Electronics (ELEC)

Courses

ELEC 120   Introduction to Electronics (3 Hours)

This is a beginning course in electronics technology that is appropriate for both electronic majors and other interested students. An overview of basic electronic theory, principles and components is presented. In addition, the laboratory exercises will emphasize the operation and use of the primary pieces of electronic test equipment and the fabrication of selected circuits. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab-lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 125   Digital Electronics I (4 Hours)

This is a beginning course in which students will study and practice the basic concepts of digital electronics. Topics will include digital number systems, logic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, digital arithmetic, counters and registers. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

ELEC 127   Robots for Humans (4 Hours)

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of robotics. The class will use lectures, demonstrations and lab work to teach the basics of robotics. This course is designed to assist new users in making use of this technology in their own lives and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field. 3 hrs lecture, 2 hrs open lab/wk.

ELEC 134   DC Circuits* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 120.

Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 130 (or higher).

This course covers resistive circuits having DC sources. Analysis topics include Ohm's law, Kirchoff's law, Watt's Law, the Superposition Theorem, Thevenin's Theorem and Norton's Theorem. The current, voltage and resistance relationships in series, parallel and combination circuits will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 185   LAN Cabling and Installation (3 Hours)

This course is designed to provide specialized skills for installing and testing local area network cabling and wireless installation. Twisted-pair, coax and fiber cables will be introduced and contrasted based on their characteristics and applications. Laboratory exercises for terminating and testing network cables and installing wireless systems will accompany the lectures. Students will be trained how to use common wiring tools and testing instruments. Methods of documenting LAN systems will also be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 186   CompTIA A+ Essentials (3 Hours)

Students will gain the knowledge required to assemble components based on customer requirements, and to install, configure and maintain devices for end users. This course also covers the basics of networking and security/forensics, proper and safe diagnosis, and how to resolve and document common hardware issues while applying troubleshooting skills. 2 hrs lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 212   Fundamentals of Light and Lasers* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: MATH 131 (or higher).

This is the foundational course necessary for applying lasers and/or photonics to other technologies. It covers the basics of light and lasers that will allow a technician to continue his or her studies in any photonics-enabled technology. This course reviews the physics of light, geometrical and wave optics, light sources, basic optical material and lab equipment, laser principles, and laser safety. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 225   Digital Electronics II* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 125.

Students will continue their study of digital concepts and will learn how to build digital circuitry using digital integrated circuit chips and basic concepts of computer organization. In additional, emphasis will be placed on learning how to troubleshoot digital circuits and digital systems. Each student will build a digital computer through a series of laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

ELEC 234   AC Circuits* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 134.

The analysis techniques presented in Electronics I will be applied to complex circuits driven by Alternating Current (AC) and pulsed sources. The responses of the circuits having resistance, impedance, inductive and capacitive reactance will be analyzed. Other topics will include transformers and electronic filters. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 235   Microprocessors* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 225.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to advanced microcomputer concepts and applications. This course is a continuation of topics introduced in the Digital Electronics I and II classes. Included are hardware and software topics in operating systems, peripherals, displays, processors, storage media, maintenance, diagnostics and troubleshooting. Analog and digital data acquisition and processing will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 236   Semiconductor Devices* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 234.

Topics for this class include the analysis and understanding of diodes and transistors. Special purpose diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT) and field effect transistors (FET) will be examined. Additional topics include operational amplifiers (Op-Amps), four-layer semiconductor devices and voltage regulators. Op-Amp applications will cover comparators, summing amplifiers, integrators, differentiators and active filters. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 240   Electronic Communication Systems* (4 Hours)

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 236.

This course provides a study of electronic communication systems used in today's world. Topics will include the electromagnetic spectrum, decibels, signal-to-noise ratio, AM and FM super-heterodyne radios, antennas, transmission lines and the Global Positioning System. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 250   Microcomputer Maintenance* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 186.

This course is a continuation of the study of personal computers and will further the student's ability to maintain and repair them. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for computer-maintenance certification. Topics will include interaction of hardware and operating systems, resource conflicts, networking capabilities, common hardware and software problems, hardware differences of portable computers and upgrading computers. The course topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 251   Laser Systems and Applications* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 212.

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 252.

Laser Systems and Applications covers more advanced concepts in photonics and the operating principles, output characteristics, diagnostics and applications for fiber- and diode-based lasers. These lasers will be classified according to their active medium, output wavelength and applications. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 252   Specialized Lasers and System Integration* (3 Hours)

Prerequisites: ELEC 251.

The advanced course will focus on the function on the Fiber Laser and the Diode (Semiconductor) Laser. Students will work with laser operation and safety procedures. Topics will also cover system integration and the subsystems required in today's industry that depend on Photonics. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

ELEC 271   Electronics Internship I* (1-3 Hour)

Prerequisites: Department approval.

This course affords the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. It will provide selected advanced electronics technology students with appropriate on-the-job experience with area employers, under instructional oversight, that will promote the student's career goals. 18 hrs. approved and appropriate work activity/wk.

ELEC 291   Independent Study* (1-7 Hour)

Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval.

Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience.

ELEC 120

  • Title: Introduction to Electronics
  • Number: ELEC 120
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in electronics technology that is appropriate for both electronic majors and other interested students. An overview of basic electronic theory, principles and components is presented. In addition, the laboratory exercises will emphasize the operation and use of the primary pieces of electronic test equipment and the fabrication of selected circuits. 2 hrs. lecture, 2 hrs. lab-lecture, 2 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Operate primary pieces of electronics test equipment: Oscilloscope, DC power supply, Signal generator and Digital multimeter.
  2. Demonstrate fundamental soldering techniques.
  3. Use basic electronic hand tools.
  4. Assemble elementary electronic kits.
  5. Perform basic circuit parameter measurements.
  6. Identify basic electronic components and their values.
  7. Define essential electronic terms.
  8. Describe basic electronic theories and principles. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Electronic Foundations
   A. Describe atomic structure.
   B. Define current, voltage and resistance.
   C. Calculate using powers of 10.
   D. Name metric prefixes.
   E. Identify AC waveforms.
   F. State Ohm's Law.
   G. Write power formulas.
   H. Identify the resistor color code.
   I. Recognize schematic symbols.

II. Electronic Processes
   A. Solve series resistive circuits.
   B. Solve parallel resistive circuits.
   C. Describe frequency response.
   D. Demonstrate soldering.
   E. Describe filters.
   F. Interpret schematics.
   G. Summarize block diagrams.

III. Electronic Devices
   A. Explain cathode ray tube.
   B. Identify resistors.
   C. Identify inductors.
   D. Identify transformers.
   E. Identify capacitors.
   F. Explain power supplies.
   G. Identify diodes.
   H. Identify transistors.
   I. Identify integrated circuits.

IV. Operate Lab Equipment
   A. Oscilloscope
   B. Signal generator
   C. DC power supplies
   D. Digital multimeter

V. Make Lab Measurements
   A. Period
   B. Voltage
   C. Current
   D. Resistance

VI. Construct Lab Experiments
   A. Resistive circuits
   B. Rectifier circuits
   C. Digital circuits
   D. Amplifiers
   E. Oscillators

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

One written test              15-25% of grade
A laboratory equipment test   15-25% of grade
Laboratory reports            20-40% of grade
A comprehensive final exam    20-40% of grade
                                100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 125

  • Title: Digital Electronics I
  • Number: ELEC 125
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 3

Description:

This is a beginning course in which students will study and practice the basic concepts of digital electronics. Topics will include digital number systems, logic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, digital arithmetic, counters and registers. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Convert between the binary, decimal, twos complement hexadecimal, and BCD number system.
  2. Perform arithmetic in the binary, hexadecimal, 2's complement and BCD number system.
  3. Determine the outputs of gate logic circuits.
  4. Make truth tables for Boolean expressions.
  5. Determine the Boolean expression for the output of a logic circuit.
  6. Determine the outputs of flip-flop circuits.
  7. Analyze the operation of counters and registers.
  8. Troubleshoot and find faults in gate circuits. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Number Systems
   A. Count in binary and hexadecimal.
   B. Represent numbers in the binary, hexadecimal, BCD, and twos
complement number systems.
   C. Convert between binary, decimal, and hexadecimal.
   D. Convert between twos complement and decimal.
   E. Perform arithmetic in the binary, hexadecimal, BCD, and twos
complement number systems.
   F. Use ASCII code to represent symbols.

