products of reduction of carboxylic acids to primary
alcohols.
   I. Use the carboxylic reactions studied in synthesis.
   J. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for carboxylic acids
for use in structural determination of organic molecules.

VIII. Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Nucleophilic Acyl Substitution
Reactions
   A. Name by IUPAC convention and draw structures for acid halides, acid
anhydrides, amides, esters and nitriles.
   B. Recognize and use the following common names: acetyl chloride,
acetic anhydride, acetamide and acetonitrile.
   C. Show the general mechanism for nucleophilic acyl substitution.
   D. Predict the products of carboxylic acid derivative reactions.
   E. Predict the products of nucleophilic acyl substitution reactions of
carboxylic acid derivatives studied and be able to use those reactions in
synthesis problems.
   F. Use the carboxylic acid derivative reactions studied in synthesis.
   G. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for carboxylic acid
derivatives for use in structural determination of organic molecules.

IX. Carbonyl Alpha-Substitution Reactions
   A. Show keto-enol tautomerism in carbonyl compounds.
   B. Show how tautomerism differs from resonance.
   C. Illustrate the mechanism of alpha-substitution reactions.
   D. Predict the products of carbonyl alpha-substitution reactions
studied and be able to use those reactions in synthesis.     
   E. Describe the acidity of alpha-hydrogen atoms:  enolate ion
formation.
   F. Predict the reactivity of enolate ions.

X. Carbonyl Condensation Reactions
   A. Show the general mechanism of carbonyl condensation reactions.
   B. Predict the products of condensation reactions of aldehydes and
ketones:  the aldol reaction.
   C. Describe the difference of carbonyl condensation reactions versus
alpha-substitution reactions.
   D. Identify aldol products.
   E. Identify mixed aldol products.
   F. Identify intramolecular aldol products.
   G. Predict the products of reactions studied that are similar to the
aldol condensation reaction.
   H. Use the condensation reactions studied in synthesis.
   
XI. Carbohydrates
   A. Classify carbohydrates by the number of carbons, presence and size
of ring, and type of glycoside linkage.
   B. Draw Fischer projections for depicting carbohydrates.
   C. Use the DL sugars nomenclature system.
   D. Draw monosaccharides in the various representations studied and be
able to convert from one representation to another.
   E. Convert from straight chain to the cyclic hemiacetal formation for
monosaccharides.
   F. Explain mutarotation in sugars.
   G. Explain why some sugars are reducing and others are not.
   H. Predict the products of reactions studied of monosaccharides.
   I. Explain the Fischer Proof.
   J. List simple disaccharides.
   K. Discuss the similarities and differences of the polysaccharides
starch and cellulose.

XII. Aliphatic Amines
   A. Name by IUPAC and draw structures for amines.
   B. Discuss structure and bonding in amines.
   C. Relate physical properties of amines to structure.
   D. Discuss basicity of amines in terms of their structure.
   E. Compare the basicity of amines to amides.
   F. State industrial sources and uses of alkylamines.
   G. Show by equations reactions of amines.
   H. Use reactions to synthesize amines.
   I. Identify the spectroscopic regions of the IR for amines for use in
structural determination of organic molecules.

XIII. Arylamines and Phenols
   A. Explain why alkyl amines are more basic than arylamines.
   B. Show how to prepare arylamines.
   C. Predict the products of reactions of arylamines.   
   D. Use the replacement reactions of arenediazonium salts in synthesis.
   E. Show how diazonium salts can be used in coupling reactions.
   F. State industrial uses of phenols.   
   G.  Explain the acidity of phenols in terms of their structure.
   H. Show by reactions the preparation of phenols.
   I. Predict the products of reactions of phenols.
   J. Use reactions of phenols to solve synthesis problems.
   K. Recognize the spectroscopic regions of the IR for arylamines and
phenols for use in structural determination of organic molecules.