II. Logic Gates and Interfacing
   A. Describe the basic logic operations, OR, AND, and NOT.
   B. Use truth tables to represent the basic logic operations.
   C. Recognize the symbols representing the basic logic gates.
   D. Analyze circuits containing logic gates.
   E. Build logic gate circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.
   F. Troubleshoot and find faults inserted into circuits using the basic
logic gates.
   G. Describe the exclusive-OR and exclusive-NOR operations.

III. Flip-Flops
   A. Analyze the operation of RS flip-flops.
   B. Analyze the operation of JK flip-flops.
   C. Analyze the operation of D flip-flops and D latches.
   D. Analyze the operation of one-shot flip-flops.
   E. Analyze flip-flop circuits.
   F. Build flip-flop circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.

IV. Arithmetic Circuits
   A. Analyze adder circuits.
   B. Build adder circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator software.

V. Counters and Registers
   A. Describe the basic function of a register.
   B. Analyze the operation of asynchronous counter circuits.
   C. Analyze the operation of synchronous counter circuits.
   D. Analyze the operation of synchronous/asynchronous counter circuits.
   E. Build counter circuits on the Digiac Trainer and simulator
software.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four tests 60-70% of grade
Laboratory projects     30-40% of grade
                          100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
    0- 59% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 127

  • Title: Robots for Humans
  • Number: ELEC 127
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Other Hours: 2

Description:

This course is a general introduction to the rapidly growing field of robotics. The class will use lectures, demonstrations and lab work to teach the basics of robotics. This course is designed to assist new users in making use of this technology in their own lives and as an introduction for students wanting to proceed further into the field. 3 hrs lecture, 2 hrs open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the various types of robot systems currently available and their uses.
  2. Explain the various types of robotic hardware and software.
  3. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working with robot systems.
  4. Design and build a simple robot to solve a particular problem.
  5. Program a simple robot to solve a particular problem. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Types of Robot Systems 
   A. Define the difference between autonomous and remote-control
systems.
   B. List the applications of autonomous robots.
   C. List the applications of remote control robots.
   D. Determine the correct type of robot system for a given application.

II. Areas of Robotic Hardware and Software
   A. Compare Central Processing Units (CPUs) by word size, programming
capabilities, Input/Output abilities and other criteria.
   B. Explain the purposes and functions of motors and actuators.
   C. List the types of sensors and their applications.
   D. Evaluate software and hardware control systems.

III. Proper Safety Procedures when Working with Robotics Systems
   A. Demonstrate proper tool safety techniques.
   B. Display proper electrical safety techniques.
   C. Install and set limit switches and sensors to support safety
requirements.

IV. The Design and Construction of a Simple Robot to Solve an Assigned
Problem.
   A. Analyze an assigned problem.
   B. Determine the hardware requirements of the assigned problem.
   C. Develop a hardware design to meet the problem requirements.
   D. Assemble and test the hardware design.

V. use of a Simple Robot to Solve an Assigned Problem
   A. Analyze an assigned problem.
   B. Determine the software requirements of the problem.
   C. Develop a software design to meet the problem requirements.
   D. Develop software to meet the software design requirements.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Grading Scale:

Tests and Quizzes: 40-50%
Class Exercises:   10-20%
Final Project:     30-50%
            Total:  100%

A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 – 89%
C = 70 – 79%
D = 60 – 69%
F = below 60%

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 134

  • Title: DC Circuits*
  • Number: ELEC 134
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 120.
Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 130 (or higher).

Description:

This course covers resistive circuits having DC sources. Analysis topics include Ohm's law, Kirchoff's law, Watt's Law, the Superposition Theorem, Thevenin's Theorem and Norton's Theorem. The current, voltage and resistance relationships in series, parallel and combination circuits will be studied. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to

  1.  Solve electrical problems using metric prefixes and Scientific Notation.
  2. Define the electrical concepts of voltage, current and resistance.
  3. Utilize Ohm’s Law in the analysis of electrical circuits.
  4. Compute the power and energy used in electrical circuits.
  5. Compute current, voltage and resistance in series circuits.
  6. Compute current, voltage and resistance in parallel circuits.
  7. Compute current, voltage and resistance in a series-parallel circuit.
  8. Use circuit network theorems to solve electrical circuits.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Electronic Principles

A. Illustrate the application of electronics.

1. Describe common electronics measuring equipment.

2. Describe common electronics circuit components.

3. Describe the complete electronics circuit.

B. Identify metric prefixes used in electronics measurement.

C. Calculate powers of 10 represented by metric prefixes.

D. Solve problems using values expressed in metric prefixes and powers of 10.

II. Voltage, Current and Resistance

A. Describe the atomic model of matter.

B. Explain the concept of the electric charge.

C. Explain the meaning of voltage.

D. Explain the meaning of current.

E. Explain the meaning of resistance.

F. Describe the basic complete electrical circuit.

G. Describe how basic circuit measurements are made.

III. Ohm’s Law

A. Utilize Ohm’s Law.

B. Compute current flow in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law.

C. Compute voltage in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law.

D. Compute resistance in an electrical circuit using Ohm’s Law.

IV. Power and Energy

A. Define Watt’s Law.

B. Define power as it is applied in an electric circuit.

C. Define energy as it is applied in an electric circuit.

D. Compute the voltage drop across a resistance in an electric circuit.

E. List common energy sources used in an electric circuit.

F. Describe the purpose of the power supply in an electric circuit.

V. Series Resistive Circuits

A. Define a series resistive circuit.

B. Calculate the total resistance of a series circuit.

C. Use Ohm’s Law to determine the total current in a series circuit.

D. Describe how series power sources are combined in series circuits.

E. Use Ohm’s Law to predict voltage drops in a series circuit.

F. Use Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law in a series circuit.

G. Describe how a series circuit works as a voltage divider.

H. Use the Voltage Divider Law to calculate voltage drops across resistors in a series circuit.

I. Calculate the individual and total power in a series circuit.

J. Describe the meaning of circuit ground in a series circuit.

K. Identify a defective component by troubleshooting techniques for a series circuit.

VI. Parallel Resistive Circuits

A. Describe a parallel resistive circuit.

B. Explain the voltage drops in a parallel resistive circuit.

C. Calculate total resistance of a parallel circuit.

D. Use Ohm’s Law to predict the total current in a parallel resistive circuit.

E. Use Ohm’s Law to predict the individual branch currents in a parallel resistive circuit.

F. Use Kirchhoff’s Current Law to verify currents in a parallel resistive circuit.

G. Describe how a parallel resistive circuit acts as a current divider.

H. Describe current sources.

I. Explain how current sources in a parallel resistive circuits are combined.

J. Calculate power used in a parallel resistive circuit.

K. Identify defective components by troubleshooting techniques used in a parallel resistive circuit.

VII. Series-Parallel Circuits

A. Describe a series-parallel resistive circuit.

B. Use Ohm’s Law to calculate the total resistance of a series-parallel resistive circuit.

C. Explain the effects of placing a load on a series-parallel resistive circuit.

D. Predict the output voltage of a loaded voltage divider.

E. Describe a ladder resistive circuit.

F. Explain the operation of a Wheatstone Bridge resistive circuit.

G. Locate a failed component by troubleshooting techniques in a series-parallel circuit.

VIII. Circuit Theorems and Conversions

A. Explain the meaning of an ideal voltage source.

B. Explain the meaning of a non-ideal (practical) voltage source.

C. Explain the meaning of an ideal current source.

D. Explain the meaning of a non-ideal (practical) current source.

E. Convert a non-ideal (practical) voltage source to a non-ideal (practical) current source.

F. Convert a non-ideal (practical) current source to a non-ideal (practical) voltage source.

G. Explain the application of the Superposition Theorem.

H. Solve electrical circuits using the Superposition Theorem.

I. Explain Thevenin’s Theorem.

J. Solve for voltage and current in a branch of an electrical circuit by using Thevenin’s Theorem.

K. Describe the Maximum Power Transfer Theorem.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%        Participation