XIV.  Laboratory 
   A. Record data in a concise and accurate manner, reporting visual
observations such as color, physical states and temperature conditions.
   B. Correctly demonstrate required techniques, which include:
      1. Use of the laboratory balance
      2. Use of an automatic pipette
      3. Use of a heating plate with a heating block or sand bath to
monitor the temperature of a reaction
      4. Use of filtration equipment
      5. Use of equipment for crystallization and recrystallization
techniques
      6. Use of melting point apparatus to determine melting points of
organic compounds
      7. Use of equipment to determine the boiling points of organic
liquids
      8. Use of drying agents
      9. Use of equipment for reflux of reaction mixtures
     10. Use of distillation equipment
     11. Use of chromatography techniques for compound identification
     12. Use of FTIR to prepare samples and obtain spectra of organic
compound
   C. List and/or describe experimental assumptions made.
   D. Dress appropriately on lab days, which includes wearing long pants
or skirts, enclosed toes, lab coat and goggles.
   E. Follow written directions accurately.
   F. Work safely using equipment and chemicals safely and appropriately.
   G. Obtain stock reagents correctly.
   H. Dispose of waste products according to chemical hygiene guidelines.
   I. Create notebooks and laboratory reports according to written
guidelines.
   J. Correlate observations with appropriate chemical and/or physical
processes.
   K. Make calculations with the data collected, recognizing  calculations
that do not fall within reasonable ranges.
   L. Use applicable theories learned in lecture to draw experimental
conclusions and explanations of observations.  

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

All exams will be taken in class (no take home exams will be given)
 
 40% of grade        3-6 Unit Exams                   
 20% of grade        Final Exam        
 10% of grade        Quizzes and/or Homework       
 30% of grade        Laboratory              
100%

Grading Scale:
   A = 90% - 100%
   B = 80% -  89%
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0%  - 59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects.
  2. Students entering physical science classes should be aware that they may be in close contact with potentially hazardous chemicals and equipment. Student must assume responsibility in conducting himself or herself in a manner to minimize such hazards.
  3. Chemical hazards dictate that goggles, shoes and protective covering (lab coats or approved substitute) will be worn whenever chemicals are used in the laboratory. Students will not be allowed to perform laboratory experiments without proper attire and lab coats (shorts will not be allowed).
  4. Consumption of food, beverages or tobacco is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated.
  5. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. Students will not be allowed in the laboratory unless an instructor is present at all times. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 221H

  • Title: HON: Organic Chemistry II*
  • Number: CHEM 221H
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Contact Hours: 1
  • Lecture Hours: 1

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Honors department approval.

Description:

One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Content Outline and Competencies:

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 250

  • Title: Biochemistry*
  • Number: CHEM 250
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 4
  • Lecture Hours: 4

Requirements:

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and CHEM 140 or CHEM 220.

Description:

This course is an introduction to the major topics in biochemistry. Topics include the major classes of biological molecules, such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acid; an overview of the major metabolic pathways; and developments and topics relating to molecular biology. 4 hrs. lecture/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the properties of water and apply these properties to aqueous solutions.
  2. Identify the amino acids which are utilized in the construction of proteins and the properties of these amino acids, including pH, acid-base characteristics and solubility.
  3. Describe the different levels of protein structure and describe how protein structural determinations are accomplished.
  4. Define the major classes of enzyme catalyzed reactions and explain principles of enzyme kinetics.
  5. Compare and contrast the major classes of lipids and their functions.
  6. Describe the structure and functions of biological membranes and how they relate to cellular processes.
  7. Compare the structures of mono-, di- and polysaccharides and give examples of each
  8. Utilize thermodynamic equations to determine energy relationships in metabolic reactions.
  9. Identify the catabolic and anabolic reactions involved with the major metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, fatty acid and nitrogen metabolism.
  10. Describe the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of DNA and RNA.
  11. Describe the reactions and processes involved with the central dogma theory of molecular biology, including replication, transcription and translation.
  12. Apply principles involved with gene expression to recombinant DNA technology (genetic engineering). 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Investigate the Properties of Water and the Application of Aqueous
Solutions to Biochemical Systems
   A. Compare and contrast the different types of intermolecular forces.
   B. Describe the different types of acids and bases.
   C. Cite examples of buffer systems.
   D. Calculate pH and composition of buffers using the
Henderson-Hasselbach equation.
   E. Describe the effects of changes in pH on the uptake and release of
O2 and CO2 in red blood cells.