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 185

  • Title: LAN Cabling and Installation
  • Number: ELEC 185
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

This course is designed to provide specialized skills for installing and testing local area network cabling and wireless installation. Twisted-pair, coax and fiber cables will be introduced and contrasted based on their characteristics and applications. Laboratory exercises for terminating and testing network cables and installing wireless systems will accompany the lectures. Students will be trained how to use common wiring tools and testing instruments. Methods of documenting LAN systems will also be introduced. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify the components of structured cabling systems.
  2. Contrast the characteristics of common LAN cabling systems.
  3. Identify common local area network devices.
  4. Identify industry standards for local area networks.
  5. Read blueprints.
  6. Identify and evaluate types of LAN cabling.
  7. Explain grounding, bonding and electrical protection.
  8. Prepare for the installation.
  9. Pull cable.
  10. Terminate cable.
  11. Test cable.
  12. Troubleshoot cable.
  13. Perform administrative tasks. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Identify the Components of a Structured Cabling System
   A. Identify entrance facilities, backbone, horizontal, work areas.
   B. Identify equipment rooms and telecommunications closets.
   C. Identify cross-connects.

II. Contrast the Characteristics of Common LAN Cabling Systems
   A. Identify the characteristics of LAN systems.
   B. Identify the characteristics of Ethernet (Thicknet, Thinnet,
10BaseT) systems.
   C. Identify the characteristics of Token Ring systems.

III. Identify Common Local Area Network Devices
   A. Identify the characteristics of the network interface card.
   B. Identify the characteristics of hubs.
   C. Identify the characteristics of LAN connectivity devices.

IV. Identify Industry Standards for Local Area Networks
   A. Identify ANSI and EIA/TIA wiring standards.
   B. Identify the standards of the National Electrical Code as it
pertains to Local Area Networks.

V. Read Blueprints
   A. Read and interpret symbols.
   B. Read and interpret abbreviations.

VI. Identify and Evaluate Types of LAN Cabling
   A. Identify the characteristics of twisted pair (UTP, STP-A), coaxial
and fiber optic (single mode and multimode) cables.
   B. Identify the characteristics of attenuation, cross-talk, impedance,
capacitance.
   C. Identify cable connectors (UTP, STP-A, coaxial, optical fiber).
   D. Explain connector pin configurations.
   E. Identify color codes.

VII. Explain Grounding, Bonding and Electrical Protection
   A. Identify hazardous environments.
   B. Identify personal protective equipment.
   C. Explain common safety practices.

VIII. Prepare for the Installation
   A. Perform a site survey.
   B. Build closets.
   C. Install grounding infrastructure.

IX. Pull Cable
   A. Pull backbone and horizontal twisted pair cable.
   B. Pull optical fiber cable.
   C. Install firestopping.

X. Terminate Cable
   A. Terminate copper cable.
   B. Terminate coaxial cable.
   C. Terminate optical fiber cable.

XI. Test Cable
   A. Test and certify copper cable.
   B. Test and certify optical fiber cable.

XII. Troubleshoot Cable
   A. Troubleshoot copper cables.
   B. Troubleshoot optical fiber cables.

XIII. Perform Administrative Tasks
   A. Document results.
   B. Complete daily reports.
   C. Describe the ordering and management of inventory materials and
supplies.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Tests       30% of grade
Lab         30% of grade
Projects    40% of grade
    Total  100%

Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
 Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 186

  • Title: CompTIA A+ Essentials
  • Number: ELEC 186
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Description:

Students will gain the knowledge required to assemble components based on customer requirements, and to install, configure and maintain devices for end users. This course also covers the basics of networking and security/forensics, proper and safe diagnosis, and how to resolve and document common hardware issues while applying troubleshooting skills. 2 hrs lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Illustrate the installation, configuration and troubleshooting of current operating systems.
  2. Identify basic computer components.
  3. Identify, install and troubleshoot computer processors.
  4. Identify, install and troubleshoot memory.
  5. Identify, install and troubleshoot peripherals.
  6. Identify, install and troubleshoot video components.
  7. Identify, install and troubleshoot storage media.
  8. Identify, install and troubleshoot input and output ports and cables.
  9. Identify, install and troubleshoot printers.
  10. Identify, install, troubleshoot and configure basic networks and components.
  11. Perform PC maintenance.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Operating Systems

A. Install, upgrade and patch Windows.

B. Navigate through drives and folders, make and delete folders, format drives and copy files in Windows.

C. Use configuration tools and troubleshoot Windows.

II. Basic Computer Structure

A. Describe the functions of the PC chipset.

B. Configure computers using the CMOS setup.

III. Computer Processors

A. Describe the features and functions of common microprocessors.

B. List the differences among the common types of microcomputers.

IV. Computer Memory

A. Use diagnostic software and hardware to analyze and troubleshoot microcomputer memory.

B. Install memory in a computer in the forms of SIMMS, DIMMS and RIMMS.

V. Peripheral Installation

A. Identify and contrast common bus structures.

B. Display an understanding of hardware interrupts and port addresses.

VI. Computer Video

A. Evaluate video monitor operation and compare the various types.

B. Compare the common video standards including concepts of resolution, speed, dot pitch, graphic accelerators, local bus and coprocessors.

VII. Data Storage

A. Display an understanding of hard drive and floppy drive characteristics.

B. Install and configure hard drives, floppy/Zip drives and optical drives.

VIII. Input/Output Ports

A. Configure parallel ports.

B. Configure serial ports.

C. Configure USB ports.

IX. Printers

A. Set up printers and their associated software.

B. Upgrade printers and their associated software.

X. Computer Networks

A. Install basic computer networking hardware such as Network Interface Cards, cables and hubs.

B. Configure basic Peer-to-Peer and Client-Server computer networks.

XI. PC Maintenance

A. Troubleshoot common hardware and software problems using installed Windows utilities and add-on diagnostic software.

B. Perform preventive maintenance on PC hardware.

C. Demonstrate proper safety procedures when working on a PC system.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%   Tests and Quizzes
10-30%   Class Exercises
20-40%   Labs
10%       Participation

Total:     100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 212

  • Title: Fundamentals of Light and Lasers*
  • Number: ELEC 212
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: MATH 131 (or higher).

Description:

This is the foundational course necessary for applying lasers and/or photonics to other technologies. It covers the basics of light and lasers that will allow a technician to continue his or her studies in any photonics-enabled technology. This course reviews the physics of light, geometrical and wave optics, light sources, basic optical material and lab equipment, laser principles, and laser safety. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the basics of the theory of light, including wavelength, frequency, reflection and refraction.
  2. Understand and demonstrate the safe handling of lasers and laser identification.
  3. Explain the detection and manipulation of light.
  4. Demonstrate Optics handling, cleaning and positioning.
  5. Demonstrate the operation of Basic Geometric Optics.
  6. Demonstrate the operation of Basic Physical Optics.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Theory Of Light

A. State and explain the basic fundamentals of light.

B. Understand and describe the difference between wavelength and frequency.

C. Describe and calculate reflection and refraction.

D. Calculate the effect of light moving through two mediums of different refractive indexes.

II. Safe Handling of Lasers

A. Demonstrate laser safety procedures in handling and utilizing light-generating devices.

B. Identify and describe laser safety signs.

C. Understand the effects and dangers of visual and non-visual radiation.

D. Identify laser safety hazards and apply necessary control measures per ANSI Laser Safety Standards.

E. Perform frequent spot checks to ensure proper laser safety procedures per ANSI standards.

III. Detection And Manipulation Of Light

A. Understand and use different mountings for mirror, lenses and other optical components.

1. Single stages

2. Multi-dimensional stages

3. Rotational stages

B. Understand and describe the use of single and multiple anti-reflective coatings and filters.

IV. Optics Handling, Cleaning And Positioning

A. Inspect surfaces for imperfections of optical components.

B. Specify how to differentiate between coated and uncoated optics using established inspection techniques.

C. Follow proper methods for optical inspection and cleaning.

V. Basic Geometric Optics

A. Identify and describe the characteristics of Basic Geometric Optical components.

B. Measure appropriate spatial and temporal beam parameters for final product quality and adjust the laser system as required.