II. Describe the Structures and Functions of Amino Acids and Small
Peptides
   A. Classify amino acid structures according to ionic properties and
polarity.
   B. Investigate the stereochemistry of amino acids.
   C. Predict the acid-base characteristics of amino aids and peptides.
   D. Investigate the reactions and functions of small peptides and amino
acids.

III. Explain Aspects of Protein Structure
   A. Compare and contrast the four levels of protein structure.
   B. Describe different protein purification techniques.
   C. Determine the most appropriate chromatography method for a given set
of circumstances.
   D. Determine the primary structure of polypeptides from a set of data.
   E. Compare and contrast the different types of secondary structure.
   F. Describe the structure and functions of collagen.
   G. Summarize the tertiary structure of proteins.
   H. Compare and contrast differences in the structure and functions of
Hb and Mb.
   I. Relate the quaternary structure of Hb to cooperative binding of O2.
   J. Describe the effects of bisphosphoglycerate on Hb and Mb.

IV. Examine the Properties of Enzymes
   A. Classify major classes of enzymes.
   B. Correlate the relationship between free energy, catalysts and
kinetics.
   C. Interpret enzyme kinetics according to the Michaelis-Menton scheme.
   D. Determine the effects of inhibitors and activators on Km and Vmax
values.
   E. Describe allosterism and allosteric enzymes.
   F. Compare and contrast the concerted and sequential models for
allosteric enzymes.
   G. Describe zymogen activation.
   H. Explain the different modes of catalytic action in enzymes.
   I. Draw the mechanism for serine proteases.
   J. Classify coenzymes.

V. Describe the Structures and Functions of Lipids and Biological
Membranes
   A. Compare and contrast different classes of lipids.
   B. Describe the structures and properties of fatty acids.
   C. Describe the structures and functions of steroids.
   D. Explain the synthesis of eicosanoids.
   E. List the functions of eicosanoids.
   F. Compare and contrast the functions of the lipid soluble vitamins.
   G. Detail the reactions of the action of vitamin A in the process of
vision.
   H. Describe the composition and structure of membranes.
   I.    Compare and contrast the methods of membrane transport.
   J. Detail the action of the Na+, K+-ATPase.
   K. Describe enzyme receptors and the action of the insulin receptor.

VI. Describe the Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates
   A. Describe the structures of common monosaccharides and
disaccharides.
   B. Compare and contrast the structures and functions of
polysaccharides.

VII. Relate Principles of Thermodynamics to Biological Systems
   A. Relate thermodynamic properties to equilibrium and spontaneity of
chemical reactions.
   B. Calculate the change in free energy for systems not at equilibrium
and not at standard conditions.
   C. Calculate the ?GEN from equilibrium constant data (or an equilibrium
constant from ?GEN data).
   D. Calculate the ?GEN from standard reduction potentials.
   E. List high energy groups utilized in metabolism.
   F. Compare and contrast catabolic and anabolic pathways in metabolism.

VIII. Describe the Pathways Involved with Carbohydrate Metabolism
   A. Write the reactions of glycolysis.
   B. Discuss the energetics involved with glycolysis.
   C. Describe the regulation of glycolysis including activators and
inhibitors of the major regulatory enzymes.
   D. Write the reactions involved with glycogen metabolism.
   E. Describe the control of glycogen metabolism including the effect of
the c-AMP cascade.
   F. Write the reactions involved with gluconeogenesis.
   G. Describe how glucagon can affect the control of the reactions of
glycolysis and
gluconeogenesis in liver cells.
   H. Describe the major products of the pentose phosphate shunt and write
the overall reaction of the pathway.
   I. Detail the steps involved with the reaction of pyruvate in the
pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.
   J. Describe the regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex
including the   activators and inhibitors of enzymes in the complex.
   K. Write the reactions of the citric acid cycle.
   L. Describe the regulation of the citric acid cycle including
activators and inhibitors of the major regulatory enzymes.
   M. Write the reactions involving the entry and exit of metabolites into
and out of the citric acid cycle.
   N. Describe the major reactions occurring in the compartments of the
mitochondria.
   O. Write the reactions of the electron transport system.
   P. Describe the effects that uncouplers and inhibitors of oxidative
phosphorylation have on the production of ATP.
   Q. Describe the chemiosmotic coupling theory and its relationship to
the generation of ATP.
   R. Describe how a proton gradient can be utilized by the ATPase to
drive the production of ATP.
   S. Write the reactions required to oxidize NADH in the cytoplasm under
aerobic conditions.
   T. Explain how the action of cytochrome P450 is involved with oxidation
reactions occurring in the liver.