C. Set-up and perform interferometric and other displacement measurements per specification.

D. Perform functional measurements per technical specifications.

1. Proper function/operation

2. Threshold testing

VI. Basic Physical Optics

A. Identify and describe the characteristics of Basic Physical Optical components.

B. Measure appropriate spatial and temporal beam parameters for final product quality and adjust the laser system as required.

C. Set-up and perform interferometric and other displacement measurements per specification.

D. Perform functional measurements per technical specifications of:

1. Demonstrate proper function/operation

2. Perform threshold testing

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%         Participation

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Student will need a lab coat.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 225

  • Title: Digital Electronics II*
  • Number: ELEC 225
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Other Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 125.

Description:

Students will continue their study of digital concepts and will learn how to build digital circuitry using digital integrated circuit chips and basic concepts of computer organization. In additional, emphasis will be placed on learning how to troubleshoot digital circuits and digital systems. Each student will build a digital computer through a series of laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. open lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Construct and troubleshoot digital systems containing TTL and CMOS integrated circuits.
  2. Analyze and use decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and demultilplexers.
  3. Analyze and use digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.
  4. Identify the characteristics of various memory devices.
  5. Draw the block diagram of a basic computer.
  6. Write and assemble programs for a basic computer.
  7. State the cycle-by-cycle operation of a simple computer.
  8. Troubleshoot and find faults in digital circuits and systems.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Integrated Circuit Logic Families
   A. List voltage and current characteristics for TTL and CMOS integrated
circuit logic families.
   B. Use data manuals to find information about specific integrated
circuit chips.
   C. Build and troubleshoot digital circuits using integrated circuit
chips.

II. Memory Devices
   A. Describe the characteristics of ROM, EPROM and EEPROM.
   B. Describe the characteristics of static RAM and dynamic RAM.
   C. Define terms used in describing memory.

III. Computer Mathematics
   A. Perform binary and twos complement addition.
   B. Analyze the addition process taking overflow into account.
   C. Use hexadecimal representation to twos complement numbers.

IV. Digital Computer Organization
   A. Describe the Von Neuman architecture.
   B. Define terms relating to computer organization.
   C. Write assembly and machine language programs for a simple computer.
   D. Draw the block diagram of a simple computer.
   E. List cycle-by-cycle actions of a simple computer.
   F. Analyze the control circuitry of a simple computer.

V. Data Handling Logic Circuits
   A. Analyze decoder circuits and IC chips.
   B. Analyze encoder circuits and IC chips.
   C. Analyze multiplexer and IC chips.
   D. Analyze demultiplexer circuits and IC chips.
   E. Analyze BCD-to-7 segment decoder drivers.

VI. Interfacing with the Analog World
   A. Analyze digital-to-analog conversion circuits.
   B. Analyze analog-to-digital conversion circuits.
   C. Calculate resolution, percent resolution, step size and output
levels.
   D. Define the concept of accuracy in the conversion process.

VII. System Analysis and Troubleshooting
   A. Build simple digital computer.
   B. Troubleshoot simple digital computer.
   C. Program and operate simple digital computer.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

A minimum of four tests    60-70% of grade
Laboratory projects        30-40% of grade
                             100%
Grading Scale:
   90-100% = A
   80- 89% = B
   70- 79% = C
   60- 69% = D
    0- 59% = E

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

None

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 234

  • Title: AC Circuits*
  • Number: ELEC 234
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 134.

Description:

The analysis techniques presented in Electronics I will be applied to complex circuits driven by Alternating Current (AC) and pulsed sources. The responses of the circuits having resistance, impedance, inductive and capacitive reactance will be analyzed. Other topics will include transformers and electronic filters. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to

  1. Describe sine and non-sinusoidal waveforms.
  2. Use phasors and complex numbers in analyzing sinusoidal waveforms.
  3. Describe the capacitor and define its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  4. Describe the inductor and define its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  5. Describe the transformer and describe its properties in an electrical circuit using sine waveform sources (AC).
  6. Explain the operation of resistor-capacitor (RC) circuits having AC sources applied.
  7. Explain the operation of resistor-inductor (RL) circuits having AC sources applied.
  8. Explain the operation of resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuits having AC sources applied.
  9. Describe the operation of filters made from RLC component combinations with AC sources applied.
  10. Describe the operation of RLC component combinations with pulsed sources applied.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Sine and Non-Sinusoidal Waveforms

A. Describe the sine wave.

B. Describe voltage expression as a sine wave.

C. Describe non-sinusoidal waveforms.

II. Phasors and Complex Numbers

A. Explain how sine waves are expressed as phasors.

B. Describe the Complex Number plane.

C. Describe sine waves expressed in rectangular form.

D. Describe sine waves expressed in polar form.

E. Convert the polar form of a sine wave to the rectangular form of the sine wave.

F. Convert the rectangular form of a sine wave to the polar form of the sine wave.

G. Use complex numbers to perform mathematical operations.

III. Capacitors

A. Define capacitance in terms of its physical and electrical characteristics.

B. List types of capacitors according to the dialectric used.

C. Define capacitance in terms of stored charge and voltage.

D. Calculate capacitive reactance.

E. Describe how capacitive reactance changes with:

1. Applied frequency

2. Capacitor farad rating

F. Explain how capacitors are combined in series and parallel.

G. Solve capacitive circuits having AC or DC sources.

1. Solve series circuits for:

a. Voltage division

b. Current flow

c. Charge distribution

2. Solve parallel circuits for:

a. Voltage division

b. Current flow

c. Charge distribution

H. Explain how to test a capacitor using:

1. Ohmmeter

2. Capacitor analyzer

IV. Inductors

A. Define inductance in terms of an inductor’s physical and electrical characteristics, including:

1. Number of coils

2. Diameter of coils

3. Core permeability

4. Current in the coil

5. Self-induction

6. Flux density

B. List types of inductors according to core type.

C. Calculate inductive reactance.

D. Describe how an inductor’s reactance changes with:

1. Frequency

2. Inductor size

E. Explain how inductors are combined in series and parallel.

F. Solve for inductive circuits having AC sources with:

1. Series inductors

2. Parallel inductors

G. Explain how to test an inductor using:

1. Ohmmeter

2. Inductance bridge analyzer

V. Transformers

A. Explain the attributes of a transformer including:

1. Primary winding

2. Secondary winding

3. Core

4. Turns ratio

5. Voltage insulation rating

6. Power rating

B. Describe classifications of transformers.

C. Solve circuits using transformers with loaded secondaries predicting:

1. Load currents

2. Load voltage

3. Secondary power

4. Primary voltages

5. Primary currents

6. Primary power

D. Describe how a transformer acts as an impedance matching device.

E. Describe attributes of a non-ideal transformer.

F. Describe common variations of the basic transformer, including:

1. Autotransformer

2. Multi-winding transformer

3. Multi-tap transformer

G. Explain how to troubleshoot a transformer.

VI. RC Circuit Analysis

A. Define RC circuits, including:

1. Series RC components

2. Parallel RC components

3. Time constant

B. Describe the response of an RC circuit to an applied sinusoidal waveform.

C. Describe the impedance of a series RC circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangular form

D. Describe the impedance of a parallel RC circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangle form

E. Describe how impedance is used to find circuit current.

F. Draw a circuit phasor diagram.

G. Explain the meaning of total circuit phase angle.

H. Describe the meaning of circuit phase lead in an RC circuit.

I. Compute power in RC circuits.

J. Describe applications of RC circuits.

K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RC circuit.

VII. RL Circuit Analysis

A. Define RL circuits, including:

1. Series RL components

2. Parallel RL components

3. Time constant

B. Describe the response of an RL circuit to an applied sinusoidal waveform source.

C. Describe the impedance of a series RL circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangular form

D. Describe the impedance of a parallel circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangular form

E. Explain how impedance is used to find circuit current for:

1. Series RL circuit

2. Parallel RL circuit

F. Draw a circuit phasor diagram.

G. Explain the meaning of total circuit phase angle.

H. Explain the meaning of circuit phase lag in an RL circuit.

I. Calculate power in an RL circuit.

J. Describe applications of RL circuits.

K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RL circuit.

VIII. RLC Circuits and Resonance

A. Define RLC circuits, including:

1. Series RLC components

2. Parallel RLC components

B. Describe the response of an RLC circuit to an applied sinusoidal waveform.

C. Describe the impedance of a series RLC circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangular form

D. Describe the impedance of a parallel RLC circuit as a phasor in:

1. Polar form

2. Rectangular form

E. Describe resonance of RLC circuits.

F. Compute RLC circuit currents using impedance.

G. Describe circuit properties in a phasor diagram

H. Explain total circuit phase lead or lag of an RLC circuit.

I. Calculate power in an RLC circuit.

J. Describe application of RLC circuits.

K. Describe how to troubleshoot an RLC circuit.

IX. Filters

A. Describe the purpose of filters in an electronic circuit.

B. List the categories of filters.

C. Calculate the critical frequency and roll-off rate for each category of filter.

D. Draw and interpret a Bode Plot of each category of filter.

X. Pulse Response of Reactive Circuits.

A. Describe the response of RC and RL circuits to an input pulse.

B. Define categories of pulse response circuits, including:

1. RC and RL integrators

2. RC and RL Differentiators

C. Describe the time response diagram for a single pulse input.

D. Describe the time response diagram for a repetitive pulse input.

E. Describe applications of pulse response circuits in electronics.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%         Participation

100%       Total

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 235

  • Title: Microprocessors*
  • Number: ELEC 235
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 225.

Description:

This course is designed to provide an introduction to advanced microcomputer concepts and applications. This course is a continuation of topics introduced in the Digital Electronics I and II classes. Included are hardware and software topics in operating systems, peripherals, displays, processors, storage media, maintenance, diagnostics and troubleshooting. Analog and digital data acquisition and processing will also be covered. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

   1. Describe the internal structure of a typical microprocessor.

   2. Develop a program flowchart to define a problem.

   3. Program a representative microprocessor with a typical language.

   4. Describe the operating principles of applicable types of RAM (Random Access Memory) and ROM (Read Only Memory).

   5. Interface a representative microprocessor with representative RAM and/or ROM.

   6. Input and output data through appropriate ports.

   7. Interface a representative microprocessor with typical peripherals.

   8. Describe the operating principles of digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.

   9. List several applications of digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters.

   10. Interface digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters to a microcomputer system.

   11. Interface and program a programmable ROM.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Internal Structure

   A. Describe the purpose of registers.

   B. Describe the operation/theory of an ALU.

   C. Describe the operation of a Control Unit.

   D. Describe the use of internal and external buses.

II. Program Flowchart

   A. Develop a basic problem specification.

   B. Convert the program specification into a flowchart using standard symbols.

III. Typical Language Programming

   A. Convert a flowchart into an object file using an appropriate programming language.

   B. Compile/assemble the object file into an executable program file.

   C. Run and test the program.

IV. RAM and ROM Operating Principles

   A. Explain the operation of dynamic and static RAM.

   B. Compare/contrast the various types of RAM.

   C. Describe the various types of ROM, PROM, EPROM and EEPROM.

V. RAM and/or ROM Interface

   A. Install appropriate RAM with the microprocessor.

   B. Verify correct RAM operation.

VI. Ports

   A. Connect and configure input devices.

   B. Connect and configure output devices.

VII. Peripherals Interface

   A. Interface input peripherals such as sensors.

   B. Interface output peripherals such as motors.

VIII. Converter Operating Principles

   A. Describe the theory and operation of various D/A and A/D converters.

   B. Compare/Contrast the various types of A/D converters.

IX. Converter Applications

   A. Select a D/A converter for a required application.

   B. Select an A/D converter for a required application.

X. Converter Interface

   A. Interface an analog-to-digital converter to a microcomputer system.

   B. Interface a digital-to-analog converter to a microcomputer system.

XI. Programmable ROM

   A. Use a ROM burner to program a ROM with software needed for a required application.

   B. Interface a programmed ROM to a microprocessor.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%         Participation

Total:   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 236

  • Title: Semiconductor Devices*
  • Number: ELEC 236
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 234.

Description:

Topics for this class include the analysis and understanding of diodes and transistors. Special purpose diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT) and field effect transistors (FET) will be examined. Additional topics include operational amplifiers (Op-Amps), four-layer semiconductor devices and voltage regulators. Op-Amp applications will cover comparators, summing amplifiers, integrators, differentiators and active filters. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

1. Describe the characteristics of semiconductor, insulator and conductor materials.

2. Describe the characteristics of PN junctions.

3. Explain, analyze and troubleshoot the following diode applications: a) Rectifiers; b) Power supply filters; c) Limiters; d) Clampers; e) Voltage multipliers.

4. Explain how the following special purpose diodes operate: a) Zener diodes; b) Varactor diodes; c) Light emitting diodes (LEDs); d) Photodiodes; e) Shotkey diode; f) Pin diode; g) Step-rocovery diode; h) Tunnel diode; g) Laser diode.

5. Describe the characteristics of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs).

6. Analyze bipolar junction transistor (BJT) biasing circuits.

7. Analyze bipolar junction transistor (BJT) small signal amplifiers.

8. Explain and analyze the operation of power amplifiers.

9. Describe the characteristics and analyze the biasing of field-effect transistors (FETs).

10. Explain and analyze the operation of small-signal FET amplifiers.

11. Analyze the frequency response characteristics of amplifiers.

12. Describe Op-Amp characteristics.

13. Discuss Op-Amp frequency characteristics.

14. Describe Op-Amp amplifier applications.

15. Analyze active filter circuits.

16. Describe Op-Amp oscillator circuits.

17. Discuss IC voltage regulators.

18. Explain how multi-layer semiconductor devices operate.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Semiconductors

A. Discuss the basic structure of atoms.

B. Discuss semiconductors, conductors, and insulators and how they differ.

C. Discuss covalent bonding in silicon.

D. Describe how current is produced in a semiconductor.

II. Diodes

A. Describe the properties of N-type and P-type semiconductors.

B. Describe a pn junction and how it is formed.

C. Discuss the bias of a pn junction.

D. Analyze the current-voltage characteristic curve of a pn junction.

E. Discuss the operation of diodes and explain the three diode models.

III. Diode Applications

A. Explain and analyze the operation of half-wave rectifiers.

B. Explain and analyze the operation of full-wave rectifiers.

C. Explain and analyze the operation and characteristics of power supply filters.

D. Explain and analyze the operation of diode limiting and clamping circuits.

E. Explain and analyze the operation of diode voltage multipliers.

F. Troubleshoot diode circuits using accepted techniques.

G. Construct diode circuits.

H. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

IV. Special Purpose Diodes

A. Describe the characteristics of a zener diode and analyze its operation.

B. Explain how a zener is used in voltage regulation and limiting and analyze zener circuits.

C. Describe the variable-capacitance characteristics of a varactor diode and analyze its operation in a typical circuit.

D. Discuss the operation and characteristics of LEDs and photodiodes.

E. Discuss the basic characteristics of the current regulator diode, the Schottky diode, the pin diode, the step recovery diode, the tunnel diode, and the laser diode.