IX. Describe the Processes Involved in the Light Reactions of
Photosynthesis
   A. Describe the major reactions occurring in the compartments of the
chloroplast.
   B. Describe the photochemical pigments found in the antenna complex.
   C. Explain the role of carotenoids in photoprotection for
photosynthesis.
   D. Explain the steps involved in the principal photochemical events in
the light reactions of photosynthesis.
   E. Write the products of the Z-scheme of the light reactions of
photosynthesis.

X. Describe the Reactions Involved with Lipid Metabolism
   A. Compare and contrast the types of lipoproteins.
   B. Write the reactions involved in the transport of fatty acids into
the mitochondria.
   C. Write the reactions for the catabolism of saturated fatty acids.
   D. Calculate the number of ATP produced from the complete oxidation of
a fatty acid.
   E. Write the reactions for the formation of ketone bodies.
   F. Write the reactions involved with transporting acetyl-SCoA from the
mitochondria to the cytoplasm.
   G. Write the reactions involved with fatty acid synthesis.
   H. Describe the synthesis of the phospholipids and cholesterol.

XI. Describe Reactions Involved with Amino Acid Metabolism
   A. Describe the nitrogen cycle and the reactions of the nitrogenase
complex.
   B. List the ketogenic and glycogenic amino acids.
   C. Draw the mechanism for transamination reactions.
   D. Write the overall reaction of the urea cycle.

XII. Explain Aspects of the Structure of Nucleic Acids
   A. Compare and contrast the structures of purines and pyrimidines.
   B. Describe the structures of nucleotides and nucleosides.
   C. List Chargaff's rules as they apply to the primary structure of
DNA.
   D. Describe the secondary structure of B form DNA.
   E. Compare and contrast the structures of B form DNA and Z form DNA.
   F. Describe the tertiary structures of DNA.
   G. Determine the linking number associated with a piece of DNA.

XIII. Describe the Processes Associated with the Central Dogma Theory of
Molecular Biology
   A. Diagram the central dogma theory of molecular biology.
   B. Describe the processes required to sequence a piece of DNA.
   C. Discuss the experiments which show that replication is
semiconservative.
   D. Describe the processes and reactions necessary to replicate DNA.
   E. Compare and contrast different types of mutations in DNA.
   F. Describe repair mechanisms for DNA.
   G. List the requirements for transcribing a piece of DNA.
   H. Describe the processes and reactions necessary for transcription.
   I. Discuss post-transcriptional modifications of RNA.
   J. Discuss regulation of transcription and the Lac Operon.
   K. Interpret the universal genetic code.
   L. Describe the structures of t-RNA and r-RNA.
   M. Describe the processes and reactions necessary for translation.
   N. List post-translational modifications of proteins.
 
XIV. Describe the Experimental Basis for Recombinant DNA Technology
   A. Describe the experimental procedures for introducing a recombinant
into a host cell.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Examinations/projects      60-70% of grade
Quizzes                    10-20% of grade
Final exam                    20% of grade
       Total                 100%

Final grades will be determined with the following percentage scores based
upon the total number of points obtained:
   A = 90% - 100%
   B = 80% -  89%
   C = 70% -  79%
   D = 60% -  69%
   F =  0% -  59%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Computer Literacy Expectations: Students will need basic word processing and Internet searching skills for the completion of some papers, exercises and projects. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

CHEM 291

No information found.