F. Troubleshoot zener diode regulators.

G. Construct Special Purpose diode circuits.

H. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

V. Bipolar Junction Transistors

A. Describe the basic structure of the bipolar junction transistor.

B. Explain how a transistor is biased and discuss the transistor currents and voltages.

C. Discuss transistor parameters and characteristics and use these to analyze a transistor circuit.

D. Discuss how a transistor is used as a voltage amplifier.

E. Discuss how a transistor is used as an electronic switch.

F. Identify various types of transistor packages.

G. Troubleshoot various faults in transistor circuits.

H. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

VI. Bi-polar Transistor Bias Circuits

A. Discuss the concept of DC bias in a linear amplifier.

B. Analyze a base bias circuit.

C. Analyze an emitter bias circuit.

D. Analyze a voltage-divider bias circuit.

E. Analyze a collector-feedback bias circuits.

F. Troubleshoot various faults in bias circuits.

G. Construct bi-polar transistor bias circuits.

VII. Small-signal Bipolar Amplifiers

A. Describe the concept of small-signal amplifiers.

B. Identify and apply internal transistor parameters.

C. Describe and analyze the operation of common-emitter amplifiers.

D. Describe and analyze the operation of common-collector amplifiers.

E. Describe and analyze the operation of common-base amplifiers.

F. Discuss multistage amplifiers and analyze their operation.

G. Troubleshoot amplifiers circuits.

H. Construct small-signal bipolar amplifiers.

VIII. Power Amplifiers

A. Explain and analyze the operation of large-signal class A amplifiers.

B. Explain and analyze the operation of class B and Class AB amplifiers.

C. Discuss and analyze the operation of class C amplifiers.

D. Troubleshoot power amplifiers.

E. Construct power amplifiers.

IX. Field-Effect Transistors (FETs)

A. Define, discuss, and apply important JET parameters.

B. Discuss and analyze JET bias circuits.

C. Explain the operation of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFETs).

D. Define, discuss, and apply important MOSFET parameters.

E. Discuss and analyze MOSFET bias circuits.

F. Troubleshoot FET circuits.

G. Construct FET circuits.

H. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

X. Small-signal FET Amplifiers

A. Explain the operation of FET small-signal amplifiers.

B. Describe the amplification properties of an FET.

C. Explain and analyze the operation of common-source FET amplifiers.

D. Explain and analyze the operation of common-drain FET amplifiers.

E. Explain and analyze the operation of common-gate FET amplifiers.

F. Troubleshoot FET amplifiers.

G. Construct FET amplifiers.

XI. Amplifier Frequency Response

A. Discuss the frequency response of an amplifier.

B. Express the gain of an amplifier in decibels (dB).

C. Analyze the low-frequency response of a BJT amplifier.

D. Use Miller's theorem to determine amplifier capacitances.

E. Analyze the high-frequency response of a BJT amplifier.

F. Analyze an amplifier for total frequency response.

G. Analyze multistage amplifiers for frequency response.

H. Measure the frequency response of an amplifier.

XII. Operational Amplifiers (Op-amp)

A. Describe the basic op-amp and its characteristics.

B. Discuss the differential amplifier and its operation.

C. Discuss several op-amp parameters.

D. Explain negative feedback in op-amp circuits.

E. Analyze the non-inverting, the voltage follower and the inverting op-amp configurations.

F. Describe impedances of the three op-amp configurations.

G. Discuss op-amp voltage and current compensation.

H. Troubleshoot op-amp circuits.

I. Construct basic op-amp circuits.

J. Extract specifications from a data sheet

XIII. Op-amp Frequency Response, Stability and Compensation

A. Discuss the basic areas of op-amp frequency responses.

B. Analyze the open-loop response of an op-amp.

C. Analyze the closed-loop response of an op-amp.

D. Discuss positive feedback and stability in op-amp circuits.

E. Explain op-amp phase compensation.

F. Measure the frequency response of an op-amp circuit.

XIV. Op-amp Applications

A. Analyze and explain the operation of several comparator circuits.

B. Analyze and explain the operation of several types of summing circuits.

C. Analyze and explain the operation of integrators and differentiators.

D. Analyze and explain the operation of an instrumentation amplifier.

E. Analyze and explain the operation of an isolation amplifier.

F. Analyze and explain the operation of an OTA.

G. Analyze and explain the operation of log and antilog amplifiers.

H. Troubleshoot op-amp circuits.

I. Construct several op-amp circuits.

XV. Active Filters

A. Describe the gain-versus-frequency responses of the basic filters.

B. Describe the three basic shape characteristics and other filter parameters.

C. Analyze active low-pass filters.

D. Analyze active high-pass filters.

E. Analyze active band-pass filters.

F. Analyze active band-stop filters.

G. Discuss two methods for measuring frequency response.

H. Measure the frequency response of the basic active filters types.

XVI. Oscillators and Phase-Locked Loops

A. Describe the basic concept of an oscillator.

B. Discuss the principles on which the operation of oscillators is based.

C. Describe and analyze the operation of basic RC oscillators.

D. Describe and analyze the operation of basic LC oscillators.

E. Describe and analyze the operation of basic non-sinusoidal oscillators.

F. Describe and analyze the operation of a 555 timer IC as an oscillator.

G. Explain the basic concept of a phase-locked loop.

H. Construct several oscillator circuits.

XVII. Voltage Regulators

A. Describe the basic concept of voltage regulation.

B. Discuss the principles of series voltage regulators.

C. Discuss the principles of shunt voltage regulators.

D. Discuss the principles of switching regulators.

E. Discuss IC voltage regulators.

F. Discuss applications of IC voltage regulators.

G. Construct voltage regulator circuits.

H. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

XVIII. Four and More Layer Semiconductor Devices

A. Describe the basic structure and operation of the Shockley diode.

B. Describe the basic structure and operation of an SCR.

C. Discuss several SCR applications.

D. Describe the basic operation of an SCS.

E. Describe the basic structure and operation of diacs and triacs.

F. Describe a phototransistor and its operation.

G. Describe the LASCR and its operation.

H. Discuss various types of optical couplers.

I. Extract specifications from a data sheet.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50% Tests and Quizzes
10-30% Class Exercises
20-40% Labs
0-10% Participation

Total: 100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 240

  • Title: Electronic Communication Systems*
  • Number: ELEC 240
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Contact Hours: 6
  • Lecture Hours: 3
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 236.

Description:

This course provides a study of electronic communication systems used in today's world. Topics will include the electromagnetic spectrum, decibels, signal-to-noise ratio, AM and FM super-heterodyne radios, antennas, transmission lines and the Global Positioning System. 3 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the broad issues in modern communication systems.
  2. Explain the electromagnetic spectrum and frequency allocations in modern communications.
  3. Calculate wavelength, frequency and propagation velocity.
  4. Analyze low and high level transmitters.
  5. Demonstrate sections of a basic AM and FM radio system.
  6. Demonstrate the functions of the major sections of a super-heterodyne radio.
  7. State the need for systems used for frequency generation.
  8. Describe the evolution of television from analog to digital.
  9. Identify by physical appearance the various wires and cables used in the transmission of electronic signals.
  10. Describe how an antenna radiates or captures electromagnetic energy.
  11. Describe the basics of telephony, cellular and data communications.
  12. Define essential Global Positioning System (GPS) terminology and describe basic operation.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Modern Communication Systems

A. Describe basic analog systems.

B. Describe basic digital systems.

II. The Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spectrum Analysis

A. Describe the electromagnetic spectrum.

B. Define electromagnetic waves and wavelengths.

C. Identify electromagnetic allocations.

D. Describe and calculate bandwidth and information capacity.

E. Define simplex, duplex and half duplex systems.

F. Demonstrate methods of spectrum analysis.

G. Compare time and frequency domain signals.

H. Demonstrate the proper use of a spectrum analyzer.

I. Calculate signal strength in various units.

J. Calculate signal-to-noise ratio.

III. Wavelength, Frequency and Propagation Velocities

A. Understand communication wave propagation.

B. Measure wave signals in the time domain.

C. Calculate power and efficiency.

D. Convert time to frequency and frequency to time.

IV. Low and High Frequency Transmitters

A. Draw functional block diagrams of a basic transmitter and receiver.

B. State the need for modulation.

C. Define amplitude, frequency and phase modulation.

V. Basic AM Radio Receivers

A. Describe AM receiver operation.

B. Explain the time domain parts of a modulated AM radio signal.

C. Calculate the percentage of modulation.

D. Build a crystal radio receiver.

VI. The Super-Heterodyne AM and FM Radio

A. Analyze the major sections of a super-heterodyne radio system.

B. Explain integrated circuit receivers.

C. Builds a simple AM broadcasting station.

D. Build a basic FM tone and code transmitter.

E. Identify and explain various approaches used in amplitude modulation, such as SSB and SSBSC.

VII. Frequency Generation Methods

A. Explain the need and use of phase-locked loop (PLL) circuits.

B. Describe the function of PLL synthesizers.

C. Simulate and measure basic oscillator circuits.

VIII. Basic Analog and Digital Television

A. Describe analog television principles.

B. Describe the advent of color and HDTV systems in modern transmission.

IX. Transmission Lines

A. State and calculate the characteristics of each type of cable.

B. Define wire and cable parameters.

C. Describe and calculate the impact of impedance on signal transmission.

D. Calculate waveguide dimensions for various frequencies.

X. Antenna Types and Characteristics

A. Define the way that a radiated signal propagates through the atmosphere and space.

B. Define the modes of wave propagation.

C. Identify elementary antenna radiation patterns.

XI. Communication Networks

A. Describe the basic system view of the telephone systems.

B. Describe the methods of switching and encoding, including caller ID and broadband Internet services.

C. Explain the basics of network topologies, including modems and digital modulation.

XII. Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

A. Explain the major segments of current GPS systems.

B. Identify navigation signals.

C. Explain how position is determined.

D. Demonstrate the use of basic hand-held GPS devices.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Methods of Evaluation of Competencies: Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods:

60-75%    Tests and Quizzes
20-30%    Class Exercises
10-20%    Labs and participation

Total   100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 250

  • Title: Microcomputer Maintenance*
  • Number: ELEC 250
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 186.

Description:

This course is a continuation of the study of personal computers and will further the student's ability to maintain and repair them. In addition, this course will assist the student in preparing for computer-maintenance certification. Topics will include interaction of hardware and operating systems, resource conflicts, networking capabilities, common hardware and software problems, hardware differences of portable computers and upgrading computers. The course topics will be supported by laboratory projects. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Identify operating system's functions and file system.
  2. Explain PC memory and memory conflicts.
  3. Install, configure and upgrade operating software.
  4. Diagnose and troubleshoot common computer software problems.
  5. Identify the networking and internetworking capabilities of various operating systems.
  6. Install, configure and upgrade a computer's hardware.
  7. Diagnose and troubleshoot common computer hardware problems.
  8. Identify safety and maintenance procedures.
  9. Identify and distinguish between various main boards, processors and memory.
  10. Identify and distinguish between various types of printers.
  11. Identify the unique components of portable computers.
  12. Review basic network concepts and terminology.
  13. Identify behaviors that contribute to satisfying customers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Operating System Software

A. Identify the operating system's functions, structure and major system files.

B. Navigate in the operating system and show how to get needed configuration information.

C. Identify basic concepts and procedures for creating, viewing, and managing files and directories.

D. Identify the procedures for basic disk management.

II. PC Memory

A. Differentiate between types of memory.

B. Identify typical memory conflict problems.

C. Explain how to optimize memory use.

III. Operating Systems

A. Identify the procedures for installing operating systems.

B. Install an operation system.

C. Identify the steps to upgrade an operating system.

D. Identify the basic system boot sequences and alternative ways to boot the system.

E. Identify the steps to create an emergency boot diskette.

F. Identify procedures for loading and /or adding device drivers.

G. Install a device driver.

H. Identify the procedures for installing and starting applications.

I. Install and configure an application.

IV. Software Diagnosing and Troubleshooting

A. Recognize and interpret the meaning of common error codes and startup messages.

B. Recognize common printing problems and identify the procedures for correcting them.

C. Recognize common operating system problems and determine how to resolve them.

D. Identify concepts relation to viruses.

E. Perform a scan for viruses.

V. Networks

A. Identify the networking capabilities of various operating systems.

B. Identify concepts and basic procedures for setting up a system for Internet access.

VI. Peripheral Devices

A. Identify basic terms, concepts and functions of system hardware modules.

B. Identify available system resources and configuring for device installation.

C. Identify common ports and their cabling and connectors.

D. Identify procedures installing mass storage devices.

E. Install a mass storage device.

F. Identify procedures for installing common peripheral devices.

G. Install a peripheral device.

H. Identify concepts' and procedures' relation to BIOS.

VII. Hardware Diagnosing and Troubleshooting

A. Identify common symptoms and problems associated with each module and how to isolate the problem.

B. Identify basic troubleshooting procedures.

C. Troubleshoot computer problems.

D. Identify good practices for eliciting problem symptoms from customers.

VIII. Safety and Preventive Maintenance

A. Identify the purpose of various types of preventive maintenance products and procedures and when to perform them.

B. Identify procedures and devices for protecting against environmental hazards.

C. Identify the potential hazards and proper safety procedures relating to lasers and high-voltage equipment.

D. Identify items that require special disposal procedures to comply with environmental guidelines.

E. Demonstrate knowledge of electrostatic discharge precautions and procedures.

IX. Motherboards, Processors and Memory

A. Distinguish between popular CPUs in terms of their basic characteristics.

B. Identify the categories of RAM terminology and physical characteristics.

C. Identify the most popular types of motherboards, their components and their architecture.

D. Identify the purpose of CMOS and how to change its basic parameters.

E. Change CMOS parameters.

X. Printers

A. Identify basic printer concepts.

B. Identify printer operations and components.

C. Identify care and service techniques for the most common printer types.

D. Identify common problems with common printer types.

E. Identify types of printer connections and configurations.

F. Identify the procedures for changing options, configuring and using printing subsystems.

G. Install printer software (local and networked).

XI. Portable Systems

A. Identify unique components of portable systems.

B. Identify unique problems with portable systems.

XII. Networking

A. Identify basic networking concepts.

B. Identify procedures for configuring a NIC (Network Interface Card).

C. Install and configure a NIC.

D. Identify the ramifications of repairs on the network.

XIII. Customer Satisfaction

A. Identify behaviors that lead to customer satisfaction.

B. Differentiate effective from ineffective behaviors that contribute to the maintenance or achievement of customer satisfaction.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Method one: Class and lab evaluations as listed below.

All Percentages Not to Exceed:
25-50%    Minimum of two written tests
0-40%      In-class exercises and quizzes
0-25%      Homework
30-50%    Comprehensive final
20-40%    Lab experiments
0-20%      Special projects

Total: 100%

Method two: Third-party certification.

Students who receive the approved computer-maintenance certificate during the course will receive a grade of A. Students who receive the approved computer maintenance certificate within two months of the end of the course may apply for a grade change to a grade of A.

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 251

  • Title: Laser Systems and Applications*
  • Number: ELEC 251
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 212.
Prerequisites or corequisites: ELEC 252.

Description:

Laser Systems and Applications covers more advanced concepts in photonics and the operating principles, output characteristics, diagnostics and applications for fiber- and diode-based lasers. These lasers will be classified according to their active medium, output wavelength and applications. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand and demonstrate the basic concepts of Q-switching laser systems.
  2. Explain mode-locking of lasers.
  3. Calculate the nonlinear behavior characteristics of a system.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of laser beam characteristics.
  5. Understand the basic laser materials, excitation, structure and output of a laser beam.
  6. Describe and identify the different types of lasers.
  7. Understand and identify laser applications.
  8. Demonstrate proper safety protocols when working with advanced lasers and optics.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Basic Concepts Of Lasers

A. Explain the theoretical basic of Q-switching.

B. Describe and measure the effects of Q-switching on laser parameters.

C. Explain the function of continuous mode (CW) lasers and measure the output from a Fiber Laser.

D. Explain the industrial applications of Q-switches.

II. Mode-locking

A. Describe the method of mode-locking in laser functions.

B. Describe two methods of mode-locking.

C. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of mode-locking lasers in today’s industry.

D. Determine the approximate minimum pulse duration that could be obtained from a modulated pulse, given the emission spectrum of a material.

E. Operate a mode-locked laser and measure relevant output characteristics.

III. Nonlinear Behavior Of Lasers

A. Describe the nonlinear behavior of a system using appropriate equations.

B. Understand and explain the process of frequency doubling in nonlinear materials.

C. Describe nonlinear optical material.

D. Operate a frequency-doubled laser and measure relevant output characteristics.

IV. Laser Beam Characteristics

A. Explain the concept of beam coherence.

B. Explain and measure the beam divergence using a beam profiler software.

C. Demonstrate the focusing of a laser beam through the set-up and Gaussian measurement of a laser.

D. Explain the pulse properties of a laser.

E. Describe the operation and function of optical detectors.

1. Optical detector parameters

2. Optical detector categories

F. Make appropriate measurements of the following functional lasers.

1. Continuous pulse lasers

2. Pulse energy measurements

3. Pulse duration measurements

4. Measure beam divergence

5. Perform spectral measurements

V. Laser Beam Materials And Function

A. Identify the grouping of laser types.

B. Understand and calculate the wavelength tuning, shifting and harmonic generation.

C. Describe the methods of laser packaging.

VI. Basic Laser Types

A. Describe the commonly used lasers and their characteristics and their application in industry.

1. Gas lasers

2. Solid state lasers

3. Fiber lasers

4. Semiconductor lasers

5. Misc. lasers

VII. Industrial Applications

A. Describe the common application of today’s modern laser systems.

1. Communications

2. Manufacturing

3. Semiconductor Photolithography

4. Measurement and remote sensing

5. Medical treatment

6. Research and laboratory measurements

7. Reading, scanning, writing, projection and holography

8. Military applications

9. Lasers for adaptive telescope optics

B. Understand and discuss present research and possible future laser applications.

VIII. Laser And Optics Safety

A. Explain and demonstrate the proper safety procedures when working with advanced laser technology.

B. Explain and identify the types of safety glasses when working with certain laser frequencies.

C. Understand and calculate safety glass specifications versus laser wavelength.

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%          Participation

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Students will need a lab coat.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 252

  • Title: Specialized Lasers and System Integration*
  • Number: ELEC 252
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Contact Hours: 5
  • Lecture Hours: 2
  • Lab Hours: 3

Requirements:

Prerequisites: ELEC 251.

Description:

The advanced course will focus on the function on the Fiber Laser and the Diode (Semiconductor) Laser. Students will work with laser operation and safety procedures. Topics will also cover system integration and the subsystems required in today's industry that depend on Photonics. 2 hrs. lecture and 3 hrs. lab/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Understand and explain the fundamentals of Fiber Laser systems.
  2. Describe, calculate and apply the pulsing methods used with Fiber Lasers.
  3. Understand and demonstrate the output characteristics of Fiber laser systems.
  4. Understand and explain the advanced structures of Fiber lasers.
  5. Understand and describe applications for Fiber laser systems.
  6. Understand and calculate the fundamental characteristics of a Diode laser system.
  7. Identify applications for semiconductor lasers and demonstrate the utilization of various laser systems.
  8.  Understand and demonstrate methods of laser system integration in Photonics.
  9. Understand and apply System Integration procedures while utilizing lasers.

Content Outline and Competencies:

I. Fundamentals of Fiber Lasers

A. Describe and understand the basic structure of fiber laser systems including.

1. Fiber loop

2. Fiber material

3. Rare earth elements

4. Core materials

5. Mirrors

6. Pump sources

7. Fiber couplers

B. Sketch a fiber laser function including the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA).

II. Methods of Pulsing a Fiber Laser

A. Explain the pulsing method of the pump source.

B. Describe Q-switching with fiber lasers.

C. Calculate the characteristics of mode-locking with fiber lasers.

III. Output Characteristics of Fiber Lasers

A. Define the range of wavelengths produced by fiber lasers.

B. Align and calculate the beam convergence angle of a fiber laser.

IV. Advanced Structures of Fiber Lasers

A. Describe double-clad fibers.

B. Describe chirally-clad cores.

C. Explain large-mode area (LMA) fibers.

D. Explain fiber-disk lasers.

E. Explain Raman-fiber lasers.

V. Applications of Fiber Lasers

A. Interpret the advantages of fiber lasers over other types.

B. Describe the use of fiber lasers used in material processing.

VI. Fundamentals of Diode Laser Systems

A. Illustrate the energy transfer in semiconductor lasers.

1. Current flow

2. Light emission

B. Describe the basic semiconductor laser design.

1. Crystal preparation and internal structure

2. Mounting and cooling methods of the laser

C. Illustrate the output characteristics of a semiconductor laser.

1. Temperature dependence

2. Spectral characteristics

3. Spatial characteristics

D. Identify the materials used in semiconductor lasers.

E. Explain the potential damage mechanisms and damage prevention.

VII. Semiconductor Laser Applications

A. Explain the applications for semiconductor lasers in modern industry.

1. Optical telecommunications

2. Optical data storage and retrieval

3. Diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers

4. Fiber lasers

5. Helium-neon lasers

6. Material processing

7. Metal and dental applications

B. Contrast the use of different laser characteristics as associated with differing industries.

VIII. Laser System Integration in Industry

A. List uses for photonics in IT and communication systems.

B. Identify the use of lasers in material processing systems.

C. Explain laser use in digital optical disc storage systems (CD and DVD recorders and players).

D. Identify the use of photonics in laser surgery systems.

E. Explain Photonics impact on laser-jet printer systems.

F. Explain the use of lasers in 3-D applications.

G. Identify the importance of photonics in radars, guidance systems and ranging systems.

IX. Laser System Integration

A. Identify and explain how subsystems fit and work together.

B. Demonstrate basic integration steps that include:

1. Integration and installation

2. Start-up procedures

3. Verification testing

4. Documentation procedures

5. Safety protocols

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

30-50%    Tests and Quizzes
10-30%    Class Exercises
20-40%    Labs
10%          Participation

Total:    100%

Grade Criteria:

90 – 100% = A
80 – 89% = B
70 – 79% = C
60 – 69% = D
0 – 59% = F

Caveats:

Student Responsibilities:

Student will need a lab coat.

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 271

  • Title: Electronics Internship I*
  • Number: ELEC 271
  • Effective Term: 2016-17
  • Credit Hours: 1 - 3
  • Contact Hours: 16 - 21
  • Lecture Hours: 1 - 3
  • Other Hours: 15 - 18

Requirements:

Prerequisites: Department approval.

Description:

This course affords the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to an actual work environment. It will provide selected advanced electronics technology students with appropriate on-the-job experience with area employers, under instructional oversight, that will promote the student's career goals. 18 hrs. approved and appropriate work activity/wk.

Supplies:

Refer to the instructor's course syllabus for details about any supplies that may be required.

Objectives

  1. Describe the work activities accomplished on-the-job to the internship coordinator.
  2. Explain the activities of the company, its products and services.
  3. Perform basic technical electronic tasks in the accomplishment of assigned work assignments.
  4. Demonstrate an increased understanding of the application of the classroom experience to the workplace environment.
  5. Demonstrate a greater preparedness, personally and professionally, for a career position. 

Content Outline and Competencies:

The specific nature and degree of emphasis of job-related activities
performed by each student will vary from one employer to another. 
However, in general, it is expected that the student will perform many of
the following functions.

I. Operate Electronic Equipment

II. Troubleshoot and Repair Electronic Equipment

III. Test and Check Electronic Equipment

IV. Perform Equipment Calibration

V. Perform Preventative Maintenance

VI. Maintain Records and Other Data

VII. Refer to Equipment Service Manuals and Other Documents

VIII. Use Interpersonal and Communication Skills Through Interaction With
Other Professionals

Method of Evaluation and Competencies:

Percentage not to exceed:
   Instructor's on-site visits and evaluations        30% of grade
   Weekly work log                                    60% of grade
   Evaluation of the student by the work supervisor   60% of grade
                                                     100%

Grading Scale:
   90%-100% = A
   80%- 89% = B
   70%- 79% = C
   60%- 69% = D
  Below 60% = F

Grade Criteria:

Caveats:

  1. Transportation to work site is the responsibility of the student. 

Student Responsibilities:

Disabilities:

JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202).

ELEC 291

No information found.